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Missile Defense Test Yields Successful 'Hit to Kill' Intercept
American Forces Press Service ^

Posted on 06/23/2006 7:21:38 PM PDT by SandRat

WASHINGTON, June 23, 2006 – The Missile Defense Agency and the Navy conducted a successful "hit to kill" missile defense test yesterday off the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The test involved the launch of a Standard Missile 3 from the Aegis-class cruiser USS Shiloh to hit a "separating" target, meaning that the target warhead separated from its booster rocket, officials said.

"Hit to kill" technology uses direct collision of the interceptor missile with the target, destroying the target using only kinetic energy from the force of the collision.

It was the seventh successful intercept test involving the sea-based component of the nation's ballistic missile defense system in eight attempts, Missile Defense Agency officials noted.

"We are continuing to see great success with the very challenging technology of hit-to-kill, a technology that is used for all of our missile defense ground and sea-based interceptor missiles," said Air Force Lt. Gen. Henry "Trey" Obering, Missile Defense Agency director.

At about noon Hawaii time -- 6 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time -- a target missile was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands on Kauai. USS Shiloh's Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense 3.6 Weapon System detected and tracked the target and "developed a fire control solution," officials said. About four minutes later, the USS Shiloh's crew fired the SM-3, and two minutes later the missile intercepted the target warhead outside the Earth's atmosphere, more than 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean and 250 miles northwest of Kauai.

This was the USS Shiloh's first missile defense test since completing modifications and upgrades to its SPY-1 radar and advanced communications system to make it capable of serving as a sea-based missile defense platform. It was also the first time the new weapon system configuration and a new missile configuration were used during the intercept mission.

Three Aegis destroyers also participated in the flight test. One Aegis destroyer, equipped with a modified version of the Aegis ballistic missile defense weapon system, linked with a land-based missile defense radar to evaluate the ability of the ship's missile defense system to receive and use target data via the missile defense system's command, control, battle management and communications architecture.

Two other Aegis destroyers stationed off Kauai, including one from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, performed long-range surveillance and track exercises. This information can also be used to provide targeting information for other missile defense systems, including the ground-based long-range interceptor missiles now deployed in Alaska and California, to protect all 50 states from a limited ballistic missile attack, officials said. This event marked the first time an allied military unit participated in a U.S. Aegis missile defense intercept test.

Another U.S. Navy Aegis cruiser used the flight test to support development of a SPY-1B radar modified by the addition of a new signal processor, collecting performance data on its increased target detection and discrimination capabilities.

(From a Missile Defense Agency news release.)


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Japan; US: Hawaii
KEYWORDS: defense; hit; hittokill; intercept; kill; miltech; missile; missiledefense; shootdown; starwars; successful; test; yields
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1 posted on 06/23/2006 7:21:43 PM PDT by SandRat
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To: 91B; HiJinx; Spiff; MJY1288; xzins; Calpernia; clintonh8r; TEXOKIE; windchime; Grampa Dave; ...

Ronnie was right all along on STAR WARS!

My son was a part of this test at the Kauai site. One of the Engineers that built and launched the target missle -- sorry just a Dad puffing his chest out a little.


2 posted on 06/23/2006 7:24:54 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: SandRat

If we whack NK's missile, you'll hear the libs screaming.


3 posted on 06/23/2006 7:25:57 PM PDT by Steely Tom
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To: Steely Tom

Ok,.... let em scream. I enjoy them screaming more than the sound a live lobster makes when you toss it in a big pot of boiling water.


4 posted on 06/23/2006 7:28:15 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: Steely Tom

Missle Test?

Aw darn! I was hoping it was Pelosi that got hit!


5 posted on 06/23/2006 7:31:14 PM PDT by Recovering Ex-hippie (Moderate Mooslims.....what's that?)
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To: SandRat; Chieftain

Uh, duh....what happens if one of these test missles takes out a real attempted Korean missle....and uh, then, um, another of our missles goes off in, uh, a different direction a little and uhm...actually hits Korea , uh by accident, you know?

that would be awful, huh?


6 posted on 06/23/2006 7:33:43 PM PDT by Recovering Ex-hippie (Moderate Mooslims.....what's that?)
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To: SandRat

Placemark.


7 posted on 06/23/2006 7:35:50 PM PDT by Steve1789 (Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. -A.L.)
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To: Recovering Ex-hippie

So from the 38th parallel to the Yalu River we would have the Korean Sea. Where's the problem?


8 posted on 06/23/2006 7:36:43 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: SandRat

The Aegis system is becoming unbelievably potent.


9 posted on 06/23/2006 7:42:12 PM PDT by Steve1789 (Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. -A.L.)
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To: SandRat
Ronnie was right all along on STAR WARS!

Of course he was, why do you think we're called "the right"!

You should be proud, he sounds like quite fellow.

10 posted on 06/23/2006 7:44:52 PM PDT by magslinger (Watch out for Christians and their IPD's (Improvised Potluck Dinners)!)
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To: SandRat; maui_hawaii; ALOHA RONNIE

I have been privileged to be at Barking Sands for two successful tests off Kauai myself. First time we went out in a launch along the Napali coast we got to view the Lake Erie fire her interceptor. Way cool.


11 posted on 06/23/2006 7:55:18 PM PDT by Paul Ross (We cannot be for lawful ordinances and for an alien conspiracy at one and the same moment.-Cicero)
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To: magslinger; Steve0113
Just found these



060622-N-0000X-001 Pacific Ocean (June 22, 2006) - A Standard Missile Three (SM-3) is launched from the guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67) during a joint Missile Defense Agency, U.S. Navy ballistic missile flight test. Two minutes later, the SM-3 intercepted a separating ballistic missile threat target, launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. The test was the seventh intercept, in eight program flight tests, by the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense. The maritime capability is designed to intercept short to medium-range ballistic missile threats in the midcourse phase of flight. U.S. Navy photo (RELEASED)

060622-N-0000X-002 Pacific Ocean (June 22, 2006) - A Standard Missile Three (SM-3) is launched from the guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67) during a joint Missile Defense Agency, U.S. Navy ballistic missile flight test. Two minutes later, the SM-3 intercepted a separating ballistic missile threat target, launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. The test was the seventh intercept, in eight program flight tests, by the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense. The maritime capability is designed to intercept short to medium-range ballistic missile threats in the midcourse phase of flight. U.S. Navy photo (RELEASED)

060622-N-0000X-003 Pacific Ocean (June 22, 2006) - A Standard Missile Three (SM-3) is launched from the guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67) during a joint Missile Defense Agency, U.S. Navy ballistic missile flight test. Two minutes later, the SM-3 intercepted a separating ballistic missile threat target, launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. The test was the seventh intercept, in eight program flight tests, by the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense. The maritime capability is designed to intercept short to medium-range ballistic missile threats in the midcourse phase of flight. U.S. Navy photo (RELEASED)

12 posted on 06/23/2006 7:55:48 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: SandRat

In the future, we'll be firing off "hijacker interceptors".

Our missile defense will one day intercept and latch onto the warheads and guide them back to their point of origin.

One day.


13 posted on 06/23/2006 8:07:22 PM PDT by coconutt2000 (NO MORE PEACE FOR OIL!!! DOWN WITH TYRANTS, TERRORISTS, AND TIMIDCRATS!!!! (3-T's For World Peace))
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To: SandRat
Looks like we're preparing to knock NK's missile out.
14 posted on 06/23/2006 8:09:14 PM PDT by shield (A wise man's heart is at his RIGHT hand; but a fool's heart at his LEFT. Ecc. 10:2)
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To: shield

could be............


15 posted on 06/23/2006 8:11:51 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: Steve0113
The Aegis system is becoming unbelievably potent.

Still only a fraction of what it was going to be...and then the Grinch stole Xmas. The Xlintons killed the NMD capability of the SM-3 missile being deployed. They shrank the upper stage from 21 inch diameter to only 13, resulting in seriously less speed and range. They also killed its planned ability to take updated "combined" targetting information from other platforms. [CEC] Unfortunately, despite over five years in office the current administration, as much as it has doen to start down the path of NMD, it has failed to undo a lot of what Clinton did to wreck this, the most viable, and promising system. The administration, while taking bows for killing the ABM Treaty, hasn't really deployed much of anything really, and in fact, killed the Navy Area Wide defense missile which would have been vastly more robust as an interceptor. Likley because of a Faustian bargain with the Russians who insisted on keeping our nascent NMD "Limited"...and they regarded seaborne NMD as particularly "Unlimited" in potential...which indeed it is. So I suspect that Pooty-Poot suckered "W" into killing Navy Area Wide. Which was added to the "Moscow Treaty" disarmament agreement in a "Strategic Framework Agreement."

[Word to the wise: Any time an agreement has the term "framework" in it...its the U.S. getting hosed.]

Oh well, no use crying over spilled milk. We do need to know where we go from here. I would first of all, tell the Russians that their "Strategic Framework Agreement" is no longer "operative." And then push for a true, widely-deployed Seaborne NMD.

Here are some additional issues and options we need to consider from this Congressional Research Service report by Ronald O'rourke,

China Naval Modernization: Implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities — Background and Issues for Congress Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division

Replacement for NAD Program.114 Should the canceled Navy Area Defense (NAD) program be replaced with a new sea-based terminal missile defense program?

In December 2001, DOD announced that it had canceled the Navy Area Defense (NAD) program, the program that was being pursued as the Sea-Based Terminal portion of the Administration’s overall missile-defense effort. (The NAD program was also sometimes called the Navy Lower Tier program.) In announcing its decision, DOD cited poor performance, significant cost overruns, and substantial development delays.

The NAD system was to have been deployed on Navy Aegis cruisers and destroyers. It was designed to intercept short- and medium-range theater ballistic missiles in the final, or descent, phase of flight, so as to provide local-area defense of U.S. ships and friendly forces, ports, airfields, and other critical assets ashore. The program involved modifying both the Aegis ships’ radar capabilities and the Standard SM-2 Block IV air-defense missile fired by Aegis ships. The missile, as modified, was called the Block IVA version. The system was designed to intercept descending missiles within the Earth’s atmosphere (endoatmospheric intercept) and destroy them with the Block IVA missile’s blast-fragmentation warhead.

Following cancellation of the program, DOD officials stated that the requirement for a sea-based terminal system remained intact. This led some observers to believe that a replacement for the NAD program might be initiated. In May 2002, however, DOD announced that instead of starting a replacement program, MDA had instead decided on a two-part strategy to (1) modify the Standard SM-3 missile — the missile to be used in the sea-based midcourse (i.e., Upper Tier) program — to intercept ballistic missiles at somewhat lower altitudes, and (2) modify the SM-2 Block four air defense missile (i.e., a missile designed to shoot down aircraft and cruise missiles) to cover some of the remaining portion of the sea-based terminal defense requirement. DOD officials said the two modified missiles could together provide much (but not all) of the capability that was to have been provided by the NAD program. One aim of the modification strategy, DOD officials suggested, was to avoid the added costs to the missile defense program of starting a replacement sea-based terminal defense program.

In October 2002, it was reported that

Senior navy officials, however, continue to speak of the need for a sea-based terminal BMD capability “sooner rather than later” and have proposed a path to get there. “The cancellation of the Navy Area missile defence programme left a huge hole in our developing basket of missile-defence capabilities,” said Adm. [Michael] Mullen. “Cancelling the programme didn’t eliminate the warfighting requirement.”

“The nation, not just the navy, needs a sea-based area missile defence capability, not to protect our ships as much as to protect our forces ashore, airports and seaports of debarkation” and critical overseas infrastructure including protection of friends and allies.115

The above-quoted Admiral Mullen became the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) on July 22, 2005.

In light of PLA TBM modernization efforts, including the possibility of TBMs equipped with MaRVs capable of hitting moving ships at sea, one issue is whether a new sea-based terminal-defense procurement program should be started to replace all (not just most) of the capability that was to have been provided by the NAD program, and perhaps even improve on the NAD’s planned capability. In July 2004 it was reported that The Navy’s senior leadership is rebuilding the case for a sea-based terminal missile defense requirement that would protect U.S. forces flowing through foreign ports and Navy ships from short-range missiles, according to Vice Adm. John Nathman, the Navy’s top requirements advocate.

The new requirement, Nathman said, would fill the gap left when the Pentagon terminated the Navy Area missile defense program in December 2001. ... However, he emphasized the Navy is not looking to reinstate the old [NAD] system. “That’s exactly what we are not talking about,” he said March 24.... The need to bring back a terminal missile defense program was made clear after reviewing the “analytic case” for the requirement, he said. Though Nathman could only talk in general terms about the analysis, due to its classified nature, he said its primary focus was “pacing the threat” issues. Such issues involve threats that are not a concern today, but could be in the future, he said. Part of the purpose of the study was to look at the potential time line for those threats and the regions where they could emerge.116

Reported options for a NAD-replacement program include a system using a modified version of the Army’s Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) interceptor or a system using a modified version of the Navy’s new Standard Missile 6 Extended Range Active Missile (SM-6 ERAM) air defense missile.117

Aegis Radar Upgrades. Should the radar capabilities of the Navy’s Aegis cruisers and destroyers be upgraded more quickly or extensively than now planned?

Current plans for upgrading the radar capabilities of the Navy’s Aegis cruisers and destroyers include the Aegis ballistic missile defense signal processor (BSP), which forms part of the planned Block 06 version of the Navy’s Aegis ballistic missile defense capability. Installing the Aegis BSP improves the ballistic missile target-discrimination performance of the Aegis ship’s SPY-1 phased array radar.

In light of PLA TBM modernization efforts, including the possibility of TBMs equipped with MaRVs capable of hitting moving ships at sea, one issue is whether current plans for developing and installing the Aegis BSP are adequate, and whether those plans are sufficiently funded. A second issue is whether there are other opportunities for improving the radar capabilities of the Navy’s Aegis cruisers and destroyers that are not currently being pursued or are funded at limited levels, and if so, whether funding for these efforts should be increased.

Ships with DD(X)/CG(X) Radar Capabilities. Should planned annual procurement rates for ships with DD(X)/CG(X) radar capabilities be increased?

The Navy plans to procure a new kind of destroyer called the DD(X) and a new kind of cruiser called the CG(X). The Navy plans to begin DD(X) procurement in FY2007, and CG(X) procurement in FY2011. The Navy had earlier planned to begin CG(X) procurement in FY2018, but accelerated the planned start of procurement to FY2011 as part of its FY2006-FY2011 Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP). DD(X)s and CG(X)s would take about five years to build, so the first DD(X), if procured in FY2007, might enter service in 2012, and the first CG(X), if procured in FY2011, might enter service in 2016.

The Navy states that the DD(X)’s radar capabilities will be greater in certain respects than those of Navy Aegis ships. The radar capabilities of the CG(X) are to be greater still, and the CG(X) has been justified primarily in connection with future air and missile defense operations.

Estimated DD(X)/CG(X) procurement costs increased substantially between 2004 and 2005. Apparently as a consequence of these increased costs, the FY2006- FY2011 FYDP submitted to Congress in early 2005 reduced planned DD(X) procurement to one ship per year. The reduction in the planned DD(X) procurement rate suggests that, unless budget conditions change, the combined DD(X)/CG(X) procurement rate might remain at one ship per year beyond FY2011. 118

If improvements to Aegis radar capabilities are not sufficient to achieve the Navy’s desired radar capability for countering modernized PLA TBMs, then DD(X)/CG(X) radar capabilities could become important to achieving this desired capability. If so, then a potential additional issue raised by PLA TBM modernization efforts is whether a combined DD(X)/CG(X) procurement rate of one ship per year would be sufficient to achieve this desired capability in a timely manner. If the Navy in the future maintains a total of 11 or 12 carrier strike groups (CSGs), and if DD(X)/CG(X) procurement proceeds at a rate of one ship per year, the Navy would not have 11 or 12 DD(X)s and CG(X)s — one DD(X) or CG(X) for each of 11 or 12 CSGs — until 2022 or 2023. If CG(X)s are considered preferable to DD(X)s for missile defense operations, then the earliest the Navy could have 11 or 12 CG(X)s would be 2026 or 2027.

DD(X)/CG(X) radar technologies could be introduced into the fleet more quickly by procuring DD(X)s and CG(X)s at a higher rate, such as two ships per year, which is the rate the Navy envisaged in a report the Navy provided to Congress in 2003. A DD(X)/CG(X) procurement rate of two ships per year, however, could make it more difficult for the Navy to procure other kinds of ships or meet other funding needs, particularly in light of the recent growth in estimated DD(X)/CG(X) procurement costs.

A potential alternative strategy would be to design a reduced-cost alternative to the DD(X)/CG(X) that preserves DD(X)/CG(X) radar capabilities while reducing other DD(X)/CG(X) payload elements. Such a ship could more easily be procured at a rate of two ships per year within available resources. The option of a reduced-cost alternative to the DD(X)/CG(X) that preserves certain DD(X)/CG(X) capabilities while reducing others is discussed in more detail in another CRS report.119

Block II/Block IIA Version of SM-3 Interceptor. If feasible, should the effort to develop the Block II/Block IIA version of the Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) interceptor missile be accelerated?

The Navy plans to use the Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) interceptor for intercepting TBMs during the midcourse portion of their flight. As part of the Aegis ballistic missile defense block upgrade strategy, the United States and Japan are cooperating in developing technologies for a more-capable version of the SM-3 missile called the SM-3 Block II/Block IIA. In contrast to the current version of the SM-3, which has a 21-inch-diameter booster stage but is 13.5 inches in diameter along the remainder of its length, the Block II/Block IIA version would have a 21- inch diameter along its entire length. The increase in diameter to a uniform 21 inches would give the missile a burnout velocity (a maximum velocity, reached at the time the propulsion stack burns out) that is 45% to 60% greater than that of the current 13.5-inch version of the SM-3. 120 The Block IIA version would also include a improved kinetic warhead.121 The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) states that the Block II/Block IIA version of the missile could “engage many [ballistic missile] targets that would outpace, fly over, or be beyond the engagement range” of earlier versions of the SM-3, and that

the net result, when coupled with enhanced discrimination capability, is more types and ranges of engageable [ballistic missile] targets; with greater probability of kill, and a large increase in defenses “footprint” or geography predicted.... The SM-3 Blk II/IIA missile with it[s] full 21-inch propulsion stack provides the necessary fly out acceleration to engage IRBM and certain ICBM threats.122

Regarding the status of the program, MDA states that “The Block II/IIA development plan is undergoing refinement. MDA plans to proceed with the development of the SM-3 Blk II/IIA missile variant if an agreeable cost share with Japan can be reached.... [The currently envisaged development plan] may have to be tempered by budget realities for the agency.”123

In March 2005, the estimated total development cost for the Block II/Block IIA missile was reportedly $1.4 billion.124 In September 2005, it was reported that this estimate had more than doubled, to about $3 billion.125 MDA had estimated that the missile could enter service in 2013 or 2014, 126 but this date reportedly has now slipped to 2015. 127

In light of PLA TBM modernization efforts, a potential question is whether, if feasible, the effort to develop the Block II/Block IIA missile should be accelerated, and if so, whether this should be done even if this requires the United States to assume a greater share of the development cost. A key factor in this issue could be assessments of potential PLA deployments of longer-ranged PLA TBMs.

Kinetic Energy Interceptor (KEI). Should funding for development of the Kinetic Energy Interceptor (KEI) be increased?

The Kinetic Energy Interceptor (KEI) is a proposed new ballistic missile interceptor that, if developed, would be used as a ground-based interceptor and perhaps subsequently as a sea-based interceptor. Compared to the SM-3, the KEI would be much larger (perhaps 40 inches in diameter and 36 feet in length) and would have a much higher burnout velocity. Basing the KEI on a ship would require the ship to have missile-launch tubes that are bigger than those currently installed on Navy cruisers, destroyers, and attack submarines. The Missile Defense Agency (MDA), which has been studying possibilities for basing the KEI at sea, plans to select a preferred platform in May 2006. 128 Because of its much higher burnout velocity, the KEI could be used to intercept longer-ranged ballistic missiles, including intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) during the boost and early ascent phases of their flights. Development funding for the KEI has been reduced in recent budgets, slowing the missile’s development schedule. Under current plans, the missile could become available for Navy use in 2014-2015. 129

Although the KEI is often discussed in connection with intercepting ICBMs, it might also be of value as a missile for intercepting TBMs, particularly longer-range TBMs, which are called Intermediate-Range Ballistic Missiles (IRBMs). If so, then in the context of this report, one potential question is whether the Navy should use the KEI as a complement to the SM-3 for countering PLA TBMs, and if so, whether development funding for the KEI should be increased so as to make the missile available for Navy use before 2014-2015. ___________________________________

FootNotes:

114 This section includes material adapted from the discussion of the NAD program in CRS Report RL31111, Missile Defense: The Current Debate, coordinated by Steven A. Hildreth. Navy Warfare Areas and Programs Missile Defense.

115 Michael Sirak, “Sea-Based Ballistic Missile Defence: The ‘Standard’ Response,” Jane’s Defence Weekly, October 30, 2002.

116 Malina Brown, “Navy Rebuilding Case For Terminal Missile Defense Requirement,” Inside the Navy, April 19, 2004.

117 See, for example, Jason Ma and Christopher J. Castelli, “Adaptation Of PAC-3 For Sea-Based Terminal Missile Defense Examined,” Inside the Navy, July 19, 2004; Malina Brown, “Navy Rebuilding Case For Terminal Missile Defense Requirement,” Inside the Navy, April 19, 2004.

118 For more on the DD(X) and CG(X), see CRS Report RS20159, Navy DD(X) and CG(X) Programs: Background and Issues for Congress, by Ronald O’Rourke; and CRS Report RL32109, Navy DD(X), CG(X), and LCS Ship Acquisition Programs: Oversight Issues and Options for Congress, by Ronald O’Rourke.

119 See the “Options For Congress” section of CRS Report RL32109, op cit.

120 The 13.5-inch version has a reported burnout velocity of 3.0 to 3.5 kilometers per second (kps). See, for example, J. D. Marshall, The Future Of Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense, point paper dated October 15, 2004, available at [http://www.marshall.org/pdf/materials/259.pdf]; “STANDARD Missile-3 Destroyers a Ballistic Missile Target in Test of Sea-based Missile Defense System,” Raytheon news release circa January 26, 2002, available on the Internet at [http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/micro_stories.pl?ACCT=683194&TICK=RTN4& STORY=/www/story/01-26-2002/0001655926&EDATE=Jan+26,+2002]; and Hans Mark, “A White Paper on the Defense Against Ballistic Missiles,” The Bridge, summer 2001, pp. 17-26, available on the Internet at [http://www.nae.edu/nae/bridgecom.nsf/weblinks/ NAEW-63BM86/$FILE/BrSum01.pdf?OpenElement]. See also the section on “Sea-Based Midcourse” in CRS Report RL31111, Missile Defense: The Current Debate, coordinated by Steven A. Hildreth.

121 Source for information on SM-3: Missile Defense Agency, “Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense SM-3 Block IIA (21-Inch) Missile Plan (U), August 2005,” a 9-page point paper provided by MDA to CRS, August 24, 2005.

122 “Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense SM-3 Block IIA (21-Inch) Missile Plan (U), August 2005,” op cit, pp. 3-4.

123 Ibid., p. 3.

124 Aarti Shah, “U.S. Navy Working With Japanese On Billion-Dollar Missile Upgrade,” Inside the Navy, March 14, 2005.

125 “Cost Of Joint Japan-U.S. Interceptor System Triples,” Yomiuri Shimbun (Japan), September 25, 2005.

126 “Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense SM-3 Block IIA (21-Inch) Missile Plan (U), August 2005,” op cit, p. 7.

127 “Cost Of Joint Japan-U.S. Interceptor System Triples,” Yomiuri Shimbun (Japan), September 25, 2005.

128 Marc Selinger, “MDA TO Pick Platform For Sea-Based KEI in May,” Aerospace Daily & Defense Report,” August 19, 2005: 2.

129 Government Accountability Office, Defense Acquisitions[:] Assessments of Selected Major Weapon Programs, GAO-05-301, March 2005, pp. 89-90. See also Thomas Duffy, “Northrop, MDA Working On KEI Changes Spurred By $800 Million Cut,” Inside Missile Defense, March 30, 2005: p. 1.


16 posted on 06/23/2006 8:15:11 PM PDT by Paul Ross (We cannot be for lawful ordinances and for an alien conspiracy at one and the same moment.-Cicero)
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To: Paul Ross
"I have been privileged to be at Barking Sands for two successful tests off Kauai myself."

Thank you for being there. It is so good to know that we are doing something.

Another thank you to Mr. Clinton for giving away launch stability secrets to our enemy.

17 posted on 06/23/2006 8:20:59 PM PDT by AGreatPer (Who wants a coach called Bruce anyway?)
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To: Paul Ross; SandRat
I have been privileged to be at Barking Sands for two successful tests off Kauai myself. First time we went out in a launch along the Napali coast we got to view the Lake Erie fire her interceptor. Way cool.

Freepers are everywhere bump. No Shenanigans for Kim Jong Il.

18 posted on 06/23/2006 8:42:45 PM PDT by Thinkin' Gal (As it was in the days of NO...)
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To: SandRat
It's a HIT !

19 posted on 06/23/2006 8:43:36 PM PDT by ChadGore (VISUALIZE 62,041,268 Bush fans. We Vote.)
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To: SandRat

can we intercept before it hits Tokyo?


20 posted on 06/23/2006 9:23:02 PM PDT by baseball_fan
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To: SandRat

I've seen vids of some of the technology used in missile defense. Very nifty stuff.


21 posted on 06/23/2006 9:54:46 PM PDT by pissant
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To: Paul Ross

I saw a similar post of yours earlier. Very cool. Thanks


22 posted on 06/23/2006 9:56:07 PM PDT by pissant
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To: Paul Ross
Two other Aegis destroyers stationed off Kauai, including one from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, performed long-range surveillance and track exercises.

I was interested to see the Japanese participation, and then read the article you posted which indicates that Japan has been involved for some time in the Aegis testing - and development as well? Good for them. I know they have something in their constitution which limits their military involvement with other countries; I imagine the N. Korea threat is trumping that.

23 posted on 06/23/2006 10:10:01 PM PDT by hsalaw
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To: baseball_fan

don't know


24 posted on 06/23/2006 10:54:32 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: SandRat
What a change from a few years ago....Missile defense is succeeding. Tom Daschle sank, then disappeared.

Daschle embarassed himself when he attempted to ridicule supporters of the missile defense program. He meant to imply that they were mindless, but made himself look like an idiot.

June 8, 2001:
Tom Daschle, newly reseated Senate Majority Leader,* says
of the Missile Defense program "This isn't rocket science here"

Here is an exact transcript of Daschle's words.

Whether or not we want to violate the ABM treaty
especially with a concept [NMD program] that we may not know
...or...
that we do know now does not work
is something that also mystifies me.
I mean
Every aspect of the debate and the consideration
that is given this whole program
is... is troubling to me.
I... I mean... I...there's a disconnect there.
I mean...It just seems common sense....
I mean...there's no brain..
This isn't rocket science here...

Yes it IS rocket science....
that's the problem..
Hadn't thought about that..
As I just think out loud ....
as I meander through here.
(laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh)

*Jeffords had recently defected

25 posted on 06/23/2006 11:22:20 PM PDT by syriacus (The one magical word from a Democrat, that make lethal chemicals "A-OK" is -- "rust.")
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To: SandRat

No problem...except for Gore.
He would look at the result and cry "Bush's fault. It's global warming that caused this!!"


26 posted on 06/24/2006 5:39:42 AM PDT by Recovering Ex-hippie (Moderate Mooslims.....what's that?)
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To: hsalaw
Japan has been involved for some time in the Aegis testing

We sold them four Aegis systems, for their "Kogo" class ships (identical to our Arleigh Burke designs), which they built, and we outfitted with the system...which they paid for. Which is a big deal in these circles. They have participated in our upgradings and - and development as well?

Not yet. Anyways...we know precisely what we have to do. We just need to get the politicians out of the way. Especially important that the Administration recognize that they were lied to "Big Time" by the Russians in exchange for the insane "Framework" attached to the Treaty of Moscow. It needs to be promptly and permanently jettisoned. Reagan never negotiated with SDI. It wasn't a bargaining chip for him. It was a fundamental core national value. Our right to safeguard ourselves is not negotiable.

Good for them.

Yes. We just have to be extra diligent that the technology doesn't leak as our quiet propeller technology leaked via Mitsubishi around 1984 or so to Russia. So far so good. The Japanese appear to be on board with operational and systemmic confidentiality with Aegis.

27 posted on 06/24/2006 6:29:44 AM PDT by Paul Ross (We cannot be for lawful ordinances and for an alien conspiracy at one and the same moment.-Cicero)
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To: syriacus
Thanks for the link!

This portion is significant, because it is so confounding that the Administration subsequently went and deliberately killed Navy Area Wide in December, 2001...precisely the opposite direction of what Murdock clearly also advocated as politically essential:

The Bush administration could frustrate BMD opponents even further by testing boost-phase anti-missile technology. Designed to demolish hostile rockets as they slowly rise from their launch pads trailed by jets of hot gases, a low-tech, sea-based Aegis missile could splinter such a weapon relatively easily. Such tests would demonstrate that America could stop incoming rockets in both their boost- and space-flight phases. Later on, learning to destroy warheads as they descend in their terminal trajectories would round out a "layered defense."

What was amusing was the reminders in this article, wherein it describes Putin and the Russians "agreed" to killing the ABM treaty...when in fact it hadn't been in force since the demise of the Soviet Union. A treaty which the Soviets had flagrantly violated anyways with their SA-300 missiles, deploying over 10,000 of them along the periphery for a national missile defense, and the Krasnoyarsk Radar to help provide target tracking and control. And so far, they have also not been following through on the warhead reductions of the stupid Treaty of Moscow.

E.g., the Russian Generals rather brazenly announced three years ago that they are indeed keeping intact their stash of SS-18s until 2017 with over 2,300 warheads thereto just by itself. They also have a hot assembly line going turning out the newly perfected Topol-M which they persistently brag on being the best, most survivable mobile missile ever with MaRV, Stealth and FOBS capability. Immune to our kinetic interceptor technology. Which they got Bush to agree to limit.

Mean while Bush is pushing pell-mell to, in effect, unilaterally disarm the United States ahead of schedule pursuant the Treaty of Moscow. The MX is gone. Half to two-thirds of the Minuteman are gone or going. The Tridents are being cut by a third, or more if he gets his way. The B-1B is cut in half. The B-52 is almost gone. The US is not manufacturing tritium for the warheads which we have, and they are becoming inoperable.

This dangerous deterioration in our strategic deterrent posture (particularly as Putin and company shows his true Communist-Dicatatorship stripes) truly needs to be confronted and debated in the Congress. W and Condileeza Rice appears to not be paying attention. But the Left obviously won't raise the issue, because they want us to unilaterally disarm...and the Republicans won't break party unity, such as it is, over strategic nuclear issues...for fear of losing the one area where the public still has confidence in them...nuclear national security. Informing the public that things are deteriorating could have serious and embarassing political repercussions. So they are stalling hoping that we just get lucky.

But the solid conservatives are going to have to break ranks.

It appears that the Administration...and the U.S....are being played for saps by Pooty-Poot...and the people of the U.S. are being placed gravely at risk as a result...all for a delusory promise that someone's dangerous wishful thinking is not turning into reality.

28 posted on 06/24/2006 7:12:49 AM PDT by Paul Ross (We cannot be for lawful ordinances and for an alien conspiracy at one and the same moment.-Cicero)
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To: pissant
I saw a similar post of yours earlier. Very cool. Thanks

You're welcome. You'll note the footnotes are a treasure trove of links to solid information. It looks like we need to push hard, get a national movement going to deploy a solid Seabased NMD. No arbitrary or foolish political limits on essential capabilities to defend our national security.

Faustian bargains.

29 posted on 06/24/2006 7:17:10 AM PDT by Paul Ross (We cannot be for lawful ordinances and for an alien conspiracy at one and the same moment.-Cicero)
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To: SandRat

.....My son .....

We conclude it's in the genes. :)


30 posted on 06/24/2006 7:19:31 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. Slay Pinch)
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To: Steely Tom
If we whack NK's missile, you'll hear the libs screaming.

I doubt that. I think they will go either of two ways. They will either very quietly say, yes good, and then go onto their butt monkey, of the usual litany of saying that "this wasn't a real test because the NK missiles are so primitive, etc." OR some of them will even try to take credit for it. Hillary might have some of her stooges like Sandy Hamburglar claim that "clinton's military R&D" made this possible....sigh. They are not called DemonRATs for nothing.

31 posted on 06/24/2006 7:42:10 AM PDT by Paul Ross (We cannot be for lawful ordinances and for an alien conspiracy at one and the same moment.-Cicero)
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To: SandRat

can it intercept before hitting Tokyo?

"At about noon Hawaii time -- 6 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time -- a target missile was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands on Kauai. USS Shiloh's Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense 3.6 Weapon System detected and tracked the target and "developed a fire control solution," officials said. About four minutes later, the USS Shiloh's crew fired the SM-3, and two minutes later the missile intercepted the target warhead outside the Earth's atmosphere, more than 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean and 250 miles northwest of Kauai."

looking at Microsoft's virtual earth map, the distance from N.Korea to Japan appears to be approx 700 miles. since the test missle intercepted the target warhead 250 miles from its origin and 100 miles high, i assume the answer is clearly yes. if the N.Koreas were trying to hit Hawaii, i assume they would need a higher trajectory than if they were trying to hit Japan (in a worse case scenario versus just flying over Japan as a test like last time). a lower trajectory might be more difficult but there are still a few hundred miles available (700-250=450 mi margin of safety?) just a guess.

very impressive. peace through strength!


32 posted on 06/24/2006 7:43:51 AM PDT by baseball_fan
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To: Paul Ross

Yes, we need to keep pushing. I know the Airborne Laser system is very very promising as well.


33 posted on 06/24/2006 8:32:16 AM PDT by pissant
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To: Paul Ross

Thanks for providing the background to our chess game with Russia.


34 posted on 06/24/2006 8:36:39 AM PDT by syriacus (Superfunds aren't needed, since ONE WORD from a Dem neutralizes lethal chemicals -- "rust.")
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To: SandRat

Bookmarked!!


35 posted on 06/24/2006 8:38:32 AM PDT by syriacus (Superfunds aren't needed, since ONE WORD from a Dem neutralizes lethal chemicals -- "rust.")
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To: SandRat
My son was a part of this test at the Kauai site. One of the Engineers that built and launched the target missle -- sorry just a Dad puffing his chest out a little.

You are deservedly proud.

36 posted on 06/24/2006 8:39:50 AM PDT by syriacus (Superfunds aren't needed, since ONE WORD from a Dem neutralizes lethal chemicals -- "rust.")
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To: SandRat

bump


37 posted on 06/24/2006 8:41:52 AM PDT by GOPJ (Once you see the MSM manipulate opinion, all their efforts seem manipulative-Reformedliberal)
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To: SandRat
My son was a part of this test at the Kauai site.

44 YEARS AGO I was a part of the testing of our anti-missile system at White Sands Missile Range. Missiles would be fired into White Sands from Green River, Utah, and a Nike Zeus would be launched to intercept them. One of my jobs was analyzing close-up photos of the "bullet trying to hit another bullet" in order to calculate miss distance. Our ABM system has been under development a long, long time.

38 posted on 06/24/2006 8:51:23 AM PDT by JoeGar
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To: SandRat
Ronnie WAS RIGHT ALL THE WAY!!...from the morality issues to the security issues.

Kudos to your son!! (and Dad for supporting his commitment).

39 posted on 06/24/2006 8:59:16 AM PDT by Sacajaweau (God Bless Our Troops!!)
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To: bert
or could it be that he stayed in Scouting to earn Eagle Rank with 4 palms and the Bronze Hornaday Award (the equivalent of another 4 Eagle Projects in Conservation/Nature/Environment -- Upholding Values America needs to return to???
40 posted on 06/24/2006 9:30:47 AM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: syriacus

Good thing I don't wear suspenders or I'd have black-n-blue marks on my chest from hookin my thumbs under em an letin em snap.


41 posted on 06/24/2006 9:44:56 AM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: SandRat
My son was a part of this test at the Kauai site. One of the Engineers that built and launched the target missile -- sorry just a Dad puffing his chest out a little.

Congratulations! Well deserved puffing of chest.

42 posted on 06/24/2006 9:48:30 AM PDT by operation clinton cleanup
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To: JoeGar

First time I came to Ft Huachuca the Safeguard Command was here and they were working hard until Jimmie axed the program.


43 posted on 06/24/2006 9:50:00 AM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: Recovering Ex-hippie
That would have been a miscreant test.
44 posted on 06/24/2006 9:51:02 AM PDT by Redcloak (Speak softly and wear a loud shirt.)
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To: SandRat

bttt


45 posted on 06/24/2006 10:15:51 AM PDT by diamond6 (Everyone who is for abortion have been born. Ronald Reagan)
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To: shield
Looks like we're preparing to knock NK's missile out.

Yes, I wonder if this test was deliberately timed, just to send a message to the North Koreans?

46 posted on 06/24/2006 10:21:28 AM PDT by Mark17
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To: Steely Tom

"If we whack NK's missile, you'll hear the libs screaming."

If we don't whack NK's missle, they will scream. They will say; "See, told you that SDI doesn't work"

Or if NK doesn't launch, they will scream. "See, you right wingers are war monger's, you over reacted. NK is just a peacefull country"

I'm sure others on this board could add to the list.


47 posted on 06/24/2006 10:26:04 AM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (Never bring a knife to a gun fight, or a Democrat to do serious work...)
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To: Mark17

And the war games in the pacific 'Operation Valiant Shield.'


48 posted on 06/24/2006 10:27:53 AM PDT by shield (A wise man's heart is at his RIGHT hand; but a fool's heart at his LEFT. Ecc. 10:2)
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To: shield
And the war games in the pacific 'Operation Valiant Shield.'

Yes, that too. When I was in the Air Force, they had an exercise every year in Korea called Team Spirit. I wonder if they still have it? I always thought it was not only for training, but to let the North Koreans know we were still there.

49 posted on 06/24/2006 10:34:36 AM PDT by Mark17
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To: SandRat

I'm an Eagle, no plams but have the Adult Hornaday award.

I'm nearing 50 years as a registered Scout!!


50 posted on 06/24/2006 11:37:45 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. Slay Pinch)
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