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EXCLUSIVE: Iranian Weapons Arm Iraqi Militia
ABC News ^ | November 30 2006 | JONATHAN KARL AND MARTIN CLANCY

Posted on 11/30/2006 8:19:10 AM PST by jmc1969

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To: edcoil
'BIG SALE ON BOMBS AND THE LOTTO TICKET"
151 posted on 11/30/2006 1:45:30 PM PST by Westlander (Unleash the Neutron Bomb)
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To: Prokopton

Sure, , it's obvious that the war is being kept low-intensity for many political reasons. We hear breathlessly that the military has been lamed by extensive and prolonged tours, but the fact is that, judging by the poses the mullahs are striking, Iran fears possible American reprisals.


152 posted on 11/30/2006 1:48:59 PM PST by cyberdasher (Wikistan--Frontline of the information wars)
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To: jmc1969

I'll be surprised if the president goes through with what I think the commission will suggest.

Needless to say...what they're asking for is contrary to national interests. We won't negotiate with terrorists -- but we will negotiate with the people that arm them?


153 posted on 11/30/2006 1:51:50 PM PST by Black Guy who is a Republican
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To: WoofDog123
big question is what will the US do about it, publicly or otherwise?


This is peanuts compared to seizing our embassy and hostages, as blatant an act of war as can be had. We have established clear precedent that we will do not a thing when provoked by Persia. Sorry, those are the facts.
154 posted on 11/30/2006 1:57:56 PM PST by Harrius Magnus (Not Welcome.)
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To: Black Guy who is a Republican

"Needless to say...what they're asking for is contrary to national interests. We won't negotiate with terrorists -- but we will negotiate with the people that arm them?"


"And we will pursue nations that provide aid or safe haven to terrorism. Every nation, in every region, now has a decision to make. Either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists."


155 posted on 11/30/2006 2:00:35 PM PST by Prokopton
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To: All
LINEBACKER III?
156 posted on 11/30/2006 2:04:45 PM PST by finnman69 (cum puella incedit minore medio corpore sub quo manifestu s globus, inflammare animos)
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To: All

Not news to me at all. Been obvious that Iran is behind the insurgents . Meanwhile the Dems are asking that we "talk" to Iran ..the worlds gone totally mad at this point.
Might as well bring in Jimmy Carter. we wont do a damn thing abou t it anyway .


157 posted on 11/30/2006 2:10:06 PM PST by sonic109
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To: JerseyJohn61

"I have a feeling that the only reason ABC
went with this story was to prevent being
scooped by another news outfit.

It's inevitable, we will have to start
harming Iranian and Syrian interests sometime.
We've all known it was heading in this direction....JJ61"

We should have done two things:

1) Special opps destroying a government building within a block of where the mullahs gather to send a strong message, WE CAN TOUCH YOU.

2) Destroy a smaller oil field to say WE CAN HURT YOUR POCKETBOOK.

3) Killed Al Sadr

We can still do these things and should, very soon.


158 posted on 11/30/2006 2:11:12 PM PST by quantfive
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To: Harrius Magnus

I agree. I doubt America has the will to defend itself anymore. Maybe if the Mooselems sail up the Hudson River we'd fight . Even then I doubt it . We are a wounded animal at this point. Islam day by day is taking foothold in the US. I give us 8 years .


159 posted on 11/30/2006 2:15:14 PM PST by sonic109
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To: tobyhill

"If they know exactly where the factories are then we need to take them out."

At least one factory, send a strong message. Black opps can be VERY effective.


160 posted on 11/30/2006 2:16:25 PM PST by quantfive
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To: jmc1969

Tehran, Nov 29, IRNA
Iran-Iraq-Regional Peace

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said here Wednesday that a powerful Iraq and Iran would serve regional peace and security.

Addressing the Iraqi nation in a joint press conference with his Iraqi counterpart Jalal Talabani, he said the Iranian government, as before, strongly stands by Iraqi nation and intends to put all its experiences and knowledge at the disposal of Iraqi nation.

Describing Iraq as a nation with deep-rooted civilization, he said the enemies of Iraq are determined to weaken the country and prevent formation of a powerful Iraq and seek to sow the seeds of discord and enmity.

"We all should strive to forge unity among Iraqi nation," he said.

Addressing the Iraqi nation, he said that the country's hardliners intentionally or unintentionally take actions which would harm the unity of the country. He called on the people to advise them first and if they refuse, to agree to oust them.

Talabani was earlier in Iran after the downfall of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein and the establishment of a new government in the country.

As head of the Iraqi transitional government, Talabani paid his second visit to Iran on November 21, 2005 at the head of a politico-economic delegation.

Iran and Iraq have expanded ties and cooperation in various fields in recent years.

The two countries signed a memorandum of understanding on promoting political and economic ties and the reconstruction of Iraq during a visit by Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki to Tehran in September.

http://www.irna.ir/en/news/view/menu-234/0611291883194711.htm


161 posted on 11/30/2006 2:16:35 PM PST by TexKat (Just because you did not see it or read it, that does not mean it did or did not happen.)
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To: lormand

If losing involves Nancy wearing a burqa, it might almost be worth it.


162 posted on 11/30/2006 2:25:02 PM PST by Cyclopean Squid (Authoritarianism depends on lack of information. Totalitarianism depends on misinformation.)
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To: Muzzle_em
Anyone care to theorize what would be happening in Iraq and/or U.S. right now if the U.S. had never gone into Iraq and Saddam was still in power?

Late to this thread, but for starters: Saddam was trying to organize an oil embargo just before we went into Iraq. Gas would be about $5.00 to $6.00 per gallon. By now we would have been in a recession possibly on the verge of a depression. All because we were asking Saddam to simply live by the peace agreement he had signed at the end of the Gulf War. We would also have had lots of US troops still in Saudi Arabia, which apparently makes Al Qeada very angry (more 911's).

163 posted on 11/30/2006 2:36:56 PM PST by justa-hairyape
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To: Kerretarded

Eye for and eye and a bomb for a bomb.


164 posted on 11/30/2006 2:39:09 PM PST by Blue State Insurgent (Those who know the truth need to speak out against these kinds of myths, and lies, and distortions..)
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To: jmc1969; Ernest_at_the_Beach

MICHAEL WARE, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, certainly the insurgency has many different faces, Lou. And what we're talking about here is the Shia insurgency. Essentially, the Shia militias and paramilitary forces, an alignment of which essentially make up the government.

Now, according to U.S. and British military intelligence, most of these groups, political factions and military factions, receive financial aid, military aid, weapons training, and liaison from Iran, particularly from Iran's Iranian revolutionary guard Quds force. So it's equivalent to the Green Berets.

Now, we've heard about them supplying the key components for the most devastating roadside bombs here in Iraq. I've spoken to British troops in the south who say their bases have been mortared by bombs that carry Iranian markings.

We have the chief of U.S. military intelligence talking about C-4 explosives that can be traced back to Iranian batches. And now we have what U.S. intelligence says is Iranian backing of Shia death squads.

Here, for example, Lou is the tail fin of an .81 millimeter mortar round. This landed just days ago in a Sunni neighborhood here in Baghdad. It was fired from a Shia area.

What's most interesting about this is that we don't know exactly where it came from, but what we can tell you is that it's date-stamped this year, 2006. It clearly, from its condition, has not been buried in the desert.

So at some point this has crossed Iraq's border. They're not making them here. So it's crossed the border and come into the hands of a Shia militia -- Lou.

DOBBS: Let me ask you, Michael, among the field commanders there with whom you've talked, how much frustration is there that the United States has not been able to first successfully interdict those kinds of shipments of material in support of the insurgency, as well as the personnel who are also being used, according to many reports? And to what degree is the fact that the militias remain armed -- is that within the control of the forces should the Iraqi government and the United States decide to disarm the militias?

WARE: Well, the United States and the Iraqi government, for what it is, and beyond the prime minister's office and the office of the national security adviser, one wonders what there is of this government. Because beyond that, it's essentially this alliance of militias.

As we said, intelligence claiming that many of them are backed by Iran anyway. The U.S. and Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, as has been said many times in the past, have not only called upon the militias to disband and disarm, but are now insisting upon it. Yet, we've seen no movement.

DOBBS: Right.

WARE: There is no incentive, Lou, for the militias to disarm and there's nothing to force them. Not even 140,000-plus American troops.

DOBBS: And the frustration among the field commanders, has there been any expressed by those field commanders about the inability to control either the borders or to interdict those supplies?

WARE: Absolutely. I mean, Iraq's borders on both the eastern and western fronts remain porous. Fighters and material keep pouring in from the west to support al Qaeda and the Sunni insurgents. The exact same can be said of the eastern border with Iran.

I've spent a lot of time on both borders. With the troop numbers here in the country now, it's simply impossible to seal these borders off.

I've had British intelligence officers tell me that when it comes to combating Iran, it's as though we are sleepwalking, one of them said. And essentially, the Sunnis claim that the Brits maintain an appearance of stability in the south by trading off, accommodating with these Iranian-backed militias so that attacks are few, yet the influence of Iran and its surrogates is great.

DOBBS: Michael, thank you very much. Very revealing, as always. Thank you.

Michael Ware from Baghdad.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1745432/posts?page=49#49




While Americans look for a way out of Iraq, Iran has its foot firmly in the door. It is muscling its way more into the picture. Now Iran has invited the leader of Iraq to a weekend meeting. Correspondent Michael Ware joins us now from Baghdad.

Michael, Iraq's president, Mr. Talabani is going to Tehran. Do you expect any significant, tangible results from that, especially when it comes to improving the security situation?

MICHAEL WARE, CNN CORRESPONDENT, THE SITUATION ROOM: Well, there's no specific agenda we have been told of. No one has an expectation of the -- delivery of any immediate prize by President Talabani.

However, from an American perspective, key among the list of things to discuss will be security. Indeed, U.S. intelligence and the American ambassador here, and the American commander on the ground here, have all repeatedly accused Iran of sending money, fighters, training, and weapons across the border.

We are seeing essentially Iran, through its surrogates, killing American and British troops. They are also supporting the major militias, which are the fundamental building blocks of the government that President Talabani represents.

These countries share a land border. They fought a long and bitter war. There is much for them to discuss. Foremost, will be security. Now, Iran has also offered to help with the rebuilding of the Iraqi army and the Iraqi intelligence service. America does not want that to happen. We will see if that comes up in President Talabani's discussions.

KING: Mike, I want to bring your attention to policy debate here in the United States. A number of competing proposals being kicked around as to what the United States should do to change its strategy. Almost every one of them say they have to do a better job after three and half, plus, years in Iraq of finding a way to improve the training of Iraqi security forces. Is any progress being made while the politicians and others back here in Washington debate what to do next?

WARE: No, not really, John. I mean, you only have so much to work with here in Iraq. As we know, most of the security forces, particularly the police and national police, former commando paramilitary units, are heavily infiltrated by the Shia militias. That's why we are seeing in Sunni areas to the west, police being recruited locally because Sunnis simply cannot trust their own men in uniform, if they come from the central government.

There's really very little here for the Americans to work with. We have seen an entire brigade of Iraqi national police taken off-line because of its complicity in death squad activity. That unit is now undergoing further training.

But overall, essentially, America needs to accept it has not been winning this war so far. In fact, its enemies, Al Qaeda and Iran, have been emboldened by this war. America needs to make a reassessment.

Firstly, of what is it trying to achieve. Any concept of establishing a bristling, shiny new democracy for the Middle East has to be cast aside. America needs to downscale its goals and that will help reshape what strategy applies and how many forces that's going to need and for how long. Essentially, America needs to accept it is not going get what it set out to do -- John.

KING: Correspondent Michael Ware for us in Baghdad. Michael, thank you very much.

WARE: Thank you, John.

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0611/20/sitroom.02.html

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1742248/posts?page=15#15



165 posted on 11/30/2006 2:42:44 PM PST by TexKat (Just because you did not see it or read it, that does not mean it did or did not happen.)
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To: jmc1969
Every nation, in every region, now has a decision to make. Either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists. (Applause.) From this day forward, any nation that continues to harbor or support terrorism will be regarded by the United States as a hostile regime. - President George W. Bush - 9/20/2001

I guess it was all just a bunch of talk. I actually believed him. Iran is blatantly sponsoring the insurgency in Iraq and terrorism elsewhere and is gearing up to become a significant threat to the entire world. Are we going to wipe out the "hostile regime" in Iran? Not according to the Baker report that is about to come out which calls for us to sit down and talk to Adolph Ahmadinejad. And I think that Bush is going to do just that. Neville Chamberlain would approve.

166 posted on 11/30/2006 2:43:54 PM PST by Spiff (Death before Dhimmitude)
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To: navyguy
Our government will work triple overtime seeking a politically correct, euro-safe solution that will culminate in people waving pieces of paper around... if they seek a solution at all.

So we are being governed by a bunch of Chamberlains. Been there, done that. That script leads to millions of deaths.

167 posted on 11/30/2006 2:47:17 PM PST by justa-hairyape
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To: jmc1969
Well no shit.. they don't even care to hide it anymore. They can give the finger to the IAEA and the UN on nuclear issues and it only gets them more lavish praise, 'understanding' and generous offerers of goodies and larger bribes.

So they openly give money and weapons to screw with Iraq via Sadr and other militias, and the response is to 'consult' with them and ask them what we need to do that they might 'help' us in Iraq.

Its completely upside down.

The whole Baker thing is all about recommending Bush 'negotiate' a surrender to Iran. Have a 'conference' to ask them what they want from us in order to 'help' us. In other words what they we surrender for them to stop their fight.
168 posted on 11/30/2006 2:48:31 PM PST by FreedomNeocon (Success is not final; Failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts -- Churchill)
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To: rjp2005

"Yes I agree. The will of history - represented in Russia and China's stance, Europe's passivity, and the American left's rebellion - is once again pushing Persia to the forefront of power in that region.
After we leave Iraq, there will be a short war after 2008 engulfing the entire middle east, with Iran/Iraq obtaining the allegiance of neighboring countries (except Israel of course)"

Read Ezekial 38. This was prophecied 2,500 years ago. Gog and Magog, Persia and the bands of Tubal and Put (this is Russia, Iran, Syria attack Israel. It says that fire and brimstone rain down and destroy the invaders melting the flesh off their bones. The carnage is so great it takes Israel several months to clean up the bodies. Sure sounds like Israel uses the 'Sampson Option' against the invasion.


169 posted on 11/30/2006 2:51:44 PM PST by quantfive
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To: sonic109

"I agree. I doubt America has the will to defend itself anymore. Maybe if the Mooselems sail up the Hudson River we'd fight . Even then I doubt it . We are a wounded animal at this point. Islam day by day is taking foothold in the US. I give us 8 years ."

We can defend ourselves and will, like how we crushed the Taliban after we were attacked and liberated Afghanistan with only a tiny fraction of our troops, a feat the Soviets failed to do using much larger and brutal tactics over several years. The failures in Iraq are due to a lack of research prior to going in. We crushed Iraq in what, 3 weeks? Our real mistake is holding our boys back from crushing the insurgency when it was small, we wanted to give the fledling and inexperienced Iraqi government a chance to make ammends. Big mistake. Huge! But us falling to Islam in 8 years, nah. Too many gun owners here.


170 posted on 11/30/2006 3:08:26 PM PST by quantfive
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To: TexKat
But overall, essentially, America needs to accept it has not been winning this war so far. In fact, its enemies, Al Qaeda and Iran, have been emboldened by this war. America needs to make a reassessment.

BARF!!!

171 posted on 11/30/2006 3:11:21 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: TexKat
Interesting exchange on CNN. Thanks for the transcript.

If the President of Iran was sincerely concerned about the violence within Iraq, he would not be writing letters to the US population. Instead, he would be apologizing for the Iranian weapons that are some how getting into Iraq. He would also be investigating how his weapons have been getting into the hands of the 'Mahdi' army and other various Shia groups. What is happening over there ? At the very least he should be investigating to see if there are rogue elements within the Iranian military organization itself ? The fact that he is not, clearly illustrates where his true interests reside.

172 posted on 11/30/2006 3:11:27 PM PST by justa-hairyape
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To: quantfive

I dont doubt we have the fire power , not at all. I'm talking about the will to use it . Not with the ever growing population of ignorant , TV watching , backwards baseball hat wearing moron liberals we have here. Yea ,guys like me and you will be fighting them in whats left of the streets , most won't. We're watching Islam take over US cities bit by bit.Iran is giving us the finger as they bult nukes and WE DO NOTHING. I still say 8 years is it.


173 posted on 11/30/2006 3:12:13 PM PST by sonic109
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To: Spiff
See this....I still believe him:

BBC: Bush presents firm front on Iraq ~ a disarmingly relaxed President Bush fields questions .....

174 posted on 11/30/2006 3:13:37 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Spiff

"I guess it was all just a bunch of talk. I actually believed him. Iran is blatantly sponsoring the insurgency in Iraq and terrorism elsewhere and is gearing up to become a significant threat to the entire world. Are we going to wipe out the "hostile regime" in Iran? Not according to the Baker report that is about to come out which calls for us to sit down and talk to Adolph Ahmadinejad. And I think that Bush is going to do just that. Neville Chamberlain would approve."

If I was POTUS I would go to Iran which would seem to the rest of the world we are willing to talk. Then I privately would tell the Supreme Ayatollah to pound sand and that if this insurgency doesn't stop, we will fully invade and if Congress doesn't allow a full war, that at least a limited bombing that would destroy all the arms factories and nuclear facilities and oil fields.


175 posted on 11/30/2006 3:16:00 PM PST by quantfive
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To: sonic109

"I dont doubt we have the fire power , not at all. I'm talking about the will to use it . Not with the ever growing population of ignorant , TV watching , backwards baseball hat wearing moron liberals we have here. Yea ,guys like me and you will be fighting them in whats left of the streets , most won't. We're watching Islam take over US cities bit by bit.Iran is giving us the finger as they bult nukes and WE DO NOTHING. I still say 8 years is it."

I believe we will be attacked by a nuclear terrorism event within 8 years, but that will not end our country. It will certainly ignite WWIII (if Iran or North Korea doesn't do it directly first) but even then, we will survive. I am not saying it will be pretty, but the left will join us as in other times of history where our existance was threatened. It's too bad it has cost many American lives for this to happen and the next time it will cost millions of America lives, but we will survive and win.


176 posted on 11/30/2006 3:19:56 PM PST by quantfive
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To: justa-hairyape

If you think that is something wait until I post the todays transcript once it is posted on the web.


177 posted on 11/30/2006 3:23:00 PM PST by TexKat (Just because you did not see it or read it, that does not mean it did or did not happen.)
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To: sonic109

I plan on taking a few of them out before I go. Pucker up Mo, here comes your Jizya!


178 posted on 11/30/2006 3:24:05 PM PST by Harrius Magnus (Not Welcome.)
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To: jmc1969

Bump.


179 posted on 11/30/2006 3:27:00 PM PST by NutCrackerBoy
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To: jmc1969

Iraqi leader faces boycott by allies, says security forces ready by June
November 30, 2006 - 3:11 pm

By: HAMZA HENDAWI

BAGHDAD (AP) - Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, facing a boycott by key political backers who run the country's most violent militia group, boldly claimed Thursday his security forces will be ready to take over from the U.S. military by next summer.

The boycott by 30 legislators and five cabinet ministers loyal to anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada al-Sadr was in protest against al-Maliki's meeting with President George W. Bush in Amman, in neighbouring Jordan, which they said amounted to an affront to the Iraqi people.

Addressing a news conference on his return to Baghdad on Thursday, al-Maliki appealed supporters of militant Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada al-Sadr to end their boycott but also admonished them for an action he said violated the commitment expected from partners in his six-month-old coalition government.

"I hope they reconsider their decision because it doesn't constitute a positive development in the political process," al-Maliki said.

"Political partnership means commitment."

But the Sadrists, whose support was crucial to al-Maliki's election to his job, are not the only partners criticizing him at a time when the country is inching ever closer to a civil war pitting its majority Shiites against the once-dominant Sunni Muslim minority.

In violence in Iraq on Thursday, the U.S. military reported the deaths of two soldiers and Iraqi officials said 47 people were killed, 37 of that number were bodies found dumped in various regions of the country.

Vice-President Tariq al-Hashemi, a Sunni, said in an interview he wants to see al-Maliki's government gone and another "understanding" for a new coalition put in place with guarantees that ensure collective decision-making.

"There is a clear deterioration in security and everything is moving in the wrong direction," he said.

"This situation must be redressed as soon as possible. If they continue, the country will plunge into civil war."

Al-Maliki's number two, deputy prime minister Salam Zikam Ali al-Zubaie, joined in the chorus critical of the prime minister, arguing his government failed to curb the spread of sectarian politics.

But al-Maliki appeared to be unperturbed by the criticism and his own failure to make any headway on either reducing the level of violence gripping the country or in talking his allies into disbanding their militias as repeatedly demanded by his U.S. backers.

In an interview with ABC's Charles Gibson in Amman, al-Maliki confidently claimed his forces would be ready to take over responsibility for security in Iraq by June, a timeline that's about 12 months shorter than what has been floated by top U.S. military commanders.

"We and the president (Bush) agreed to keep the same (U.S.) forces on the ground but to train more Iraqi forces," he said in excerpts from the interview to be aired later Thursday.

"We did not talk about any timetables and agenda for the withdrawal but now we are focusing on training Iraqi forces and then we will talk about reducing the number of multinationals," he said, alluding to the U.S.-led, 150,000-strong multinational force in Iraq.

He said he had no objection to any timetable for a U.S. troop-withdrawal but cautioned such action should be put off until Iraqi forces are ready to stand on their own.

Later in Baghdad, al-Maliki said he is determined to enhance the battlefield capabilities of Iraq's security forces, including the acquisition of modern weapons suitable for counterinsurgency operations, including helicopters and armoured vehicles.

He was equally upbeat on the question of the Shiite militias blamed for much of the sectarian violence in Iraq and which are known to have infiltrated the national police force.

"I reject any militia within the state," he said.

"We will not negotiate with any militia. Our policy is clear, it is to eradicate all militias from the country or to have them included in the political process."

"Or we will face them even if we have to by force."

Such strong rhetoric from al-Maliki is not new but it is yet to be matched by action.

"The government cannot disband the militias because it does not have the tools to do so. Militias should not be asked to disband but ordered by strong, non-sectarin security agencies," al-Zubaie, the deputy prime minister, said in a television interview.

It's not a question of military muscle alone.

Al-Maliki is beholden to al-Sadr, the radical Shiite cleric whose Mahdi Army militia is blamed for much of the sectarian violence and fought U.S. troops for much of 2004.

He has frequently vetoed U.S. military operations against its leaders or against suspected death squad members in Baghdad's Shiite stronghold Sadr City. On at least one occasion, he ordered the Americans to release from custody top al-Sadr aides known to be involved in sectarian violence against Sunnis.

A senior Sadrist legislator, Baha al-Aaraji, said the group would end its boycott when there is an increase in what he termed well-trained Iraqi security forces and the government ends the chronic shortages of basic services like electricity and fuel.

Training enough Iraqi soldiers and police to take over from U.S. troops is one of Washington's main goals in Iraq and represents the only hope out of the Iraqi quagmire. On Thursday, Bush said he would speed a turnover of security responsibility to Iraqi forces and assured al-Maliki that Washington is not looking for a "graceful exit" from a war well into its fourth year.

"So, we'll be in Iraq until the job is complete," Bush said.

However, another Sadrist legislator, Saleh al-Ojeili, said only a timetable for the withdrawal of foreign troops from Iraq would persuade him and fellow Sadrists to resume participation in the legislature and government.

Bush has steadfastly refused to announce a timeline for a troop-pullout, saying such a move would play into the hands of insurgents.

"It is the minimum we can ask for," said al-Ojeili.

http://www.news1130.com/news/international/article.jsp?content=w113077A


180 posted on 11/30/2006 3:29:18 PM PST by TexKat (Just because you did not see it or read it, that does not mean it did or did not happen.)
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To: P-Marlowe
I was thinking more along the lines of several Neutron-Bombs and call it "The US Contribution to Unilateral Nuclear Disarmament." Oh that's right! We don't have any because of Jimmie Kart-Duh.
181 posted on 11/30/2006 4:00:46 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: jmc1969
Image hosted by Photobucket.com

do I really have to say it???
182 posted on 11/30/2006 5:16:13 PM PST by Chode (American Hedonist )
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To: quantfive
Quantfive,

your three point plan makes me understand that
both you and I are on the same page. It does
not have to start BIG in so far as quantity,
but rather BIG in so far as they realize that
we can truly snatch their hearts out....JJ61
183 posted on 11/30/2006 5:38:30 PM PST by JerseyJohn61 (Better Late Than Never.......sometimes over lapping is worth the effort....)
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To: ilgipper

move troops out of the cities and to the borders. Let the Iraqi troops/police deal with the cities, with our guys on stand by to come in to take care of situations.



That's what I had in mind. The current situation with Iran and Syria is easily comparable to what happened in Vietnam and one of the reasons we lost there. Move coalition forces to Iraq's borders, shoot whatever does not have permission to cross, and let the Iraqis lay the smack down on the cities with some coalition reinforcement.

Then again, we can't protect our own borders so not being able to protect Iraq's does not surprise me.


184 posted on 11/30/2006 6:32:09 PM PST by abercrombie_guy_38
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To: All

What will we do?

Simply take yourself back to the placards that the Iranians shoved in our faces every night while holding hundreds of hostages

..."You can't do anything to us"


185 posted on 11/30/2006 6:37:26 PM PST by rbmillerjr
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To: finnman69

Sadr should have been taken out a long time ago. He's too idolized and important now to do so. If you think Iraq is bloody now you haven't seen anything.


186 posted on 11/30/2006 6:41:07 PM PST by abercrombie_guy_38
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To: All
For the last three plus years, I have realized that
the Kurdish militia was the most potent force in
the land. That paragon of power cannot be ignored.

Amplify it much to Turkey's chagrin for not letting
us operate from their northern land back in '03.

The Northern Kurdish are an abused and defensive
people who could flex some muscle and the surround-
ing folks would have much to fear should they be
unleashed. Let the people of the area realize that
they have much to be feared from within if they do
not cool off their heels. Those Kurds are the type
who would love to run Baath types through.

If Al Sadre types get too ferocious, they'd
eat them too....JJ61
187 posted on 11/30/2006 6:56:48 PM PST by JerseyJohn61 (Better Late Than Never.......sometimes over lapping is worth the effort....)
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To: quantfive

Ping for above


188 posted on 11/30/2006 7:06:30 PM PST by JerseyJohn61 (Better Late Than Never.......sometimes over lapping is worth the effort....)
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To: jmc1969

Like we didn't know this... Obvious enough for the "captain" to come to the rescue.


189 posted on 11/30/2006 8:14:30 PM PST by madison10 (If my people, who are called by My name will humble themselves and pray...I will heal their land.)
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To: justa-hairyape

"So we are being governed by a bunch of Chamberlains. Been there, done that. That script leads to millions of deaths."

That is PRECISELY where we are at. Bullseye.


190 posted on 11/30/2006 8:25:56 PM PST by navyguy (We don't need more youth. What we need is a fountain of SMART.)
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To: jmc1969

Bomb the Holy Shiite out of them!!


191 posted on 11/30/2006 9:14:46 PM PST by JohnRand
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US troops should be moved to interdict the Syrian and Iranian borders and leave the bloody center area now to the Iraqi security forces (but be available by offensives against insurgents).

Take the US troops out of the way of the IEDs and eliminate the foreign support and flow of instigators from outside.
192 posted on 12/01/2006 5:04:29 AM PST by wodinoneeye
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To: jmc1969

They're eager to wipe entire countries off the map in support of the Sunnis in Palestine, but they supply terrorists with weapons to obliterate Sunnis in Iraq.


193 posted on 12/01/2006 6:03:37 AM PST by Saveaplant_Eatavegan
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Comment #194 Removed by Moderator

To: shahab312

That really is the answer, we need to do a Reagan. Identify the sanest and most likely to succeed resistance group, support them and their popogandaa, support them with arms, and let them go at it with covert support.

But the Liberals in the gov't would leak so bad nothing could be done covertly.


195 posted on 12/01/2006 10:09:43 AM PST by Idaho Whacko
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To: JerseyJohn61

Yes, I agree. I believe it is time to turn them lose.


196 posted on 12/01/2006 10:47:43 AM PST by LongViewSC
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To: Muzzle_em

--Anyone care to theorize what would be happening in Iraq and/or U.S. right now if the U.S. had never gone into Iraq and Saddam was still in power?--

Zarqawi, Uday, and Qusay would still be at 98.6 degrees body temperature. Chemical Ali would be free to play golf with OJ.

Qadhafi would be holding on to his nukes.

The inspectors would have produced a whitewash report on WMD, and the UN would be applauded by the world.

The oil-for-food scam would be buried as deeply as the Venona cables. Kofing Anus would have won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Sanctions would have ended, allowing Saddam to fund whatever palaces & suicide bombers he wished.

The Enemedia would have blamed Bush for the high oil prices and worldwide recession, provoking a RATS election landslide.

President Jean-Francois Kerree and First Hag Teresa Heinz would be wining and dining leaders of Hamas, Hezbollah and Islamic Jihad at the White House, together with Small Peanut Carter, Woody-for-brains Harrelson & the fat b@$t@rd who made that oscar-winning "9-11 documentary".

Justices Alcee Hastings and Lynne Stewart would be on the Supreme Court instead of Roberts & Alito.

Ambassador Monica Lewinsky would be in Paris, servicing Jacques Chiraq.


197 posted on 12/01/2006 12:00:17 PM PST by rfp1234 (I've had it up to my keyster with these leaks!!! - - - Ronald Reagan)
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To: jmc1969

Imagine that, but the left says Iran is a peaceful nation. Make 'em glow!


198 posted on 12/01/2006 1:03:16 PM PST by Sword_Svalbardt (Sword Svalbardt)
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To: rfp1234

hilarious, and sadly, probably true.


199 posted on 12/01/2006 1:48:51 PM PST by Muzzle_em (taglines are for sissies)
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To: ScaniaBoy
>>>No, no, no. You've got to talk to them. /major sarcasm <<<

Well, don't be to hasty. We haven't seen the wonderful Baker/Hamilton report yet. It might say "talk to them...after Bush has knocked them flat on their azz"!

But, then again....probably not.

200 posted on 12/01/2006 5:03:38 PM PST by HardStarboard (Give Pelosi and Reid Enough Rope to Hang Themselves.)
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