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NATION'S PAPER CONTINUE CIRCULATION SLIDE (Dead Tree Dino Media Alert)
http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003576374# | April 25, 2007 | Jennnifer Saba

Posted on 04/25/2007 3:23:30 PM PDT by CT

FAS-FAX Preview: Circ Numbers To Take Another Big Hit

By Jennifer Saba

Published: April 25, 2007 12:30 PM ET

NEW YORK Anyone thinking the declines in circulation should ease when the Audit Bureau of Circulations releases its spring numbers on Monday will be disappointed.

According to industry sources, overall daily circulation for the six months ending March 2007 is expected to sink approximately 2.5% while Sunday will drop around 3.0%.

Yet again, major metro papers are bearing the brunt of the responsibility for the declines. Papers that are showing daily drops of 5% or more, according to circulation sources, include: The Dallas Morning News, The Miami Herald, The San Diego Union-Tribune, The Star Ledger in Newark, N.J., The Orange County (Calif.) Register, The Austin American-Statesman, the San Jose Mercury News, and the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

The Staten Island Advance reported that Monday-Friday circulation was down 3.9% to 59,461. Sunday dropped 4.6% to 73,203.

Gary Pruitt, CEO of McClatchy, explained during a Q1 earnings call on Tuesday that his company will continue to experience declines in circulation. (It was not too long ago that McClatchy could boast of constant circ gains). To give a taste of what is to come, during Q1, McClatchy executives said daily circulation fell 3.6% and Sunday dropped 3.9%.

Some city papers eked out increases, including The Indianapolis Star, which should be one of the biggest metro gainers. Daily circulation (Monday-Friday) rose 2.4% to 261,405 copies and Sunday was up 2% to 354,312 copies, according to Bryan Sturgeon, vice president of circulation at the Indy Star. The paper benefited when the Colts made (and won) the Super Bowl and by adding Thursday editions to Sunday-only subscriptions.

The St. Paul Pioneer Press grew its daily circulation (Monday-Friday) 0.3% to 191,736. Sunday is virtually flat up 0.1% to 251,865. Also encouraging: the paper attributed the increases to gains made in home-delivered copies.

The Kansas City Star's daily circulation (Monday- Saturday) slipped 0.7% -- a victory these days -- to 261,367. Sunday circulation was weaker, down 2.3% to 359,255.

Other papers that are expected to report small advances (or at least down less than 1%) in daily circulation, according to the same sources, include: The Charlotte Observer, The Denver Post, The San Antonio Express-News, the combined circulation of The Salt Lake Tribune and The Deseret Morning News, the St. Louis Post Dispatch, the St. Petersburg Times, The Plain Dealer in Cleveland, and The Oklahoman.

The Philadelphia Inquirer has said it is up 0.6% to about 352,600 in daily circulation.

At the big three national papers, The Wall Street Journal reported that daily circulation rose 0.6% to 2,062,000. USA Today is expected to show gains, according to sources.

The New York Times, however, will most likely be flat to down according to comments made by executives during a Q1 earnings call last week. "We are expecting circulation declines at our properties, slight declines to mid-single digits," said New York Times Co. CEO Janet Robinson during the call. She attributed the drops to the trimming of third-party circulation -- part of the other-paid category, which also includes employee, hotel, and Newspapers in Education copies -- and a focus on individually paid categories.

That refrain is likely to repeated often next week since publishers are still paring down other-paid circulation considered to be "less valuable" by advertisers. It's a trend that started well over two years ago, thanks to the circulation scandals of 2004, when it raised the level of scrutiny on the data.

Gary Pruitt attributed half of the McClatchy decrease to the culling of third-party circulation and the typical run rate, meaning the natural losses in circulation due to readers flocking to the Internet for news.

He said that when ABC relaxed the third-party rule in the 1990s, McClatchy opposed the moved. While the company was more judicious using third-party circulation, Knight Ridder wasn't. "Many newspaper companies used [third-party] to grow circulation. McClatchy didn't rely on it to a great extent but Knight Ridder did," he said during the call.

In effect McClatchy is busy trimming third-party circulation from the 20 former Knight Ridder papers it acquired last year.

Frank Whittaker, vice president of operations at McClatchy, said during the call that while circulation is falling the company is concentrating on home-delivered copies and its raising retention rates.

While the overall numbers look bleak, there is a renewed focus on the part of publishers to increase individually paid circulation and to lower the churn rate. Since the industry is selling fewer copies, when they do snag a subscriber they want to make it count.

John Murray, vice president of circulation at the Newspaper Association of America, pointed to a heartening trend amidst the troubling data: stops are down and retention is up.

On Tuesday, Scarborough Research released a report measuring the total audience of 135 papers in 74 markets. Many papers increased their reach by several percentage points when their online properties were taken into account.

Furthermore, the Newspapers Association of America released record-breaking online newspaper readership figures on Monday. During Q1, newspaper Web site traffic rose 5.3%, hitting an all-time high.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: ccrm; going
Pity, isn't it?
1 posted on 04/25/2007 3:23:32 PM PDT by CT
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To: CT
Yet again, major metro papers are bearing the brunt of the responsibility for the declines.

Ha!

2 posted on 04/25/2007 3:26:52 PM PDT by mdittmar (May God watch over those who serve,and have served, to keep us free.)
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To: CT

I am saving a bottle of Dom Perignon for the day the NY Times closes down.


3 posted on 04/25/2007 3:29:42 PM PDT by FormerACLUmember
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To: CT

The decline of a sunset industry.


4 posted on 04/25/2007 3:31:22 PM PDT by NativeNewYorker (Freepin' Jew Boy)
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To: CT

The Pro-Abortion Dallas Morning News down 5%. Pity.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/opinion/editorials/stories/DN-abortion_24edi.ART.State.Edition1.4286e68.html


5 posted on 04/25/2007 3:36:19 PM PDT by cowtowney
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To: NativeNewYorker

well, my stock in the buggy whip industry has been steadily declining for some reason...


6 posted on 04/25/2007 3:36:32 PM PDT by brivette
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To: CT

I would think enviro-wacko’s would want the printed media to stop making newspapers in order to save trees.


7 posted on 04/25/2007 3:38:00 PM PDT by stockpirate (Congress should MANDATE the right to carry concealed weapons in ALL schools.)
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To: stockpirate
I would think enviro-wacko’s would want the printed media to stop making newspapers in order to save trees.

All the better to use the Sheryl Crowe 'wipe.'

8 posted on 04/25/2007 3:44:29 PM PDT by CT
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To: cowtowney
While circulation at the traditionally conservative Indianapolis Star is up.
9 posted on 04/25/2007 3:45:46 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
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To: CT
[Furthermore, the Newspapers Association of America released record-breaking online newspaper readership figures on Monday. During Q1, newspaper Web site traffic rose 5.3%, hitting an all-time high.]

This does not count for much now because newspaper websites don’t earn the advertising revenues that print does and won’t support the huge news staffs big city papers have always employed. The industry is scrambling to find a formula whereby they can generate the same money on-line as they did in print. This is going to usher in more, not less, newspapers on-line. I think what will happen is papers like the New York Times will shrink in size and power to the point where many entrepreneurs who could never afford to build a newspaper plant will be able to compete on-line. They will have to create a news and advertising staff but they won’t have to buy a printing press and other costly production equipment or fleets of trucks for circulation.

I believe the internet is the greatest event in mass communication since the invention of movable type.

10 posted on 04/25/2007 3:49:44 PM PDT by Brad from Tennessee ("A politician can't give you anything he hasn't first stolen from you.")
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To: Brad from Tennessee
I believe the internet is the greatest event in mass communication since the invention of movable type.

And I believe you are correct, and at least as smart as Al Gore. Probably much more though, if you are here.

11 posted on 04/25/2007 3:52:31 PM PDT by CT
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To: CT

We could use the old newspapers. Have you noticed how everything the left talks about that we MUST do has to do with giving something up?

Give up our toilet paper, big cars, fast food, fighting to defend ourselves, and freedom.


12 posted on 04/25/2007 4:05:04 PM PDT by stockpirate (Congress should MANDATE the right to carry concealed weapons in ALL schools.)
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To: CT

you keep calling them the “dino” media,

but they’re still alive, too alive imo,

they helped elect a democrap u.s. congress in 2006

and, they’ll help elect a democrap president in 2008.


13 posted on 04/25/2007 4:07:41 PM PDT by ken21 (it takes a village to brainwash your child + to steal your property! /s)
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To: CT
The pity is the print media devolved to the point of tendering juvenile “creative writing” opinion pieces, instead of true and factual reports.
They ruined their own industry.
People didn’t buy newspapers for the primary purpose of reading the terrific new advertising campaign of another industry.
People bought newspapers as a trusted source, to keep current with factual reporting of local and national news and interesting international news and current events.... The owners of print media killed themselves long ago when they all lost their minds, and convinced themselves that their information seeking customers really wanted to buy advertisements and coupons, not simple "boring facts" researched and written by an impartial reporter. Only their laid off advertising departments will mourn their passing. The actual reporters left long ago.
14 posted on 04/25/2007 4:20:33 PM PDT by sarasmom ( The cover of my "Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy" is now flashing "Panic".)
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To: Mr. Lucky

Wish we could get a conservative newspaper here in Atlanta. Of course, we can get home delivery of the Wall Street Journal, but it’s not a general-interest paper. If some enterprising soul would come up with a conservative alternative to USA Today, I know I would get home delivery.


15 posted on 04/25/2007 4:39:39 PM PDT by madprof98 ("moritur et ridet" - salvianus)
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To: CT

they would all die tomorrow if every new car dealer did not buy ad space.


16 posted on 04/25/2007 4:40:39 PM PDT by advertising guy (If computer skills named us, I'd be back-space delete.)
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To: CT
The Philadelphia Inquirer has said it is up 0.6% to about 352,600 in daily circulation.

Recently hired a conservative editor.

17 posted on 04/25/2007 5:30:06 PM PDT by Albion Wilde (...where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. -2 Cor 3:17)
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To: CT
What is unclear to me, if all these papers underperform so badly where is the hostile takeover crowd?

It seems people like Rush Limbaugh and Ann Coulter et.al. could form a consortium and turn the circulation numbers around immediately just by remixing the staff with fresh blood.

I'd buy shares in that venture.

Best regards,

18 posted on 04/25/2007 5:45:04 PM PDT by Copernicus (Mary Carpenter Speaks About Gun Control http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=7CCB40F421ED4819)
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To: CT

Newspapers are like nightly news—their customers are the elderly, those that grew up getting news from print and broadcast TV. That group isn’t going to get any larger. Newspapers can measure their loss in circulation by reading their own obituaries.


19 posted on 04/25/2007 6:24:40 PM PDT by randog (What the...?!)
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To: randog
Newspapers are like nightly news—their customers are the elderly, those that grew up getting news from print and broadcast TV

Respectfully disagree. Like them or not, Jon Stewart and Steven Cobert both repackaged the evening news and have influence far beyond their target audience.

Dinosaur Media refuse to repackage in any way and consequently continue to lose readers. Just look at the number of writers on the front page of Drudge that DO NOT appear in your local paper.

Ann Coulter, for example, is a proven circulation magnet. Very few outlets will swallow their pride to include her column in their venue. And yet, if advertising dollars follow circulation, they should.

Best regards,

20 posted on 04/25/2007 8:19:54 PM PDT by Copernicus (Mary Carpenter Speaks About Gun Control http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=7CCB40F421ED4819)
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To: CT

Thanks to public schools today nobody can read.


21 posted on 04/26/2007 5:29:28 AM PDT by 4Liberty (Forced charity = theft)
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To: CT

Last night during bible study, the host received a phone call solicting the LA Times. He just said “not interested” and hung up. The leader of the study mentioned that he’d gotten a similar call recently and responded, “No, thanks. I don’t have a bird.”

I can’t truthfully use the same line, but I thought it was great.


22 posted on 04/26/2007 5:33:42 AM PDT by william clark (DH4WH08 - Ecclesiastes 10:2)
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