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'Cincy Post' Staffers React to Shutdown Notice
Editor&Publisher ^ | July 17, 2007 | Joe Strupp

Posted on 07/17/2007 10:27:51 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement

NEW YORK Although Cincinnati Post staffers were expecting today's announcement that the paper would cease publication at the end of the year, several newsroom employees admitted the final blow is not easy to take.

Members of the 52-person news staff said they were not surprised at the decision by E.W. Scripps Company to fold the paper when the joint operating agreement with Gannett Co. Inc., owner of the rival Cincinnati Enquirer, expires Dec. 31. The JOA's demise had been decided three years ago when Gannett exercised an option to pull out.

"We were surprised it took this long to announce an official date," said Peggy Kreimer, a 34-year veteran reporter. "It is nice to know that at least we will not get closed down in August or October. I think it is a money-making decision. We would like to think decisions are made by the heart and not the pocketbook. But I don't think the Post can go it alone."

Tom O'Neill, a three-year employee and current education reporter, agreed: "No one is surprised at all, but still for some people the finality of it is hard. "

(Excerpt) Read more at mediainfo.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News; US: Ohio
KEYWORDS: chili; cincinnati; cincinnatichili; cincinnatipost; cincychili; deathknell; dinosaurmedia; msm; msmdeathwatch; newspapers
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The Cincinnati Post endorsed President Bush in 2004.
1 posted on 07/17/2007 10:27:52 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: abb; Milhous

Ping to you.


2 posted on 07/17/2007 10:29:18 AM PDT by ConservativeMind
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

If they have quality reporters and editors, they will quickly find new jobs in journalism. More trees are saved by this move regardless of if they were a more balanced news outfit.


3 posted on 07/17/2007 10:30:12 AM PDT by MovementConservative (Terminate the Duke 88)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

I lived in The Queen City for 4 years and loved it. “I’ll have a 4-way please.” Always enjoyed reading the Post...I remember how amazed I was—coming from NYC—that a newspaper could actually be REPUBLICAN!


4 posted on 07/17/2007 10:34:52 AM PDT by Pharmboy ([She turned me into a] Newt! in '08)
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To: Pharmboy

3-way for me....YUM!


5 posted on 07/17/2007 10:35:38 AM PDT by Suzy Quzy (Hillary in '08.....Her PHONINESS is GENUINE !!!!)
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To: MovementConservative
When the last printed page is shipped out the door, maybe the furloughed scribblers will come to realize nobody wants to pay money just to read lame liberal claptrap fronting itself as news.
6 posted on 07/17/2007 10:37:52 AM PDT by Weeedley
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To: Pharmboy
I was there last summer. You made me hungry.

Here:

http://www.skylinechili.com/signature.php

7 posted on 07/17/2007 10:38:38 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: Suzy Quzy
Cincy - the only place you can ask the cops where you can get a good three way cheaply. (well, maybe San Fran also)
8 posted on 07/17/2007 10:38:58 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (May the heirs of Charles Martel and Jan Sobieski rise up again to defend Europe.)
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To: Pharmboy

4 way, beans, dry. 2 skyliners, loaded, please.


9 posted on 07/17/2007 10:40:45 AM PDT by Bosco (Remember how you felt on September 11?)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
We would like to think decisions are made by the heart and not the pocketbook.

It's not surprising that journalists confuse their personal life with business.

10 posted on 07/17/2007 10:42:13 AM PDT by wideawake
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
We would like to think decisions are made by the heart and not the pocketbook.

Operate your love life that way if you want to but not a business.

11 posted on 07/17/2007 10:47:16 AM PDT by Graybeard58 (Remember and pray for SSgt. Matt Maupin - MIA/POW- Iraq since 04/09/04)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan; Suzy Quzy

Whenever I fly and need to do a stopover in St Loo or Dallas or wherever, I always try and go through Cinti airport instead so I can get a chili. People I travel with think I’m nuts...until they taste the chili.


12 posted on 07/17/2007 10:48:43 AM PDT by Pharmboy ([She turned me into a] Newt! in '08)
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To: KarlInOhio

LOL!! NEVER ask for a 3-way in San Francisco!!


13 posted on 07/17/2007 10:49:49 AM PDT by Pharmboy ([She turned me into a] Newt! in '08)
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To: Pharmboy
“I’ll have a 4-way please.”

Huh? Do tell.

14 posted on 07/17/2007 10:51:42 AM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

What is a JOA. Also what is a three way.


15 posted on 07/17/2007 10:51:42 AM PDT by bilhosty
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To: bilhosty

JOA = Joint Operating Agreement (between the two newspapers in this case).

The other reference is to Cincinnati’s tremendous chili (a link is posted up above somewhere).


16 posted on 07/17/2007 10:54:05 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: 04-Bravo; aimhigh; andyandval; Arizona Carolyn; backhoe; Bahbah; bert; bilhosty; Caipirabob; ...

Pinging with Tuesday afternoon Good News!


17 posted on 07/17/2007 10:57:03 AM PDT by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
"We would like to think decisions are made by the heart and not the pocketbook."

I was laid off by a company after 21 years with them. If my boss had told me he made his decision based on the heart I'd have kicked him in the sweet spot! I could understand it being a business decision.


18 posted on 07/17/2007 10:57:23 AM PDT by sinclair (If government provided corn cobs instead of Charmin there'd be less incentive to be on the dole.)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

I grew up in Cincinnati, lived there until I was 23. It was a super place to grow up in the 40’s and 50’s. I remember the Cincinnati Post as a staple in our household and all the relatives too. I hate to see it go, even though I haven’t been there to read it in many many years. Guess I don’t like change like that. Some things should go on forever. : ) Sigh.


19 posted on 07/17/2007 11:01:43 AM PDT by Frwy (Proud member of the vast right wing conspiracy.)
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To: bilhosty

Cincinnati style chili is a watery concoction of ground beef, cinnamon, chocolate and other spices. It was developed by Greek immigrants. It can be had with chili, spaghetti, beans, onions, and cheese (a five way). Topped off with hot sauce that will eat the tarnish off of a penny. It popular with regular folks across the region...


20 posted on 07/17/2007 11:04:12 AM PDT by chadwimc (Proud to be an infidel ! Allah fubar !!!)
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To: Pharmboy

Skyline Chili isn’t just for Cincy any more. It’s in Dayton, and Columbus I know for certain. It was in Pickerington, where I just moved from. I know I’ve seen it other places too.


21 posted on 07/17/2007 11:05:31 AM PDT by Frwy (Proud member of the vast right wing conspiracy.)
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To: All

But the trees get to live...

22 posted on 07/17/2007 11:12:09 AM PDT by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: abb

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070717/EDIT/707170341/1001

A turning point for all of us

Column by Post editor Mike Philipps

• The Post to say farewell Dec. 31

It was a different world in September of 1977 when Bill Keating at the Enquirer and Ed Estlow at Scripps put their signatures to a document that virtually guaranteed two newspapers would compete in Cincinnati for at least 30 years.

With this agreement, The Post hoped to survive; the Enquirer hoped to lure more advertisers by putting their ads in two newspapers for one price; both papers hoped to make some money, and the community hoped to enjoy competing teams of reporters. It worked, for a while.

But times have changed and continuation of the arrangement that has seen The Post’s advertising, circulation and printing handled by the Enquirer no longer makes sense to the Enquirer and will end on Dec. 31.

Nor can The Post go on alone.

To understand why, we need to look back at the world in 1977.

In that world, three major networks fought one another to bring their version of what was most important into our homes. We watched because there wasn’t much choice.

• Comment on the Post and its impending closing

Telephones were tethered to the wall by wires and choice was not a word at all understood by phone companies.

If you wanted to buy a car, rent an apartment, find a job, move into a new home there was one place to go ... the classified section of your daily newspaper.

In January 1977, 80 million persons participated in a shared experience ... the broadcast of the miniseries “Roots.” We were a country which shared experiences because that’s the way our media worked.

Microsoft was a small company with sales totaling just under $382,000 for the year.

Smart as they were, Keating and Scripps could not on that day imagine the nature of the competition their two newspapers would face nearly 30 years later.

Today, cable TV firms advertise more than 300 channels. Satellite TV providers tout more than 250. Satellite radio? 130.

A generation has grown up not just with wireless telephones ... but with wireless phones which deliver a breathtaking selection of news, entertainment, information and, yes, advertising.

Choice is everywhere. Media, instead of drawing us together, split us into smaller and smaller slices, indulging our individual interests, instead of our collective interests.

For an industry that built more than 100 years of success on delivering masses of readers to individual advertisers, this is a world turned upside down. A world that at its core remains rooted in 19th century technology of ink on paper.

Meanwhile, Microsoft revenues have grown to an expected $51 billion this year, most of it from technologies which are challenging the old newspaper model in a dozen different ways.

These are difficult times for even healthy newspapers. It is not a time to invest in starting virtually from scratch what would amount to a new newspaper.

Count me among those who believe there will be a day when communities see the value of local news, professionally gathered and delivered, perhaps even on paper.

I do not think it inevitable that newspapers will go away, but even if I am wrong, I think communities will somehow re-invent them or something to take their places.

Today we are in the throes of a great struggle to discover a new model for local journalism. Can the Internet produce the kinds of revenue needed to support a professional newsroom? What will be the role of the gifted amateur in producing the newspaper of the future? What technological breakthrough looms just around the corner?

Timing, of course, is everything. Had Keating and Estlow picked 40 years instead of 30, we might have a few more years to find answers to those questions and be in a position to soldier on. But the reality is that today we are not.

There will be lots of time in the coming months to reflect on the role of The Post over 126 years. And I am confident many of you will weigh in with your opinions on what might have been had we just done this or done that.

But the reality is this: Our time has come ... and gone. Because Keating and Scripps were smart, we got a 30-year reprieve from the fate that awaited first evening newspapers and now, I fear, our morning brethren.

I wish things were different. I wish the world was more agreeable to the profession I have invested more than 35 years trying to master.

I wish young people read more. I wish advertisers realized the value of an product with ads that can’t be filtered out. But, as Napoleon observed, and Donald Rumsfeld famously cribbed, “We must take things as we find them, and not as we might wish them to be.”

Mike Philipps is editor of The Post.


23 posted on 07/17/2007 11:14:28 AM PDT by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: abb

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/artikkel?Dato=20070717&Kategori=BIZ&Lopenr=707170339&Ref=AR&Show=0&template=printpicart

The Post to say farewell Dec. 31
Owner Scripps cites market pressures, changes in announcing newspaper’s end after 126 years

By Kerry Duke
Post staff reporter

BOB DICKERSON/The Post

Assistant news editor John Seney works on the front page of today’s edition of The Post in the newsroom.

RELATED STORIES
• A turning point for all of us
• 126 years of lighting the way for betterment

Post file photo

Two icons of The Post’s past, Scripps Howard columnist Ernie Pyle, left, and Post columnist, Al Segal, whose byline was Cincinnatus, together in the newsroom.

BOB DICKERSON/The Post

Pressman Gary Patterson checks the ink on the early edition of Tuesday’s Cincinnati Post. The Post shares its printing facility with the Cincinnati Enquirer under a joint operatring agreement that expires Dec. 31. The Post’s owner, E.W. Scripps, said Tuesday the paper would then be closed.

The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post - afternoon daily newspapers serving Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky for more than a century - will cease publication on Dec. 31, 2007, the newspaper’s owners announced today.

The last edition of the newspapers, owned by Cincinnati-based E.W. Scripps Co., will be published on that Monday, New Year’s Eve.

The decision by Scripps to cease publication comes three years after the company was notified by the Gannett Co., owner of the Cincinnati Enquirer, that the 30-year contractual agreement under which the Enquirer handles business operations for The Post would not be renewed when it expired at the end of this year. Under that agreement, advertising and subscription sales, production and distribution were handled for The Post newspapers by the Enquirer, but the news operations and the editorial pages were separate and competed with each other.

“It is always a difficult decision to cease publication of a newspaper, especially two with such fine traditions of journalistic excellence and community service as The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post,” said Rich Boehne, chief operating officer for Scripps and a former Post staff member.

Since receiving notification from Gannett that the joint operating agreement would not be renewed, Boehne said Scripps had explored options for The Post’s future. A company official said those included continued publication, turning the paper into a free distribution newspaper and even becoming an Internet-only news site. However, because Scripps does not employ advertising and circulation staffs or other production and business employees locally and does not own any newspaper printing facilities in Greater Cincinnati, continued publication would have been too costly to pursue.

“After careful analysis and weighing several alternatives for the future of The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post, it’s apparent to us that it would not be feasible to continue publishing the newspapers after the end of the joint operating agreement,” Boehne said. “The investment that would be needed to continue publishing a daily newspaper that could successfully compete in a marketplace with so many media alternatives would be prohibitive.”

Other options were ruled out for similar reasons - too great a start-up cost and giant and rapid shifts in media consumption.

The decision brings to an end the two Post newspapers that carried the imprint of E.W. Scripps, who built a chain of papers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries that comprised the heart of what today is a media enterprise with interests in national cable networks, newspaper publishing, broadcast television stations, interactive media and licensing and syndication.

It also brings to an end newspapers that were champions of civic reform and unafraid to take up a cause. The Cincinnati Post took the lead in ending the notorious Cox political machine that ran the city into the early part of the 20th century and championed the city manager form of government. The Kentucky Post backed reform movements that brought an end to Newport’s “sin city” regime in the late 1950s and led an award-winning crusade to clean up the Licking River. Both newspapers have advanced the cause of education, with The Kentucky Post advocating for school reform and successfully campaigning for an overhaul of state laws that have made Kentucky a model for education reform throughout the nation.

“For decades I think the Post has served a very important role in providing news coverage for our entire region,” said Steve Stevens, president of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. “I really think that the people of this region should count themselves quite lucky, in that a market this small has been able to support two daily newspapers (The Post and Enquirer) for that period of time. That’s saying something when you can look back and say we were covered better than the majority of communities our size with these two papers.”

• Comment on the Post and its impending closing

Stevens said the community will lose an important editorial voice, as well, that has been part of a dialogue that makes the community a better place.

“I think dialogue is always so important to us in terms of helping us solve problems and consider angles and solutions. Opinions are what we like to value. This chamber succeeds because we have the opinions of many members and also of many engaged people who are out there talking to us about the issues we ought to be talking about and working on,” Stevens said. “The editorial voice in the newspaper is similar to that in terms of saying, ‘Hey, community, wake up. We might be missing something here. Maybe we ought to be diving into this issue a little deeper or we’re forgetting about these possibilities.’”

Ellen van der Horst, president of Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, said the closing of The Post will leave a void.

“The Cincinnati Post has enjoyed a grand tradition of journalistic excellence, lively writing and brilliant photography, and will be missed,” said van der Horst. “Cincinnati without The Post on a week day or Saturday afternoon is like Cincinnati without its chili. The Post gave Cincinnati a flavor all its own, and its voice throughout the years has been critical in shaping our region’s future.”

A.J. Schaeffer, a lawyer and chairman of a group that is striving to implement the long-range plans for Northern Kentucky put forth by Vision 2015, the community-wide effort to set goals and map plans for the region’s future, said he was saddened to hear of the demise of The Post.

“I have long admired The Post for its reporting and the integrity of the organization. They brought an important perspective to the community that I think will be missed here in Northern Kentucky,” Schaeffer said.

Schaeffer said not only will the news coverage of the region be missed but also the separate editorial voice that the newspaper provided.

“It’s an intimate connection to the community that The Post has that we will lose. That intimacy, that connectedness with folks on the ground throughout the community, is an important factor in the kind of reporting The Post has done over the years,” he said. “It’s been a hallmark.”

The decision to cease publication of the newspaper was not a great surprise. The notification in 2004 by Gannett that it did not intend to renew the 30-year joint operating agreement, continuing declines in circulation of most afternoon newspapers and the increased competitiveness of other media - television, cable, radio, niche publications and the Internet - conspired against a decision to continue publishing.

Paid circulation of The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post when the joint operating agreement was formed stood at about 188,000. By March 2007 - 30 years later - the combined circulation of the two newspapers stood at about 27,000, Monday through Friday, and 37,000 on Saturday. The afternoon editions of The Post newspapers reach only about 4 percent of the occupied households in Greater Cincinnati, down dramatically from their peak in the pre-television era, Scripps reported.

However, the circulation declines at The Kentucky Post were not as precipitous. The newspaper circulated more than 30,000 editions scarcely a decade ago and reached some 30 percent of households in some areas of Northern Kentucky.

“If The Post had a future, I always believed it might be in Northern Kentucky,” said Mike Philipps, who became editor of both newspapers in 2001.

Still, the trends of declining circulation and changing reader habits continued to sap not just The Post but also most afternoon newspapers. At the end of 2006, there were 614 afternoon newspapers in the United States, compared with 1,450 at the end of 1950.

The joint operating agreement, allowed under the Newspaper Preservation Act of 1970, gave The Post newspapers a 30-year lease on life. This federal law grants limited anti-trust exemption - essentially allowing partners to pool resources - in the interest of preserving independent editorial voices in communities threatened with the financial failure of one or more of their newspapers. The agreement has been profitable for Scripps. The company takes in 20 percent to 25 percent of the earnings generated through the joint operating agreement. That amounted to $20.8 million in 2006, $23.5 million in 2005 and $23.1 million in 2004, according to the company. Out of those annual amounts, the company pays the expenses of operating the newspapers’ newsroom. In 2005, the Cincinnati newspapers contributed $15.4 million in profit to Scripps after paying those expenses.

“There’s been a lot of great journalism and service to this community since the joint operating agreement was signed,” Scripps executive Boehne said,” but those who created it 30 years ago understood the reality of the media marketplace. The fact is, throughout the duration of the agreement, media consumers in Greater Cincinnati have been increasingly choosing other alternatives for news and information over their afternoon newspapers.”

Scripps owns two of those alternative media in the region: WCPO-TV (Channel 9) and its Web site, WCPO.com.

“In many ways, our predecessors at Scripps had the foresight to recognize early on that the habits of media consumers were changing in an increasingly electronic age,” Boehne said. “The wisdom of getting into broadcast television as it emerged 60 years ago is poignantly evident given the trends that inevitably led to the difficult decision that we’ve been forced to make today.”

During the years of the joint operating agreement, The Post has continued to focus on local news and provide a clear editorial voice on local issues.

“I’ve always thought of The Post as kind of a surrogate town square, a place for readers to hang out and be informed and entertained and frightened and fascinated all at the same time,” said Philipps. “We’ve tried to have some fun, do a little bit of good and maybe shed a bit of light in the dark corners here and there. But what we’ve tried to be most of all is part of our community. And I like to think our community has been a better place with The Post in it.”

Mark Contreras, senior vice president/newspapers for Scripps, praised Philipps and the newsroom staff of The Post for their commitment to journalistic excellence and for providing the newspapers’ readers with a consistently solid daily news report despite the challenging circulation and readership trends.

“Mike Philipps and the entire staff of The Post are true professionals in every sense of the word,” Contreras said. “They’ve never lost sight of the responsibility they have to their readers to publish a newspaper that’s credible, highly informative and striving to make a difference in its community. The Post has accomplished much over the years, thanks to their efforts.”

“I just really want to take my hat off to both Mike and the entire staff for working through the last couple of years in particular. It’s not an easy set of circumstances that you work with. I have never seen this kind of esprit de corps with a staff that size in the circumstances that you are in É in a two-newspaper town,” he said.

Post employees were informed of the decision at a staff meeting today in The Post newsroom and through phone calls from managers. The decision to cease publication of the newspapers will affect 52 full-time newsroom employees, who will be offered severance packages, including outplacement services and three months of paid medical benefits. Scripps took a $1.8 million pre-tax charge for the fourth quarter of 2003 to reflect the expected severance costs to Post employees in the event of closure of the newspapers at the end of 2007.

Scripps took steps to reduce the number of editorial employees at The Post newspapers from 84 in 2004 through attrition and a series of early retirement offers to eligible employees. The intent, according to the company, was to minimize the number of employees affected if closing the newspapers became necessary.

Between now and the end of the year, there will be no changes in efforts by The Post to offer the best news coverage and insight into the communities the newspapers cover.

“We’ll continue to go out and find the news just like we have for 126 years,” said Philipps. “We still have an important role in the community. We still have acres of newsprint. We still have an aggressive staff.”

Circulation numbers

Paid circulation figures for The Post and Enquirer for the last 30 years, when the papers were published under a joint operating agreement which expires Dec. 31.

Post Enquirer
Year Mon-Fri Mon-Sat Sunday

2006 28,549 197,962 288,030
2005 32,204 189,210 289,933
2004 36,990 183,051 301,126
2003 42,219 182,176 306,093
2002 46,061 189,084 308,797
2001 49,779 188,173 307,990
2000 55,807 195,360 311,425
1999 61,288 195,744 318,915
1998 66,637 196,181 327,188
1997 72,616 194,328 329,692
1996 76,640 205,233 346,279
1995 82,146 203,158 350,979
1994 85,643 203,118 349,774
1993 95,116 201,415 354,347
1992 98,520 199,257 350,323
1991 100,912 198,475 344,615
1990 104,264 199,012 342,076
1989 107,378 196,290 337,653
1988 110,781 193,445 327,124
1987 115,092 194,251 324,561
1986 117,216 188,927 312,558
1985 125,220 189,664 307,241
1984 129,697 189,840 300,176
1983 135,585 189,763 294,343
1982 142,746 191,571 298,752
1981 146,069 188,635 291,303
1980 151,277 183,951 282,989
1979 175,896 189,842 290,492
1978 184,474 184,138 287,113
1977 190,303 190,407 291,012
1976 198,694 188,092 283,455

* Though higher than weekday sales, Saturday Weekender edition sales were not broken out for the entire period.
Source: Editor & Publisher International Yearbook


24 posted on 07/17/2007 11:18:39 AM PDT by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: abb

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070717/NEWS01/707170351

126 years of lighting the way for betterment

By Kerry Duke
Post staff reporter

RELATED STORIES
• The Post to say farewell Dec. 31

At a cost of just one penny and with an appeal to the common man that was to be its hallmark, the newspaper that was to become The Cincinnati Post began its history 126 years ago.

Nine years later, a sister publication to the afternoon newspaper, The Kentucky Post, was launched, marking what would become more than a century of two vigorous afternoon newspapers dedicated to covering their communities, exposing wrongs and lighting the way for betterment.

The first edition of Cincinnati’s new newspaper, begun by brothers Walter and Frank Wellman, was published Jan. 3, 1881, a scrappy competitor up against 12 dailies (seven in English and five in German) already established in the city.

The Penny Paper, as the brothers named it, soon ran into trouble. The few hundred dollars they had between them to finance the enterprise was depleted and the newspaper was on the verge of collapse, George Edward Stevens wrote in his book “A History of The Cincinnati Post.”

The brothers turned to James E. Scripps, who, with his half-brother Edward Wyllis Scripps, had begun a string of “people’s papers” in the Midwest and had inspired the Wellmans to try the same in Cincinnati. Scripps stepped in with financing and ultimately gained control of the newspaper. In 1881, he put E.W. Scripps in charge of the paper for 10 percent of its stock.

The name of the growing afternoon daily was changed to the Penny Post on Jan. 1, 1883 - the same year in which E.W. Scripps gained controlling interest of it. The newspaper emphasized local news, took on the political boss system that controlled the city at the time and rapidly grew in circulation. It was renamed the Evening Post on Oct. 11, 1883, and became The Cincinnati Post on Sept. 2, 1890 - the same year E.W. Scripps launched The Kentucky Post. That sister newspaper was printed by The Cincinnati Post for 89 years until a contractual agreement with the Cincinnati Enquirer shifted printing responsibilities for both newspapers to the Enquirer.

In just seven years after its founding, the newspaper had taken over circulation leadership in Cincinnati, led in local advertising and gained influence to match its prosperity.

The newspaper continued to campaign for reform and to challenge political bosses as E.W. Scripps gained control of the family business in the 1890s and added newspapers to his chain. George B. Cox, who ran city hall, was the chief focus of the newspaper’s reporting as it exposed graft and corruption and urged municipal reform in its editorial columns.

Those earlier sorties foreshadowed campaigns to come. Throughout its history, The Post sought to expose and address shortcomings in governments, injustice and unfairness.

In 1924, its long campaign for better government finally bore fruit when voters overwhelmingly adopted a city-manager form of government under a new charter. The Post championed the reforms. In addition to Post news coverage of the critical problems of one-party rule and its editorials urging reform, Post columnist Al Segal, one of Cincinnati’s most renowned journalists, wrote a Page One column titled “Cincinnatus” for decades, in which he advocated for better government and fought for justice and humanity.

In the 1960s, the newspaper succeeded in its push to overhaul Ohio’s driving laws to make them tougher on drunken drivers and those with poor records. It returned to that theme in the 1980s with an examination of repeat drunken driving offenders and a look at the leniency offenders received in mayor’s courts. In 1990, The Post uncovered a tax-break scandal in which then-Hamilton County Auditor Joseph L. DeCourcy Jr. approved illegal property tax reductions totaling more than $1.4 million for friends and well-connected individuals. The DeCourcy stories broke the Republican Party’s two-decade stranglehold on non-judicial offices in Hamilton County and led to a revamping of property-tax procedures. After the 2001 riots in Cincinnati, The Post examined the root causes and assessed the efforts toward change. All along the newspaper has promoted major reforms to improve public education and has been a leader in redevelopment of the city’s downtown and riverfront.

Across the river, The Kentucky Post fought for an end to tolls on the Ohio and Licking river bridges in the early part of the 20th century, successfully pushed for city-manager governments in Covington and Newport and helped save Cumberland Falls. The Kentucky Post backed reform movements that brought an end to Newport’s “sin city” regime in the late 1950s and promoted efforts to make Boone County the site of Cincinnati’s regional airport - an economic engine for the entire region. In the 1980s, The Kentucky Post chronicled life on Banklick Street, one of Covington’s grittiest and poorest, and examined the city’s slumlords. It pointed up the commonwealth’s shameful neglect of public education and championed Kentucky’s 1990 education reform that became a national model.

In 1958, The Cincinnati Post purchased the afternoon Times-Star and operated as The Cincinnati Post and Times-Star until 1974, when Times-Star disappeared from the masthead. The purchase gave The Post circulation an immediate boost, ensuring its place as Cincinnati’s largest daily. But new competition from television and changing lifestyles and reader habits already were beginning to sap afternoon newspapers and send more and more readers to morning editions.

Circulation eroded through the 1970s. In 1960, circulation of the newspaper stood at 270,410. By 1977, it had slid to 190,303. That year, The Post proposed a deal with the Cincinnati Enquirer designed to preserve its life. The Post had been hurt by the departure of key advertisers, leading to revenues that weren’t keeping pace with its operating costs. The newspaper lost more than $13 million from 1969 to 1979, when the agreement worked out between the newspapers went into effect and about 500 Post employees lost their jobs.

The agreement was formed under the Newspaper Preservation Act, which allows newspapers in the same city to operate as a single business entity while maintaining separate news and editorial staffs. Congress sanctioned such arrangements, commonly called joint operating agreements, in 1970 as a way to prevent metropolitan dailies from failing. It lets partners pool profits, fix advertising rates and control circulation that otherwise would not be permitted under antitrust laws.

Under the joint operating agreement, the Gannett Co.-owned Enquirer would handle all advertising, circulation and production operations for the Enquirer, The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post at its printing plant in Queensgate. Each newspaper would operate its own newsroom and would compete for news stories and provide separate editorial voices. The agreement was to extend for 30 years, expiring on Dec. 31, 2007, unless renewed or unless three years of unprofitability triggered an escape clause.

Still circulation for the afternoon newspaper declined. Ten years into the agreement, circulation had fallen to 115,092. By 1997, circulation was down to 72,616.

In 2001, The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post reduced staff by about 20 positions in an effort to cut costs. The job cuts, which amounted to about 18 percent of the paper’s work force, were blamed on a general slowdown in newspaper advertising. In 2005 and again in 2006, the afternoon newspapers again sought to reduce the size of the news staff through voluntary buyout offers.

In 2004, the Enquirer, per specifications in the joint operating agreement, notified the E.W. Scripps Co., the parent company of The Cincinnati Post and Kentucky Post, that it intended not to renew but rather let the agreement terminate when it expired. That left Scripps with a decision of whether to make a major investment to continue publication, seek a new partner, turn into an alternative publication or cease the operations altogether.

The company decided after exploring the options that both the cost and changing media habits made continuation of the two afternoon newspapers infeasible and announced its decision today.


25 posted on 07/17/2007 11:20:23 AM PDT by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: Pharmboy

I’m going thru Cinci next month and have an hour or so to kill between flights. 2 questions:

1. What’s the name of the place where they sell the chili?

2. Will I regret it on the 2nd, 2 hour, flight? : )


26 posted on 07/17/2007 11:25:35 AM PDT by radiohead
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
I used to deliver the Post when I was in Junior High.

I have mixed feelings about it now. Part of me is sad to see it go, and part of me wishes it was the liberal rag Enquirer that was going in its place.

27 posted on 07/17/2007 11:29:47 AM PDT by libs_kma (www.imwithfred.com)
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To: radiohead

As a former resident, you’ll get several answers.
1) You won’t regret it, it’s too delicious to pass up.
2) Skyline is the most numerous, but Gold Star is I think superior. There are a few smaller ones like Dixie chili which is good also. Go with Gold Star.
3) I always get the 5-way. One chain, Empress had a “six-way”, but I never found out what the sixth ingredient was.


28 posted on 07/17/2007 11:31:34 AM PDT by boop (Trunk Monkey. Is there anything he can't do?)
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To: radiohead
The name of the place is Skyline Chili.

Will you regret it on the next 2 hour flight? Not a chance. It will take you at least 3 hours to regret it. /s

Really though, It's good chili, but it won't be what some from the Southwest think of as chili.

Everytime we have guests from out of town we take them to skyline for the experience. At leat 4 out of 5 think its great and we end up putting them on our skyline chili christmas list and send them cans of it.

My Dad, who retired in Florida, makes Skyline his first stop everytime he comes back to visit.

29 posted on 07/17/2007 11:35:24 AM PDT by libs_kma (www.imwithfred.com)
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To: radiohead

There’s a food court and a Skyline (I think)—I believe it’s terminal C. And no—it’s not that kind of chili...it’s CINCINNATI chili (Texans do NOT consider it chili).


30 posted on 07/17/2007 11:44:53 AM PDT by Pharmboy ([She turned me into a] Newt! in '08)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
I'm very sad to see the Cincinnati Post go. I subscribed to both the Enquirer and the Post when I first moved to Cincinnati ten years ago, but eventually I did not have time to read both papers and now I do not get either one, except for the, Enquirer on Sundays occasionally.

RIP Cincinnati Post

31 posted on 07/17/2007 11:55:21 AM PDT by GreenLanternCorps (Thompson for President: 2008, 2012: Jindal for President 2016, 2020)
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To: boop

Dixie for sure offers GARLIC as the 6th. Now that will certainly make for more elbow room in your cramped seat. However that may not be the only thing cramped.

BTW many will try the chili and think what is so special about it. But one day, maybe in a week or a month out of the blue the craving will hit you.

Try Camp Washington Chili, Price Hill Chili, Empress (the original), Dixie, Goldstar, and the King of them all Skyline. All have their own character. Personally I like Dixie, but that’s the Ky. side.


32 posted on 07/17/2007 12:17:34 PM PDT by bleach
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To: bilhosty

three-way....Cinti chile, cheese and onion.....4 way is all that plus beans.


33 posted on 07/17/2007 1:00:18 PM PDT by Suzy Quzy (Hillary in '08.....Her PHONINESS is GENUINE !!!!)
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To: Frwy

Skyline Chili WAS in Ft. Lauderdale.


34 posted on 07/17/2007 1:01:22 PM PDT by Suzy Quzy (Hillary in '08.....Her PHONINESS is GENUINE !!!!)
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To: radiohead

SKYLINE.....Cinti Chili is a pale substitute.


35 posted on 07/17/2007 1:03:06 PM PDT by Suzy Quzy (Hillary in '08.....Her PHONINESS is GENUINE !!!!)
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To: abb


I see dead dinomediasaurs ... everywhere.
36 posted on 07/17/2007 1:50:17 PM PDT by Milhous (There are only two ways of telling the complete truth: anonymously and posthumously. - Thomas Sowell)
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To: abb
By March 2007 - 30 years later - the combined circulation of the two newspapers stood at about 27,000, Monday through Friday, and 37,000 on Saturday.

Wow. This is amazingly low for an area the size of Cincinnati. I'm surprised Scripps has made any money at all from the Post the last few years.

37 posted on 07/17/2007 3:24:59 PM PDT by Dont Mention the War (My voting record: Rudy '89, Rudy '93, Rudy '97, Rudy '08. (Why not piss off BOTH sides?))
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To: Pharmboy
....Ah Yes! :D
....A three-way (Lg. in a bowl/w lotta oyster crackers. :) and 3 Coneys
.....Life is good. :D
38 posted on 07/17/2007 4:09:57 PM PDT by skinkinthegrass ( just b/c, you suffer from paranoia, doesn't mean they're not out to get you....Run, Fred, Run :^)
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To: Pharmboy

Ya got that right.


39 posted on 07/17/2007 4:21:17 PM PDT by Marysecretary (GOD IS STILL IN CONTROL.)
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To: bleach

I used to live right around the corner from the camp washington chili. I liked its chili the best, but I hated the thick udon-style noodles they served with it. Hmmmm... I’ll have to try that “six-way” with garlic. I guess I just assumed it was a dollop of sour cream for the #6.


40 posted on 07/17/2007 4:32:23 PM PDT by boop (Trunk Monkey. Is there anything he can't do?)
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To: Puppage; All
EVERYONE should have Cincinnati chili before they meet their maker...Scroll down the site to see the definitions of the number types...When I lived there we had Queen City and Skyline Chili...I used to bring it frozen to NYC when I came back for Christmas.
41 posted on 07/17/2007 5:47:01 PM PDT by Pharmboy ([She turned me into a] Newt! in '08)
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To: Frwy

Some of my friends tell me they have even seen Cincy Chili in Supermarkets!


42 posted on 07/17/2007 5:49:40 PM PDT by Pharmboy ([She turned me into a] Newt! in '08)
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To: Weeedley

???


43 posted on 07/17/2007 5:50:15 PM PDT by Gondring (I'll give up my right to die when hell freezes over my dead body!)
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To: Milhous

And so the FR Ostrich Brigade marches on, insisting that it’s liberalism that kills newspapers, and not illiterate America.


44 posted on 07/17/2007 5:51:46 PM PDT by Gondring (I'll give up my right to die when hell freezes over my dead body!)
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To: MovementConservative
If they have quality reporters and editors, they will quickly find new jobs in journalism.

Doubtful.

45 posted on 07/17/2007 5:53:31 PM PDT by Gondring (I'll give up my right to die when hell freezes over my dead body!)
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To: Gondring
Blame Inet "heterarchies"1 instead of American illiteracy for killing the newspaper.
In a survey last year, the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press found only 23 percent of people under 30 read a daily newspaper, compared with 60 percent of older people.

The number of people going online for news, or getting their fix from cable television, was growing, the survey found, a trend that was also hitting traditional television network news.

Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch citing research that 44 percent of people in the 18- to 34-year-old group use an Internet portal daily, while only 19 percent of them open a newspaper.

the most cynical news baron could not dismiss the way that ever more young people are getting their news online. Britons aged between 15 and 24 say they spend almost 30% less time reading national newspapers once they start using the web.

[1] A "heterarchy" is a system in which each individual rules his own domain. In contrast to a hierarchy ruled from the top, a heterarchy is a society of equals under the law.
46 posted on 07/17/2007 7:00:41 PM PDT by Milhous (There are only two ways of telling the complete truth: anonymously and posthumously. - Thomas Sowell)
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To: Pharmboy

Thanks for the link.


47 posted on 07/17/2007 7:10:01 PM PDT by HoosierHawk (No American soldier has ever lost a war, but plenty of U.S. politicians have.)
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To: Suzy Quzy

I passed a Skyline in Ft Looterdale on Federal Hwy a few weeks ago and could not believe my eyes! I was going to meet someone for dinner a mile or so south, otherwise I would have made a U-turn and had a 4-way.


48 posted on 07/17/2007 7:17:12 PM PDT by Pharmboy ([She turned me into a] Newt! in '08)
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To: libs_kma
“Really though, It’s good chili, but it won’t be what some from the Southwest think of as chili.”

True; it’s not what we call “chili,” but it’s very much like another Mexican dish - mole. I’ve always wondered whether there was a connection.

49 posted on 07/17/2007 7:27:47 PM PDT by decal (Sign over DNC headquarters: Please Check Common Sense And Morals At The Door)
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To: Pharmboy

It’s still THERE????? OMG....it was there when I lived at Inverrary in 1980 I think!!


50 posted on 07/17/2007 7:51:16 PM PDT by Suzy Quzy (Hillary in '08.....Her PHONINESS is GENUINE !!!!)
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