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Bobby Jindal's Response: Full Text
Hawaii Free Press ^ | 2-24-09 | Governor Bobby Jindal

Posted on 02/24/2009 9:05:11 PM PST by AndrewWalden

Jindal:

As I grew up, my mom and dad taught me the values that attracted them to this country -- and they instilled in me an immigrant's wonder at the greatness of America. As a child, I remember going to the grocery store with my dad. Growing up in India, he had seen extreme poverty. And as we walked through the aisles, looking at the endless variety on the shelves, he would tell me: 'Bobby, Americans can do anything.'

Obama:

...Dillon, South Carolina - a place where the ceilings leak, the paint peels off the walls, and they have to stop teaching six times a day because the train barrels by their classroom. She has been told that her school is hopeless, but the other day after class she went to the public library and typed up a letter to the people sitting in this room. She even asked her principal for the money to buy a stamp. The letter asks us for help...

(Excerpt) Read more at hawaiifreepress.com ...


TOPICS: Breaking News; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; US: Louisiana; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: 111th; bho44; bhospeech; bobbyjindal; conservatives4obama; gopresponse; iraq; jindal; obama; stimulus; transcript
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Obama's Full Text is HERE: http://www.hawaiifreepress.com/main/ArticlesMain/tabid/56/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/460/Pres-Obama-address-to-Congress.aspx
1 posted on 02/24/2009 9:05:12 PM PST by AndrewWalden
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Comment #2 Removed by Moderator

To: AndrewWalden

Thanks for posting the link to the full text of Jindal’s speech. It is a good read.


3 posted on 02/24/2009 9:14:40 PM PST by jennyjenny
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To: jennyjenny

I think you hit the salient point: Jindal’s speech reads well, bu he did a poor job delivering it.

Admittedly, anyone delivering the “opposition response” has their work cut out for them; the hallway of a governor’s mansion is no substitute for the House Chamber and all the trappings of the presidency.

Still, I was disappointed in Jindal’s performance. His sing-song delivery sounded like someone who just graduated from the Columbia School of Broadcasting and is trying to avoid a monotone at all costs.

I actually heard Jindal’s speech on both radio and TV. I was in my car when he started and watched the rest on television, after I got home. It was slightly better on television, but he’s got a long way to go in terms of delivery and style. Sadly, those points count for a lot in today’s political environment.

Clearly, someone in the GOP establishment didn’t bother to “screen” Jindal’s speech skills before tonight’s performance. Instead, we gave the Dims a talking point. All the press covearge will be geared to how “poorly” Jindal performed on the national stage, with no regard for what he actually said.

And that’s a damn shame. I’ve seen Jindal in other TV forums (Meet the Press, addressing his state during hurricane emergencies) and he did just fine. And I still believe he would clean the Annointed One’s clock in a debate. But tonight was not his finest hour.


4 posted on 02/24/2009 9:26:35 PM PST by ExNewsExSpook
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To: ExNewsExSpook

Au contraire. I watched on FOX and the audio was atrocious, but at least Bobby looked us in the eye; something that the MasterOratorBator never did.

Yes, he has a Loosiana accent which doesn’t quite qo with his Indian IT nerd face, but I thought the delivery was great.


5 posted on 02/24/2009 9:29:29 PM PST by PhilosopherStones
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To: PhilosopherStones

I thought everything sucked. From the faux presidential entrance to his nervous start to his weird smile to his Mr Rogers cadance to his hand moves. It was a disaster.

I could not believe this was the cool calm Jindal I waytcged tear up Gregory on MTP a couple days back. It was ugly.

Palin is smiling tonight.


6 posted on 02/24/2009 9:49:25 PM PST by nhwingut (,)
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To: AndrewWalden

“...Dillon, South Carolina - a place where the ceilings leak, the paint peels off the walls, and they have to stop teaching six times a day because the train barrels by their classroom. She has been told that her school is hopeless, but the other day after class she went to the public library and typed up a letter to the people sitting in this room. She even asked her principal for the money to buy a stamp. The letter asks us for help...”

Even inner city kids have over $10,000 a year spent on their education.

WE SPEND $100,000 TO EDUCATE THE AVERAGE CHILD IN AMERICA TO GRADE 12, AND WE HAVE TO LISTEN TO THIS GARBAGE?


7 posted on 02/24/2009 9:52:36 PM PST by WOSG (tagline is now unemployed due to Obama economy)
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To: PhilosopherStones

What a missed opportunity for capitalism and freedom. Bobby Jindal will never be president. Ain’t gonna happen. Nope.


8 posted on 02/24/2009 9:53:35 PM PST by shempy (BOYCOTT GM & CHRYSLER - support American VALUES!)
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To: PhilosopherStones

Until we are honest about our weaknesses (and strengths) we will never gain the majority.

Jindal was a train wreck.

Unless, we move along and bring forth the ideas and policies that make the party great, we will be the minority for decades.

We can’t afford to just support someone cuz they’re ‘our guy or gal’

It’s time to fight fire with fire.


9 posted on 02/24/2009 9:54:37 PM PST by rightreb (Lib setup?)
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To: ExNewsExSpook

BFD, we have socialism to fight and there is a lot bigger thiings to worry about. JMHO.

Jindal’s a great Governor, and I am sure a bad Jindhal speech is more conservative and better than any speech McCain made, and no worse than all the other forgettable ‘response’ speeches that nobody watches.


10 posted on 02/24/2009 9:56:08 PM PST by WOSG (tagline is now unemployed due to Obama economy)
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To: jennyjenny

Really saddens me to read some of the downright NASTY FR swipes at Jindahl! Guess you prefer the teleprompter reading skills of the kenyan?!

Perhaps consillatory McCain will run in 2012 ;(

BTW, kenyan did not fool Wall Street as DOW futures are DOWWWWN,.


11 posted on 02/24/2009 9:59:37 PM PST by bushwon
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To: WOSG

I disagree, but Jindal has plenty of time to get better, and I concur with your point—he’s still a better than McCain.

However, the GOP should have done a better job in preparing him for tonight’s speech. When your delivery’s off, it doesn’t matter what you say; people start focusing on the mechanics and not the message. Watching the speech, I wondered how many times Governor Jindal has used a teleprompter before. How ironic; our guy comes across poorly when reading a speech off the ‘prompter, while the POTUS can’t get by without one.


12 posted on 02/24/2009 10:09:46 PM PST by ExNewsExSpook
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To: nhwingut

People keep bashing his delivery. Come on, we are not obamabots we don’t care about how it was said, we care about what was said. ie. Did you have a problem with the content of what Jindal said?


13 posted on 02/24/2009 10:16:27 PM PST by lnzog (I'm from Illinois and I apologize.)
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To: AndrewWalden

Was he delivering a major speech to America or reading a children’s bedtime story?


14 posted on 02/24/2009 10:20:32 PM PST by stainlessbanner
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To: ExNewsExSpook; All

I didn’t have too much of a problem with the overall speech, but as a recipient of the Catastrophism Ping List here at FR, I was a little distressed at his putting down the money for volcano monitoring. He is very aware of the New Orleans environmental risk, but obviously has no idea what the volcano risks are in this country.

The former residents of the Tootle Valley could tell him a thing or two about volcanic flooding when Mt. St. Helens erupted, only killing between 50 and 100 people. It would have been more, but fortunately it blew before the public got tired of listening to the warnings of the volcano experts. The Armaro lahar in South America killed 23,000 people in a few minutes. We have valleys in our own country that could be equally devastated if a volcano erupted suddently. Signs of old lahars are more than 50 miles long in valleys of the Cascade volcanos. Yellowstone has been acting up a bit in recent months.

When Mt. Pinitubo blew and destroyed our major air base in the Philippines, the volcanologists had a major problem getting enough equipment to adequately monitor the volcano as it was ramping up. They had to borrow from our American monitoring areas leaving them underwatched. One seventh of the world’s population is at risk from volcanos, about the same as those at risk from wind storms, like New Orleans population.


15 posted on 02/24/2009 10:24:59 PM PST by gleeaikin
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To: rightreb

Can you now say either S-A-N-F-O-R-D or ROMNEY


16 posted on 02/24/2009 10:30:43 PM PST by GerardKempf (Let's Get Over This)
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To: AndrewWalden

I liked his bringing up of his backgroun “up-bringing” (as a son of immigrant parents) as a response to Obama’s propaganda.


17 posted on 02/24/2009 10:32:08 PM PST by PRePublic
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To: AndrewWalden
Loved Governor Jindal’s speech, thought he did a great job. From the governor's speech:

“In the end, it comes down to an honest and fundamental disagreement about the proper role of government. We oppose the National Democrats’ view that says — the way to strengthen our country is to increase dependence on government. We believe the way to strengthen our country is to restrain spending in Washington, and empower individuals and small businesses to grow our economy and create jobs.”

18 posted on 02/24/2009 10:32:26 PM PST by InterestedQuestioner (Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you and your household will be saved.)
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To: rightreb
I'm glad to see your response to the speech. As for me, I couldn't help but think that we would be in much better shape right now if Governor Jindal was our president. Bobby is sharp and competent. That's in sharp contrast to our current president.
19 posted on 02/24/2009 10:37:51 PM PST by InterestedQuestioner (Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you and your household will be saved.)
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To: gleeaikin

I was taken aback by that as well.. being as the entire SW is potential volcano country and if Yellowstone blows, for instance, we are all toast out here.


20 posted on 02/24/2009 10:43:30 PM PST by Arizona Carolyn
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To: AndrewWalden
BTW, that's a nice contrast you made in the OP between the current president's speech, and Governor Jindal’s. From Bobby's speech:

This is the nation that cast off the scourge of slavery, overcame the Great Depression, prevailed in two World Wars, won the struggle for civil rights, defeated the Soviet menace, and responded with determined courage to the attacks of September 11, 2001.

The American spirit has triumphed over almost every form of adversity known to man — and the American spirit will triumph again.
--Governor Bobby Jindal
21 posted on 02/24/2009 10:45:24 PM PST by InterestedQuestioner (Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you and your household will be saved.)
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To: AndrewWalden; andrew

Like most Americans, I didn’t see or hear the Obama speech or the GOP response, but that was good timing by the Republicans to pick Jindal... Slumdog Millionaire, Mall Cop... Indians are HOT right now.


22 posted on 02/24/2009 10:47:33 PM PST by Cinnamon Girl (G-d Bless President Bush. He kept us safe.)
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To: Cinnamon Girl

http://hotair.com/archives/2009/02/24/video-jindals-awful-rebuttal/


23 posted on 02/24/2009 10:49:29 PM PST by Arizona Carolyn
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To: ExNewsExSpook

I thought Jindal did fine.


24 posted on 02/24/2009 10:53:39 PM PST by omega4179 (Jindal MMXII)
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To: ExNewsExSpook

He emphasizes the wrong word in each sentence.

I say that as someone who wishes Jindal well and recognizes that he has good things to offer the Republican Party.

He just needs to work on his communication.


25 posted on 02/24/2009 10:58:52 PM PST by TheFourthMagi
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To: gleeaikin

“the money for volcano monitoring”.....

And how, exactly, does this fit into a stimulus package?

No need to answer, almost everything in the “stimulus package” had no business being there.


26 posted on 02/24/2009 11:26:53 PM PST by BlessingsofLiberty
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To: AndrewWalden

This man does not come across as a leader. If this is the best we can do for a leader, we are in really poor shape. Sarah Palin, given all her “deficiencies”, comes across as a much stronger leader. Where are the leaders who can understand minorities and women?


27 posted on 02/24/2009 11:43:54 PM PST by malkee (Actually I'm an ex-smoker--two and a half years-- But I think about it every day.)
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To: AndrewWalden
Sorry, but Jindal's response was weak.

I have no doubts about his credentials, but he needs time to season.

Jindal should have focused first and foremostly on the Porkulus and the threat the Democrat policies pose to our liberty and prosperity.

This was like a lackluster introductional campaign speech, too much about his personal story and WAY too much praise and, yes, adulation for Obama. Courtesy and civility is great, but it's enough already with glorifying Obama's "historical" significance.

Jindal could have done much much better.

28 posted on 02/24/2009 11:54:58 PM PST by SolidWood (Palin: "In Alaska we eat therefore we hunt.")
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To: ExNewsExSpook

Don’t take this personal, but I consider Jindal’s speech to be one of the best I’ve heard in over a decade. He touched on his connection to the immigrant issue. It was a crafty way to neutralize Obama’s attempt to claim hero status.

Then Jindal moved into the realm of big government and personal responsibility. He explained why big government is bad, taking money from taxpayers is bad, and why the reverse is better.

His delivery was incredibly good.


29 posted on 02/25/2009 12:54:34 AM PST by DoughtyOne (Resolved: Gregg, McCain, Snowe, Spectre: 2010, Collins, Graham: 2014)
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To: DoughtyOne

I heard Jindal on the radio and he sounded good there.

Palin is my first choice, but Jindal is a rising star in the GOP for sure.


30 posted on 02/25/2009 1:05:40 AM PST by Nextrush (Sarah Palin is the new Ronald Reagan.)
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To: DoughtyOne

I thought Jindal did fine — hit a lot of good points. Biggest problem for me here in L.A. was the bad sound, i.e., the sound “skipped” on many words throughout so I had to guess what word Jindal had just used.

Otherwise, it was a good effort for someone who is a bit of a young novice. I was favorably impressed.


31 posted on 02/25/2009 1:09:01 AM PST by CaliforniaCon
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To: Nextrush

We may be looking at our ticket in 2012. It will be nice to see how it shakes out. Wouldn’t it be refreshing to see them campaigning together, not even caring who got the top spot. I realize that’s a bit over the top, but I would like to see them campaign by complimenting each other for the most part, then tweaking their policy differences in a very low key way.


32 posted on 02/25/2009 1:30:27 AM PST by DoughtyOne (Resolved: Gregg, McCain, Snowe, Spectre: 2010, Collins, Graham: 2014)
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To: CaliforniaCon

We don’t get a good barn burner like that very often. It wasn’t fire and brimstone, but I think it was the perfect response. Obama is a tough guy to criticize right now, so soon after he came to power. It has to be done in a way that does not rip him, but none the less reveals his policies for the mistakes they contain.

Whoever wrote that speech did a masterful job IMO.

I just read it again. I wouldn’t change much.


33 posted on 02/25/2009 1:33:15 AM PST by DoughtyOne (Resolved: Gregg, McCain, Snowe, Spectre: 2010, Collins, Graham: 2014)
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To: AndrewWalden

“Good evening. I’m Bobby Jindal, Governor of Louisiana.

Tonight, we witnessed a great moment in the history of our Republic. In the very chamber where Congress once voted to abolish slavery, our first African-American President stepped forward to address the state of our union. With his speech tonight, the President completed a redemptive journey that took our nation from Independence Hall . to Gettysburg . to the lunch counter . and now, finally, the Oval Office.

Regardless of party, all Americans are moved by the President’s personal story — the son of an American mother and a Kenyan father, who grew up to become leader of the free world. Like the President’s father, my parents came to this country from a distant land. When they arrived in Baton Rouge, my mother was already 4 ½ months pregnant. I was what folks in the insurance industry now call a ‘pre-existing condition.’

To find work, my dad picked up the yellow pages and started calling local businesses. Even after landing a job, he could still not afford to pay for my delivery — so he worked out an installment plan with the doctor. Fortunately for me, he never missed a payment.

As I grew up, my mom and dad taught me the values that attracted them to this country — and they instilled in me an immigrant’s wonder at the greatness of America. As a child, I remember going to the grocery store with my dad. Growing up in India, he had seen extreme poverty. And as we walked through the aisles, looking at the endless variety on the shelves, he would tell me: ‘Bobby, Americans can do anything.’

I still believe that to this day. Americans can do anything. When we pull together, there is no challenge we cannot overcome.

As the President made clear this evening, we are now in a time of challenge. Many of you listening tonight have lost jobs. Others have seen your college and retirement savings dwindle. Many of....

...you are worried about losing your health care and your homes. And you are looking to your elected leaders in Washington for solutions.

Republicans are ready to work with the new President to provide those solutions. Here in my state of Louisiana, we don’t care what party you belong to if you have good ideas to make life better for our people. We need more of that attitude from both Democrats and Republicans in our nation’s capital.

All of us want our economy to recover and our nation to prosper. So where we agree, Republicans must be the President’s strongest partners. And where we disagree, Republicans have a responsibility to be candid and offer better ideas for a path forward.

Today in Washington, some are promising that government will rescue us from the economic storms raging all around us. Those of us who lived through Hurricane Katrina, we have our doubts.

Let me tell you a story.

During Katrina, I visited Sheriff Harry Lee, a Democrat and a good friend of mine. When I walked into his makeshift office I’d never seen him so angry. He was yelling into the phone: ‘Well, I’m the Sheriff and if you don’t like it you can come and arrest me!’ I asked him: ‘Sheriff, what’s got you so mad?’ He told me that he had put out a call for volunteers to come with their boats to rescue people who were trapped on their rooftops by the floodwaters.

The boats were all lined up ready to go — when some bureaucrat showed up and told them they couldn’t go out on the water unless they had proof of insurance and registration. I told him, ‘Sheriff, that’s ridiculous.’ And before I knew it, he was yelling into the phone: ‘Congressman Jindal is here, and he says you can come and arrest him too!’ Harry just told the boaters to ignore the bureaucrats and start rescuing people.

There is a lesson in this experience: The strength of America is not found in our government. It is found in the compassionate hearts and enterprising spirit of our citizens.

We are grateful for the support we have received from across the nation for the ongoing recovery efforts. This spirit got Louisiana through the hurricanes — and this spirit will get our nation through the storms we face today.

To solve our current problems, Washington must lead. But the way to lead is not to raise taxes and put more money and power in hands of Washington politicians. The way to lead is by empowering you — the American people. Because we believe that Americans can do anything.

That is why Republicans put forward plans to create jobs by lowering income tax rates for working families, cutting taxes for small businesses, strengthening incentives for businesses to invest in new equipment and hire new workers, and stabilizing home values by creating a new tax credit for home-buyers.

These plans would cost less and create more jobs.

But Democratic leaders in Congress rejected this approach. Instead of trusting us to make wise decisions with our own money, they passed the largest government spending bill in history — with a price tag of more than $1 trillion with interest.

While some of the projects in the bill make sense, their legislation is larded with wasteful spending. It includes $300 million to buy new cars for the government, $8 billion for high-speed rail projects, such as a ‘magnetic levitation’ line from Las Vegas to Disneyland, and $140 million for something called ‘volcano monitoring.’ Instead of monitoring volcanoes, what Congress should be monitoring is the eruption of spending in Washington, DC.

Democratic leaders say their legislation will grow the economy. What it will do is grow the government, increase our taxes down the line and saddle future generations with debt.

Who among us would ask our children for a loan, so we could spend money we do not have, on things we do not need? That is precisely what the Democrats in Congress just did. It’s irresponsible. And it’s no way to strengthen our economy, create jobs or build a prosperous future for our children.

In Louisiana, we took a different approach. Since I became governor, we cut more than 250 earmarks from our state budget. And to create jobs for our citizens, we cut taxes six times — including the largest income tax cut in the history of our state.

We passed those tax cuts with bipartisan majorities. Republicans and Democrats put aside their differences, and worked together to make sure our people could keep more of what they earn. If it can be done in Baton Rouge, surely it can be done in Washington, DC.

To strengthen our economy, we need urgent action to keep energy prices down. All of us remember what it felt like to pay $4 at the pump — and unless we act now, those prices will return. To stop that from happening, we need to increase conservation, increase energy efficiency, increase the use of alternative and renewable fuels, increase our use of nuclear power, and increase drilling for oil and gas here at home.

We believe that Americans can do anything — and if we unleash the innovative spirit of our citizens, we can achieve energy independence.

To strengthen our economy, we also need to address the crisis in health care. Republicans believe in a simple principle: No American should have to worry about losing their health coverage - period.

We stand for universal access to affordable health care coverage. We oppose universal government-run health care.Health care decisions should be made by doctors and patients — not by government bureaucrats. We believe Americans can do anything — and if we put aside partisan politics and work together, we can make our system of private medicine affordable and accessible for every one of our citizens.

To strengthen our economy, we also need to make sure every child in America gets the best possible education. After Katrina, we reinvented the New Orleans school system — opening dozens of new charter schools, and creating a new scholarship program that is giving parents the chance to send their children to private or parochial schools of their choice. We believe that, with the proper education, the children of America can do anything. And it should not take a devastating storm to bring this kind of innovation to education in our country.

To strengthen our economy, we must promote confidence in America by ensuring ours is the most ethical and transparent system in the world. In my home state, there used to be saying: At any given time, half of Louisiana is under water — and the other half is under indictment.

No one says that anymore. Last year, we passed some of the strongest ethics laws in the nation — and today, Louisiana has turned her back on the corruption of the past. We need to bring transparency to Washington, DC — so we can rid our Capitol of corruption and ensure we never see the passage of another trillion dollar spending bill that Congress has not even read and the American people haven’t even seen.

As we take these steps, we must remember for all our troubles at home, dangerous enemies still seek our destruction. Now is no time to dismantle the defenses that have protected this country for hundreds of years, or make deep cuts in funding for our troops.

America’s fighting men and women can do anything. And if we give them the resources they need, they will stay on the offensive, defeat our enemies and protect us from harm.

In all these areas, Republicans want to work with President Obama. We appreciate his message of hope — but sometimes it seems we look for hope in different places. Democratic leaders in Washington place their hope in the federal government. We place our hope in you — the American people.

In the end, it comes down to an honest and fundamental disagreement about the proper role of government. We oppose the National Democrats’ view that says — the way to strengthen our country is to increase dependence on government. We believe the way to strengthen our country is to restrain spending in Washington, and empower individuals and small businesses to grow our economy and create jobs.

In recent years, these distinctions in philosophy became less clear — because our party got away from its principles. You elected Republicans to champion limited government, fiscal discipline, and personal responsibility. Instead, Republicans went along with earmarks and big government spending in Washington. Republicans lost your trust — and rightly so.

Tonight, on behalf of our leaders in Congress and my fellow Republican governors, I say: Our party is determined to regain your trust. We will do so by standing up for the principles that we share — the principles you elected us to fight for — the principles that built this into the greatest, most prosperous country on earth.

A few weeks ago, the President warned that our nation is facing a crisis that he said ‘we may not be able to reverse.’ Our troubles are real, to be sure. But don’t let anyone tell you that we cannot recover — or that America’s best days are behind her.

This is the nation that cast off the scourge of slavery, overcame the Great Depression, prevailed in two World Wars, won the struggle for civil rights, defeated the Soviet menace, and responded with determined courage to the attacks of September 11, 2001.

The American spirit has triumphed over almost every form of adversity known to man — and the American spirit will triumph again.

We can have confidence in our future — because, amid today’s challenges, we also count many blessings: We have the most innovative citizens —the most abundant resources — the most resilient economy — the most powerful military — and the freest political system in the history of the world.

My fellow citizens, never forget: We are Americans. And like my Dad said years ago, Americans can do anything.

Thank you for listening. God bless you. And God bless America.”


34 posted on 02/25/2009 1:42:18 AM PST by iowamark
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To: SolidWood

Both Palin and Jindal have great potential as future national leaders; I hope both have TWO terms in their states and make those states the envy of the USA.

In other words, follow the Ronald Reagan example.

I liked Mitt in the primaries, partly because he had executive experience...but one of his problems in my opinion was that he only had ONE term. If he had two terms of solid conservative governorship, it might have helped him establish more credibility with those who wonder if he is a true Republican.

Bump to your observation.....I did not watch anything last night, btw.


35 posted on 02/25/2009 2:13:17 AM PST by Recovering_Democrat
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To: WOSG

Links about the school ZerO was talking about...

http://www.dillon2.k12.sc.us/jvm/history_of_j.htm

http://www.dillon2.k12.sc.us/jvm/

I can’t see the railroad tracks in the pic that shake the foundation of this old school..ugh. ZerO must have chosen this particular school because it’s on Martin Luther King Blvd.


36 posted on 02/25/2009 2:20:42 AM PST by tina07 (In loving memory of my father,WWII Vet. CBI 10/16/42-12/17/45, d. 11/1/85 -Happy B'day Daddy 2/20/23)
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To: CaliforniaCon
Biggest problem for me here in L.A. was the bad sound, i.e., the sound “skipped” on many words throughout so I had to guess what word Jindal had just used.

I'm not in California, but we had the skipping issue here as well. I had to wonder if the skipping was intentional. Interestingly, Gov. Jindal's speech was followed by a sweeping montage of Barack Obama in slow motion as he “heroically” waved to a crowd. I've never seen the image of a president manipulated that way. Hmmm.

37 posted on 02/25/2009 2:35:32 AM PST by InterestedQuestioner (Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you and your household will be saved.)
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To: DoughtyOne
“..I consider Jindal’s speech to be one of the best I’ve heard in over a decade. He touched on his connection to the immigrant issue. It was a crafty way to neutralize Obama’s attempt to claim hero status.”

Obama introduced himself to the American people by his reference to his parents—an all American example of the melting pot.

Bobby's response was a rib shot directed at Obama. Gov. Jindal made a comparison between his parents (immigrants from India,) and Barack Obama’s folks. The implied difference was that Jindal’s parents were responsible. Obama’s philandering dad statutorilly raped an American teenager, absconded without seeing the lad, and later killed a man in Africa before drunkenly ending his own life. Obama’s mom later headed for the hills, abandoning “Barack junior” to be raised by her mother, the much maligned “typical white person.”

Compare that to an immigrant busting his hump to find a job, and fulfill his financial obligations, including setting up an installment plan to pay the doctor who delivered Bobby.

38 posted on 02/25/2009 2:45:56 AM PST by InterestedQuestioner (Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you and your household will be saved.)
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To: lnzog
People keep bashing his delivery. Come on, we are not obamabots we don’t care about how it was said, we care about what was said. ie.

It doesn't matter what we think, but the rest of the country that was watching as well. He and the GOP did themselves no favors by being so poorly prepared.

Listen, I have no problem with Jindal and think that he's indeed the real deal, just like Governor Palin. But, Palin would eat him alive in a debate based on sheer charisma, just like she did Joe Biden, who didn't know what hit him.

39 posted on 02/25/2009 2:49:28 AM PST by Virginia Ridgerunner (Sarah Palin is a smart missile aimed at the heart of the left!)
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To: AndrewWalden

Jidal’s delivery was embarrassingly awful. He’s definitely not ready for prime time.


40 posted on 02/25/2009 2:53:30 AM PST by Post5203 (Democrats have become so low, they need a step ladder to kiss a snake's ass.)
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To: InterestedQuestioner

Yes, I agree with your take on this.

You did touch on the difference between the parents too, something I had not thought of. I think that’s a pretty good point.

I might add, if Obama’s and Jindal’s parents had held Obama’s views, both he and Jindal probably wouldn’t be here. Both boys came along at times that might not have been convenient for their parents.

Yes, the work ethic was presented. I gotta say, I think this was much better than folks think. It was low key, but it got a number of good solid points across, without seeming to club Obama over the head with a bat.

IMO, that’s a very effective way to do it.


41 posted on 02/25/2009 2:55:06 AM PST by DoughtyOne (Resolved: Gregg, McCain, Snowe, Spectre: 2010, Collins, Graham: 2014)
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To: lnzog
I agree. Obozo delivers his scripted piles ‘o’ excrement flawlessly. And it's still..well..excrement. I didn't see the televised version, but rather read the transcript. I loved one part in particular
“This is the nation that cast off the scourge of slavery, overcame the Great Depression, prevailed in two World Wars, won the struggle for civil rights, defeated the Soviet menace, and responded with determined courage to the attacks of September 11, 2001”

Wow. I needed that. It's hard to remember who we are when we are governed by a party that despises the true America.

42 posted on 02/25/2009 3:17:20 AM PST by dixiedarlindownsouth (I love my country, but I fear my government)
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To: GerardKempf

or DeMint?


43 posted on 02/25/2009 3:23:55 AM PST by jersey117
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To: Cinnamon Girl
Indians are HOT right now.

I was telling an Indian buddy of mine recently that I notice that a lot of ads have an Indian guy in them for the "coolness" factor. It used to be that ads put blacks in them so that no one would complain that blacks are being ignored. Now Indians are used to cover the "minority spot" and also because they're cool in some odd way understand but can't explaing.

Also love your screen name - my favorite Neil Young song, and an all time favorite period.

44 posted on 02/25/2009 3:51:19 AM PST by Hardastarboard (The Fairness Doctrine isn't about "Fairness" - it's about Doctrine.)
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To: AndrewWalden

Ok...Just watched the speech. I see nothing awful about it. If it’s at all reminiscent of Mr. Rogers, don’t forget 69 million people were dumb enough to vote for 0bama; maybe Jindal wasn’t aiming his remarks at YOU, maybe he was pitching underhand to your idiot co-worker or your brother-in-law.
I think the reason so many people here gave Jindal low marks is because they listened to 0bama’s speech right before. That left them thirsting for blood, and Jindal served cookies and milk. He offered no catharsis. But again, he wasn’t pitching this to us on the raging right.
And maybe this isn’t yet the time for Jindal to draw fire from the left for attacking The One. Give it time. Give 0bama the time to make himself stink broadly. Give people time to suffer from his policies; then, at the right moment, attacks will be more effective and blame will connect with 0bama like a guided missile.
This speech was my first encounter with Jindal. I never really noticed him before, he was just a name until now. It was a respectable first impression, and that’s what a first impression should be.


45 posted on 02/25/2009 3:52:40 AM PST by 668 - Neighbor of the Beast (American Revolution II -- overdue.)
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To: DoughtyOne

> His delivery was incredibly good.

Wow, seriously?

Loved the content of the speech, but the delivery, in my opinion, was like he was reading a children’s story, and sounded condescending in an algore kind of way. Where was the Meet the Press Jindal? He wasn’t there tonight.


46 posted on 02/25/2009 3:54:27 AM PST by VictoryGal (Never give up, never surrender!)
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To: 668 - Neighbor of the Beast

> If it’s at all reminiscent of Mr. Rogers, don’t forget 69 million people were dumb enough to vote for 0bama; maybe Jindal wasn’t aiming his remarks at YOU, maybe he was pitching underhand to your idiot co-worker or your brother-in-law.

Even dumb people don’t like that tone of voice.


47 posted on 02/25/2009 3:59:05 AM PST by VictoryGal (Never give up, never surrender!)
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To: VictoryGal

I liked the content of the speech too...but and I saw this on another site....
the delivery was more Kenneth the Page from 30 Rock.


48 posted on 02/25/2009 4:02:01 AM PST by tj21807
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To: rightreb

I disagree that he was a train wreck. His address style need work. No doubt. But he has time. 2012 may not be his time. The man is my ten years Barry’s junior and the style points come with experience. What Jindal has and then some is substance. He is focused on limiting government and returning us to the core principles of our Constitution. We need leaders like that out front opposing this blind run into fascism led by Zero.


49 posted on 02/25/2009 4:12:05 AM PST by GodBlessAmericaKD (Who is John Galt?)
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To: AndrewWalden

I thought he was OK, but I cannot see him ready-for-prime-time for at least two Presidential election cycles. I have no doubt that the intellect is there, but the gravitas is not.

Yes, I know. Obama had even less of both and won handily, but 2008 was an anomoly - a perfect storm in which a snake-oil salesman hypnotized a nation while he was picking its pocket. Realistically, there is no such thing as a Republican Obama, imo. Not Jindal. and not Palin, unless she changes dramatically over time.

If I were to be honest, if I could point to one person and install him in the oval office without going through the election process, it would be Dick Cheney. He’s everything I want in a President.

Other than that, you have to give up something to get the most electable Republican - all the “perfect” candidates (on issues) are not electable in ‘12, imo.

What about Newt?


50 posted on 02/25/2009 4:15:38 AM PST by StatenIsland
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