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Interpol no longer subject to U.S. Constitution
One News Now ^ | 1/20/2010 | Chad Groening

Posted on 01/20/2010 2:29:51 PM PST by Ooh-Ah

The head of a civil liberties organization is concerned about an executive order signed by President Obama last month which allows an international law enforcement agency to have jurisdiction in the United States without being subject to the U.S. Constitution.

In June 1983, President Ronald Reagan signed Executive Order 12425, recognizing the International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) as an international organization with certain privileges and immunities afforded to diplomats. But Reagan structured his executive order to ensure that Interpol -- like every other law enforcement agency in the United States -- was accountable to the rule of law.

John Whitehead, president of The Rutherford Institute, explains that President Obama recently issued a new executive order that amends Reagan's and establishes Interpol as an self-ruling police agency within the U.S.

"The president of the United States is creating an autonomous international police force on American soil that's not subject to our Constitution," says Whitehead.

"What this means is that Interpol, if they want to -- and we don't know if they will or not -- can do police activities against American citizens; they can investigate American citizens," he continues. "But again, they're not subject to the Constitution. So the entire concept of rule of law breaks down."

(Excerpt) Read more at onenewsnow.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bho44; bhofascism; bhotreason; bhotyranny; constitution; democrats; donttreadonme; executiveorder; globalism; interpol; obama; obamalegacy; rapeofliberty; soldusout; sovereignty

1 posted on 01/20/2010 2:29:51 PM PST by Ooh-Ah
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To: Ooh-Ah

Been posted before but a good reminder. Does he have the power to do this?


2 posted on 01/20/2010 2:33:07 PM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Ooh-Ah

Uh-Oh


3 posted on 01/20/2010 2:33:10 PM PST by GranTorino
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To: driftdiver

It’d be easier to tally the things he’s done that he DOES actually have the power to do.


4 posted on 01/20/2010 2:34:35 PM PST by a fool in paradise (Keep on truckin', Senator Brown.)
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To: Ooh-Ah

“they’re not subject to the Constitution.”

They are in my world and on my property.


5 posted on 01/20/2010 2:35:54 PM PST by Gator113 (Obama is America's First FAILED "light skinned African American [Pres-dent] with no Negro dialect..")
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To: driftdiver

Did we ever get an explanation by anyone in the Administration as to why this was so freaking important?


6 posted on 01/20/2010 2:36:41 PM PST by Hildy (This Christmas, the Democrats have given America the one gift that keeps on taking.)
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To: Ooh-Ah
Interpol no longer subject to U.S. Constitution

Apparently, neither are the White House and Congress.

7 posted on 01/20/2010 2:37:21 PM PST by Allegra (It doesn't matter what this tagline says...the liberals are going to call it "racist.")
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To: Ooh-Ah
My understanding is that Interpol is just a few people in an office using Lexis/Nexus to maintan lists of criminals and their likely whereabouts.

Do they have any real field agents? Do they have technical capabilities like electronic snooping that we really should be worried about?

8 posted on 01/20/2010 2:38:09 PM PST by who_would_fardels_bear (These fragments I have shored against my ruins)
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To: Hildy
The most disturbing thing is that this is executive order 12425.

Have we ever gotten any kind of explanation for the other 12,424?

9 posted on 01/20/2010 2:39:24 PM PST by who_would_fardels_bear (These fragments I have shored against my ruins)
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To: Hildy

Explanation? We’re lucky they allow us to breathe.


10 posted on 01/20/2010 2:40:46 PM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Ooh-Ah

The Patriot Act and Interpol

JINSA Report #: 
953
December 30, 2009

Before leaving town, the House and Senate agreed to a 60-day extension of provisions of the Patriot Act set to expire at the end of the year. When they return they will take up the separate House and Senate versions of the bill that would reauthorize the full Patriot Act through 2013.

The three key - and sometimes controversial - provisions extended are known as the "lone wolf," "business records," and the "roving wiretap."

  • The "lone wolf" allows the government to track a non-American suspect who has no discernable tie to a terrorist group or foreign power. It appears never to have been used in a FISA application (FISA is the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that governs national security related warrants).

  • The "business records" provision allows the government to compel third parties (telephone companies, banks, etc.) to provide them access to a suspect's record without notifying the suspect. The FBI told the Senate that the "business records" provision had been used just over 200 times between 2004 and 2007.

  • "Roving wiretaps" allow investigators to apply one FISA court warrant to all forms of electronic communications used by the suspect (phone, cell phone, BlackBerry, home computer, etc.) but only if the government can show that the suspect is switching devices to evade detection. The government has applied for roving wiretaps an average of 22 times a year since 2001.

The numbers repudiate the notion that the government is in wholesale violation of the civil liberties of Americans and despite his previous denunciation of the Patriot Act, President Obama has publicly supported the reauthorization with the inclusion of these three provisions. We hope Congress returns able to make the case that the government has been - and will remain - able to balance security and civil liberties while we are at war.

On the other hand, as regards civil liberties, before leaving town, President Obama issued a worrisome Executive Order regarding Interpol, the international law enforcement organization headquartered inside the Justice Department.

In 1983, President Reagan gave Interpol elements of diplomatic status, subject to constraints; the most important being that Interpol's property and assets remained subject to search and seizure, and its archived records remained subject to public scrutiny under provisions including the Freedom of Information Act. President Obama's brief Executive Order (100 words including the full title of Interpol) removes the Reagan limitations.

Interpol's files and assets are now inviolable while it conducts operations in the United States that affect Americans and American interests. Former federal prosecutor Andrew McCarthy notes that Interpol works with foreign courts including those in Europe that are investigating the Bush administration for purported war crimes, and asks, "Why is it suddenly necessary to have, within the Justice Department, a repository for stashing government files which... will be beyond the ability of Congress, American law enforcement, the media, and the American people to scrutinize?"

"Why would we elevate an international police force above American law? Why would we immunize an international police force from the limitations that constrain the FBI and other American law-enforcement agencies?"

Good questions. Congress might want to consider them when they address the civil liberties questions arising from the Patriot Act.


11 posted on 01/20/2010 2:41:31 PM PST by Ooh-Ah
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To: driftdiver
"Does he have the power to do this?"

Yes. He's overruling a previous President's Executive Order and extending to INTERPOL privileges that are allowable under a law from the late 1940's. Of course, that law was passed prior to the advent of the Freedom of Information Act. I don't think this move violates the letter of the law, I do think it violates the spirit of the law - at least the spirit of FOIA.

12 posted on 01/20/2010 2:49:42 PM PST by OldDeckHand
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To: driftdiver

Interpol just swore in Acorn International as their US agents.


13 posted on 01/20/2010 2:52:58 PM PST by P8ri0
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To: Ooh-Ah
Interpol no longer subject to U.S. Constitution

Not being part of the US government, it never was subject to the limitations that document puts on the US government. However that doesn't mean it can do anything that would be a crime if you or I did it. It may have even less things it can do, being a foreign entity.

14 posted on 01/20/2010 2:54:46 PM PST by El Gato
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To: who_would_fardels_bear

“Do they have any real field agents? Do they have technical capabilities like electronic snooping that we really should be worried about? “

I am sure will sign an EO that funds them. A great way to create your own secret police


15 posted on 01/20/2010 3:01:01 PM PST by dozer7 (Love many, trust few and always paddle your own canoe)
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To: Gator113

I hear that.


16 posted on 01/20/2010 3:12:42 PM PST by stevio (Crunchy Con - God, guns, guts, and organically grown crunchy nuts.)
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To: Ooh-Ah

Hey, I have no fear that Obama signed away any Constitutional rights. He may think he can, but the courts have in most cases said otherwise.

H


17 posted on 01/20/2010 3:17:41 PM PST by Howindependent (A Liberal has no concept of reality.)
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To: Gator113

“They are in my world and on my property.”

We’ll see if they are subject to the laws of Physics when met with lead from my .45.


18 posted on 01/20/2010 3:18:31 PM PST by Syntyr (Mace, Kirk, Thomson, Griffin, Scusa, Martin, Gallegos, Hart - Remember the fallen of Kamdesh)
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To: Ooh-Ah

So, since the constitution doesn’t apply to Interpol, that means if they are caught messing around where they shouldn’t be they enjoy no protection under the law. Works both ways.


19 posted on 01/20/2010 3:22:02 PM PST by Quickgun (As a former fetus, I'm opposed to abortion. Pray for Obama,Psalms109:8)
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To: driftdiver
Does he have the power to do this?

If no one challenges him he does!

20 posted on 01/20/2010 3:24:08 PM PST by Mind-numbed Robot (Not all that needs to be done needs to be done by the government)
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To: who_would_fardels_bear

Here, as far as I know, is a complete list of Obama’s Executive Orders with PDFs and explanations

http://1461days.blogspot.com/2009/01/current-list-of-president-obamas.html.

Of course there are under 40 E.O.s , those numbers you
refer to may be the cumulative E.O.s since they existed,
(but that’s probably way too high).....there may be a different numbering system.


21 posted on 01/20/2010 3:36:48 PM PST by supremedoctrine (Time is the school in which we learn that time is the fire in which we burn.)
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To: Ooh-Ah

22 posted on 01/20/2010 4:03:35 PM PST by rlmorel (We are traveling "The Road to Serfdom".)
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