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Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome in Studies
HealthDay News via Yahoo! ^ | June 20, 2010 | NIH

Posted on 06/27/2010 6:58:30 PM PDT by CutePuppy

A pair of new studies has uncovered evidence that low levels of vitamin D could lead to poor blood sugar control among diabetics and increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome among seniors.

.....

More than 90 percent of the patients, who ranged in age from 36 to 89, had either vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, the authors found, despite the fact that they all had had routine primary care visits before their specialty visit.

Just about 6 percent of the patients were taking a vitamin D supplement at the time of their visit, the research team noted, and those who had lower vitamin D levels were also more likely to have higher average blood sugar levels.

"This finding supports an active role of vitamin D in the development of type 2 diabetes," study co-author Dr. Esther Krug, an assistant professor of medicine, said in a news release from the Endocrine Society.

"Since primary care providers diagnose and treat most patients with type 2 diabetes, screening and vitamin D supplementation as part of routine primary care may improve health outcomes of this highly prevalent condition," Krug added.

A second study involving nearly 1,300 white Dutch men and women over the age of 65 found almost half were vitamin D-deficient, while 37 percent had metabolic syndrome.

Metabolic syndrome is a grouping of health risk factors, including high blood pressure, abdominal obesity, abnormal cholesterol levels and high blood sugar.

"Because the metabolic syndrome increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, an adequate vitamin D level in the body might be important in the prevention of these diseases," .....

Regardless of gender, those with insufficient amounts of vitamin D in their blood were more likely to have the syndrome than those with sufficient amounts of vitamin D, Eekhoff and her colleagues found.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: diabetes; health; lactose; lactoseintolerance; medicine; metabolicsyndrome; vitamind; vitamind3; vitamins; vitd
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1 posted on 06/27/2010 6:58:38 PM PDT by CutePuppy
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To: decimon; neverdem
Additional information on the subject is from Medical News Today article

Benefit Of Vitamin D In Diabetes And Other Chronic Diseases

13 Jan 2009   

Vitamin D is quickly becoming the "it" nutrient with health benefits for diseases, including cancer, osteoporosis, heart disease and now diabetes.

A recent review article published by researchers from Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing concluded that adequate intake of vitamin D may prevent or delay the onset of diabetes and reduce complications for those who have already been diagnosed. These findings appeared in the latest issue of Diabetes Educator.

"Vitamin D has widespread benefits for our health and certain chronic diseases in particular," said Sue Penckofer, Ph.D., R.N., study co-author and professor, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing. "This article further substantiates the role of this nutrient in the prevention and management of glucose intolerance and diabetes."

Many of the 23 million Americans with diabetes have low vitamin D levels. Evidence suggests that vitamin D plays an integral role in insulin sensitivity and secretion. Vitamin D deficiency results in part from poor nutrition, which is one of the most challenging issues for people with diabetes. Another culprit is reduced exposure to sunlight, which is common during cold weather months when days are shorter and more time is spent indoors.

One study examined for this review article evaluated 3,000 people with type 1 diabetes and found a decreased risk in disease for people who took vitamin D supplements. Observational studies of people with type 2 diabetes also revealed that supplementation may be important in the prevention of this disease.

"Management of vitamin D deficiency may be a simple and cost-effective method to improve blood sugar control and prevent the serious complications associated with diabetes," said Joanne Kouba, Ph.D., R.D., L.D.N., study co-author and clinical assistant professor of dietetics, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing.

Diet alone may not be sufficient to manage vitamin D levels. A combination of adequate dietary intake of vitamin D, exposure to sunlight, and treatment with vitamin D2 or D3 supplements can decrease the risk of diabetes and related health concerns. The preferred range in the body is 30 - 60 ng/mL of 25(OH) vitamin D.

"People at risk for diabetes should be screened for low vitamin D levels," said Mary Ann Emanuele, M.D., F.A.C.P., study co-author and professor of medicine, division of endocrinology and metabolism, Loyola University Health System. "This will allow health care professionals to identify a nutrient deficiency early on and intervene to improve the long term health of these individuals."

Vitamin D deficiency also may be associated with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hypertension and heart disease. In fact, Penckofer recently published another study in Circulation that reported on the role of chronic vitamin D deficiency in heart disease. The Circulation study authors included Glen W. Sizemore, MD, emeritus professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, and Diane E. Wallis, MD, Midwest Heart Specialists, Downers Grove, Ill.
2 posted on 06/27/2010 7:02:55 PM PDT by CutePuppy (If you don't ask the right questions you may not get the right answers)
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To: CutePuppy

Could be coincidental.

Diabetes type 2 is related to a sedentary lifestyle.

Vitamin D is largely obtained by getting up and going outside in the sunlight.


3 posted on 06/27/2010 7:06:49 PM PDT by I_Like_Spam
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To: CutePuppy

No wonder! My husband is diabetic and cannot drink milk, because the lactose is converted to glucose. So I am not surprised that most diabetics are deficient in vitamin D.


4 posted on 06/27/2010 7:08:15 PM PDT by Former Fetus
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To: I_Like_Spam
Could be coincidental. Diabetes type 2 is related to a sedentary lifestyle. Vitamin D is largely obtained by getting up and going outside in the sunlight.

Nature' 'correlations' quite amazing. . .For sure you cannot get it in front of a computer screen. (A new idea for Steve Jobs/lol. . .)

Meantime, if you are not in sun; and even 'if you are' - take enough; get enough. . .'D'.

5 posted on 06/27/2010 7:12:42 PM PDT by cricket ('flies don't lie')
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To: Former Fetus

Supplements have no taste. . .easy to take. Take enough and take ‘D/3’. . .


6 posted on 06/27/2010 7:15:04 PM PDT by cricket ('flies don't lie')
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To: I_Like_Spam

Correlation? Seems very likely. Causation? Possibly, but not determined.

In either case, gives something to work with, and maybe help find the cure or help with care / treatment. After all, if a daily (still sedentary) “activity” of sitting “on the sun” for 20 minutes, or taking a supplement can help, it’s worth studying.


7 posted on 06/27/2010 7:17:07 PM PDT by CutePuppy (If you don't ask the right questions you may not get the right answers)
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To: CutePuppy

Dr. Mercola has a video where he says that 10-20 years from now if you go to an emergency room and they do NOT test you for Vit D deficiency they (emergency room personnel) will go to jail. He says that Vit D is responsible for the on/off switch for over 2000 genes - cancer, everything imaginable, etc.

He also says that Vit D deficiency is the reason black Americans suffer from so many diseases. Because of their melanin, they bodies don’t make Vit D like white people do, even if they are out in the sun all day.


8 posted on 06/27/2010 7:18:03 PM PDT by japaneseghost
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To: Former Fetus

Consider getting it from other source, other than milk.

Supplements are readily available, if limited sunshine exposure is not an option. See if it may help.


9 posted on 06/27/2010 7:20:56 PM PDT by CutePuppy (If you don't ask the right questions you may not get the right answers)
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To: japaneseghost
Because of their melanin, they bodies don’t make Vit D like white people do, even if they are out in the sun all day.

That's a simple property of spectrum physics, but an interesting observation re Vitamin D3 generation.

10 posted on 06/27/2010 7:24:03 PM PDT by CutePuppy (If you don't ask the right questions you may not get the right answers)
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To: CutePuppy

What do increased levels of D do for diabetics, I wonder. Alleviate the severity — or no changes once diabetes has set in?


11 posted on 06/27/2010 7:25:27 PM PDT by Exit148 (Loose Change Club Founder. Save your pennies for the next Freepathon. A little goes a long way!)
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To: I_Like_Spam

Depends upon where you live. Above a certain latitude, there’s not enough UVB available, even in summertime, to activate the VitD in the body. Northern states typically.

So no matter how much you “go outside”, you won’t create enough Vit D internally and need to supplement. Your advice would be fine for CA-TX-FL latitudes, but not so good for WA-ND-WI-NY denizens.

There’s a lot more to it than just “going outside”.


12 posted on 06/27/2010 7:27:07 PM PDT by hadit2here ("Most men would rather die than think. Many do." - Bertrand Russell)
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To: Former Fetus

Who told him that? I’ve been diabetic for nearly 40 years and drik milk as part of a balanced diet.


13 posted on 06/27/2010 7:28:04 PM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: I_Like_Spam
But Type 1 diabetes isn't.

One study examined for this review article evaluated 3,000 people with type 1 diabetes and found a decreased risk in disease for people who took vitamin D supplements.

Type 1 is an autoimmune disease, and if vitamin D significantly helps it, that suggests that vitamin D may be helpful for autoimmune disorders in general.

14 posted on 06/27/2010 7:28:30 PM PDT by GovernmentShrinker
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To: CutePuppy

Thanks!

I forwarded it to someone who has a 79 year old parent with diabetes, heart disease, etc. They were out of town when this was published, so I’m sure they missed it.

Thanks again. :)


15 posted on 06/27/2010 7:29:30 PM PDT by Daisyjane69 (Michael Reagan: "Welcome back, Dad, even if you're wearing a dress and bearing children this time)
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To: CutePuppy

They have done studies with children just diagnoised with type 1 and found that by giving them massive doses of Vitiman D can reverse it in it’s early stages and those children who are borderline they can keep it from happening by giving them large doses of Vitimin D. Lifestyle has nothing to do with it some people who are very light skinned can not get enough vitimin D from the sun because they can’t process it properly. I take a prescription vitmin D that is 50,000iu once a week I am a 40 year type 1.


16 posted on 06/27/2010 7:31:53 PM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: japaneseghost

And I’m sure Je$$e Jacka$$ or other race whores will call him racist for saying that and try to shake down the medical establishment for mo’ money, mo’ money for his Rainbow Coalition that no other blacks will ever see or benefit from.

I remember something of an uproar about Sickle Cell Anemia when it first was discovered and the Docs were called racist because they said it was predominant in Blacks.

Not to mention the word “niggardly”.


17 posted on 06/27/2010 7:33:17 PM PDT by hadit2here ("Most men would rather die than think. Many do." - Bertrand Russell)
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To: Daisyjane69

You are very welcome!


18 posted on 06/27/2010 7:37:10 PM PDT by CutePuppy (If you don't ask the right questions you may not get the right answers)
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To: japaneseghost

After reading about Vitamin D and cancer (specifically Pancreatic Cancer) I take 2000 IU daily. I’m also addicted to milk - I LOVE it.


19 posted on 06/27/2010 7:44:55 PM PDT by peggybac
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To: CutePuppy

I’ve been taking vitamin D3 supplements for several years now. I was taking some earlier, but now taking more.

It seems as if every day a new story comes out about the importance of getting enough vitamin D—especially in cloudy weather or in the winter or if you don’t get enough sun for one reason or another.

I was a couple of years ahead of my doctor, who has been prescribing massive doses for some of my grownup children, to bring them up to snuff. I told all the kids to start taking this stuff, but I guess not all of them were listening. My wife, too.

If you are older, and taking calcium to prevent deterioration of your bones, you need it to help process the calcium, too. It appears to be very basic, and deficient in an awful lot of people.


20 posted on 06/27/2010 7:47:04 PM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: chris_bdba

Thanks, it’s great to know. I thought this would only apply to Type 2.


21 posted on 06/27/2010 7:47:12 PM PDT by CutePuppy (If you don't ask the right questions you may not get the right answers)
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To: Cicero
If you are older, and taking calcium to prevent deterioration of your bones, you need it to help process the calcium, too.

Yes, a few years ago I informed relatives, who were taking calcium supplements, that they need to take Vitamin D3 to help absorb calcium or it's not going to be very effective.

22 posted on 06/27/2010 7:55:56 PM PDT by CutePuppy (If you don't ask the right questions you may not get the right answers)
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To: TigersEye

Vit D ping


23 posted on 06/27/2010 7:56:45 PM PDT by pandoraou812 (I don't trust the government for anything ever!)
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To: CutePuppy

I have osteoporosis, Vit D deficiency, degenerative disc disease, herniated discs, bone spurs, spinal stenosis, and have had skin cancer. I don’t think time in the sun is going to help this Irish American. My skin is very pale, my bones are bad...and I’m dong the best I can.


24 posted on 06/27/2010 7:59:03 PM PDT by sissyjane (Did you plug the hole yet Daddy????)
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To: Former Fetus
My husband is diabetic and cannot drink milk, because the lactose is converted to glucose.

While I'm not diabetic, I am lactose intolerant. You can buy lactase supplements (drops or tablets) that will get rid of the lactose, or you can buy milk that's already lactose free. It's substantially more expensive, but on the other hand, it will last a LONG time in the fridge, since when milk goes bad, the lactose is converted by lactic acid.

Mark

25 posted on 06/27/2010 8:05:48 PM PDT by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
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To: Former Fetus

There are many ways to get Vit D. I’m also lactose intolerant and was never a milk drinker, but could tolerate some cheese and some ice cream, if it was the cheap kind whipped up with a lot of air and not so much cream. As a vegan now, I get my Vit D from fortified soy milk, food, and vitamins.

That said, after seeing some of the Vit D/diabetes posts and medical reporting over the past year, I started taking Vit D supplements. I was taking about 2-3000 units a day for about 6 months. Even at that, when I had my levels checked by my endo, my Vit D levels were almost nonexistent. I’m now on prescription strength Vit D taken 2x a month. I need to get my levels rechecked to see if they’ve improved, but if there is any correlation between Vit D levels and diabetes, I seem to be living proof. I also have metabolic syndrome, am beige/olive skinned and lived in cloudy Seattle for almost 5 years. I didn’t think it would be as low as it was, but I wasn’t surprised I had a low Vit D level.

Regarding another post re sedentary lifestyle - I wish people knew more about diabetes. There are very obese, inactive people who never become diabetics; there are people like me with diabetes on both sides of the family and who was probably going to get it at some point, no matter what the activity level; there are average-sized active people who get it. I agree that some of the increase in diabetes is linked to the type and amount of food people eat and their general lifestyle, but you can’t point to every Type 2 diabetic and say ‘you did this to yourself’ just as not every case of cancer is due to a lack of vegetables in the diet. Sometimes it just happens.


26 posted on 06/27/2010 8:07:04 PM PDT by radiohead (Buy ammo, get your kids out of government schools, pray for the Republic.)
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To: hadit2here

I really think this is not a racist statement. How many times have you heard a racist say that black people are “inferior” because they have so many diseases, kidney disease, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, etc. If these conditions are caused by a lack of Vit D3, that puts the racist factor in the garbage can.


27 posted on 06/27/2010 8:11:28 PM PDT by japaneseghost
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To: pandoraou812

Going to take my D now.


28 posted on 06/27/2010 8:34:55 PM PDT by TigersEye ("Flotilla" means "pirate ships running supplies to terrorists.")
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To: Former Fetus

The lactose is converted to acid and gas by
enteric bacteria when there is no lactase to
convert the lactose to glucose. Lactose intolerance is
a common symptom of gluten intolerance. Lactase
is manufactured by the tips of the cilia in the
small colon. Gluten damages the cilia. The first
thing to go is the tips...with the loss of lactase.
Try a gluten free diet for a month. That may solve
the lactose intolerance. If drinking milk brings on
a “loopy” feeling, try goat’s milk. If that doesn’t
work, soy milk is a decent fallback.


29 posted on 06/27/2010 8:37:18 PM PDT by Myrddin
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To: CutePuppy

Okay, that does it. Less time on FR, more time outside... :)


30 posted on 06/27/2010 8:44:37 PM PDT by swatbuznik
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To: radiohead

One of my closest friends is skinny as a rail, has been all his life, plays more golf than Bozo and still has type 2.


31 posted on 06/27/2010 8:45:44 PM PDT by calex59
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To: Cicero
"I’ve been taking vitamin D3 supplements for several years now. I was taking some earlier, but now taking more."

I've also been taking it for a few years. My family tends toward depression, and keeping up with Vitamin D helps keep it at bay during the "dark months". My Dad's longtime remedy is a nice 5-6 week visit to Florida during the depths of the Michigan winters. He's done that ever since he retired, and whether it's physiological or purely psychological, it seems to have helped him. He's always spent a lot of time outdoors hunting and fishing. He'll be 90 next month, and has lived quite a bit longer then either of his parents. Although grandmother had diabetes from middle age, Dad avoided it until fairly recently. He managed with exercise and diet until just 3-4 years ago, when he started taking medicine for it.

32 posted on 06/27/2010 9:07:03 PM PDT by Think free or die
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To: hadit2here
In general I agree with you, but I thought I'd read that in the summer, even here in Chicago, one can get the Vit D benefit from the sun. This article seems to support that idea.

Dr Holick: We did a study that showed that if you expose a person in a bathing suit to what we call 1 minimal erythemal dose, which is a light pinkness to the skin 24 hours after sun exposure, it’s equivalent to taking between 15 000 and 20 000 IU of vitamin D3. For a white adult, that would be equivalent to being exposed to sunlight in June at noon for about 10-15 minutes on a Cape Cod beach. Your body has a huge capacity to make vitamin D. What’s interesting is that the sunlight destroys any excess vitamin D that your body makes, so you could never become vitamin D intoxicated from sun exposure.

http://www.alternative-therapies.com/resources/web_pdfs/popular/0508_interview.pdf

33 posted on 06/27/2010 9:13:40 PM PDT by jonathonandjennifer
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To: CutePuppy

I take 4,000 IU of vitamin-D a day in the winter time and 2,000 IU a day in the summer time.


34 posted on 06/27/2010 9:27:36 PM PDT by blam
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To: CutePuppy

Vit D is readily available as a supplement. Cheap, too.

I take 5000 IU of D3-5 each day.

Better safe than sorry.


35 posted on 06/27/2010 9:31:35 PM PDT by upchuck (Don't let freedom slip away. After America, there is no place to go ~ Kitty Werthmann - Google her.)
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To: CutePuppy

Vitamin D ping!


36 posted on 06/27/2010 9:33:06 PM PDT by diamond6 (Pray the Rosary to defeat communism and Obamacare!!)
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To: CutePuppy
I am on my second round of 50,000 units of Vitamin D, 3 times a week.

The last round was five months ago and I was on 2,000 units a day of supplemental Vitamin D after that. I travel an hour to and from work during daylight hours every week.

And I'm diabetic. Usually 6 shots a day.

The one thing I notice is that my fingernails get very brittle when I am D depleted.

Better living through modern chemistry.

37 posted on 06/27/2010 9:34:35 PM PDT by Glenn (iamtheresistance.org)
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To: japaneseghost
How many times have you heard a racist say that black people are “inferior” because they have so many diseases, kidney disease, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, etc.

Um... Never? Maybe I don't hang around enough racists to know.

38 posted on 06/27/2010 9:37:50 PM PDT by Yaelle
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To: japaneseghost

Does the good doc have a side business selling Afro-specific Vitamin D supplements? (”The pale northern sun just isn’t up to the job for you folks!”)


39 posted on 06/27/2010 9:43:18 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (I am in America but not of America (per bible: am in the world but not of it))
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To: Exit148

There are many questions left to be answered. Do people who are susceptible to diabetes also have difficulty in either absorbing or maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D? Does supplementing with D actually do anything to help combat diabetes? Is it even possible to raise a diabetic’s D level to the “normal” range?

Just because the 2 conditions coexist, does not mean that attempting to increase the level of vitamin D will necessarily do anything meaningful to prevent the complications of diabetes.


40 posted on 06/27/2010 10:15:13 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: japaneseghost

This is an excellent website for nutritional/medical info:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/


41 posted on 06/27/2010 10:52:24 PM PDT by matthew fuller (2012: Bachman, Bolton, Brewer, Liz Cheney, Coburn, DeMint, Inhofe, Jindal, Palin and Pence.)
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To: CutePuppy

I take extra Vitamin D and it definently makes a difference especially in my mood and I notice I maintain my weight easier. You can’t really overdose on it unlike Vitamin A which is fat soluable and can build up to toxic levels and cause higher blood pressure irritability and headaches. I’ve experienced it myself by accident when taking extra doses of Vit A.

I’ve tried a lot of things but Vit D is the one vitamin I would reccomend. Also if you are stressed, depressed, etc try it you can take double or triple the recommended dose safely. I take 4000ius of D3 twice a day.

Next two things I take are Alpha lipoic Acid 1000mg 3 times a day and Acetyl L-Carinitine 1000mg 3 times a day. I’ve not had a cold for more than a year and I heal faster and feel overall just better.

I also take a Calcium Magnesium Zinc combination sometimes but Im careful because while zinc can help your immune system too much will suppress it. None of this is magic or a cure all but the D, ALA, and ALCAR will make you feel much better if you take it regularly.
They are also inexpensive and safe.

I’d avoid multivitamins personally especially if you are taking them as a catch all. Take


42 posted on 06/27/2010 10:56:09 PM PDT by Maelstorm (Tyranny thrives when the people are silent.)
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To: Former Fetus

I’m type 2 and my doctor told me not to drink milk and i’m not lactose int in fact i don’t think my doctor ever checked anything to do with my vity D ..


43 posted on 06/27/2010 11:05:06 PM PDT by ATOMIC_PUNK (Any man may make a mistake ; none but a fool will persist in it . { Latin proverb })
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To: nnn0jeh

ping


44 posted on 06/28/2010 4:49:17 AM PDT by kalee (The offences we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: nnn0jeh

ping


45 posted on 06/28/2010 4:49:17 AM PDT by kalee (The offences we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: CutePuppy

I often wonder if these studies are funded by vitamin supplement companies.

Because I am 70 yo. and pre-diabetic I read the article and then went to google for info on Vitamin D.

First, best, and cheapest source of Vitamin D appears to be lying out in the sun naked for a couple of hours per week. It probably means that older people have to stay in the sun longer however since one study shows that absorbtion rates dwindle with age. Of course I may die from skin cancers.

Very few foods in nature contain vitamin D. The flesh of fish (such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel) and fish liver oils are among the best sources [4]. Small amounts of vitamin D are found in beef liver, cheese, and egg yolks

I like and drink a lot of milk and almost all our milk is fortified with Vitamin D. —but I have to change from my average of a gallon per week to a gallon per day.

Or I can eat 3 oz. of fresh sockeye salmon every day which is unlikely on my budget.

Or I can take a tbs of cod liver oil daily.

Or I can reflect on a relatively long and fun life and say to hell with it, everything is a trade off, and I’m not going to ruin my remaining years by living in fear and trying to forestall the inevitable.


46 posted on 06/28/2010 6:28:01 AM PDT by wildbill (You're just jealous because the Voices talk only to me.)
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To: japaneseghost

I’ve never heard someone say that.


47 posted on 06/28/2010 6:56:05 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: wildbill

How about just a vitamin D-3 supplement?


48 posted on 06/28/2010 6:58:33 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: Former Fetus

Seriously, check out buttermilk. I forget what I read about it tho. :-)


49 posted on 06/28/2010 6:59:03 AM PDT by Rannug ("When you make peaceful protest impossible, you make violent protest inevitable." JFK)
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To: I_Like_Spam

That is an oversimplification. I have chronic low Vit D. I spend hours a day outside and am anything but sedentary.


50 posted on 06/28/2010 6:59:22 AM PDT by mad_as_he$$ (Sometimes you have to go to dark places to get to the light....)
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