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On Palin's Reading List, C.S. Lewis
WSJ ^

Posted on 12/20/2010 6:57:54 PM PST by roses of sharon

Since Katie Couric first asked the question a couple of years back, journalists continue to pepper Sarah Palin with that classic ice-breaker: "So, what are you reading?" The subject came up again in a recent profile in the New York Times Magazine, and last week Barbara Walters returned to the question in interviewing Mrs. Palin as one of her "10 most fascinating people of 2010."

In both interviews Mrs. Palin cited C.S. Lewis as a favorite author she looks to for inspiration. This prompted talk-show host and comedienne Joy Behar of "The View" to deride Mrs. Palin and her choice of reading, asking: "Aren't those children's books?"

Lewis would likely have appreciated making Mrs. Palin's reading list. But he probably would have appreciated the questions about it even more. For Lewis, one of the best ways to know a person was to know what they read. He was convinced that books defined us and shaped our character.

***

Mrs. Palin is on the right track by giving C.S. Lewis a prominent place on her reading list. Yet Ms. Behar and other Palin critics have dismissed Lewis's work, forgetting that Lewis was a medieval and renaissance scholar at Oxford and the author of several brilliant Christian apologetics. Ms. Behar's dismissal of children's books as less than important makes her a modern-day Eustace, the type of bully who mocks readers of fairy tales as simpletons.

Lewis thought quite the opposite. He thought that fairy tales were the best way to convey truth for children and adults alike. He wrote about this quite often in his letters, and took no shame in reading fairy tales out loud in British pubs with his friend J.R.R. Tolkien, author of the epic "Lord of the Rings" trilogy.

(Excerpt) Read more at online.wsj.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: books; cslewis; freepressforpalin; palin; reading
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"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience." -- C.S. Lewis
1 posted on 12/20/2010 6:57:57 PM PST by roses of sharon
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To: roses of sharon

What’s on Behar’s reading list?


2 posted on 12/20/2010 7:01:08 PM PST by WestTexasWend
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To: roses of sharon

“We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and then bid the geldings to be fruitful.”

—C. S. Lewis


3 posted on 12/20/2010 7:02:37 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: roses of sharon
Lewis wrote much more than children books. His book “Mere Christianity” is classic... and read and reread in my home.
4 posted on 12/20/2010 7:04:06 PM PST by bareford101 (For me, there is no difference in a tolerant, open mind and a cess pool. Both are open to filth.)
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To: All

OK, it’s Hollywood and it’s just a movie but I enjoyed Shadowlands a lot. :p

https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Shadowlands_%28film%29


5 posted on 12/20/2010 7:05:14 PM PST by Irenic
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To: WestTexasWend
What’s on Behar’s reading list?

I'll wager Whoopie Goldberg's Big Book of Manners.

6 posted on 12/20/2010 7:05:35 PM PST by Fester Chugabrew (..)
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To: roses of sharon
I guarantee, "Abolition of Man" 'The Screwtape Letters" and "Mere Christianity" are not not on Kneepad Behar's reading list.
7 posted on 12/20/2010 7:06:22 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: Brices Crossroads; Clyde5445; Lakeshark; Al B.; Virginia Ridgerunner; hoosiermama; CAluvdubya; ...
The lovely photo of her at the link, accompanying this well-written column.


8 posted on 12/20/2010 7:07:33 PM PST by onyx (If you truly support Sarah Palin and want on her busy ping list, let me know!)
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To: Irenic

That’s up next on my netflix queue


9 posted on 12/20/2010 7:07:44 PM PST by porter_knorr (John Adams would be arrested for his thoughts on tyrants today!)
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To: Irenic
"Shadowlands" was far more than a Hollywood movie.
10 posted on 12/20/2010 7:08:13 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: porter_knorr

I have that on VHS, DVD...I’ve watched it a gazillion times and he and the boy, at the end, make me cry GOBS...every time! It’s a box of hankies movie!


11 posted on 12/20/2010 7:11:17 PM PST by Irenic
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To: WestTexasWend

Marx, Trotsky, Stalin, Mao, Lenin, Guevera, Chomsky


12 posted on 12/20/2010 7:11:24 PM PST by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: bareford101

mine, too.


13 posted on 12/20/2010 7:11:32 PM PST by Jude in WV
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To: roses of sharon
You already quoted one of my favorite C.S. Lewis passages for children in part. Here's a fuller version:

"Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. They may be more likely to go to Heaven yet at the same time likelier to make a Hell of earth. This very kindness stings with intolerable insult. To be “cured” against one’s will and cured of states which we may not regard as disease is to be put on a level of those who have not yet reached the age of reason or those who never will; to be classed with infants, imbeciles, and domestic animals."
- C. S. Lewis, The Humanitarian Theory of Punishment, 1930

14 posted on 12/20/2010 7:12:25 PM PST by Always A Marine
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To: roses of sharon
my favorite C.S.Lewis quote
15 posted on 12/20/2010 7:14:04 PM PST by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: hinckley buzzard

Best movie Debra Winger ever made.


16 posted on 12/20/2010 7:15:19 PM PST by Lucius Cornelius Sulla ('“Our own government has become our enemy' - Sheriff Paul Babeu)
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To: roses of sharon

I propose that any post mentioning Boy Jehar be labeled with a 50-Gallon-Drum-Barf-Alert!


17 posted on 12/20/2010 7:16:22 PM PST by rfp1234 (Badgers? We don't need no stinkin' badgers!)
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To: bareford101

“Mere Christianity” is the book that led Chuck Colson to Christ.


18 posted on 12/20/2010 7:17:12 PM PST by Tucker39
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To: roses of sharon

Behar might enjoy the The Screwtape Letters. At least she could relate.


19 posted on 12/20/2010 7:17:12 PM PST by La Lydia
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To: roses of sharon

In their attempts to mock Sarah Palin, they mock themselves and are completely unaware of their lunacy.


20 posted on 12/20/2010 7:17:27 PM PST by Keflavik76
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To: hinckley buzzard

I rewatch Shadowlands twice a year.


21 posted on 12/20/2010 7:18:44 PM PST by Tucker39
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To: roses of sharon

Fantastic, Palin is a C.S. Lewis fan, she just went up another notch and she was already near the bell anyway. What a great lady! And what a surprise..NOT!


22 posted on 12/20/2010 7:19:32 PM PST by HerrBlucher (Defund, repeal, investigate, impeach, convict, jail, celebrate.)
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To: roses of sharon

That’s my favorite C.S. Lewis Quote. Lewis is dismissed because of his effectiveness. He was expert at using his own self reflection as well as his surgical style of reasoning in his writing. The appeal of Lewis to me is his brutal honesty with himself. ‘A Grief Observed’ was a particularly moving book. I found very interesting that a man that was so matter of fact was so good at writing ‘Fairytales’.


23 posted on 12/20/2010 7:19:35 PM PST by Maelstorm (Better to keep your enemy in your sights than in your camp expecting him to guard your back.)
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To: roses of sharon
With regards to the "ladies on the View"


24 posted on 12/20/2010 7:19:58 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country! What else needs said?)
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To: roses of sharon

“Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art... It has no survival value; rather it is one of those things that give value to survival.” -— C. S. Lewis

:::::::::::::::

Critical thinking that is well beyond the wonks of the liberal MSM. She will make a very valuable contribution to the upcoming election, regardless of what she decides to do. We need a hundred more like her, for starters.


25 posted on 12/20/2010 7:20:43 PM PST by EagleUSA
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To: Tucker39

And they could not have picked a better actor to play Lewis than Anthony Hopkins.


26 posted on 12/20/2010 7:21:31 PM PST by HerrBlucher (Defund, repeal, investigate, impeach, convict, jail, celebrate.)
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To: WestTexasWend

She can read?


27 posted on 12/20/2010 7:23:16 PM PST by Altura Ct.
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To: La Lydia

LOL! She will make very tasty demon food.


28 posted on 12/20/2010 7:23:52 PM PST by HerrBlucher (Defund, repeal, investigate, impeach, convict, jail, celebrate.)
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To: hinckley buzzard

“Shadowlands” was far more than a Hollywood movie.
___________________________________________________

I think so...it’s one of my favorite movies.

“Why love, if losing hurts so much? I have no answers anymore: only the life I have lived. Twice in that life I’ve been given the choice: as a boy and as a man. The boy chose safety, the man chooses suffering. The pain now is part of the happiness then. That’s the deal.”


29 posted on 12/20/2010 7:25:00 PM PST by Irenic
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To: WestTexasWend
What’s on Behar’s reading list?

Doubtless only the trite, the trivial, and the terribly grown-up (after the manner of the apostate Queen Susan of Narnia), the sort of stuff suited to reading only by those whose intellect is the result of the decayed education that Lewis's The Abolition of Man set out to decry on its way to becoming a prophecy of the whole state of Western culture at the turn of the 21st Christian century.

30 posted on 12/20/2010 7:25:00 PM PST by The_Reader_David (And when they behead your own people in the wars which are to come, then you will know. . .)
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To: WestTexasWend

Behar’s list probably includes a bathroom wall.


31 posted on 12/20/2010 7:26:20 PM PST by Trick or Treat (Palin/Bachmann 2012!)
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To: bareford101

“His book “Mere Christianity” is classic... and read and reread in my home.”

His letters to Tolkien and Dorothy Sayers (aside from her Lord Peter Whimsey’s Novels, which are my favorites, a very serious writer) a brilliant man and communicator, he is terrific to read. His letters are fascinating. From the sounds of it you are probably already familiar with them;

C. S. Lewis was a prolific letter writer, and his personal correspondence reveals much of his private life, reflections, friendships, and the progress of his thought. This second of a three-volume collection contains the letters Lewis wrote after his conversion to Christianity, as he began a lifetime of serious writing. Lewis corresponded with many of the twentieth century’s major literary figures, including J. R. R. Tolkien and Dorothy Sayers. Here we encounter a surge of letters in response to a new audience of laypeople who wrote to him after the great success of his BBC radio broadcasts during World War II — talks that would ultimately become his masterwork, Mere Christianity.”

http://www.harpercollins.com/books/Collected-Letters-C-S-Lewis-Box-Set-C-S-Lewis/?isbn=9780060882280


32 posted on 12/20/2010 7:27:09 PM PST by jessduntno ("'How fortunate for governments that the people they administer don't think." - Adolph Hitler)
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To: Trick or Treat

“Behar’s list probably includes a bathroom wall.”

Just reading, or writing her phone number?


33 posted on 12/20/2010 7:28:34 PM PST by jessduntno ("'How fortunate for governments that the people they administer don't think." - Adolph Hitler)
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To: roses of sharon; Kolokotronis

How wonderful it would be if Sarah became Orthodox Christian!

http://orthodoxwiki.org/C._S._Lewis


34 posted on 12/20/2010 7:31:48 PM PST by eleni121 (Prepare the table, watch in the watchtower, eat, drink: arise ye princes, and prepare the shield)
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To: Trick or Treat

Behar’s list probably includes a bathroom wall.


Great line! LOL


35 posted on 12/20/2010 7:34:02 PM PST by eleni121 (Prepare the table, watch in the watchtower, eat, drink: arise ye princes, and prepare the shield)
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To: hinckley buzzard

By the way; that little boy, Douglas Gresham, went on to start a ministry of his own. Back in the late 80s or early 90s they had him as a guest on The 700 Club. I have that segment of the show on a VHS tape somewhere.

He said that it was a joy to be with them when Lewis and his mother Joy were married. He said both of them were so intelligent they used to play Scrabble in several languages at once. (I could do that....in vulgarity, profanity and English). Doug said that in his late teens he rebelled, got into drugs, etc., but eventually surrendered to Christ, and later started a ministry, in Australia or New Zealand, if I’m not mistaken.


36 posted on 12/20/2010 7:34:07 PM PST by Tucker39
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To: roses of sharon

A powerful declaration!


37 posted on 12/20/2010 7:36:30 PM PST by jennings2004 (Sarah Palin: "The bright light at the end of a very dark tunnel!")
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To: onyx

Just stunning! WOW!!


38 posted on 12/20/2010 7:37:59 PM PST by jennings2004 (Sarah Palin: "The bright light at the end of a very dark tunnel!")
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To: GreyFriar

You flatter her. She probaby reads People and the National Enquirer.

So do I at the beauty shop.


39 posted on 12/20/2010 7:41:08 PM PST by altura
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To: Maelstorm

His sci fi trilogy is excellent also.


40 posted on 12/20/2010 7:42:40 PM PST by altura
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To: eleni121
Even better if she becomes Catholic. Why I Am A Catholic By G. K. Chesterton From Twelve Modern Apostles and Their Creeds (1926) Reprinted in The Collected Works of G.K. Chesterton, Vol. 3 Ignatius Press 1990 The difficulty of explaining "why I am a Catholic" is that there are ten thousand reasons all amounting to one reason: that Catholicism is true. I could fill all my space with separate sentences each beginning with the words, "It is the only thing that . . ." As, for instance, (1) It is the only thing that really prevents a sin from being a secret. (2) It is the only thing in which the superior cannot be superior; in the sense of supercilious. (3) It is the only thing that frees a man from the degrading slavery of being a child of his age. (4) It is the only thing that talks as if it were the truth; as if it were a real messenger refusing to tamper with a real message. (5) It is the only type of Christianity that really contains every type of man; even the respectable man. (6) It is the only large attempt to change the world from the inside; working through wills and not laws; and so on. Or I might treat the matter personally and describe my own conversion; but I happen to have a strong feeling that this method makes the business look much smaller than it really is. Numbers of much better men have been sincerely converted to much worse religions. I would much prefer to attempt to say here of the Catholic Church precisely the things that cannot be said even of its very respectable rivals. In short, I would say chiefly of the Catholic Church that it is catholic. I would rather try to suggest that it is not only larger than me, but larger than anything in the world; that it is indeed larger than the world. But since in this short space I can only take a section, I will consider it in its capacity of a guardian of the truth. The other day a well-known writer, otherwise quite well-informed, said that the Catholic Church is always the enemy of new ideas. It probably did not occur to him that his own remark was not exactly in the nature of a new idea. It is one of the notions that Catholics have to be continually refuting, because it is such a very old idea. Indeed, those who complain that Catholicism cannot say anything new, seldom think it necessary to say anything new about Catholicism. As a matter of fact, a real study of history will show it to be curiously contrary to the fact. In so far as the ideas really are ideas, and in so far as any such ideas can be new, Catholics have continually suffered through supporting them when they were really new; when they were much too new to find any other support. The Catholic was not only first in the field but alone in the field; and there was as yet nobody to understand what he had found there. Thus, for instance, nearly two hundred years before the Declaration of Independence and the French Revolution, in an age devoted to the pride and praise of princes, Cardinal Bellarmine and Suarez the Spaniard laid down lucidly the whole theory of real democracy. But in that age of Divine Right they only produced the impression of being sophistical and sanguinary Jesuits, creeping about with daggers to effect the murder of kings. So, again, the Casuists of the Catholic schools said all that can really be said for the problem plays and problem novels of our own time, two hundred years before they were written. They said that there really are problems of moral conduct; but they had the misfortune to say it two hundred years too soon. In a time of tub-thumping fanaticism and free and easy vituperation, they merely got themselves called liars and shufflers for being psychologists before psychology was the fashion. It would be easy to give any number of other examples down to the present day, and the case of ideas that are still too new to be understood. There are passages in Pope Leo's [Also known as , released in 1891] which are only now beginning to be used as hints for social movements much newer than socialism. And when Mr. Belloc wrote about the Servile State, he advanced an economic theory so original that hardly anybody has yet realized what it is. A few centuries hence, other people will probably repeat it, and repeat it wrong. And then, if Catholics object, their protest will be easily explained by the well-known fact that Catholics never care for new ideas. Nevertheless, the man who made that remark about Catholics meant something; and it is only fair to him to understand it rather more clearly than he stated it. What he meant was that, in the modern world, the Catholic Church is in fact the enemy of many influential fashions; most of which still claim to be new, though many of them are beginning to be a little stale. In other words, in so far as he meant that the Church often attacks what the world at any given moment supports, he was perfectly right . The Church does often set herself against the fashion of this world that passes away; and she has experience enough to know how very rapidly it does pass away. But to understand exactly what is involved, it is necessary to take a rather larger view and consider the ultimate nature of the ideas in question, to consider, so to speak, the idea of the idea. Nine out of ten of what we call new ideas are simply old mistakes. The Catholic Church has for one of her chief duties that of preventing people from making those old mistakes; from making them over and over again forever, as people always do if they are left to themselves. The truth about the Catholic attitude towards heresy, or as some would say, towards liberty, can best be expressed perhaps by the metaphor of a map. The Catholic Church carries a sort of map of the mind which looks like the map of a maze, but which is in fact a guide to the maze. It has been compiled from knowledge which, even considered as human knowledge, is quite without any human parallel. There is no other case of one continuous intelligent institution that has been thinking about thinking for two thousand years. Its experience naturally covers nearly all experiences; and especially nearly all errors. The result is a map in which all the blind alleys and bad roads are clearly marked, all the ways that have been shown to be worthless by the best of all evidence: the evidence of those who have gone down them. On this map of the mind the errors are marked as exceptions. The greater part of it consists of playgrounds and happy hunting-fields, where the mind may have as much liberty as it likes; not to mention any number of intellectual battle-fields in which the battle is indefinitely open and undecided. But it does definitely take the responsibility of marking certain roads as leading nowhere or leading to destruction, to a blank wall, or a sheer precipice. By this means, it does prevent men from wasting their time or losing their lives upon paths that have been found futile or disastrous again and again in the past, but which might otherwise entrap travelers again and again in the future. The Church does make herself responsible for warning her people against these; and upon these the real issue of the case depends. She does dogmatically defend humanity from its worst foes, those hoary and horrible and devouring monsters of the old mistakes. Now all these false issues have a way of looking quite fresh, especially to a fresh generation. Their first statement always sounds harmless and plausible. I will give only two examples. It sounds harmless to say, as most modern people have said: "Actions are only wrong if they are bad for society." Follow it out, and sooner or later you will have the inhumanity of a hive or a heathen city, establishing slavery as the cheapest and most certain means of production, torturing the slaves for evidence because the individual is nothing to the State, declaring that an innocent man must die for the people, as did the murderers of Christ. Then, perhaps, you will go back to Catholic definitions, and find that the Church, while she also says it is our duty to work for society, says other things also which forbid individual injustice. Or again, it sounds quite pious to say, "Our moral conflict should end with a victory of the spiritual over the material." Follow it out, and you may end in the madness of the Manicheans, saying that a suicide is good because it is a sacrifice, that a sexual perversion is good because it produces no life, that the devil made the sun and moon because they are material. Then you may begin to guess why Catholicism insists that there are evil spirits as well as good; and that materials also may be sacred, as in the Incarnation or the Mass, in the sacrament of marriage or the resurrection of the body. Now there is no other corporate mind in the world that is thus on the watch to prevent minds from going wrong. The policeman comes too late, when he tries to prevent men from going wrong. The doctor comes too late, for he only comes to lock up a madman, not to advise a sane man on how not to go mad. And all other sects and schools are inadequate for the purpose. This is not because each of them may not contain a truth, but precisely because each of them does contain a truth; and is content to contain a truth. None of the others really pretends to contain the truth. None of the others, that is, really pretends to be looking out in all directions at once. The Church is not merely armed against the heresies of the past or even of the present, but equally against those of the future, that may be the exact opposite of those of the present. Catholicism is not ritualism; it may in the future be fighting some sort of superstitious and idolatrous exaggeration of ritual. Catholicism is not asceticism; it has again and again in the past repressed fanatical and cruel exaggerations of asceticism. Catholicism is not mere mysticism; it is even now defending human reason against the mere mysticism of the Pragmatists. Thus, when the world went Puritan in the seventeenth century, the Church was charged with pushing charity to the point of sophistry, with making everything easy with the laxity of the confessional. Now that the world is not going Puritan but Pagan, it is the Church that is everywhere protesting against a Pagan laxity in dress or manners. It is doing what the Puritans wanted done when it is really wanted. In all probability, all that is best in Protestantism will only survive in Catholicism; and in that sense all Catholics will still be Puritans when all Puritans are Pagans. Thus, for instance, Catholicism, in a sense little understood, stands outside a quarrel like that of Darwinism at Dayton. It stands outside it because it stands all around it, as a house stands all around two incongruous pieces of furniture. It is no sectarian boast to say it is before and after and beyond all these things in all directions. It is impartial in a fight between the Fundamentalist and the theory of the Origin of Species, because it goes back to an origin before that Origin; because it is more fundamental than Fundamentalism. It knows where the Bible came from. It also knows where most of the theories of Evolution go to. It knows there were many other Gospels besides the Four Gospels, and that the others were only eliminated by the authority of the Catholic Church. It knows there are many other evolutionary theories besides the Darwinian theory; and that the latter is quite likely to be eliminated by later science. It does not, in the conventional phrase, accept the conclusions of science, for the simple reason that science has not concluded. To conclude is to shut up; and the man of science is not at all likely to shut up. It does not, in the conventional phrase, believe what the Bible says, for the simple reason that the Bible does not say anything. You cannot put a book in the witness-box and ask it what it really means. The Fundamentalist controversy itself destroys Fundamentalism. The Bible by itself cannot be a basis of agreement when it is a cause of disagreement; it cannot be the common ground of Christians when some take it allegorically and some literally. The Catholic refers it to something that can say something, to the living, consistent, and continuous mind of which I have spoken; the highest mind of man guided by God. Every moment increases for us the moral necessity for such an immortal mind. We must have something that will hold the four corners of the world still, while we make our social experiments or build our Utopias. For instance, we must have a final agreement, if only on the truism of human brotherhood, that will resist some reaction of human brutality. Nothing is more likely just now than that the corruption of representative government will lead to the rich breaking loose altogether, and trampling on all the traditions of equality with mere pagan pride. We must have the truisms everywhere recognized as true. We must prevent mere reaction and the dreary repetition of the old mistakes. We must make the intellectual world safe for democracy. But in the conditions of modern mental anarchy, neither that nor any other ideal is safe. just as Protestants appealed from priests to the Bible, and did not realize that the Bible also could be questioned, so republicans appealed from kings to the people, and did not realize that the people also could be defied. There is no end to the dissolution of ideas, the destruction of all tests of truth, that has become possible since men abandoned the attempt to keep a central and civilized Truth, to contain all truths and trace out and refute all errors. Since then, each group has taken one truth at a time and spent the time in turning it into a falsehood. We have had nothing but movements; or in other words, monomanias. But the Church is not a movement but a meeting-place; the trysting-place of all the truths in the world.
41 posted on 12/20/2010 7:42:50 PM PST by Steelfish (ui)
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To: Always A Marine; All

Thanks so much for that full quote!

And what a great thread everyone....C.S. Lewis always makes me feel good.


42 posted on 12/20/2010 7:45:43 PM PST by roses of sharon (I can do all things through Him who strengthens me. Philippians 4:13)
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To: jennings2004

And to know that God gave her the beautiful heart and soul to match her face.


43 posted on 12/20/2010 7:46:31 PM PST by onyx (If you truly support Sarah Palin and want on her busy ping list, let me know!)
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To: Steelfish

Actually the Eastern Orthodox Church is the ONE HOLY and APOSTOLIC CATHOLIC Church.

We pray that the Latins will return to the fold. We pray for unity.


44 posted on 12/20/2010 7:50:45 PM PST by eleni121 (Prepare the table, watch in the watchtower, eat, drink: arise ye princes, and prepare the shield)
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To: altura

I read them when I was 13 or so. I loved the Hross but I need to read them again...they were a *lot* for a young teen to handle but I tried. :)


45 posted on 12/20/2010 7:52:08 PM PST by Kieri (The Conservatrarian)
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To: bareford101

His “A Grief Observed” is beautiful, and has been a great comfort in my bereavement.


46 posted on 12/20/2010 7:56:50 PM PST by sometime lurker
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To: Fester Chugabrew

Behar can read?


47 posted on 12/20/2010 7:58:24 PM PST by Exton1
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To: sometime lurker

I agree with you. His words about the grief being new over and over again really touched a nerve with me.


48 posted on 12/20/2010 7:58:33 PM PST by bareford101 (For me, there is no difference in a tolerant, open mind and a cess pool. Both are open to filth.)
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To: jessduntno

LOL


49 posted on 12/20/2010 7:59:30 PM PST by Exton1
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To: Joe 6-pack

ping


50 posted on 12/20/2010 8:02:43 PM PST by definitelynotaliberal
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