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The Gettysburg Reunion of 1913
Huntington News ^ | June 16, 2011 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 06/17/2011 3:29:43 PM PDT by BigReb555

Fifty years had passed since the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1st- 3rd, 1863.

(Excerpt) Read more at huntingtonnews.net ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: confederate; union
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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America will celebrate her 235th birthday on July 4th!

Fifty years had passed since the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1st- 3rd, 1863, when the Veterans of Blue and Gray braved the summer heat to meet again in Gettysburg.

America celebrated her 137th birthday, nearly a century ago, when….

From June 29 to July 4, 1913, 53,407 Confederate and Union Veterans of the War Between the States came to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania for a Reunion and encampment. Veterans came from 47 of the 48 states of the Union and the Chief Surgeon said of the event, quote “Never before in the world’s history had so great a number of men advanced in years been assembled under field conditions” unquote.

It was the largest combined reunion of War Between the States Veterans.

Do you know who Gen. Robert Edward Lee, Major Gen. George Edward Pickett and Major Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain were? Are children still taught about these men and all those who met on the famous War Between the States battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania? Some call the Gettysburg Battlefield the most haunted place in America because so many thousands died on that fateful month of July 1863.

“Comrades and friends, these splendid statues of marble and granite and bronze shall finally crumble to dust, and in the ages to come, will perhaps be forgotten, but the spirit that has called this great assembly of our people together, on this field, shall live forever.” -----Dr. Nathaniel D. Cox at 1913 Gettysburg Reunion

The youngest Veteran was reported to be 61 and the oldest was 112 years young.

The United States and Confederate flags flew side by side at the Gettysburg soldier’s reunion of honored men who had been enemies on the field of battle.

The State of Pennsylvania hosted the 1913 reunion at the insisting of state Governor John K. Tener. Tener also encouraged other states to arrange rail transportation for the participants. Down South in Dixie, the United Daughters of the Confederacy helped raise money for the transportation and uniforms for their Confederate Veterans.

The soldiers of Blue and Gray, Black and White, came with heads held high and full of war stories. It is written that the hosts did not count on Black Confederates attending the meeting and had no place to put them but the White Confederates made room for their Southern brothers. Black Union veterans also attended this event.

It is written that nearly 700,000 meals were served that included fried chicken, roast pork sandwiches, ice cream and Georgia watermelon. The temperature soared to 100 degrees and almost 10,000 veterans were treated for heat exhaustion and several hundred more were hospitalized. The United States Army was also present in support and it’s written that the old men loved the attention.

A highlight of the reunion was the Confederate Veterans walk on the path of Gen. George Pickett’s charge that was greeted, this time, by a handshake from the Union Veterans.

President Woodrow Wilson said about these men, Quote

“These venerable men crowding here to this famous field have set us a great example of devotion and utter sacrifice. They were willing to die that the people might live. But their task is done. Their day in turned into evening. They look to us to perfect what they established. Their work is handed to us, to be done in another way but not in another spirit. Our day is not over; it is upon us in full tide” unquote.

The War Between the States Sesquicentennial, 150th Anniversary, runs 2011 through 2015. The Georgia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans joins the nation in remembering this historic time in our nation’s history. See information at: http://www.150wbts.org/

1 posted on 06/17/2011 3:29:45 PM PDT by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555

There is a fantastic painting of Joshua Chamberlain, who died not long after this reunion, at Little Round Top in his suit in 1913 looking out at ghosts doing battle.


2 posted on 06/17/2011 3:34:31 PM PDT by LS ("Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually." (Hendrix))
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To: BigReb555

May God bless them in their final rest for upholding our sacred ideals.


3 posted on 06/17/2011 3:45:36 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: BigReb555
Brave and noble men all. Those men, North and South, were countrymen and not natural enemies. Too bad that the secessionists tried to divide that which should have never been divided for the furtherance of their narrow political interests.
4 posted on 06/17/2011 3:47:02 PM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

It is written that the hosts did not count on Black Confederates attending the meeting and had no place to put them but the White Confederates made room for their Southern brothers.


5 posted on 06/17/2011 3:54:13 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: BigReb555

Oh how they mowed them down. What a waste.

It is said that man changes history by war. I agree. How many potential leaders were killed in that battle.


6 posted on 06/17/2011 3:55:31 PM PDT by crz
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

7 posted on 06/17/2011 3:56:15 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: BigReb555
For our families that fought on both sides terrible war - That haunting song from Ken Burns, The Civil War.

Ashokan Farewell

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QGKlZLgz3w

8 posted on 06/17/2011 4:10:30 PM PDT by NavyCanDo
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To: BigReb555

One interesting fact which I am sure most people would never guess is that casualties were just about identical for both armies.

In fact the best sources show the Confederacy lost just a tad less than the Union.


9 posted on 06/17/2011 4:19:09 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: crz
"How many potential leaders were killed in that battle."

And how many were brought about because of it? In Chapter 5 of CS Lewis's Screwtape Letters, the junior demon, Wormwood, writes his uncle with delight because war has broken out among men. His uncle cautions him to not be too elated, because, he advises, the struggles and deprivations of war, horrid though they are, also drive people towards God, and can bring about tremendous acts of self sacrifice, compassion and courage in the face of adversity and death.

10 posted on 06/17/2011 4:19:58 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: LS

Just an odd tidbit of info:

George Pickett’s wife “Sallie” attended that reunion with a date - a former UNION General. I did some research for a biographer of Pickett and he sent me to a woman’s house in Arlington VA - a relative of Sallie - she had letters etc back and forth with this General..It’s been 15 years so I can’t remember his name but he wasn’t well known.


11 posted on 06/17/2011 4:20:03 PM PDT by 30Moves
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To: BigReb555

Video 75th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, 1938. Footage of Confederate and Union veterans shaking hands over a stone wall. Rebels give a Rebel yell

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1byof4IAHk&feature=related


12 posted on 06/17/2011 4:20:21 PM PDT by NavyCanDo
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To: central_va
It is written that the hosts did not count on Black Confederates attending the meeting and had no place to put them but the White Confederates made room for their Southern brothers.

Too bad those guys hadn't got in touch with Confederate big shot Howell Cobb who said:

"if slaves seem good soldiers, then our whole theory of slavery is wrong."

13 posted on 06/17/2011 4:21:33 PM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: LS

If you have a link to this painting, could you please provide it? I’d love to see it.


14 posted on 06/17/2011 4:42:34 PM PDT by Stonewall Jackson (Democrats: "You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy.")
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To: BigReb555
My ggg-grandfather fought at Culps's Hill with the 29th Pennsylvania Volunteers.


Colonel Patrick O'Rorke was killed at Little Round Top and is buried a few miles from where I live.

15 posted on 06/17/2011 4:45:04 PM PDT by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: NavyCanDo

NavyCanDo (great name!): here is a link to a performance by the Author of “Ashokan Farewell” , Jay Ungar, recorded in a castle in Scotland on the BBC series “The Original Transatlantic Sessions”.

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vN_ZKB_Hdbo

Jay describes a little how the tune came about and they then play what is arguably the most heart rending version one could find with a final scene of the Scottish hills outside. Jay wrote the tune in 1982 in reaction to the closing day of an annual Fiddle & Dance Camp that Jay and his wife ran in NY- and what he described as a deep sense of loss. It is a song that is new and yet seems to be ancient.

It features, on fiddles Jay Ungar, Aly Bain (Boys of the Lough), Mark O’Connor(child prodigy and virtuoso), Charlie McKerron, Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh and Martyn Bennett, on bass Molly Mason. On guitar Russ Barenberg, with Cathal McConnell on flute and Phil Cunningham on piano accordion.
Just beautiful.

Deo Vindice.


16 posted on 06/17/2011 5:01:15 PM PDT by John S Mosby (Sic Semper Tyrannis)
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To: BigReb555

“During the 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1913, arrangements were made for a joint reunion of Union and Confederate veterans. The commission in charge of the event made sure they had enough accommodations for the black Union veterans, but were completely surprised when unexpected black Confederates arrived. The white Confederates immediately welcomed their old comrades, gave them one of their tents, and “saw to their every need”. Nearly every Confederate reunion included blacks that served with them, wearing the gray.”

Yes, there were more than a few Blacks who fought in the Confederate Army and Navy. But it is not PC to generally acknowledge such today.

“There are at the present moment many colored men in the Confederate Army as real soldiers, having muskets on their shoulders, bullets in their pockets, ready to shoot down loyal troops and doing all that soldiers may do to destroy the Federal government. There were such soldiers at Manassas and they are probably still Negros in the Confederate Army”.......Frederick Douglas, Douglas Monthly, Sept 1861, PP/ 516

Read more here: http://www.scv-kirby-smith.org/Black%20Confederate.htm


17 posted on 06/17/2011 5:02:42 PM PDT by Sea Parrot
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To: BigReb555

ping for later


18 posted on 06/17/2011 5:11:55 PM PDT by BlackElk (Dean of Discipline, Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club: Burn 'em Bright!!!)
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To: Stonewall Jackson

Well, I did a search and can’t find it. Oddly, another person asked “Answer.com” the same question, noting he had seen this painting, and there was no real answer. So I know it exists. But it apparently is not Troiani or Kunstler, two of the more famous Civil War artists.


19 posted on 06/17/2011 5:12:52 PM PDT by LS ("Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually." (Hendrix))
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To: yarddog
One interesting fact which I am sure most people would never guess is that casualties were just about identical for both armies. In fact the best sources show the Confederacy lost just a tad less than the Union,

Lincoln knew that given enough battles with equal or even higher Union losses the Union would still win the war. He called this: "the terrible arithmetic". The Confederate white population was less than 6 million. There were 22 million in the North. There was never really any doubt which side would win the war if the Union remained determined to keep fighting.

20 posted on 06/17/2011 5:14:32 PM PDT by Upstate NY Guy
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

Sherman and Grant thought very very poorly of blacks as soldiers and would not let any fight in their armies. But yet blacks served in other parts of the union armies (albeit they had to buy their own uniforms and were paid less).

Numerous blacks served in the Southern armies too, regardless of what a few folks may have thought about it. Many southern generals (like Lee) were in favor of having blacks in the southern armies. Get over it.


21 posted on 06/17/2011 5:37:28 PM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis (Want to make $$$? It's easy! Use FR as a platform to pimp your blog for hits!!!)
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To: BigReb555

I have seen photos of these old veterans at various reunions and I think “boy they look old”. Then I realize I am now about the same age as they were then.

I served in Viet Nam in 1965 to 1966, it has been about 45 years. I wonder if we will have a 50 year reunion? I wonder if we will look as old?


22 posted on 06/17/2011 5:57:33 PM PDT by CIB-173RDABN (California does not have a money problem, it has a spending problem.)
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To: Upstate NY Guy

Taken as a whole, actual combat deaths for either side cannot be compared to the much greater death toll attributed to disease etc. But in combat causalities, the North suffered many more than the South.

The NRA of today was birthed in 1871 as a direct response to faults which arose during the civil war. In that war, as a whole, the superior marksmanship of the average Confederate troops (more rural) was far superior to those of the Union Army. (more urban)

In battles of the western campaigns, the rural western army troops of both sides were much more evenly matched as to having a lifelong familiarity with firearms and being accurate with same, and the causality ratios reflected this.

The NRA’s purpose was to correct that acknowledged accuracy imbalance of the civil war, to encourage and teach marksmanship for all American civilians, especially the young.

http://www.nrahq.org/history.asp


23 posted on 06/17/2011 6:03:24 PM PDT by Sea Parrot
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To: BigReb555
It is written that the hosts did not count on Black Confederates attending the meeting and had no place to put them but the White Confederates made room for their Southern brothers.

I didn't know this, but frankly it doesn't surprise me one bit.

24 posted on 06/17/2011 7:07:59 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: central_va

...that place they had for them, was it in the front?


25 posted on 06/17/2011 7:39:24 PM PDT by RaceBannon (Ron Paul is to the Constitution what Fred Phelps is to the Bible.)
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To: RaceBannon; BigReb555

I’m sure cva will regale us with a made up answer to an equally made up assertion. Or maybe BigReb555 would like to take a whack at it.


26 posted on 06/17/2011 7:50:17 PM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: Sea Parrot
But in combat causalities, the North suffered many more than the South.

Major reason had little to do with shooting skill.

To win, the South had only to avoid losing. They therefore, especially after Gettysburg when most of the casualties occurred, normally fought on the defensive from behind fortifications. When Lee first took command, his troops called him Granny Lee because he was always making them dig in. It is to be expected that assaulting fortifications will be more costly than defending them, that's the whole point of digging in.

Due to the more constricted terrain, there was less room for maneuver on the eastern front, and much more trench warfare than in the west.

Many exceptions, of course, to these generalities.

27 posted on 06/17/2011 7:50:41 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: nnn0jeh

ping


28 posted on 06/17/2011 7:52:42 PM PDT by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
Sherman and Grant thought very very poorly of blacks as soldiers and would not let any fight in their armies.

Apparently true of Sherman. Not true of Grant.

One case I'm familiar with was the Battle of the Crater, where a black regiment had been specially trained to lead the attack after the detonation of the mine. In an early case of political correctness, the black unit was replaced at the last moment by an untrained white unit, which bungled the operation and turned it from a likely great Union victory into a major Union defeat.

Three of the 17 regiments that blocked Confederate escape at Appamatox Courthouse were black.

From March 1864 on, Grant was General in Chief, so all troops, including all black troops, were under his command.

He may or may not have thought poorly of them, but he was certainly willing to let them fight for him.

Grant, as President, fought more effectively for the rights of blacks and freedmen than any president of the 19th century.

29 posted on 06/17/2011 8:02:47 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: BigReb555

Just finished a biography of Richard Gatling.

If Union supply officers had been a little more imaginative, they could have had 50 or 100 Gatling guns in the line on Cemetery Ridge.

Could have ended the war right there.


30 posted on 06/17/2011 8:06:37 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis

You are incorrect. Sherman had many in his army, as did Grant. Grant also depended on black soldiers in his army to act as guides as he cut off Vicksburg. A black division figured prominently at the Battle of the Crater. Sherman depended on Black soldiers as he cut across Georgia, and in his linkup to the Atlantic Coast.

Of all the ‘Black Confederates’ at Gettysburg, apparently they all fit in a single tent.


31 posted on 06/17/2011 8:45:22 PM PDT by donmeaker ("Get off my lawn..." Clint Eastwood, Green Ford Torino)
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To: Sea Parrot

When counting casualties, keep in mind that Lee frequently didn’t turn in correct casualty reports. The south couldn’t stand the truth. His whole army was nearly gone already at Appomattox Courthouse. Some he had shot for desertion, and then didn’t report the number he had shot.


32 posted on 06/17/2011 8:49:38 PM PDT by donmeaker ("Get off my lawn..." Clint Eastwood, Green Ford Torino)
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To: LS

An image of the painting is here:

http://jessicajewettonline.blogspot.com/2011/04/what-does-civil-war-mean-to-me.html

It’s the only one I found when I googled it, and the site doesn’t give any details.


33 posted on 06/17/2011 10:33:47 PM PDT by PLMerite (Shut the Beyotch Down!)
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To: BigReb555

Too bad the JACKASS party didn’t learn from their mistake,.


34 posted on 06/17/2011 10:54:44 PM PDT by RasterMaster (We the tax-payer subsidize DUh-bama's failures)
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To: LS

Here you go:

http://www.lloydgarrison.com/wargallery.htm

There are two of J. Chamberlain and ghosts.


35 posted on 06/17/2011 10:55:15 PM PDT by PLMerite (Shut the Beyotch Down!)
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To: BigReb555

Hang all secessionist JACKASSES!


36 posted on 06/17/2011 10:59:36 PM PDT by RasterMaster (We the tax-payer subsidize DUh-bama's failures)
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To: donmeaker

“When counting casualties, keep in mind that Lee frequently didn’t turn in correct casualty reports. The south couldn’t stand the truth. His whole army was nearly gone already at Appomattox Courthouse. Some he had shot for desertion, and then didn’t report the number he had shot.”

Excuse me, but do you have provenance for those statements?

So called desertions in the Confederate Army should not be confused with same in the Union. Many Confederate soldiers would simply go AWOL, go home and put in, or harvest a crop, to keep their families from starving, then return to their units to fight again. This was widely known and understood by most Confederate commanders, executing such men was not good strategy, killing a man willing to fight, made for one less soldier in battle.

IIRC, President Lincoln pardoned very few men condemned to death for desertion. But President Davis pardoned the majority of deserters when pertinent facts and extenuating circumstances were made known, and except in extreme cases, very seldom approved their death sentences.


37 posted on 06/17/2011 11:31:40 PM PDT by Sea Parrot
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To: Sherman Logan

The South of necessity had always mostly fought defensive battles up to Gettysburg. When Lee against advice from all his subordinate officers, got his nose wide and PO, attacked a superior enemy in defensive positions. The battle cry of the Union troops at Gettysburg was “Fredericksburg” from battle of same name where they suffered huge losses when situation was the reverse.

The actual trench warfare you reference did not come into being until last months of the war around Petersburg, VA.

I think the best defensive Confederate General was Joe Johnston, where in the Hundred Days Battle in Georgia he so skillfully frustrated Sherman’s advance on Atlanta. But after much back stabbing politics, President Davis relieved and replaced him with General Hood. Who immediately went out in front of Atlanta, attacked Sherman in a series of battles, and was soundly defeated for his efforts.

Hood in1864, IMO, totally destroyed the Confederate Army of Tennessee, when against all advice, stupidly attacked a much superior foe who was in very strong defensive positions at the Battle of Franklin TN.


38 posted on 06/18/2011 12:27:37 AM PDT by Sea Parrot
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To: PLMerite

Thank you. So, it’s called “Chamberlain.”


39 posted on 06/18/2011 5:40:21 AM PDT by LS ("Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually." (Hendrix))
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To: Stonewall Jackson
Here you are, and the title is "Chamberlain" by Lloyd Garrison.

http://www.lloydgarrison.com/wargallery.htm

40 posted on 06/18/2011 5:41:54 AM PDT by LS ("Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually." (Hendrix))
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To: DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
. Many southern generals (like Lee) were in favor of having blacks in the southern armies. Get over it

If it had been up to many Southern generals like Virginians Lee and George Thomas, there would have been no secession at all. My disdain is for the secessionist politicians.

41 posted on 06/18/2011 7:12:53 AM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
. Many southern generals (like Lee) were in favor of having blacks in the southern armies. Get over it

If it had been up to many Southern generals like Virginians Lee and George Thomas, there would have been no secession at all. My disdain is for the secessionist politicians.

42 posted on 06/18/2011 7:12:59 AM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: Sea Parrot
I think the best defensive Confederate General was Joe Johnston, where in the Hundred Days Battle in Georgia he so skillfully frustrated Sherman’s advance on Atlanta.

Old Joe certainly was more effective than Hood. However, his skillful maneuvers always ended in retreats, not surprisingly since he was usually outnumbered 2 to 1.

Over the entire campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta in which he so skillfully fought Sherman, he retreated every time. Hood, OTOH, attacked and was quickly clobbered.

The only difference in the outcome was how long it took. A purely defensive strategy can never defeat the enemy militarily, although it can wear him down until he gives up and goes home, which was the sole CSA hope in the last two years of the war.

A lot of people trash the decision by Lee and Davis to invade the north in the Gettysburg campaign. I don't. After the failure of hopes for foreign intervention, it was the only realistic hope for winning southern independence.

Lee never really wanted to fight at Gettysburg and in another location he very well might have won.

Even at Gettysburg itself, the fate of the battle and of the South hung in the scales at least half a dozen times, and could easily have come down on the other side.

Had Lee been able to put together a victory as complete as Chancellorsville or Second Bull Run, which he came very close to doing, he could have marched on and probably occupied Washington. Whether this would have ended the war is anybody's guess. Certainly the CSA did not have the military potential to overwhelm the Union in purely military terms, but Union morale and confidence might have crumbled to point they would have accepted southern independence.

IOW, Lee's second invasion of the North was the moral equivalent of Hood's battles for Atlanta, though much better managed. A last desperate gamble for victory chosen over the certainty of slow but well-managed defeat.

43 posted on 06/18/2011 8:47:48 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Sea Parrot

Grant was widely considered and called a butcher at the time and since because of the high casualties his troops suffered.

It is therefore interesting to learn that of all the major generals of the war, the one with the highest casualty rate for troops under his command was ... R. E. Lee.

Grant, I believe, came in second.


44 posted on 06/18/2011 9:02:46 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Sea Parrot

Grant was widely considered and called a butcher at the time and since because of the high casualties his troops suffered.

It is therefore interesting to learn that of all the major generals of the war, the one with the highest casualty rate for troops under his command was ... R. E. Lee.

Grant, I believe, came in second.


45 posted on 06/18/2011 9:02:53 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: NavyCanDo

That is sweet


46 posted on 06/18/2011 9:22:04 AM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: Sherman Logan
While they saw heavy action in several battles, black troops were never welcomed into the ranks of the two main armies commanded by Ulysses S. Grant and W. T. Sherman. Grant reluctantly agreed that black men could one day become soldiers, but he never allowed them to be part of his Army of the Potomac. The blacks who served in the east were in the Army of the James.

Sherman was unapologetic in his racism and dislike of black soldiers and never allowed them to be part of his army as soldiers. In 1863 he said that "I cannot bring myself to trust Negroes with arms..."

When the war ended the North planned a gaudy two day parade called the Grand Review in DC. Meade's army of the Potomac would march the first day, and Sherman's army of Georgie and Army of the Tennessee would star on the next day. Grant commander in chief of all the armies of th United States oversaw the planning.

Only one "army" was not invited. They were the men of the United States Colored Troops. The reason that the hundreds of black troops were not allowed to march was because Grant specifically ordered them to stay away. Sherman had told Grant that if black trrops marched in any proximity to his army, he would pull his soldiers out of the ranks in protest. Grant agreed. Grant reorganized the black troops into the 25th corps and shipped them off to Texas just days before the Grand Review.

Sherman did not believe that black men deserved to wear blue uniforms. When a subordinate said, "They [black soldiers] can stop a bullet as well as a white man, " Sherman replied, "A sandbag is better." Contrast this with the Confederate Army, which paid black Confederates the same wages, gave them free uniforms and rations, and allowed them to march side by side with the rest of the Confederate Army, even if this was not authorized by the CSA government, which did not approve black regiments until the end of the war.

In 1862 Dr. Lewis Steiner, chief inspector of the US Army Sanitation Commission was an eyewitness to the occupation of Frederick, Maryland by Stonewall Jackson's army. He wrote that, "Over 3,000 Negroes must be included in this number. They were clad in all kinds of uniforms, no only cast of or captured United States uniforms, but in coats with Southern buttons, State buttons, etc. These were shabby, but not shabbier or seedier that those worn by white men in the rebel ranks. Most of the Negroes had arms, rifles, muskets, sabres, bowie-knives, dirks, etc....and were manifestly an integral portion of the Southern Confederacy Army."

Captain Freemantle, a British observer attached to Lee's army at Gettysburg wrote about a case regarding a black southern soldier and Yankee prisoners during the Gettysburg campaign: "This little episode of a Southern slave leading a white Yankee soldier through a Northern village, alone and of his own accord, would not have been gratifying to an abolitionist....Nor would the sympathizers Both in England and in the North feel encouraged if they could hear the language of detestation and contempt with witch the numerous Negroes with Southern armies speak of the liberators." Many blacks, slave and free served in CSA army in many positions. Henry Brown (SC) and James Clarke (GA) were free men and fifers in the CSA army. Charles Lutz was a free man of color from Louisiana. He participated in all the major VA battles, was a POW after Fredericksburg, was exchanged and wounded at Gettysburg, was a POW again and later exchanged and finally furloughed. Levy Carnine was a slave who served with three different master during the war, and became a local here for his efforts in getting mail through Yankee lines. Jean Baptiste Pierre-Auguste (free man of color) fought at Vicksburg and was paroled.

Gus Brown (colored) from Richmond said that "The Yankees didn't beat us, we wuz starved out!....I am a Confederate veteran."

James Gill (colored) of Arkansas said that "...all dem good times ceasted atter a while when de War come and de Yankees started all dere debbilment [devilment]. Us was Confederates all de while...but de Yankees, dey didn't know dat we was Confederates....When de Yankees ud come dey would ax [ask] my mammy, 'Aunt Mary, is you seen any Se-cesh [secessionists] today'? and mammy, sheud say, 'Naw-suh' eben iffen she had seen some of us mens, but when any our sojers ud come and ay, 'Aundt Mary, is you seen any Yankees 'round here recent?' she ud allus [always] tell dem de truf."

Tome Mc Alpin (colored) from Alabama said that "...dere ain't never been nobody afightin' lak our 'Federates [Confederates] done, but dey ain't never had a chance. Dere was jes' too many of dem blue coats for us to lick....Our 'Federates was de bes' fightin' men dat ever were. Dere warn't nobody lak our 'Federates."
(Quotes from Alpin, Gill and Brown taken from Slave Narratives).

47 posted on 06/18/2011 12:49:30 PM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis (Want to make $$$? It's easy! Use FR as a platform to pimp your blog for hits!!!)
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To: donmeaker

Ping to post #47 :-)


48 posted on 06/18/2011 12:50:30 PM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis (Want to make $$$? It's easy! Use FR as a platform to pimp your blog for hits!!!)
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To: Colonel Kangaroo
My disdain is for the Radical Republicans, the free soilers, and those who supported higher tariffs. :-)
49 posted on 06/18/2011 12:53:34 PM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis (Want to make $$$? It's easy! Use FR as a platform to pimp your blog for hits!!!)
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To: Sherman Logan
“they could have had 50 or 100 Gatling guns in the line on Cemetery Ridge. Could have ended the war right there.”

A Pair of walkie talkies would have had the same result for the Confederates. Lack of Communication was key to their loss. If Lee had known his cannon shells were mostly falling behind the Union main lines, or if only he knew Jeb Stuart was not going to complete his attack on the other side of Culps Hill, Pickets charge may have never happened and tens of thousands may have lived to fight another battle closer to Washington.

50 posted on 06/18/2011 11:18:51 PM PDT by NavyCanDo
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