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Big push for home births: Too many babies are being born in hospital, say doctors
Daily Mail ^ | 7/14/11 | Sophie Borland

Posted on 07/14/2011 8:47:22 PM PDT by Nachum

Women should no longer assume they will give birth in hospital with a doctor on hand. In a watershed moment, leading medical experts declared that mothers should be given more opportunity to have babies at home because a maternity ward is not necessarily the 'safer option'. A report by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists suggests that as many as a third of all women should give birth 'without a doctor going anywhere near them'. It calls for a radical shake-up in the NHS which could lead to thousands more women having babies at home, as was the case

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: big; births; home; push
What, you want an epidural? Fogedaboudit.
1 posted on 07/14/2011 8:47:26 PM PDT by Nachum
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To: Nachum

Coming soon to a hospital near you! Thank you Obamacare!


2 posted on 07/14/2011 8:50:56 PM PDT by Shadow44
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3 posted on 07/14/2011 8:51:02 PM PDT by musicman (Until I see the REAL Long Form Vault BC, he's just "PRES__ENT" Obama = Without "ID")
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To: Nachum
Don't have a problem with this idea, as long as you have a competent midwife.
4 posted on 07/14/2011 8:51:54 PM PDT by svcw (democrats are liars, it's a given)
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To: Nachum

In the UK (’round 1999) they sent me home to labor for a WEEK because a bed wasn’t available at the hospital. Almost lost my baby.


5 posted on 07/14/2011 8:52:00 PM PDT by RushIsMyTeddyBear (Mr. Weiner...Don' t Tweet your meat. It's too late to delete!)
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To: Nachum

Coming soon to a bathtub near you.

Never mind that if the baby was in dire need of a doctor, the mother might not have time to get to the hospital in time. Check the mortality rates from pre to post hospital eras and then repeat that with a straight face.


6 posted on 07/14/2011 8:53:38 PM PDT by bgill
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To: svcw

I deliberately had my babies at home.


7 posted on 07/14/2011 8:54:13 PM PDT by abigail2
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To: Nachum

Big push for home births: Too many babies are being born in hospital.

This is England, where the waiting period for prenatal care is 10 monthes.


8 posted on 07/14/2011 8:54:37 PM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER (I love the smell of burning Hope & Change in the morning.)
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To: Nachum

I’ve got 4 kids. I delivered 3 of them at home. 1st kid was born in the hospital. The next three came so sudden there wasn’t time to get to the hospital.


9 posted on 07/14/2011 8:57:41 PM PDT by umgud
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To: Nachum

Next, the NHS will be recommending do-it-yourself appendectomies. Isn’t government health care wonderful?


10 posted on 07/14/2011 8:58:53 PM PDT by kittymyrib
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To: Nachum

More home births will lead to more dead babies. Sad fact.

I understand they want to cut costs but they shouldn’t do so by lying to mothers.

Don’t get me wrong, home births CAN go fine obviously with a trained midwife but implying there’s something wrong with going to the hospital? Poppycock. There are a lot of stupid young (and not so young) parents out there. The government tells them stay home to have the baby and they will and something will go wrong.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2013874/Holly-Piggott-Pregnant-teen-drinks-32-units-week.html

Case in point. Tell her to have her baby at home. I dare you.


11 posted on 07/14/2011 9:00:26 PM PDT by Impy (Don't call me red.)
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To: Nachum

I foresee a sharp rise in boiling water usage in the U.S..

Not sure that anyone will do anything with it though.


12 posted on 07/14/2011 9:00:35 PM PDT by VanDeKoik (1 million in stimulus dollars paid for this tagline!)
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To: bgill
Check the mortality rates from pre to post hospital eras and then repeat that with a straight face.

'59 to now appears to be more than triple from what I could find.

13 posted on 07/14/2011 9:12:50 PM PDT by Mygirlsmom (If only Mark Halprin told us how he REALLY felt - it would start to approach the truth.)
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To: Nachum

I’d like to have every male doctor have his pelvic bones stretched and then to have him give birth to a 8# baby thru his man part....then we’ll talk....


14 posted on 07/14/2011 9:13:51 PM PDT by cherry
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To: RushIsMyTeddyBear

My sister-in-law just delivered a beautiful boy at the end of June. She had visions of, and made preparations for an at-home, perfumed, lightly lit, midwife-proctored delivery. Pre-eclampsia and other issues forced an early and immediate induction. She insisted on continuing with her home delivery plans. I played no small part in coaxing her to have the wonderful doctors at Johns Hopkins handle it. She grudgingly agreed. Her baby and cord came out simultaneously in prolapse. Had it not been the doctor quite literally knocking her husband to the floor to get to her, that child would have died within seconds.

Needless to say, she’s a changed woman, and a grateful mother.


15 posted on 07/14/2011 9:21:58 PM PDT by Per-Ling
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To: Per-Ling

I don’t have a problem AT ALL with women who make the choice to give birth at home with a trained midwife. In fact, I think it’s great. Unfortunately, the ‘midwife’ in the UK NHS only goes so far. You have the baby at the hospital. They only come back AFTER the baby is born to visit the home to make sure ‘baby’ is OK for a few days. Then they send a f***ing NAZI ‘case worker’ to make sure ‘baby’ is doing ‘thriving’.

That’s another story......and my blood pressure doesn’t need to rise.


16 posted on 07/14/2011 9:30:28 PM PDT by RushIsMyTeddyBear (Mr. Weiner...Don' t Tweet your meat. It's too late to delete!)
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To: Nachum

"Wait, here's an idea ... a healthcare system for everyone ... a NATIONAL Health Care system ..."

17 posted on 07/14/2011 9:41:18 PM PDT by ZOOKER ( Exploring the fine line between cynicism and outright depression)
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To: bgill
Check the mortality rates from pre to post hospital eras and then repeat that with a straight face.

I didn't read the whole article, but there's a whole lot going on here. Sanitation is a big part of this issue. In 1959, the general level of sanitation in England was about at the level of refrigeration: About nil. Infection has been the biggest factor in medical risk everywhere in the world since about forever. So for a country that was pretty backwater, soap-and-water wise, you can imagine why moving to a hospital setting would have improved things.

But since then, hospitals and houses have been moving in opposite directions with respect to sanitation—washing hands, cleaning cuts, and so on. Ordinary people are much more sophisticated than they were. Meanwhile, at a hospital, you're keeping company with a lot of really sick people, so the germs are really flying. At the same time, hospitals these days are much more . . . unionized. There is a dazzling level of stupidity available. After my wife had given birth to our 2nd in a hospital, she was getting some well-earned sleep. An aide appeared and woke her up to give her . . . a sleeping pill.

Another problem: At hospitals, most of the docs we met had never had children. They seemed to have no sense or experience with kids, and misdiagnosed some obvious things.

We had 2 of our 5 at home with a midwife, the other 3 at various hospitals. The vast majority of the time, complications are something you can see coming weeks or months in advance by signs in the mom or the baby. And at home, you always have a backup plan for which doc you will meet at which hospital if something starts going funny.

For our family, for a straightforward birth, home is way easier, safer, and more comfortable for Mom and kid. Yes, some judgment in your choice of "providers" is called for. But some judgment is always called for.

18 posted on 07/14/2011 9:43:59 PM PDT by SamuraiScot
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To: Per-Ling

A competent midwife can tell when things are going normally and when things are headed into the abnormal zone. Yes, some deliveries do need ready access to sophisticated medical care, but these are in a small minority. My wife, who was a home birth, has had four home births. If one can find a competent midwife, I would recommend going that route, and trusting the midwife to judge whether the hospital end of things is needed or not.


19 posted on 07/14/2011 10:33:57 PM PDT by Hieronymus ( (It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged. --G.K. Chesterton))
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To: svcw

“. . . as long as you have a competent midwife.”

That’s just for the birth. And that’s if everything, ahem, comes out alright. But the amount of, well, bleeding that occurs in a complicated birth makes a head wound bleed look like a scrape. It is quickly life threatening.

In any case, access to a pediatrician and emergency equipment is the reason to deliver in the hospital (with a competent midwife if one prefers). Most moms and babies (after a non anesthetized delivery) could go back home (with housekeeping assistance) within hours.


20 posted on 07/14/2011 10:35:55 PM PDT by stanne
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To: bgill
Check the mortality rates from pre to post hospital eras and then repeat that with a straight face.

Actually, the highest maternal mortality rates in all history were in early to mid 19th century hospitals. 10% to 35%. MUCH higher than home births during the same period.

The guy who dropped this rate by over 95% in two years by making the doctors wash their hands was subsequently locked up in the loony bin. Must be crazy, saying doctors could cause disease.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ignaz_Semmelweis

21 posted on 07/14/2011 11:34:17 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: stanne

I agree with your post. I gave birth to all 3 of mine in the hospital. The first was a normal birth, but I was in labor so long that I was exhausted, and the epidural was blessing.

I waited as long as possible to go to the hospital for #2, and it turns out that the cord was wrapped around her head TWICE, and at every contraction, her heartbeat stopped. They used the plunger to get her out in a hurry, but I have no doubt that a C-section could have been imminent. If I had been at home, she might have died.

#3: used my OB-practices nurse-practioner midwives. Had the baby in the hospital, easy birth.....but knew that there was a doctor on call just down the hall if complications arose.

Natural birth is wonderful.......if all goes according to plan.


22 posted on 07/15/2011 12:13:31 AM PDT by Explorer89 (And now, let the wild rumpus start!!)
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To: Nachum

That’s nice. My wife would have probably bled out had we followed this advice, which we had no way of knowing ahead of time.


23 posted on 07/15/2011 12:23:28 AM PDT by thecabal (Redeem your mind from the hockshops of authority.)
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To: stanne
But the amount of, well, bleeding that occurs in a complicated birth makes a head wound bleed look like a scrape. It is quickly life threatening.

Very much so, thanks for saying it. Without getting too graphic, everything was fine with our delivery right until the very end, when things got tore up real bad. I damn near passed out from seeing all of the bleeding. The OB had to immediately call in a team with another MD and about 5 other nurses. Had they not immediately sprung into action, I have no doubt that my wife would have been in serious danger. It was then that it really sunk into me why the mortality rate from childbirth was so high before modern medicine.

24 posted on 07/15/2011 12:38:29 AM PDT by thecabal (Redeem your mind from the hockshops of authority.)
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To: Shadow44

You got it! Third world country ... here we come!!! US was envy of the world when it came to medical care. Soon to be no more... thanks to the illegitimate Kenyan usurper and his Rat and Rino buddies.


25 posted on 07/15/2011 12:48:00 AM PDT by antceecee (Bless us Father.. have mercy on us and protect us from evil.)
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To: abigail2

I know a few ladies with similar experience.

If a women is having a 2nd+ uncomplicated pregnancy, and is dilating “on schedule”, why not opt to “send her home”?


26 posted on 07/15/2011 6:04:04 AM PDT by jonno (Having an opinion is not the same as having the answer...)
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To: stanne
There is nowhere in my post that says there should not be prenatal care. I know many women who saw doctors through the pregnancy, and working with a midwife. According to my OB-GyN 95% of births are perfectly normal, if a woman wants a home birth fine. I could have easily had my first two at home, my third it was apparent from month eight there was a problem. We just need to use common sense. A friend of mine went to a birthing center for her four, she labored and delivered in the same room. We all got to be with her and her husband even the kids. Very homey, hospitals are not the only option.
27 posted on 07/15/2011 7:05:33 AM PDT by svcw (democrats are liars, it's a given)
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To: cherry

How about trying to pass a bowling ball.


28 posted on 07/15/2011 7:07:42 AM PDT by svcw (democrats are liars, it's a given)
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To: Nachum
Too many babies are being born in hospital, say doctors

Amen, bro. And then there's all those sick people and people with broken bones and all manner of injuries.

It's like hospitals are magnets for people with health issues.

29 posted on 07/15/2011 7:08:58 AM PDT by Texas Eagle (If it wasn't for double-standards, Liberals would have no standards at all -- Texas Eagle)
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To: Explorer89

Laboring at home allows the labor process to proceed uninterrupted, but only because the hospital, with bossy uniformed staff with their fluorescent lighting naturally stop the labor process, but that pesky umbilical cord does get in the way all too often, so one would never be well advised to labor at home. Csections, inductions and all of the trappings ARE better than the alternative, of course.

Natural birth IN the hospital is ideal. Problem is the staff takes over instead of realizing their actual role - support in case of emergency. Babies really have been arriving naturally for millennia.

The Germans manage to do natural childbirth in the hospital and it seems to work.

It is actually the staff who need to make the hospital environment more like home; they are the ones who are well advised to not ony alter the environment, but to inform the mom about the process. They don’t want to do this, as they need to justify financially all of their staff and equipment- the system is addicted to it- equipment and pharmaceuticals.

Oh, well. I guess I need to write about it.


30 posted on 07/15/2011 7:16:38 AM PDT by stanne
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To: thecabal

What you witnessed is very common and the reason, as you surmised, for former high mortality rates.

Literature from the fairy tales of the Middle Ages with all of its wicked stepmothers to American folklore is full of references to death by childbirth.

Hospital staff could do more to allow normal labor and delivery to proceed and save their scary lights and bossiness for the true emergencies.


31 posted on 07/15/2011 7:23:56 AM PDT by stanne
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To: Nachum

Our last child was born in our bedroom. Best birth of them all by far. Wonderful experience. Highly recommend it.


32 posted on 07/15/2011 7:31:37 AM PDT by montag813 (SECURE THE BORDER! http://www.StandwithArizona.com)
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To: svcw

Just meant that a competent midwife, a very necessary team member, cannot help with a true emergency at home if specialty personnel and equipment are needed.

A home environment, with down the hall access to emergency care, is good. Hospitals won’t do this because they . . . well they just haven’t done it.


33 posted on 07/15/2011 7:32:28 AM PDT by stanne
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To: stanne

You describe my third birth precisely. In the hospital, but with a midwife. It was a very easy birth, but the other two had blazed the trail, as it were! (After baby #1, I did learn to stay at home as long as humanly possible, which was way more comfortable.)


34 posted on 07/15/2011 7:40:08 AM PDT by Explorer89 (And now, let the wild rumpus start!!)
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To: Per-Ling
Her baby and cord came out simultaneously in prolapse. Had it not been the doctor quite literally knocking her husband to the floor to get to her, that child would have died within seconds.

Any competent midwife can handle that situation, and one must be within 15 min of a hospital or forget about homebirths. We have a friend whose cord prolapsed and the midwife kept the cord back in her uterus while waiting for the ambulance to arrive. The baby was delivered 40 minutes later (not "seconds"), perfectly healthy. My child's head got stuck in my wife's cervix and the heartrate increased. The midwife calmly use a hand technique and it was over in seconds. We also had a midwife use her hands to turn a breach baby (our prior one) around in my wife's uterus. They are amazing. OBGYNs in hosptials these days are all too often akin to salespeople for C-Sections, and otherwise are useless. Watch TLC "Baby Story" sometime and see how impatient idiot MDs constantly push women to have C-sections if they are 'taking too long'. There is no risk to the baby whatsoever. It's ALL about money and lawyers.

35 posted on 07/15/2011 7:45:38 AM PDT by montag813 (SECURE THE BORDER! http://www.StandwithArizona.com)
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To: Nachum

Third world nation The United Banana States of America


36 posted on 07/15/2011 8:14:09 AM PDT by winodog
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To: Impy
More home births will lead to more dead babies. Sad fact.

This is not a "fact." I understand you believe this, but it is your supposition, not a fact.

Planned homebirths tend to be very safe. This is because most mothers who choose to have a homebirth are healthy and psychologically mature women. Their main concern is the welfare of their babies. Most will choose NOT to have a homebirth if they have medical conditions that might lead to complications (e.g. diabetes or high blood pressure).

These women will have planned carefully. They will not insist on sticking with a homebirth plan if there is any indication, at any point, that the birth would be safer in the hospital. They will always have a back-up plan to get to a hospital asap if necessary.

As for those "stupid young" women out there that you refer to -- guess what? They are NOT going to have a home birth.

Why? Because these stupid types tend to be scared to death of pain and are completely unwilling to put up with it. They will demand their epidural when the time comes! (And since they're often getting Medicaid, they don't pay for the costly anesthesia -- YOU do.)

I know this because I've had hospital births (3), and one home birth. During the hospital births, I heard other women in labor in adjoining beds, and believe me, the Medicaid types are definitely out to milk the hospital for all services they can get (and speaking of milk, they will NOT nurse their babies, but will demand free formula). These women will never have a homebirth ... unless it's by accident.

I believe that homebirths are actually safer, for both mothers and infants, as long as the mother has had a healthy pregnancy. Having experienced both kinds of births myself, I have plenty of anecdotal evidence. And I think there are statistics out there that will bear me out. But, that's a topic for another day.

37 posted on 07/15/2011 8:15:10 AM PDT by shhrubbery!
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To: RushIsMyTeddyBear

Very sorry to hear that, but that is not standard practice.


38 posted on 07/15/2011 9:03:31 AM PDT by the scotsman (I)
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To: RushIsMyTeddyBear

1—How did you find the NHS overall?.
2—How did you find Britain overall (likes/dislikes)?.
3—When did you live here and where?.


39 posted on 07/15/2011 9:05:21 AM PDT by the scotsman (I)
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To: Nachum
Why don't they just use Mosque's for child birth. Most of the children born in Britain now are “Asian” after all.
40 posted on 07/15/2011 11:38:55 AM PDT by HenpeckedCon (What pi$$es me off the most is that POS commie will get a State Funeral!)
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To: the scotsman

Sorry, Scotsman. Not able to get on the ‘puter as much during the summer. Kids! LOL!

“1—How did you find the NHS overall?.
2—How did you find Britain overall (likes/dislikes)?.
3—When did you live here and where?.”

(1) I found the NHS poor, if I can be brutally honest. Have many stories. Most of the time it would take me several days to get in with a doctor if I was sick, and never could get the doctor of my choice (3 in the surgery). One story of many: Had to go to an ER because the surgery couldn’t get me in until 4 days.....ER doc took 20 minutes flipping through a PRD (physicians desk reference) to find the medications to treat me. I was pregnant. He told me there was no guarantee that the meds would not hurt the baby. On, and on, and on. Don’t even get me started on the poor care my elderly FIL received. He was, basically, sent home to die.

During the time of my FIL’s illness, I did a little digging into NHS databases (they were once open but are all locked down, now). I called up one such database that the doctors used. It told them, step by step, what to do if the patient exhibited particular symptoms, the steps to be taken, what meds were available, how much it cost ‘the state’, the timeline for next appointments, and when to refer. I was shocked and showed my husband this. Basically....anyone with a slight bit of medical knowledge only had to follow the government guideline.

(2) I liked GB OK. GREAT pubs, loved the ability to be able to walk or cycle to places, LOVED the rich history, the humour. Found it particularly hard being a ‘Yank’ at times and that there was profound ingnorance about the US that was mainly swallowed and spewed thanks to Hollyweird’s influence and ‘Auntie Beeb’s’ anti-American slant. I’m from the South.....so I got a lot of ‘Jerry Springer’ comparisons. XD Made a few, good friends, tho, and still keep in touch. I learned A LOT whilst living there and it gave me a different perspective of the US from when I left. I was quite young and naive.....ESPECIALLY politically.

(3) From ‘93 to 2001. Yorkshire. Sheffield and then near Hull.

Your moniker says you live in (are from?) Scotland? I LOVED Scotland and vacationed there quite a bit. “Local Hero” is one of my favourite movies. Spent many times in the village where it was filmed. Loved an interesting, little town we happened upon called ‘Wigtown’ which was nothing but bookstores. Got to view a near total eclipse of the sun there.

Husband grew up in Cumbria. Many tales of the Solway Firth when he was a boy.


41 posted on 07/15/2011 8:55:17 PM PDT by RushIsMyTeddyBear (Mr. Weiner...Don' t Tweet your meat. It's too late to delete!)
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To: the scotsman

Oh!!! I forgot to add....I miss “Coronation Street”. *chuckle*


42 posted on 07/15/2011 8:59:07 PM PDT by RushIsMyTeddyBear (Mr. Weiner...Don' t Tweet your meat. It's too late to delete!)
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To: RushIsMyTeddyBear

Hi, thanks for reply.

1—Sad to hear you didnt like the NHS. I am a conservative yet here I defend to an extent the NHS. Odd I know. More the fact that ‘criticism’ here tends to base itself on myth than proper criticism, which I dont mind.

I have to say that I and my family and friends have never had anything but great help/service on the NHS, any criticism I have personally is very minor.

I think the NHS is overall good. No better than that, and could be much better, equally its not a third rate system/horror show. You at least have experience of it, unlike 99.99% here and of Americans who criticise it.

2—IMO most British people are not antiamerican, if anything we swallow too much US/Hollywood culture. Some of the ‘bashing’ youll have taken was genuine from idiots, some probably most is simply the British taking the mickey. If you were Swedish or Thai, we’d do the same.

Ironically, with Clinton, Friends, The Simpsons et al, we were fond of America in the 90’s, ironically as there was a resurgence of British culture (Britpop and UK dance/techno in music, the resurgence of the British film industry with films like Trainspotting, The Full Monty, Lock Stock, Shallow Grave).

3—I am from Ayrshire. Ayr to be exact.

I didnt expect you to like everything about Britain 1993-2001, at least I think you found more to like than dislike.
Some good things happened to us then, some bad.


43 posted on 07/16/2011 3:24:56 AM PDT by the scotsman (I)
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To: stanne; svcw

Interesting.

Both of your posts were interesting as is this thread.

Personally, I had four high risk pregnancies and c-sections. Two of my children had to be in NICU immediately and one a few days after delivery. Thus, I’m a bit biased.

Pregnancy and childbirth is natural and usually normal. Sometimes it isn’t and since I’ve experienced that four times I tend to lean toward hospitals/doctors when it comes to delivery.


44 posted on 07/16/2011 4:28:00 AM PDT by Twink
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To: montag813

Rubbish. C-sections are not pushed. C-sections are major surgery. TLC Baby Story is a freakin’ TV show.

I was on complete bed rest for the last six weeks of my pregnancy and then hospitalized in the Maternity Observation Unit for a week and a half. They induced me for two days before giving me a C-Section. With my second pregnancy, VBAC was pushed until four and a half weeks before due date. After daily visits to the hospital for Doppler Ultrasounds, and finally an amnio to determine if the lungs were developed enough for safe delivery, there was no longer a choice for VBAC. Four and a half weeks before full term, C-section. Surgery complications (dehissing hematoma) which required the doctor to open me up on my hospital bed, out of a sterile environment, and another eight weeks until wound was healed. After eight weeks of a home care nurse and my husband and mother irrigating and cleaning and packing the wound until it closed, the wound finally closed.

Third pregnancy was easy but we weren’t taking any chances given the other two, lol.

Fourth was a nightmare and epidural for C didn’t work, as I felt them cutting, so they had to put me to sleep/knock me out. It was kind of funny, the conversation...it’s pressure, hell no this is my fourth c section and that is not pressure that is pain, like a knife cutting into me pain, lol.

I will never be convinced that OBs want to perform C sections. They do them because they are medically necessary.


45 posted on 07/16/2011 5:18:03 AM PDT by Twink
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To: ZOOKER

BTTT! Brilliant!


46 posted on 07/16/2011 5:22:09 AM PDT by sono (What Rough Beast ... Slouches Toward Bethlehem To Be Born?)
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To: bgill

Great post.


47 posted on 07/16/2011 5:23:49 AM PDT by Twink
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To: thecabal

Exactly. Well stated. We always hear how childbirth has been going on since the beginning of time, but what’s left out of that statement is the high mortality rate until recently/modern times.


48 posted on 07/16/2011 5:36:02 AM PDT by Twink
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