Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Rolling Greens resident's invention: Trash Can Storm Shelter
Ocala.com (Florida) ^ | 7/15/11 | Tom McNiff

Posted on 07/15/2011 9:02:15 PM PDT by ruralvoter

They mocked the Wright Brothers, too.

So if Laura Nell Britton’s latest invention, the Trash Can Storm Shelter, catches on, she’ll stand in good company.

Britton recently sunk two large plastic trash cans into the ground outside her Rolling Greens home, then installed rebar and poured cement around it and, voila! — instant, inexpensive shelter against the power of a tornado.

Now she’s hoping the idea will gain momentum and that the trash can manufacturer, Toter, will help her market this novel use for their product.

(Excerpt) Read more at ocala.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: hurricane; invention; shelter; tornado

1 posted on 07/15/2011 9:02:17 PM PDT by ruralvoter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

Huh...when the house collapses on top of them how do they get out? Or is that a problem with all shelters?


2 posted on 07/15/2011 9:06:49 PM PDT by JoeDetweiler
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

Any port in a storm.


3 posted on 07/15/2011 9:10:03 PM PDT by Patrick1 ("The problem with Internet quotations is that many are not genuine." - Abraham Lincoln)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

Pray there isn’t a flash flood at the same time.


4 posted on 07/15/2011 9:11:01 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JoeDetweiler

Well I’m no engineer, but it would seem to me, one would want the level of the concrete to be level not with the (bottom) of the bin cover - but with the top?

Nice idea though. Bet it does catch on, actually. Heck, seems you could pull of a DIY version over a weekend with a trip to Home Depot.


5 posted on 07/15/2011 9:11:06 PM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: JoeDetweiler

“when the house collapses on top of them how do they get out?”

That’s the beauty of it... it doubles as a coffin.


6 posted on 07/15/2011 9:14:04 PM PDT by PastorBooks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Cringing Negativism Network

I agree. Easy to throw stones at...until you ask people to come up with a better idea for that situation.


7 posted on 07/15/2011 9:17:24 PM PDT by BobL (PLEASE READ: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2657811/posts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

Excellent idea. Three cheers for the gal!


8 posted on 07/15/2011 9:20:52 PM PDT by Dudoight
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JoeDetweiler
Or is that a problem with all shelters?

It's a problem with all shelters. I've got a buddy that put in a tornado shelter and spent big bucks for it.

He put a tractor jack in it to open the door in case a house landed on the door.

Family uses it for storing canned goods and as a root cellar when not required by the weather.

Pretty good to have in tornado country, but yep, think about how you are going to get out.

/johnny

9 posted on 07/15/2011 9:24:16 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

It would be easy to make a metal lid with diamond plate and have it sunk into the concrete as well. Throw on a couple of gate latches with pushrods on the inside to open them and you are all set.


10 posted on 07/15/2011 9:24:51 PM PDT by ResponseAbility (Islam...Imperialism in a turban.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

I believe in going whole hog so I’m installing a dumpster instead ;-)


11 posted on 07/15/2011 9:25:38 PM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pan_Yan

Email this to your brother-in-law.


12 posted on 07/15/2011 9:29:41 PM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife (Utopia is being foisted on Americans for their own good.-- J. Robert Smith)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PastorBooks

LOL!


13 posted on 07/15/2011 9:32:50 PM PDT by beaversmom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

Aside from the house falling onto it, how do you keep the lid shut down tight against the wind and any wind pulling you out? Sure, it’d make for a weekend diy project but there’s some major tweeking to be done. Most people got for a septic tank but those need to be dug out and placed in with someone with equipment larger than a hand shovel.


14 posted on 07/15/2011 9:33:29 PM PDT by bgill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ResponseAbility

I should have read down the thread for the lid. Yours makes more sense than the original flimsy plastic ones.


15 posted on 07/15/2011 9:35:23 PM PDT by bgill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

Great idea for hiding things too.....if you know what I mean....just plant grass on top....or a garden....and do what the Japanese did during WWII...use RICE around whatever you put in there...


16 posted on 07/15/2011 9:35:54 PM PDT by goodnesswins
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ResponseAbility
"It would be easy to make a metal lid with diamond plate and have it sunk into the concrete as well"

If you don't have some sort of solid, lockable lid aren't these just launch tubes?

17 posted on 07/15/2011 9:36:34 PM PDT by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: JoeDetweiler

That would be the case of any underground shelter. It’s important that neighbors know where to find each others’ shelter entries.


18 posted on 07/15/2011 9:38:26 PM PDT by ChocChipCookie (Jonah is my patron saint.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

Those lids will be no protection at all in a direct hit. You’d just be another morsel of debris


19 posted on 07/15/2011 9:38:42 PM PDT by Figment ("A communist is someone who reads Marx.An anti-communist is someone who understands Marx" R Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rockrr

You could make a nice little pad in a dumpster.


20 posted on 07/15/2011 9:41:11 PM PDT by beaversmom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: BobL

I agree. Easy to throw stones at...until you ask people to come up with a better idea for that situation.

Not throwing stones. It is practical, and possibly could save your life if the house is blown away. Could have something more secure than that folding lid on top though


21 posted on 07/15/2011 9:45:28 PM PDT by Figment ("A communist is someone who reads Marx.An anti-communist is someone who understands Marx" R Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Kartographer

ping

might interest the list


22 posted on 07/15/2011 9:46:57 PM PDT by bgill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rockrr
You think too small.


23 posted on 07/15/2011 10:01:56 PM PDT by Salamander (I'm your pain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: JoeDetweiler

I’ve always wondered about that. Best to have more than way in and out.


24 posted on 07/15/2011 10:09:55 PM PDT by skr (May God confound the enemy)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: JoeDetweiler

It’s a mobile home park. The mobile homes will be turned into toothpicks if a tornado rolls through.


25 posted on 07/15/2011 10:14:48 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open ( <o> ---)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Flag_This

In a direct hit, you would be sucked right out with those flimsy lids. Better, lockable lids with air holes that wont leak rainwater that will eventually fill it up is a must for a direct hit.


26 posted on 07/15/2011 10:25:39 PM PDT by ResponseAbility (Islam...Imperialism in a turban.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: PastorBooks

LOL!!!!!


27 posted on 07/15/2011 11:00:22 PM PDT by sklar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

Ideally you’d want several exit doors, and a shovel just in case.


28 posted on 07/15/2011 11:51:40 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Hawk)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Salamander

A few passes with a Ditch Witch, and you’d have an ideal hole for it.


29 posted on 07/15/2011 11:52:45 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Hawk)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Flag_This
Yep, you're right on target.. This would absolutely be a launch tube without a lockable door or lid.

The old time tornado shelters that I grew up around in Oklahoma generally were a reinforced concrete room in the back yard. And, you can sardine a lot of people much less the whole family into a 10’ x 10’ room when you have to.

The shelter was set in the ground with a foot or two of the sidewall above grade and with a concrete roof. One or two air vents with U-inverts were in the roof and probably 2 or 3 real small windows in the portion of the sidewall above grade. The entry door was above grade and opened swung upwards to open. Since the door was made of steel plate and quite heavy there would be a cable and counter weight to make it easier to open and shut. A fancy shelter might have a bed, some folding chairs and be wired for electricity with a supply of candles for backup. To pull double duty, there were often shelves for storing canned goods. We had variations on this kind of construction such as a below grade,concrete room as part of the well house or another that was integrated into the backyard porch. Probably the greatest single use for lots of tornado shelters was for kids to play in as they were a naturally cool spot in the hot summer.

I've seen free standing above ground construction that would provide a safe room but it's more expensive than going in ground. In new construction, the cost of an integrated safe room is a reasonably small add-on cost.

30 posted on 07/15/2011 11:54:19 PM PDT by Hootowl99
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: HiTech RedNeck

Yep, sure would.


31 posted on 07/15/2011 11:59:14 PM PDT by Salamander (I'm your pain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Hootowl99
Yep, you're right on target.. This would absolutely be a launch tube without a lockable door or lid. The old time tornado shelters that I grew up around in Oklahoma generally were a reinforced concrete room in the back yard. And, you can sardine a lot of people much less the whole family into a 10’ x 10’ room when you have to. The shelter was set in the ground with a foot or two of the sidewall above grade and with a concrete roof. One or two air vents with U-inverts were in the roof and probably 2 or 3 real small windows in the portion of the sidewall above grade. The entry door was above grade and opened swung upwards to open. Since the door was made of steel plate and quite heavy there would be a cable and counter weight to make it easier to open and shut. A fancy shelter might have a bed, some folding chairs and be wired for electricity with a supply of candles for backup. To pull double duty, there were often shelves for storing canned goods. We had variations on this kind of construction such as a below grade,concrete room as part of the well house or another that was integrated into the backyard porch. Probably the greatest single use for lots of tornado shelters was for kids to play in as they were a naturally cool spot in the hot summer. I've seen free standing above ground construction that would provide a safe room but it's more expensive than going in ground. In new construction, the cost of an integrated safe room is a reasonably small add-on cost.

"In new construction, the cost of an integrated safe room is a reasonably small add-on cost."

With very minor tweaking, it can double as an integrated vault for valuables as well, making it another kind of "safe" room.

32 posted on 07/16/2011 12:21:34 AM PDT by marktwain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Salamander

Look on the web for buried storm shelters. I did and many are pretty slick. They are often large plastic forms that one can buy installed for around 3,500-5,500 installed.


33 posted on 07/16/2011 3:41:26 AM PDT by almost done by half
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: JoeDetweiler
"Huh...when the house collapses on top of them how do they get out? Or is that a problem with all shelters?"

Well, it's certainly better than being crushed by the debris as said house collapses (although the truth is that houses don't collapse, they mostly explode due to the pressure difference). Not foolproof, but certainly ups the probability of survival.

34 posted on 07/16/2011 4:13:40 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

This is not a new concept. Individually sized underground shelters were dotted all over the city of Hanoi during the Viet Nam war.


35 posted on 07/16/2011 4:19:11 AM PDT by AlphaOneAlpha
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

A large concrete or metal culvert pipe makes a good strong one as well. Can be buried vertically or horizontally and will withstand dirt pressure of any depth.


36 posted on 07/16/2011 5:42:57 AM PDT by Boiling point (Cain / Palin 2012)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Figment

“Could have something more secure than that folding lid on top though”

Those can be pretty tough lids...and you don’t want it to be too heavy if something is also on top of it. The key is keep it from getting blown open, which probably is not that hard to do (i.e., a string wrapped around a cleat).


37 posted on 07/16/2011 6:26:07 AM PDT by BobL (PLEASE READ: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2657811/posts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: JoeDetweiler

Problem with all shelters, more so with shelters next to the house or inside your garage. That’s why, here in Oklahoma, people register their shelters with the police and fire departments so that when the big one comes and you’re buried by debris, emergency services can come and dig you out.
The big problem I see with her shelter is the top. It’s just a plastic trashcan lid. I wonder how secure it will be when a tornado passes directly overhead.


38 posted on 07/16/2011 6:27:52 AM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: almost done by half

I just installed a 8 x 8, concrete, below ground shelter with a solid metal door that can be dogged-down from the inside. Total cost, $2470.00.


39 posted on 07/16/2011 6:32:19 AM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: ruralvoter

Plan on a good view of a tornado above you when that plastic lid blows off.

This thing would be better than nothing but not by much. If one is working with reinforcing rods and concrete, one should start with a better plan than plastic garbage cans.


40 posted on 07/16/2011 6:38:34 AM PDT by CharlyFord (t)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Salamander

I was trying to avoid appearing too ostentatious...;-)


41 posted on 07/16/2011 7:12:57 AM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: ops33

Saw those too. How do you keep it dry?


42 posted on 07/16/2011 8:45:43 AM PDT by almost done by half
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: almost done by half

If you mean my shelter it is sealed on the inside to prevent water seepage. The top has a turban vent which allows air inside and keeps water out. The door is also sealed from the inside to keep water out. I’m not sure how the trash can shelter keeps water out. Any puncture in the side will allow ground water to seep inside. Also, I have never seen one of those type of trash cans that has a water tight lid.


43 posted on 07/16/2011 9:00:35 AM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: ResponseAbility

Russian fallout shelters often have a metal door like a manhole cover that is hinged to ROTATE to the side. That is, it does not open to the outside or the inside, it just rotates to the side. They have a flange on it so that a hydraulic car jack can force the door open against debris.

Clever designers, those Russkis.


44 posted on 07/16/2011 9:14:37 AM PDT by darth
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Salamander

I’ve seen experiments with buried Conex containers. You have to reinforce the roof, otherwise the weight of the dirt will crush it.


45 posted on 07/16/2011 9:19:04 AM PDT by Mountain Troll (My investment plan - Canned food and shotguns)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: ops33

I’ve seen a number of plastic, metal, or fiberglass models similar to this that seem to be pretty cost effective.

http://www.stormshieldtornadoshelter.com/


46 posted on 07/16/2011 9:24:10 AM PDT by almost done by half
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: rockrr

Go for the gold!

Make a tornado watch palace.

:)


47 posted on 07/16/2011 9:59:57 AM PDT by Salamander (I'm your pain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Mountain Troll

My dad claimed he was making a “root cellar” out of one of those huge, used fiberglass gas tanks we can buy in this area.

I watched with amusement as he dug the ditch into the bank, carefully placed it and then...poured concrete over it for good measure.

Not surprisingly, it collapsed.

So, there went his fallout shelter....er....’root cellar’.


48 posted on 07/16/2011 10:04:33 AM PDT by Salamander (I'm your pain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: rockrr

Actually, the best idea would be to purchase old trailer rigs, or shipping containers (like the ones used on ships and trains).

There are places where jillions of old containers are stacked.

Drop one of those into the ground,and I don’t think you’ll need any concrete or rebar.


49 posted on 07/16/2011 11:49:47 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson