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Want a Job? Go to College, and Donít Major in Architecture
New York Times ^ | 01/09/2012 | By CATHERINE RAMPELL

Posted on 01/09/2012 7:49:35 PM PST by SeekAndFind

Say it with me, readers: College is worth it.

For all the bellyaching about wasted degrees and the many indebted grads stuck on their parents’ couches, recent college graduates are still doing a lot better than their less-educated counterparts. Unemployment for new graduates is around 8.9 percent; the rate for workers with only a high school diploma is nearly three times as high, at 22.9 percent.

That’s according to a new report [PDF] from Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce. The report also had some fascinating statistics on earnings and jobless rates by college major, something we’ve written about before.

The chart below shows unemployment rates sorted by major, based on 2009-10 census data. You can also see jobless rates for graduates of a given undergraduate major who went on to receive further education (not necessarily related to their college major). In the chart, “recent college graduate” refers to workers who are 22 to 26 years old; “experienced college graduate” covers those 30 to 54; and “graduate degree holder” is limited to workers 30 to 54 years old.

DESCRIPTIONGeorgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce American Community Survey, 2009-10, pooled sample. Recent college graduates are those 22 to 26 years old, and experienced college graduates are 30 to 54. Graduate degree holders are also limited to those 30 to 54. The percentage unemployed is based on total employed and unemployed. Earnings are based on full-time, full-year workers.

Some majors even produced college graduates who, at mid-career, earned more than workers from other fields who went on to received a tertiary degree.


(Excerpt) Read more at economix.blogs.nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: architecture; bondcollapse; college; default; dollarcollapse; economy; jobs; unemployment

1 posted on 01/09/2012 7:49:46 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Architecture is fine as long as you combine it with a firm grounding in business and contruction. My Brothers-in-law, for example, have made a lot of money in design build.


2 posted on 01/09/2012 7:52:02 PM PST by achilles2000 ("I'll agree to save the whales as long as we can deport the liberals")
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To: SeekAndFind

I see that education is highest on the list for getting a job. Interesting.


3 posted on 01/09/2012 7:53:51 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: achilles2000

Many architects need only design a couple of buildings and they are set for life. Others move on into other related fields. Part of the problem is that when you have a recession or depression commercial building grinds mostly to a halt!


4 posted on 01/09/2012 7:55:47 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: SeekAndFind

Howard Roark laughed.


5 posted on 01/09/2012 7:57:39 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Nothing will change until after the war.)
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To: SeekAndFind
Want a Job? Go to College, and Don’t Major in Architecture

This was originally "...and Don't Major in Underwater Ethnic Transgender Women's Basket-Weaving Studies," but for some reason the editors rejected that one.

6 posted on 01/09/2012 7:57:47 PM PST by Lonely Bull
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To: Lonely Bull

RE: Don’t Major in Underwater Ethnic Transgender Women’s Basket-Weaving Studies,”

I believe that is covered by the all-encompassing term called -— The ARTS.

Or as they usually call it — LIBERAL ARTS (I wonder.. why don’t we have CONSERVATIVE ARTS??)


7 posted on 01/09/2012 8:00:07 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: Cicero

Big Government hires a lot of ‘em.


8 posted on 01/09/2012 8:04:15 PM PST by BradyLS (DO NOT FEED THE BEARS!)
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To: SeekAndFind
If I were to return to school, architecture would be one of the things I would want to study. The employment rate in architecture is due to the housing crash here, but it is having a Renaissance in many countries. This would actually be an exiting time to be an architect. There are new ways of building, new materials, and the money to build them. (somewhere else)

30 story building built in 15 days.

9 posted on 01/09/2012 8:05:44 PM PST by Vince Ferrer
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To: SeekAndFind

Why the recent college graduates had an unemployment rate 3 times less than high school graduates is because the college graduates are taking jobs that high school graduates would have normally taken. Restaurants have masters degree waitresses, MacDonalds has BBAs and MBAs for Asst Managers, UPS has some of the most degreed sorters and loaders, telephone solicitors are graduates at a minimum .... but more would be so redundant.


10 posted on 01/09/2012 8:05:49 PM PST by RetiredTexasVet (There's a pill for just about everything ... except stupid!)
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To: SeekAndFind

I find it difficult to believe that Education majors are as highly employed as the chart shows. Seems like there was a glut of education majors over the past two decades—though that could just be my limited perception. Still, most of the ones I knew took jobs in other professions.


11 posted on 01/09/2012 8:08:59 PM PST by Lou L (The Senate without a fillibuster is just a 100-member version of the House.)
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To: SeekAndFind

12 posted on 01/09/2012 8:09:05 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Nothing will change until after the war.)
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To: SeekAndFind

From the young “lady’s” sign in Occupy NYC, going into $90,000 student loan debt for a BA in Hispanic Transgender, Gay and Lesbian studies would probably not be a great choice either.


13 posted on 01/09/2012 8:09:38 PM PST by RetiredTexasVet (There's a pill for just about everything ... except stupid!)
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To: SeekAndFind

19 Facts About The Deindustrialization Of America That Will Make You Weep
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2830862/posts


14 posted on 01/09/2012 8:09:46 PM PST by familyop (We Baby Boomers are croaking in an avalanche of rotten politics smelled around the planet.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Maybe one’s GPA is also important?


15 posted on 01/09/2012 8:12:42 PM PST by LibWhacker
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To: ClearCase_guy

Don’t forget Marine Biology. Oh and latex.


16 posted on 01/09/2012 8:16:17 PM PST by DManA
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To: SeekAndFind

Want a job? Go to college and don’t major in medicine. It’s a regulated industry.


17 posted on 01/09/2012 8:16:26 PM PST by cynwoody
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To: LibWhacker

Probably not. Everyone gets B+ now. All the students are above average.


18 posted on 01/09/2012 8:17:52 PM PST by DManA
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To: RetiredTexasVet
UPS has some of the most degreed sorters and loaders, telephone solicitors are graduates at a minimum ....

I know a guy who works for UPS as a sorter. Has an undergrade in International Relations or something like that, plus an MBA! He's a classic under-achiever in all other respects.

19 posted on 01/09/2012 8:20:12 PM PST by Lou L (The Senate without a fillibuster is just a 100-member version of the House.)
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To: Lou L
I find it difficult to believe that Education majors are as highly employed as the chart shows. Seems like there was a glut of education majors over the past two decades—though that could just be my limited perception. Still, most of the ones I knew took jobs in other professions.

Supposedly there are a ton of boomer teachers that will be retiring in the next five to 10 years. Of course studies are always done with agenda. Even conservative studies are done to find out a favorable outcome. Too much money spent on studies. i say just get out there and work hard. If you are a plumber, work hard. If you are a chemist work hard. If you are a janitor then work hard. If you are an anesthesiologist then work hard. That is really the bottom line.

20 posted on 01/09/2012 8:27:53 PM PST by napscoordinator (Go Rick! Go Rick! Go Newt! Let's get 'er done.)
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To: ClearCase_guy
Fountainhead is one of the best books of all time. Even better than Atlas Shrugged in my opinion. Ayn Rand was definitely seeing the future. Even if she does remind me of my cranky aunt.
21 posted on 01/09/2012 8:28:22 PM PST by SamAdams76 (I am 29 days away from outliving Marty Feldman)
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To: SeekAndFind

You know why they call it the Liberal Arts, right? It has nothing to do with politics. Historically, the liberal arts were the fields of study a free man needed to know—rhetoric, logic, and grammar. Later, in medieval times, the liberal arts were expanded to include math, (by which they meant arithmetic and algebra), geometry, music, and astrology/astronomy.

Amazingly enough, for many centuries people did not go to college to learn how to do a particular job. They went only to improve their minds. It has only been in the past few decades that we’ve expected our colleges and universities to teach job skills and have become angry with them if they didn’t show kids how to earn a living.


22 posted on 01/09/2012 8:28:44 PM PST by ottbmare (off-the-track Thoroughbred mare)
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To: SeekAndFind

It’s not just Architecture. For an actual comparison of 4 yr. vs technical school job demand and hiring rates, watch this video from MacIver Institute of Wisconsin:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oa77NBArfA&feature=youtu.be


23 posted on 01/09/2012 8:56:34 PM PST by bigbob
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To: Vince Ferrer

The housing slump is only one factor. Less than 5% of buidings today are designed by architects, and technology is making it extremely easy to apply design automation and CAD techniques to minimize the work required by an actual architect and thus his fees. An adjacent field that is using these tools and achieving more success is that of Design-Build Contractors.

As an architect friend says, anyone going into architecture today had better have a “Plan B”.


24 posted on 01/09/2012 9:03:54 PM PST by bigbob
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To: bigbob
I'm sure that's all true, but it also the sign of a quantum leap in productivity in the field, which goes back to my belief that architecture is experiencing a renaissance. There will definitely be adjustments, some of them painful, if experienced architects simply want to continue what they have been doing for years, working on minor tweaks to yet another strip mall.

In the video I posted, a Chinese company has taken the franchising model and manufactured homes to skyscrapers, to build McSkyscrapers. Think of how much construction is going on in Asia to drive that innovation. . Architects will have to take a step back and let software worry about where every little electrical outlet goes, and concentrate on the bigger picture.

Hundreds of years ago, people got together and built things like this cathedral:

Most everyone who was involved in building this cathedral could not read. None of them had electricity, or a more powerful machine than a horse, and they lived in houses with no heat or plumbing. Yet they could build this.

Then we went crazy with modernism. With electricity, computers, wealth unimaginable hundreds of years earlier, this is what we build:

But when I write about a renaissance in architecture, it is because I see a true rejection of this dehumanizing modernism, and both a return to the aesthetically pleasing forms, and the willingness to go further, with new designs, new materials, to create something functional and yet beautiful and inspiring again.


25 posted on 01/09/2012 9:55:04 PM PST by Vince Ferrer
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To: Vince Ferrer

hey, McSkyscraper have their place. they are the most compact way to accomodate humans on a given plot of land.
support all their human needs so to speak.

i did visit the cathedral at Salisbury back in 1989.
What efforts were expended to create all that majesty!
They were skilled artisans whomever they were.


26 posted on 01/09/2012 10:09:36 PM PST by RitchieAprile
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To: RetiredTexasVet

I think the stats are skewed.....those with just a HS diploma who aren’t working include many from the inner city or illegals....I’d like to see a stat comparing North Dakota young men without college degrees to those with...or Iowa....or Wyoming...


27 posted on 01/09/2012 10:14:31 PM PST by cherry
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To: Lou L

I know several people who couldn’t buy themselves a teaching job...so much for the teaching shortage....


28 posted on 01/09/2012 10:15:36 PM PST by cherry
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To: Cicero

“I see that education is highest on the list for getting a job. Interesting.”

Well, it IS from the NY Slimes.


29 posted on 01/09/2012 10:49:32 PM PST by Rembrandt (.. AND the donkey you rode in on.)
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To: Vince Ferrer

Part of the reason that skyscrapers are so homogenous in appearance is the value of real estate. A builder is trying to maximize the space available for an expensive piece of property. The easiest, fastest, and most efficient way to do that is to build a boxy skyscraper and fill it with tenants right away.

Those fantastic structures you hint at, many of the them are built in the Gulf States where a nation’s immense wealth is concentrated in a few decisive hands, populations are low, and arid land is cheap. With cheap land and few native tenants, they can build such fanciful structures to attract international clientele.

I’m not disagreeing with you. You can point to new structures in the US that are breath-taking (though still tame compared to a lot of those fanciful oil-money structures). Singapore and Hong Kong—where capital is king—also is home to many fantastic buildings. I think things are changing, but just suggesting how the price of land and heavy regulation on the use of it can drive builders to go for space-maximizing solutions.


30 posted on 01/10/2012 12:54:34 AM PST by BradyLS (DO NOT FEED THE BEARS!)
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To: Vince Ferrer
Suggest The Design of Design [Addison-Wesley, 2010] by Frederick Brooks (same author of The Mythical Man-Month from 1975 [cover has mural of La Brea Tar Pits]).
31 posted on 01/10/2012 2:17:38 AM PST by jamaksin
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To: Lou L

I’ve done that work myself. Not as degreed as he is, but the economy is tough out there for young folks. Sorting work for UPS is a honest living. Nothing to be ashamed there.


32 posted on 01/10/2012 2:23:02 AM PST by BenKenobi
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To: achilles2000
Architecture is fine as long as you combine it with a firm grounding in business and contruction. My Brothers-in-law, for example, have made a lot of money in design build.

Bingo. I have a friend who's doing that. He and his partner are so busy, I can't get them to finish my plans.

33 posted on 01/10/2012 2:31:31 AM PST by Right Wing Assault (Dick Obama is more inexperienced now than he was before he was elected.)
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To: SeekAndFind

"Just one word.”

34 posted on 01/10/2012 3:02:36 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: SeekAndFind

Now you tell me...


35 posted on 01/10/2012 6:33:50 AM PST by r-q-tek86 ("It doesn't matter how smart you are if you don't stop and think" - Dr. Sowell)
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To: SeekAndFind

College isn’t a safe bet. I would say trade school, but the illegals are killing that also.


36 posted on 01/10/2012 9:11:47 AM PST by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: BenKenobi
I’ve done that work myself. Not as degreed as he is, but the economy is tough out there for young folks. Sorting work for UPS is a honest living. Nothing to be ashamed there.

No, I completely agree with you. I wasn't making an assessment of the UPS work...only that he was was degreed, and under-employed, considering his qualifications.

37 posted on 01/10/2012 11:43:52 AM PST by Lou L (The Senate without a fillibuster is just a 100-member version of the House.)
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