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Online Schools Becoming More Popular, Despite Union Resistance
Townhall.com ^ | October 2, 2012 | Kyle Olsen

Posted on 10/02/2012 6:58:03 PM PDT by Kaslin

Enrollment in online schools has increased twelvefold in Ohio since the first internet-based school was created in the state in 2000, The Gazette Medina reports.

More than 30,000 students are currently enrolled, most of them concentrated in seven statewide cyber schools. Only Arizona had more students in online schools, according to the news report.

Online schools, and other forms of digital learning, are an inevitable and promising form of education for the 21st Century, unless special interest forces are able to keep technology from becoming more integrated into everyday education.

Professor Gary Miron of the National Education Policy Center is a leading voice for those special interests, which include teachers unions and the education establishment in general. He suggested that online schools in Ohio may not be properly serving their students due to a lack of state regulation.

“Miron … said Ohio has fewer requirements for online schools than most other states. He cited items like financial reporting, student-to-teacher ratios, and how long students have to stay in a school or pass state tests in order for schools to receive state money,” the newspaper reported.

And?

Miron states those facts as if they’re negatives. Toledo schools may have more “financial reporting,” but does that make them better? The Columbus teachers’ contract may mandate “student-to-teacher ratios,” but does that make the most sense? The state may dictate how long some students must stay in school, but is that always in the best interest of students?

The educational establishment prefers more regulation for alternative school choice options, presumably to make them less attractive to students and families.

The National Education Association – the teachers union that funds Miron’s opinions – wants a one-size-fits-all, government-run monopoly where kids are assigned to schools based on where they live, regardless of that school’s performance. Union leaders don’t want options for parents. They don’t want competition from for-profit operators because they know they’ll lose business.

But competition is what they’re getting. Now that Ohio has lifted the cap on the number of online schools, watch for even more students to exercise their newfound freedom, which is the American way.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: arizona; education; homeschool; homeschooling; laborunions; learning; nea; ohio; onlinelearning; teachersunions; teaching
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1 posted on 10/02/2012 6:58:11 PM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

I think online schools are fantastic, provided that the students get as good, or better, education than the brick and mortar.

I wish I had that as an option.


2 posted on 10/02/2012 7:07:07 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Kaslin

“Professor Gary Miron.....uggested that online schools in Ohio may not be properly serving their students due to a lack of state regulation.”

Uhmmmm.....Sir, isn’t state regulation responsible for the present state of education?????

Oh!!!!.....you see it as a viable system....Hmmmmmm?

What’s that adage....doing something over and over again expecting different....

You can apply that to socialism and every failed version of it.

Another brick in the wall.


3 posted on 10/02/2012 7:07:11 PM PDT by Puckster
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To: Kaslin

There are considerable waiting lists for cyberschools here in Michigan.

I think I would have done far better if something like this had been available back in the 80s.


4 posted on 10/02/2012 7:07:16 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Jonty30

Certainly not an option for lazy students or parents.


5 posted on 10/02/2012 7:08:32 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Kaslin

Computers don’t pay union dues.

That is ALL the teacher’s union care about.

Not if these schools are actually doing a better job.


6 posted on 10/02/2012 7:08:40 PM PDT by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: Kaslin

There’s a place for online schools, but I like the structure and the organization of traditional classrooms.

It is good to be forced to meet at a certain time or place to study a subject intensely for an hour. It is a plus to have a knowledge area expert leading and explaining.

I’ve tried both, and I definitely prefer the traditional format.

Unfortunately, the new format is the avenue that will free students from the burdensome liberalism hawked in so much of higher education.

Online needs to work harder at both student accountability and communication/teacher access.


7 posted on 10/02/2012 7:08:40 PM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! True supporters of our troops pray for their victory!)
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To: Kaslin

I received my masters online, for me the best option.


8 posted on 10/02/2012 7:09:09 PM PDT by svcw (Why is one cell on another planet considered life, and in the womb it is not.)
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To: cripplecreek

No it isn’t. It’s good for people, like myself who doesn’t learn well with the industrial method of educating outlr students, where we essentially put facts into their heads and keep moving on.

If I had been able to keep studying material, until I knew it deeply, before moving forward, I would have been considerably more educated than I am.


9 posted on 10/02/2012 7:12:05 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Puckster

There are online PUBLIC schools too, they’ll even send you the computer


10 posted on 10/02/2012 7:12:16 PM PDT by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Kaslin
unless special interest forces are able to keep technology from becoming more integrated into everyday education

Now, they would not put self interest ahead of the needs of the young people, would they? /sarc>

11 posted on 10/02/2012 7:16:07 PM PDT by The_Media_never_lie (Actually, they lie when it suits them! The crooked MS media must be defeated any way it can be done!)
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To: svcw
I also got a Master's via online courses. I took 12 credits at Wake Forest U and got all A'S, and found the online courses MUCH more labor and study intensive. Anyone who writes off online schools as easy hasn't had to read entire textbooks and written major papers without professorial spoon feeding.
12 posted on 10/02/2012 7:16:11 PM PDT by Rutabega (If you don't want me in your personal affairs, don't stick your hand out for my help.)
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To: Jonty30

Even as an adult the internet has been a great aid to me. Between my graphic arts classes through the online college extension and the online lectures from Hillsdale college I can keep right on learning.


13 posted on 10/02/2012 7:16:52 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: xzins

Its the flexibility that makes it work.


14 posted on 10/02/2012 7:17:14 PM PDT by svcw (Why is one cell on another planet considered life, and in the womb it is not.)
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To: Rutabega

Agreed


15 posted on 10/02/2012 7:18:03 PM PDT by svcw (Why is one cell on another planet considered life, and in the womb it is not.)
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To: Kaslin

Hubby is a prof. and just had a seminar this week about this very subject. I could care LESS about what the unions think.

MY concern is....text books are going digital. Call me a ‘fuddy duddy’....but I like PAPER in my hand. Digital can be erased. Over a period of time....all books and materials are ‘digitized’....which is where we are headed. Where is the ‘backup’?

Second.....if there is a hacking or power outage.....the server goes down. Then what? Is the student re-reimbursed?

Also.....SOCIALIZATION. Students interacting with PEOPLE....IN PERSON.

Just a couple of concerns I have with this. JMHO.


16 posted on 10/02/2012 7:20:18 PM PDT by RushIsMyTeddyBear (Great vid by ShorelineMike! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOZjJk6nbD4&feature=plcp)
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To: Kaslin

I think this is the wave of the future. I would like to see them put all possible classes online free of charge. To get credit you would have to go to your university and pay to get tested. Save the going away to school for the classes that require lab time and more complex studies. It is senseless to pay tuition for basic courses.


17 posted on 10/02/2012 7:21:12 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (Ignorance is bliss- I'm stoked)
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To: Kaslin

My boy attended a virtual school this past spring. He had wonderful grades and finished the courses weeks ahead of time.

But he missed his AFJROTC class and is back in a brick and mortar school again.


18 posted on 10/02/2012 7:28:21 PM PDT by Beach_Babe
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To: Jonty30

Agreed. I wish online ed was available when u was growing up.
I’ve even taken online college courses and enjoyed them.


19 posted on 10/02/2012 7:29:15 PM PDT by GreatRoad (O < 0)
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To: Lurkina.n.Learnin

Basic courses in college these days are bonehead English and bonehead math for those that failed to grasp them in high school.

Students should be able to sue their high schools if they need to take the courses in college.


20 posted on 10/02/2012 7:31:29 PM PDT by listenhillary (Courts, law enforcement, roads and national defense should be the extent of government)
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To: RushIsMyTeddyBear

I personally like physical textbooks, because of the reusability factor and that they make great reference material, so I agree with you here.

But much of the socialization does not really happen in the classroom, where students are supposed to be paying attention to what the teacher is saying. It happens after class, which can still happen through student collaboration.


21 posted on 10/02/2012 7:31:33 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Jonty30

u = i , sorry for typo


22 posted on 10/02/2012 7:37:45 PM PDT by GreatRoad (O < 0)
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To: GreatRoad

You’d probably enjoy Khan academy and coursera.

Also, MIT has thrown all of their courses online for free, so you can get a free, albeit non-accredited, MIT education.


23 posted on 10/02/2012 7:37:46 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Lurkina.n.Learnin

That’s exactly where it is headed, just so you know.


24 posted on 10/02/2012 7:44:44 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: RushIsMyTeddyBear
The virtual high school we used was free. Teachers held live on-line classes — some daily, some once or twice a week. All the classes were recorded and could be viewed at a later time in case they were missed because of a power failure, a doctor's appointment, a field trip, etc. Although we didn't attend any, there were many school-sponsored field trips throughout the semester. And teachers were just a phone call away if a problem/question arose.
25 posted on 10/02/2012 7:50:44 PM PDT by Beach_Babe
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To: cripplecreek

Same here. No more worrying about the bullies smacking me around in the playground at recess. No yucky school food. No teachers claiming I insulted them by mentioning church in an essay (yes, that happened). No gum wads being spat at the back of my shirt. No getting stabbed with a pencil because I wouldn’t pass somebody’s note. Being able to study something until *I* got it, not until the teacher decided it was time. Or, being able to move on after getting it, instead of waiting while the teacher rehashed it for the rest of the class. No having to beg for bathroom priviledges. No bus rides.

There are times when the classroom format works best, and it is good to know how to sit still and pay attention when needed. But, not all the time!


26 posted on 10/02/2012 7:52:40 PM PDT by Ellendra (http://www.ustrendy.com/ellendra-nauriel/portfolio/18423/concealed-couture/)
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To: Jonty30

And that is a good thing. All the
Politicians talk of the value of education so why not make it available to everyone. You could learn at your own rate and if the accreditation is important to you you could pay for that and get tested on campus. I


27 posted on 10/02/2012 7:54:05 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (Ignorance is bliss- I'm stoked)
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To: Jonty30

My kids’ private school was K-8. The challenge of becoming accredited for a high school diploma prevented it from going higher. They’ve hooked up with an online private, Christian high school.
Kids now go K-12. The high schoolers are in what was empty classroom space. The high school students go to service, they get track and PE, they have language classes in small groups with what was previously several part time language teachers (Spanish and French). Their parents do not have to choose between horrific commutes and tuition costs and public high school.
Online schooling, IMO, is going to make private schools more competitive. You can use one to complement the other.


28 posted on 10/02/2012 7:58:44 PM PDT by tbw2
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To: Jonty30

There are also several groups now offering the classes on which all CLEP tests are based online. You take the online class to prep for the test, then pay $79 for the test. Way cheaper than college tuition. An enterprising student, whether home schooler or college kid home for the summer, could knock out a lot of college credits that way.


29 posted on 10/02/2012 8:01:31 PM PDT by tbw2
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To: tbw2

bump for later


30 posted on 10/02/2012 8:09:32 PM PDT by timestax (Why not drug tests for the President AND all White Hut staff ? ? ?)
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To: Kaslin
Not only do cyberschools make sense, but computers don't pay union dues, and students actually receive an education instead of indoctrination. The state bureaucrats and teachers are scared to death their lock on “education” will be broken — and they will fight tooth and nail to preserve their monopoly.
31 posted on 10/02/2012 8:12:20 PM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: cripplecreek

I disagree. One aspect of the John Dewey Marxist Prussian public school system that was put in place in 1930, was to destroy the “love of knowledge” which is natural in all healthy children. Children aren’t taught knowledge in schools....they are taught “cognitive dissonance” and can’t make sense of it and get frustrated or think they are dumb. (They are usually the brightest).

Children are the most curious and love to learn-—unless they are ridiculed and humiliated by a bunch of peers who are made to laugh at them when they don’t conform to the “proper” Marxist way of thinking—which avoids truth and real knowledge.

The other thing children HATE to do is waste their time. Public school is a big waste of time because it is geared for collective learning and not the individual-—like what Lincoln had...... Public school teaches dependence on the State-—the opposite of a Ben Franklin/Abe Lincoln education. They teach children to be servile, and dependent on a teacher, having to get permission to go to the bathroom. No Mark Twain or Lincoln would have resulted from such a repressive, slavish condition. Children used to be independent in early childhood, do all sorts of chores which contributed to the family unit and establish true learning and true self-esteem and knowledge.

It is indoctrination and total dependency which destroys that search for the Truth which is natural in all emotionally healthy children.

It is right after age 7 when we see this drop (and hate) of school. Very curious when parents and children used to yearn and save and work for education.

Nothing free is ever valued by most people.


32 posted on 10/02/2012 8:19:18 PM PDT by savagesusie (Right Reason According to Nature = Just Law)
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To: GeronL

MIT has free on-line courses that you can receive a certificate of completion for the course.

Dove-tail that in with on-line, or home school, education and you have a recipe for success.

I do not have a degree, but, I have made more than most college graduates due my certifications.


33 posted on 10/02/2012 8:23:23 PM PDT by Puckster
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To: cripplecreek

I probably would’ve done better as well if I was home schooled. My endocrine disease would’ve been a non-factor because I’m sure I would’ve been done by age 16; the surgery would have been done after, then gone on to college, either a traditional one or a technical school.


34 posted on 10/02/2012 8:24:55 PM PDT by wastedyears (The First Law of Heavy Metal: Not all metal is satanic.)
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To: Jonty30
If I had been able to keep studying material, until I knew it deeply, before moving forward, I would have been considerably more educated than I am.

Ditto for me, especially regarding math. That was always my worst subject.

35 posted on 10/02/2012 8:26:41 PM PDT by wastedyears (The First Law of Heavy Metal: Not all metal is satanic.)
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To: RushIsMyTeddyBear
Also.....SOCIALIZATION. Students interacting with PEOPLE....IN PERSON.

I knew some pretty crappy people when I was 8 to 10 years old. It would've been worth it to avoid them.

36 posted on 10/02/2012 8:30:54 PM PDT by wastedyears (The First Law of Heavy Metal: Not all metal is satanic.)
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To: wastedyears

My problem is due to problems with my short-term memory. It’s as though my short-term memory is like a small pitcher that fills quickly and needs time to process before I can take in more stuff.

It’s not because I lack IQ. Having had it tested several times, I consistently score between 135 and 160.


37 posted on 10/02/2012 8:33:14 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Jonty30

Thinking back on it, I had a similar problem when I was in school. The textbook knowledge I lack is astounding, but when you hear me talk you wouldn’t think I had a horrible education. Took me 5 years and another 2 months after moving to CT from NYC for me to finish high school from start to end. It was most noticeable for me that way with math; learn these equations today, and something different tomorrow, or sometimes we’d learn two different equations in the same day.

I suffered a ton of anxiety during tests because I couldn’t remember what went with what, and I also had anxiety about asking the teacher to stop and go over something, probably a bad habit I picked up thanks to various people in my life. As such, I was scared that either the students would make fun of me, or the teacher would break that golden rule and insult me.

I’m all for online/home schooling as it takes out so much anxiety associated with learning, because you can do so at your own pace. Not saying the other side of it is wrong, but people who are against online/home schooling (minus the unions) either had a remarkably pleasant childhood and school experience, or have an uncanny ability to forget about the bad things that happened during those years.


38 posted on 10/02/2012 8:48:53 PM PDT by wastedyears (The First Law of Heavy Metal: Not all metal is satanic.)
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To: Jonty30; wastedyears

Another small note, I remember testing my IQ a few times online and got scores around 120. It’s definitely better than average.


39 posted on 10/02/2012 8:49:56 PM PDT by wastedyears (The First Law of Heavy Metal: Not all metal is satanic.)
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To: Puckster

A really motivated student wouldn’t even need a school, just a library.


40 posted on 10/02/2012 8:56:04 PM PDT by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: wastedyears

Well, you’ll be happy to know that is about where fighter pilots or engineers test at. It’s a good IQ.


41 posted on 10/02/2012 8:58:06 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Jonty30

Long ago - right after we came over on the Mayflower and before computers and the internet - our local junior college offered basic courses via a local TV station. The classroom session was taped live and then replayed at a later time. Students had a choice to either attend actual class on campus or watch from the comfort of their living room. Of course we also had books back then, nothing digital. Only had to go to the campus to take tests and turn in papers.

It was not only very inexpensive but a great time saver and easy way to pile up the college credits on core curriculum courses.


42 posted on 10/02/2012 9:10:55 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
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To: wastedyears

I was pretty good at math it was English and grammar that was my hold up. It didn’t interest me at all. Math and science was bad because I would pick it up right away and then have to wait for the rest of the class. If something interested me I usually breezed right thru it. If it didn’t interest me it was pure agony. History I had mixed results on. American history was fun but European history was horrid. I think it’s just as hard to be held back as it is to not be able to keep pace. By the time I got thru high school I hated school.


43 posted on 10/02/2012 9:17:34 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (Ignorance is bliss- I'm stoked)
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To: MasterGunner01

“The state bureaucrats and teachers are scared to death their lock on “education” will be broken — and they will fight tooth and nail to preserve their monopoly.”

They’ll need every weapon at their disposal, as the urban permanent underclass heads out into formerly-middle class suburbs armed with gubmint rent vouchers. Those taxpayers left in those areas will do anything to keep their kids out of schools filling with “cash-for-kids” animals. In my area private schools are being driven to extinction by our property taxes (most of which go to public schools), so any public-school option that doesn’t involve ghetto kids will be vigorously pursued.


44 posted on 10/02/2012 9:25:29 PM PDT by kearnyirish2 (Affirmative action is economic war against white males (and therefore white families).)
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To: xzins

Unfortunately, traditional public school is now “be sort of requested to show up, but not forced because that might hurt your feelings or self esteem and we can’t have that, so you can study members of the opposite sex intensely for an hour while someone who has no real grasp of the ostensible subject matter blathers on and on about why Heather Has Two Mommies instead of, say, math.”


45 posted on 10/02/2012 9:34:11 PM PDT by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
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To: RushIsMyTeddyBear; All
Also.....SOCIALIZATION. Students interacting with PEOPLE....IN PERSON

MANTRA!

BALONEY!

Are you still in school? If not, do you not have a 'social' life?

Public schools segregate students in same age groups, an unnatural setting that they won't encounter again - in time wasting classes...programming them to be good little worker bees.

Individuality is tampered down, conformity is the drum beat.

Yes, there are people who need the structure, who need someone else to plan the hours of their days, who have little ability to be self-activated.

There are others who are hampered by such settings.

One size, like 800 calorie lunches, does not fit all.

46 posted on 10/02/2012 9:38:21 PM PDT by maine-iac7 (Christian is as Christian does)
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To: Kaslin

Yep... technology will tear down the brick-and-mortar school in the same way that technology is eroding away the power of the mainstream media. (Interesting how we have a term for both of these institutions to distinguish them from their Internet-based counterpart, isn’t it?)

In any case, I think my story is typical. I’m an English teacher at an Alaskan Bush school. I wanted to earn a master’s degree - which the University of Alaska Fairbanks was more than willing to provide at confiscatory rates after years of study. I found an online school sponsored by DePauw University in Chicago that gave me the education I wanted for one-third the cost in 18 months, and, most pleasantly, with none of the politically correct crap which floods the education classes at UAF. In fact, the classes were well presented and gave me lots of good information.

I can easily see most post-secondary degrees being awarded this way in the near future. Certainly there will be a need for hands-on classes in disciplines where it is appropriate, but other classes which are based on reading, research, and discussion have no need for a physical location.

I like where we’re headed. It was great living in the Alaskan Bush and still working alongside folks in New Orleans and Wisconsin, with the professor in Florida. Competition is excellent for my profession - someday we’ll have real choice - but until then, this is a great step in that direction.


47 posted on 10/02/2012 9:45:03 PM PDT by redpoll
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To: Lurkina.n.Learnin
I think this is the wave of the future. I would like to see them put all possible classes online free of charge. To get credit you would have to go to your university and pay to get tested. Save the going away to school for the classes that require lab time and more complex studies. It is senseless to pay tuition for basic courses.

Whole ball of wax.

I got excited, and predicted, that the ability to learn at home would become available way back before the Internet and DVD's. I was excited that vhs tapes could provide classes - then along came the Internet. Best thing for education ever to come down the pike.

Of course the government will hamper it anyway they can. They lose power, money and the ability to brainwash.

But it WILL prevail.

48 posted on 10/02/2012 9:45:08 PM PDT by maine-iac7 (Christian is as Christian does)
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To: Beach_Babe

Have you checked with some ‘home school’ groups on the law that allows such students to still participate in some classes at public school?

I know students who do this.


49 posted on 10/02/2012 9:46:38 PM PDT by maine-iac7 (Christian is as Christian does)
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To: Grams A

Back in the 70’s I took a video course when that was rather new. I loved it. I could watch it at home, or go to the library and pop the tape in at my convenience. I very much prefer online classes to keep my nursing license current. My daughter did 2 semesters of online clasess and absolutely hated them, despite starting on a computer at 18 months old. She also wants a physical textbook in her hands, and it can’t be used, either. On top of that, the online classes were more expensive than on campus classes and she was watching recycled videos.

People learn differently and one size doesn’t fit all. School was torture for me, having a high IQ. A history teacher threatened to fail me if I missed another day of class. I asked him how he could justify that if I had a B+ and never cracked the book. In a small town, his personal war stories were crap compared to his neighbor who’d been in the Bhutan Death March. Maybe he was jealous I was friends with the guy’s daughter.

Back in the early 90s when online schools first became available, it was a Godsend for a colleague with a child that had ADHD and was being abused by his teacher and the school system. It made a huge difference for him and he finally started learning. Again, one size doesn’t fit all.


50 posted on 10/02/2012 9:48:59 PM PDT by pops88 (Standing with Breitbart for truth.)
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