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142nd Anniversary of Gen. Lee’s death
Huntington News ^ | October 2, 2012 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 10/03/2012 2:20:10 PM PDT by BigReb555

America mourned the death of Gen. Robert E. Lee on Wednesday, October 12, 1870 and Friday, October 12th marks the 142nd anniversary of his death.

(Excerpt) Read more at huntingtonnews.net ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: confederacy; confederate; dixie; union
Hello America!

Please share this story with students, educators, historians and all who love history.

Every year, the Lee Chapel at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia presents a lecture and special events commemorating the Washington College presidency of Robert E. Lee on the anniversary of his death.

On Monday, October 8, 2012, the college chapel will present a book signing beginning at 10:30 am, followed by an Address at 12:15 pm in the auditorium. A program commemorating the 142th anniversary of Lee's death will feature Jeffry D. Wert, speaking on "Lee and the Rebirth of an Army: From Seven Days to Gettysburg." See details at: http://www.wlu.edu/x56830.xml

America mourned the death of Gen. Robert E. Lee on Wednesday, October 12, 1870 and Friday, October 12th marks the 142nd anniversary of his death.

Robert E. Lee, son of Light Horse “Harry” Lee of Revolutionary War fame and Anne Hill Carter Lee, distinguished himself as an exceptional officer and combat engineer in the United States Army for 32 years and Commanded the legendary Army of Northern Virginia for the Confederacy during the War Between the States. He was also a top honored student at the United States Military Academy at West Point where he would serve as Superintendent in 1852.

General Lee died at his home at Lexington, Virginia at 9:30 AM on October 12, 1870. His last great deed came after the War Between the States when he accepted the presidency of Washington College, now Washington and Lee University. He saved the financially troubled college and helped many young people further their education.

Returning home from a church meeting, Robert E. Lee sat at the supper table and was about to say grace. The general could not say a word and slumped down in his chair. It was believed that he had a stroke.

His condition seemed hopeless when a doctor told him, "General, you must make haste and get well---Traveller--- has been standing too long in his stable and needs exercise." Lee could only shake his head as he knew he would never again ride his beloved horse.

The rains and flooding were the worse of Virginia's history on the day General Lee died. On Wednesday, October 12, 1870, in the presence of his family, Lee quietly passed away.

The church bells rang as the sad news passed through Washington College, Virginia Military Institute and the town of Lexington. School Cadet's carried the remains of the old soldier to Washington Chapel where he lay in state and would be buried.

Memorial meetings were held throughout the South and as far North as New York. At Washington College in Lexington eulogies were delivered by: Reverend Pemberton, Reverend W.S. White--Stonewall Jackson's Pastor and Reverend J. William Jones. Former Confederate President Jefferson Davis brought the eulogy in Richmond, Virginia. Lee was also eulogized in Great Britain.

“Duty, then is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more; you should never wish to do less”---Robert E. Lee.

The War Between the States Sesquicentennial, 150th Anniversary, runs 2011 through 2015. The Georgia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans joins the nation in remembering this historic time in our nation’s history. See information at: http://www.150wbts.org/ Gen. Douglas MacArthur once said, “Old soldier’s don’t die; they just fade away”!

Let’s not allow the memory of our nation’s heroes to fade away!

1 posted on 10/03/2012 2:20:12 PM PDT by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555
He remains America's greatest general.
2 posted on 10/03/2012 2:21:34 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: BigReb555

I’m looking at my calendar, and the 12th is a week from Friday, but I appreciate the heads-up.

Two of my children (James, who is 8, and Kathleen, almost 9 months) share General Lee’s birthday, January 19, and one of my sons is named “Thomas Jackson.”


3 posted on 10/03/2012 2:23:11 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Optimism is much shallower than hope.)
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To: BigReb555

Indeed, I have read a couple of books about this truly remarkable man. The honor he held is a foreign concept in today’s society. God rest his soul.


4 posted on 10/03/2012 2:23:30 PM PDT by Neoliberalnot (Marxism works well only with the uneducated and the unarmed.)
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To: Neoliberalnot; BenLurkin

Whether Gen. Lee was one of our greatest generals is open to argument. (I’m on the “Yes” side.) Whether he was a man of, as the book says, “Sterling Nobility,” is not up for argument. Anyone who chooses Robert E. Lee as a role model can’t go wrong.


5 posted on 10/03/2012 2:26:35 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Optimism is much shallower than hope.)
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To: BenLurkin

Something interesting to me is how the war aged Lee. In all photographs before the war, he had dark black hair. In all during or after the war he was totally grey and looked 20 or even 30 years older.


6 posted on 10/03/2012 2:30:33 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: Tax-chick

I’ve been to his house that they stole from him...........


7 posted on 10/03/2012 2:32:55 PM PDT by Red Badger (Is it just me, or is Hillary! starting to look like Benjamin Franklin?.................)
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To: Tax-chick
"Whether Gen. Lee was one of our greatest generals is open to argument."

I wouldn't deny that Lee was one of the greatest American generals ever. Unfortunately for him he was second best general in the war he was fighting. A good, honorable man however in every respect. RIP Marse Robert.

8 posted on 10/03/2012 2:33:50 PM PDT by circlecity
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To: Red Badger

I’ve been to the cemetery, but I have never toured the Arlington house. (Anyway, it was his father-in-law’s house ;-).

I think Gen. Lee would appreciate the cemetery and the museum.


9 posted on 10/03/2012 2:34:53 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Optimism is much shallower than hope.)
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To: circlecity
Unfortunately for him he was second best general in the war he was fighting.

Or the best general in the war he wasn't fighting! Is a great general the one who wins the war by any means? Grant! Or one who wins battles? Jackson, Thomas, Forrest, Custer (well, oops ...).

There's a lot of ground to cover.

10 posted on 10/03/2012 2:37:30 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Optimism is much shallower than hope.)
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To: circlecity

“Unfortunately for him he was second best general in the war he was fighting.”

IMHO, I’m not sure I agree with you because his support was second. With the other sides support he probably would have won.


11 posted on 10/03/2012 2:40:32 PM PDT by A Strict Constructionist (We're an Oligrachy...Resistance to tyrants is obedience to God. Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Tax-chick
"Is a great general the one who wins the war by any means? Grant! Or one who wins battles?"

You mean like the battles of Ft. Donaldson, Ft. Henry, Shiloh, Iuka, Jackson, Champions Hill, the Vicksburg seige, Chattanooga, and the seige of Petersburg and Richmond. That would be Grant too.

12 posted on 10/03/2012 2:48:07 PM PDT by circlecity
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To: Tax-chick

I was surprised at how small it was. Doors, furniture all the stuff like cabinetry seemed to be about 80% of what the modern size should be. People were short in those days.......


13 posted on 10/03/2012 3:01:12 PM PDT by Red Badger (Is it just me, or is Hillary! starting to look like Benjamin Franklin?.................)
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To: A Strict Constructionist
"IMHO, I’m not sure I agree with you because his support was second."

That never mattered until Grant came along. If resources is what won campaigns the war would have ended with McClellen's peninsular campaign.

14 posted on 10/03/2012 3:15:00 PM PDT by circlecity
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To: Tax-chick

I always swore I would name my first born son Robert after General Lee. My Robert is full time in the Air Guard and has spent his time in the sand box. He tries to live up to his name.


15 posted on 10/03/2012 3:16:23 PM PDT by Himyar
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To: BigReb555
I drive past "Lee upon Traveler" often.
16 posted on 10/03/2012 3:18:33 PM PDT by jaz.357 ( *Luke 6:43-45* Twas Ever Thus!)
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To: BigReb555

“Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more, you should never wish to do less.”- Robert E. Lee


17 posted on 10/03/2012 3:53:22 PM PDT by GenXteacher (You have chosen dishonor to avoid war; you shall have war also.)
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To: BigReb555

I have a beautiful color print of “The Last Meeting” hanging on the wall in my office to the right of my computer monitor. Lee and Jackson in their final conference, mounted, during the Chancellorville campaign. They are both great American heroes in my opinion and I am a born and bred Yankee.


18 posted on 10/03/2012 3:57:29 PM PDT by MountainYankee
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To: BigReb555

I have a beautiful color print of “The Last Meeting” hanging on the wall in my office to the right of my computer monitor. Lee and Jackson in their final conference, mounted, during the Chancellorville campaign. They are both great American heroes in my opinion and I am a born and bred Yankee.


19 posted on 10/03/2012 3:58:55 PM PDT by MountainYankee
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To: BigReb555

August 9, 1960

Dear Dr. Scott:

Respecting your August 1 inquiry calling attention to my often expressed admiration for General Robert E. Lee, I would say, first, that we need to understand that at the time of the War Between the States the issue of Secession had remained unresolved for more than 70 years. Men of probity, character, public standing and unquestioned loyalty, both North and South, had disagreed over this issue as a matter of principle from the day our Constitution was adopted.

General Robert E. Lee was, in my estimation, one of the supremely gifted men produced by our Nation. He believed unswervingly in the Constitutional validity of his cause which until 1865 was still an arguable question in America; he was thoughtful yet demanding of his officers and men, forbearing with captured enemies but ingenious, unrelenting and personally courageous in battle, and never disheartened by a reverse or obstacle. Through all his many trials, he remained selfless almost to a fault and unfailing in his belief in God. Taken altogether, he was noble as a leader and as a man, and unsullied as I read the pages of our history.

From deep conviction I simply say this: a nation of men of Lee’s caliber would be unconquerable in spirit and soul. Indeed, to the degree that present-day American youth will strive to emulate his rare qualities, including his devotion to this land as revealed in his painstaking efforts to help heal the nation’s wounds once the bitter struggle was over, we, in our own time of danger in a divided world, will be strengthened and our love of freedom sustained.

Such are the reasons that I proudly display the picture of this great American on my office wall.

Sincerely,

Dwight D. Eisenhower


20 posted on 10/03/2012 4:03:34 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va

Fascinating. I’d never read that before. Thanks for posting it.


21 posted on 10/03/2012 4:10:54 PM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
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To: Stonewall Jackson

I’d post the Dr. Scott part but it would make you throw up.


22 posted on 10/03/2012 4:13:00 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va
Indeed.

I was just reading Simon Bolivar Buckner: Borderland Knight, a fascinating biography of one of the most underrated generals of the Western Theater. I highly recommend it. As an interesting aside, his son, General Simon Bolivar Buckner Junior, is the highest ranking American general to be killed by enemy fire. He was killed by the last Japanese artillery barrage of the Battle of Okinawa.

23 posted on 10/03/2012 4:31:57 PM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
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To: Neoliberalnot

He was a man of honor—respected by friend and foe alike. I believe—if the CSA had won—he would have become the second president of the Confederacy—and I believe he would have Freed the slaves!


24 posted on 10/03/2012 4:41:24 PM PDT by Forward the Light Brigade (Into the Jaws of H*ll)
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To: BigReb555

“Duty, then is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more; you should never wish to do less”-—Robert E. Lee.


25 posted on 10/03/2012 4:55:25 PM PDT by SunTzuWu
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To: Stonewall Jackson; rockrr

To my great surprise, that is actually true (I had him confused with another general and assumed the WWII general must have been a grandson). Simon Jr. was born when Simon Sr. was in his sixties.


26 posted on 10/03/2012 5:02:54 PM PDT by x
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To: circlecity

Good point...but the war did stretch on...but still a good point.


27 posted on 10/03/2012 7:40:40 PM PDT by A Strict Constructionist (We're an Oligrachy...Resistance to tyrants is obedience to God. Thomas Jefferson)
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To: x

An interesting thing about General Buckner Senior is that he was the Confederate commander at the Battle of Munfordville during the Heartland Campaign. What makes this interesting is that Buckner was from Munfordville and his forces had to attack the town in order to secure a bridge over the Green River.


28 posted on 10/03/2012 9:32:43 PM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
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To: circlecity

Good point.


29 posted on 10/04/2012 3:23:05 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Optimism is much shallower than hope.)
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To: Tax-chick

The cemetery began as an insult to Lee. When Lee chose sides, his home was seized by the Union Army. The head of the Army decided to bury the civil war dead in his front yard. It wasn’t until many years after the war and court battles that Arlington became a national monument.......


30 posted on 10/04/2012 6:15:30 AM PDT by Red Badger (Is it just me, or is Hillary! starting to look like Benjamin Franklin?.................)
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To: Stonewall Jackson

FYI LTG Timothy J. Maude, USA, was killed on 9/11 in the attack on the Pentagon.


31 posted on 10/04/2012 8:25:45 AM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
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To: ops33

The new Army Human Resources Center at Fort Knox is named in his honor. He and Buckner were both Lt Gen’s at the time of their deaths, but Buckner was posthumously promoted to four-star.


32 posted on 10/04/2012 8:43:59 AM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
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To: Stonewall Jackson

Did not know that LG Buckner was postumously promoted.
I believe there were 3 3 stars lost during WW2; LG McNair, killed by friendly fire, LG Andrews, killed in a plane crash, and LG Buckner.


33 posted on 10/04/2012 9:23:01 AM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
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To: ops33
McNair was also posthumously promoted to four-star.

There was a fourth three-star, Millard Harmon, who was lost in the war. Harmon was the deputy commander of the 20th Air Force, under Hap Arnold. He was a passenger on a B-24 that disappeared somewhere between Kwajalein and Hawaii on February 24, 1945.

34 posted on 10/04/2012 10:24:41 AM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
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