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NY: Hurricane Sandy forces mass transit closure, evacuations (Zone A evacuation ordered)
myfoxny.com ^ | 10/28/12 | FOX 5

Posted on 10/28/2012 10:33:56 AM PDT by NormsRevenge

MYFOXNY.COM/AP -Transit officials in New York are preparing for a total shutdown of subway, bus and train service as Hurricane Sandy continues to bear down on the metropolitan region.

All service will be suspended at 7 p.m. on Sunday.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordered the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to start planning for an orderly suspension of service.

New York City subways and buses will start phasing out service at 7 p.m. Metro-North Railroad and the Long Island Rail Road will suspend service at 7 p.m. Sunday.

The city's mass transit system is the nation's largest. The subway alone has a daily ridership of more than 5 million.

(Excerpt) Read more at myfoxny.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: New York
KEYWORDS: closure; cuomo; evacations; hurricane; hurricanesandy; masstransit; newyork; sandy
TO: All those in the path of Sandy, Good luck, Godspeed, and see ya on the other side of the eye, God willing.
1 posted on 10/28/2012 10:34:01 AM PDT by NormsRevenge
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To: NormsRevenge

Newspaper headlines for November 7th: “Obama would have won if it wasn’t for hurricane Sandy.”


2 posted on 10/28/2012 10:40:55 AM PDT by 109ACS (If this be Treason, then make the most of it. Patrick Henry, May 1765)
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To: 109ACS

It’s always nice to have a fallback alibi. ;-]


3 posted on 10/28/2012 10:43:33 AM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: NormsRevenge

Not being frm NYC wonder if is possible for the subway to flood

Prayers for everyone in the path of this storm


4 posted on 10/28/2012 10:45:16 AM PDT by Harold Shea (RVN `70 - `71)
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To: NormsRevenge
This will amount to little more than a wind-driven rainstorm for most. We get these several times a year in the Northeast. No...big...deal.

The media is overhyping this storm beyond all comprehension. People who sell batteries and bottled water are going to make a killing.

5 posted on 10/28/2012 10:45:50 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: NormsRevenge

How long before the Climate Change nuts come out and scream...”WE TOLD YOU SO!”


6 posted on 10/28/2012 10:48:55 AM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2011)
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To: Dallas59

The concern with SANDY is not the wind and rain, its the tidal surge. At 1130 this morning, we had a high tide 3-4 feet above normal without tomorrow night’s full moon and with the storm 575 miles south of here. Living on the water, I know about the wolf cryers. This one doesn’t look like an average storm.


7 posted on 10/28/2012 10:55:57 AM PDT by cumbo78
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To: NormsRevenge

Let’s pray the storm peters out for both the sake of lives & property & also so Obama isn’t delivered both a national distraction from the campaign & opportunity to look like a stand up guy (to wishy washy independents). Romney would be paralyzed & forced to walk a tight line campaigning in the middle of a disaster.


8 posted on 10/28/2012 11:01:25 AM PDT by The Hound Passer
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To: Harold Shea
"Not being frm NYC wonder if is possible for the subway to flood"

Yes -- at least the subways in lower Manhattan. Irene came close, but was a foot or so shy of topping over and flooding the subways. Sandy may manage to do it, but on the second high tide of Monday, not the first.

We just came back from the beach -- and it was awfully windy -- amazing considering how far away this storm still is. After Irene -- that was not a hurricane when it hit us -- I do not think this is being hyped at all. If anything, it's still being underestimated. Less than half of the ocean-facing properties we saw were boarded up.

9 posted on 10/28/2012 11:11:27 AM PDT by Sooth2222 ("Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of congress. But I repeat myself." M.Twain)
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To: cumbo78

I know that water has to be constantly pumped out of the underground subway system there. Don’t need more. I hate it though when the libs use something like this to push some far left political crap.


10 posted on 10/28/2012 11:15:07 AM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2011)
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To: Harold Shea

Yes...it can happen and does somewhat frequently when we experience flash flooding, although disruptions are minor. The subway has a very effective pumping system that limits disruptions. The problem will be storm surges which can affect lower Manhattan. We got lucky with Irene and hopefully no big issues this time. As SamAdams said, we get a few Nor’Easters a year so generally we are used to these types of storms, however, they are predicting this to be different than what we normally experience.


11 posted on 10/28/2012 11:25:45 AM PDT by usafa92 (Conservative in Jersey)
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To: 109ACS

GOD acts in mysterious ways.


12 posted on 10/28/2012 11:26:57 AM PDT by Orange1998
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To: SamAdams76

“This will amount to little more than a wind-driven rainstorm for most. We get these several times a year in the Northeast. No...big...deal.”

Generally I share you opinion on media hype on hurricanes. Not everyone of them is a Katrina....or a Sandy, if the computer models verify.

But Sandy is different from a normal Cat 1 storm at her location for several reasons;

Super Low Barometer.

The last reading was 28.08 and falling. This is extremely low for a Cat 1 hurricane. It is more like what is found in a strong Cat 3. There some models that show sustained winds of 100 MPH at landfall in the NYC,Long Island, North Jersey Shore area. Sandys winds could easily be Cat 2 at landfall, Most computer models have her intensifying as it approaches land.

And these are the wind speeds at the ground. They could much higher on NYC skyscrapers, resulting in blown out windows like happened in Miami with Wilma.

Long Duration of the Winds

Even if Sandy’s worst case wind scenario doesnt verify, Cat 1 winds and tropical force winds for hour after hour can cause widespread damage. I learned this the hard way when Hurricane Francis hit Florida in 2004.

I didnt prepare for power outages because the eye was supposed to landfall 250 miles south of us. Because Francis was a huge storm several feeder bands trained over us for almost 12 hours.Even thoug the highest wind gusts were only 73 mph, we lost power for 10 days. Some of the isolated rural areas were with out power for a month! Sandys TS winds extend almost 500 miles from the center,(twice the size of Francis) people in the right location could experience them for days.

A huge storm surge. Sandy projected to landfall at high tide on a Full moon

When these storms are giants like Katrina, Ike, and Sandy, they have storm surges at much higher categories than their wind categories. Katrina was a Cat 3 based on its land fall wind speeds yet the storm surge was a Cat 5+. Ike was a cat 2 at landfall, yet the storm surge was a 4+. Sandy could have a 4 or a 5 storm surge which would flood the NYC subways for starters.

Massive Power Outages

Because of the long duration of the winds covering a huge area of high population density, this could be the largest power outage in US history. Power could be out for over a month in many areas. Sandy is not expected to exit the area quickly once she arrives so rainfall totals and snowfall totals could be very high.

We live in interesting times.


13 posted on 10/28/2012 11:29:52 AM PDT by Uncle Lonny
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To: NormsRevenge
This Is The Scariest Thing I've Seen About Hurricane Sandy


14 posted on 10/28/2012 11:31:54 AM PDT by blam
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To: Uncle Lonny
Last hurricane to hit us was Isaac.
Not much in the wind department, approx 80mph, but we were under the eye for 6-7 hours, lots of rain and flooding.
Don't underestimate a slow mover with relatively weak winds, damage will occur.
Plus we didn't have cold temps. to contend with.
15 posted on 10/28/2012 11:39:04 AM PDT by The Cajun (Sarah Palin, Mark Levin......Nuff said.)
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To: cumbo78

“The concern with SANDY is not the wind and rain, its the tidal surge. At 1130 this morning, we had a high tide 3-4 feet above normal without tomorrow night’s full moon and with the storm 575 miles south of here. Living on the water, I know about the wolf cryers. This one doesn’t look like an average storm.”

Agreed. I just talked to my brother who went surfing at the North Jetties near Jacksonville, Florida. He always surfs there when passing hurricanes bring in larger waves.

He was dumbfounded by how high the tide was.He said the ocean had risen so high that it was cutting deeply into mature sand dunes. This was much higher than he had ever seen the tide there with a passing offshore hurricane.

This is not your average storm.


16 posted on 10/28/2012 11:42:25 AM PDT by Uncle Lonny
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To: SamAdams76
This will amount to little more than a wind-driven rainstorm for most. We get these several times a year in the Northeast. No...big...deal.

Really.

We have a hurricane moving INTO the Mid-Atlantic instead of a N'oreaster paralleling the coast.

We have a windfield of tropical storm-force winds that extends out 500 miles.

Some areas will see sustained winds of 50+ mph for nearly two full days. Areas with large, mature trees, many still with full leaf cover, with adjacent power lines.

Meterologists who don't hype weather events are saying this will be bad. The totality of this storm is unprecedented in modern meterological history.

Yet you see it as no big deal. We'll see.

17 posted on 10/28/2012 11:42:25 AM PDT by dirtboy
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To: Uncle Lonny

The media is hyping Sandy unbelievably. I firmly believe that it is a convenient distraction from talking about Benghazi.

On the other hand, this storm has the lowest barometric pressure of any storm we have had in more than two decades. New York City sits at sea level. We have never really had a direct hit of major flooding. They are expecting winds that could gust up to 70mph. In Westchester county, where I live, this means downed trees, power outages, blocked roads and parkways. 3-4 inches of rain will flood out the usual parkways and rivers. It’s a full moon tomorrow night which brings higher tides than normal. Tidal surge could really do a number. Last year, Irene wreaked absolute havoc in areas that normally do not sustain flooding.

This storm is also huge. Think I heard this morning that it’s 500 miles wide. The wind was picking up this morning already and the temperature is dropping a little.

I, being a good prepper, have my generator and chain saws ready to go, plenty of food and alcohol in the house, and lots of water and guns. Bring it on.


18 posted on 10/28/2012 11:45:53 AM PDT by NoKoolAidforMe (I'm clinging to my God and my guns. You can keep the change.)
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To: SamAdams76
Extraordinary Storm, Extremely Serious Threat

Stu Ostro, Senior Meteorologist, The Weather Channel
Oct 28, 2012 12:46 pm ET

Graphical tropical update:Tropics Watch

SANDY

- History is being written as an extreme weather event continues to unfold, one which will occupy a place in the annals of weather history as one of the most extraordinary to have affected the United States.

- REGARDLESS OF WHAT THE OFFICIAL DESIGNATION IS NOW OR AT/AFTER LANDFALL -- HURRICANE (INCLUDING IF "ONLY" A CATEGORY ONE), TROPICAL STORM, POST-TROPICAL, EXTRATROPICAL, WHATEVER -- OR WHAT TYPE OF WARNINGS ARE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AND NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER -- PEOPLE IN THE PATH OF THIS STORM NEED TO HEED THE THREAT IT POSES WITH UTMOST URGENCY.

- TAKE COASTAL FLOODING EVACUATION ORDERS SERIOUSLY; PREPARE FOR DOWNED TREES AND STRUCTURAL DAMAGE BY OBSERVING TORNADO SAFETY GUIDELINES, I.E. STAYING INSIDE AND GETTING INTO THE LOWEST, MOST-INTERIOR PORTION OF THE BUILDING OR ANOTHER DESIGNATED SAFE PLACE; BE KEENLY AWARE OF YOUR LOCATION'S SUSCEPTIBILITY TO FLASH FLOODING (URBAN AND SMALL STREAM) FROM RAINFALL AND RIVER RISES; KNOW THAT YOU COULD BE WITHOUT POWER FOR A LONG TIME BUT ALSO UNDERSTAND THE DANGERS OF CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING FROM IMPROPER USE OF GENERATORS.

- With Sandy having already brought severe impacts to the Caribbean Islands and a portion of the Bahamas, and severe erosion to some beaches on the east coast of Florida, it is now poised to strike the northeast United States with a combination of track, size, structure and strength that is unprecedented in the known historical record there.

- Already, there are ominous signs: trees down in eastern North Carolina, the first of countless that will be blown over or uprooted along the storm's path; and coastal flooding in Florida, North Carolina and Virginia, these impacts occurring despite the center of circulation being so far offshore, an indication of Sandy's exceptional size and potency.

- A meteorologically mind-boggling combination of ingredients is coming together: one of the largest expanses of tropical storm (gale) force winds on record with a tropical or subtropical cyclone in the Atlantic or for that matter anywhere else in the world; a track of the center making a sharp left turn in direction of movement toward New Jersey in a way that is unprecedented in the historical database, as it gets blocked from moving out to sea by a pattern that includes an exceptionally strong ridge of high pressure aloft near Greenland; a "warm-core" tropical cyclone embedded within a larger, nor'easter-like circulation; and eventually tropical moisture and arctic air combining to produce heavy snow in interior high elevations. This is an extraordinary situation, and I am not prone to hyperbole.

- That gigantic size is a crucially important aspect of this storm. The massive breadth of its strong winds will produce a much wider scope of impacts than if it were a tiny system, and some of them will extend very far inland. A cyclone with the same maximum sustained velocities (borderline tropical storm / hurricane) but with a very small diameter of tropical storm / gale force winds would not present nearly the same level of threat or expected effects. Unfortunately, that's not the case. This one's size, threat, and expected impacts are immense.

- Those continue to be: very powerful, gusty winds with widespread tree damage and an extreme amount and duration of power outages; major coastal flooding from storm surge along with large battering waves on top of that and severe beach erosion; flooding from heavy rainfall; and heavy snow accumulations in the central Appalachians.

- Sandy is so large that there is even a tropical storm warning in effect in Bermuda, and the Bermuda Weather Service is forecasting wave heights outside the reef as high as 30'.

- There is a serious danger to mariners from a humongous area of high seas which in some areas will include waves of colossal height. Wave forecast models are predicting significant wave heights up to 50+ feet, and that is the average of the top 1/3, meaning that there will be individual waves that are even higher. The Perfect Storm, originally known as the Halloween Storm because of the time of year when it occurred, peaking in 1991 on the same dates (October 28-30) as Sandy, became a part of popular culture because of the tragedy at sea. This one has some of the same meteorological characteristics and ingredients coming together, but in an even more extreme way, and slamming more directly onshore and then much farther inland and thus having a far greater scope and variety of impacts.

19 posted on 10/28/2012 11:51:38 AM PDT by blam
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To: NormsRevenge
TO: All those in the path of Sandy, Good luck, Godspeed, and see ya on the other side of the eye, God willing.

Amen to that.

Wonder how it will affect broadcasting...particularly from New York.

Perhaps folks will just stay put at their stations.

20 posted on 10/28/2012 11:54:39 AM PDT by Churchillspirit (9/11/2001. NEVER FORGET.)
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To: NormsRevenge; All
From St. Augustine Beach, this weekend.

Normally a sloping beach, the cut is 4 feet deep.

Looting has begun!

Photobucket

21 posted on 10/28/2012 11:59:39 AM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: SamAdams76
You can call it "hype" all you want. My memory is strong enough to be cautious as this sort of thing unfolds. If anything, perhaps the only hype is that this is being referred to as a "hurricane" in the warnings from New Jersey northward. I can pretty much guarantee that the sustained winds will not be strong enough for the storm to be categorized as a hurricane by the time it comes through here. In fact, it won't even be a tropical storm, either.

This is a classic "Nor'easter" the likes of which we don't see more than a couple of times every few decades. The biggest threat, as others have pointed out, is the tidal surge from the storm itself -- exacerbated by the wind out of the east driving waves into inlets and river mouths along the East Coast. This means there will be a surge of ocean water up into these areas while 5-10 inches of rain is falling in the interior of New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. Quite simply, the runoff from the rainfall will not be able to drain out of the watersheds as quickly as usual because of the higher water levels downstream.

Some folks are comparing this to the infamous March 1993 "super-storm," but my recollection is that it may be more similar to the December 1992 storm. For those Freepers who remember that one, it occurred just before Christmas in 1992, and the storm surge was unlike anything I've ever seen in the NYC metro area. Not only did the storm peak during a full moon that made the tides that much higher, but there was also a total lunar eclipse during the full moon that month -- which meant the storm surge came on top of what was an extraordinarily high tide.

22 posted on 10/28/2012 12:56:21 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: NormsRevenge
I have looked at the flood maps for NYC. Thankfully, I don't live in Zone A (most likely to be flooded), B, or C. They have actually called for the MANDATORY evacuations of everyone in Zone A, which includes Battery Park (lower Manhattan), The Rockaways (a barrier island complex south of Brooklyn and Queens), the Long Island City area (next to the East River) and other parts. The Weather Channel guy in a video just out said that those areas would be under water by tomorrow night. Storm surge of 6-11 feet over the normal tides. Winds predicted to be gusting to 80+ mph. They are shutting down the public transportation system in its entirety by 7 p.m. (subways) and 9 p.m. (buses). The commuter trains will also shut down by 7 p.m. Schools are closed (will miracles NEVER cease??????).

So, I am saying that I don't believe this to be merely media hype. I have been watching weather blogs and webpages most of last evening and many of them say, "I am not prone to hyperbole, but folks, this is going to be BAD".

That's why I got out early this morning with my trusty backpack, having found a very sheltered place for my car away from any trees, and hit the stores for more batteries, Purell, cans of tuna, cash, and, most important, crickets for my tiny pet lizards. Hey, they gotta eat, too!

I just hope we don't lose power, but there's a very good chance that we will. Reading by lantern light?

23 posted on 10/28/2012 1:10:30 PM PDT by EinNYC
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To: Alberta's Child
but there was also a total lunar eclipse during the full moon that month -- which meant the storm surge came on top of what was an extraordinarily high tide.

Understand the full moon's relationship to a high tide. But what would a lunar eclipse have to do with it? A shadow has no mass...

24 posted on 10/28/2012 1:13:26 PM PDT by okie01 (THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA; Ignorance on parade.)
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To: NormsRevenge

Preparation for what.... MARTIAL LAW?..

This ‘cane is just a Northeaster.. they happen ever year..
Its not like a category 2 hurricane or 3, 4 or 5..

I suspect something else is at hand.. WHAT?...
Can anyone say.. “President for Life”?...


25 posted on 10/28/2012 1:28:14 PM PDT by hosepipe (This propaganda has been edited to include some fully orbed hyperbole..)
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To: okie01
A full moon occurs when the moon and sun are on opposite sides of the earth. A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon and sun are exactly on opposite sides of the earth ... meaning the opposing gravitational forces that affect the tides are stronger than what you'd see during a typical full moon.
26 posted on 10/28/2012 1:31:02 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: NormsRevenge
This is why the powers-that-be all want you dependent on mass transit, people.

They can ground you on a whim.

It's a storm. Storms have been happening on this planet since before there was anything here resembling a living organism.

A century or two ago, people would have just kept plugging. Now, we have to shut down all transportation and wring our hands about it a week before anybody sees any symptoms.

People need to just shut up, saddle their horses and move to shelter until it passes. Oh, wait..........nobody has or knows how to saddle a horse anymore. They all have electric cars that won't go any distance under excellent circumstances and can't plow through a pile of leaves under "adverse" circumstances.

27 posted on 10/28/2012 1:47:35 PM PDT by elkfersupper ( Member of the Original Defiant Class)
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To: dirtboy
Not saying this won't be a "big blow" for some - with lots of rain. But the media hysteria surrounding this storm is laughable. For most of us in the Northeast, it's going to be a wind-driven rainstorm, something that we should be used to by now.

After all, it was only a year ago at this time that we had a powerful northeaster dump up to a foot of snow in most of interior New England, where many of us lost power for a week or more. I had six inches of slush with downed trees all over my backyard and lost power for four days. I don't remember that being portrayed in the media as an apocalypse. I just fired up the generator, took some cold showers and ate a lot of canned salmon sandwiches for a few days.

Also around Halloween, we had that "Perfect Storm" back in 1991. Five days of rains and severe coastal damage. Not to mention those fisherman that perished and had a movie made about them.

So yes, this will be another big storm, but not the end of the world. I have more cans of salmon (Alaskan sockeye!), plenty of canned sardines and a whole mess of cans of Progresso soup, mostly the chicken and sausage gumbo, which is my favorite.

I don't need to rush to the supermarket like a maniac and clear the shelves of milk and bread - and batteries. I still have batteries from the Y2K scare. They supposedly expired in 2005 but they still work fine when I slide them into my flashlights and transistor radios.

It's just a storm. I live in New England. I'm used to storms. I've got the candles ready to go, lots of beer and some good books to read.

28 posted on 10/28/2012 2:26:56 PM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: NormsRevenge

Geez. Where’s my freaking shovel?


29 posted on 10/28/2012 2:36:33 PM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Dumb or Dumber? Biden or Obama?)
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To: SamAdams76

“So yes, this will be another big storm, but not the end of the world.”

I agree. The weather people get positively orgasmic when they have something like this going on.

Boston has cancelled school,though. Now all the kids can go out and hang around the malls.

.


30 posted on 10/28/2012 2:41:18 PM PDT by Mears
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To: NormsRevenge

Not the NY of my youth.


31 posted on 10/28/2012 2:43:41 PM PDT by wtc911 (Amigo - you've been had.)
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To: Alberta's Child

Gotcha.


32 posted on 10/28/2012 9:43:39 PM PDT by okie01 (THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA; Ignorance on parade.)
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