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Gubernatorial candidate Steve Woods says 108 Maine towns ‘basically insolvent’
Bangor Daily News ^ | March 12, 2013 | Seth Koenig

Posted on 03/13/2013 5:57:24 AM PDT by wbill

FALMOUTH, Maine — Gubernatorial hopeful Steve Woods unveiled an economic strategy Tuesday that could result in the closure of more than 100 small Maine towns and redirect their state dollars — and potentially their residents — toward more urban centers.

Woods said the state now invests too much maintaining infrastructure to reach a widely dispersed population and it’s unsustainable. In his report, Woods states that 108 Maine towns receive five times as much in state and federal subsidies as they generate in local taxes and fees.

In short, the study contends the state’s “underlying problem” can be summed up as “more than 100 Maine communities that cost hundreds of millions of dollars a year to sustain while making very little contribution to the wealth and capacity of our state.”

While the theory behind Woods’ plan was substantiated, at least in part, by one of Maine’s best-known economists, the strategy didn’t sit well with the manager of Milo, the only small town cited in the report by name.

The study, titled “Maine Forward: 2020 Vision for Maine’s Economic Future,” is only 11 pages but was developed using data culled from thousands of pages of statewide municipal budgets going back at least a decade.

“I’ve realized as the chairman of the Yarmouth Town Council that governments are not commercial businesses, but some measure of business mathematics still applies,” Woods told the BDN on Tuesday. “If your expenses continue to exceed your revenues, you become insolvent. You can delay that by taking on debt, and you can mask it by seeking out more in grants and other subsidies. But I’ve found that there are 108 towns which — by no fault of the leaders there and by no fault of the people who have lived there, sometimes for generations — are basically insolvent.”

And those municipalities are drawing down state resources that could be used to make Maine’s urban centers — such as the Portland, Bangor and Lewiston areas, which already are home to 93 percent of new capital investments in the state, he said — more competitive on the global market.

Woods said the main thrust of his plan would be to level out tax disparities among municipalities around the state, meaning those communities he said are absorbing five times as much in state and federal subsidies as they’re generating in local tax revenues would begin to see less aid from Augusta.

In addition to cutting funding to those towns, he would seek to reduce the number of roads and highways — among other infrastructure obligations — the state is responsible for maintaining. Woods then would seek to support programs that would make it easy for residents in those targeted towns to pack up and move to more populated areas, perhaps through giveaways of publicly owned properties and tax waivers.

Woods declined to name the 108 towns he identified as underperformers, but used the 2,300-person Piscataquis County town of Milo as a case study in his report. Woods, who penned the report himself with the help of two research volunteers, wrote that while there are 377 jobs in the town, 576 residents receive state aid and 855 receive Social Security payments.

David Maynard, town manager of Milo, said Woods is “on the fringe of the fringes” with his new economic plan.

“As a town manager who has specialized in small towns all over the country … I’m very much aware that there is a portion of the American public who loves and cherishes small towns,” Maynard said. “I think it’s fair to say there’s a decent amount of people who would seriously resent a plan that would move their lives and businesses out of town. Not everybody wants to live in a city.”

Woods acknowledged Tuesday that giving the towns more infrastructure to pay for and less money to pay for it with, as well as encouraging mass relocations, could essentially create “ghost towns.”

“I don’t want to say, ‘Hey, I want to close down 108 towns,’” Woods said. “My plan is to give people in those towns more options.

“I’m not suggesting in any way we mandate people move,” he added. “You can have your 2-acre plot [in an underperforming rural town], but somebody in Lewiston-Auburn shouldn’t have to be subsidizing it.”

During a visit to Milo during the weekend, Woods wrote that he met a retiree who “lives a comfortable but by no means affluent life,” as well as two waitresses — an unwed mother in her mid-20s who is aspiring to qualify for subsidized housing and a 17-year-old who plans to move to Portland as soon as she graduates high school.

Those individuals, he suggested, represent drivers of the downward economic spirals he said are facing communities such as Milo. Young people, who are statistically more likely to be entrepreneurs and support education, relocate from the towns and leave behind mostly retired people or those who don’t have the means to leave.

“We are putting a disproportionate amount of resources into economic zones that are not performing,” he said. “We are giving just enough support to some of these places to suspend them in economic despair.”

Charles Colgan is chairman of the University of Southern Maine’s Muskie School of Public Service’s Community Planning and Development Program and is one of the state’s best-known economists. Colgan said on Tuesday he’s familiar with Woods’ plan and “I agree with him on parts and disagree with him on parts.”

“I think he’s right in the sense that most of the growth in Maine has been and will continue to be in the urban areas, and that does require a fair amount of attention toward how urban areas are going to grow and what resources that will take,” Colgan said. “Having said that, I don’t necessarily think the way to do that would be at the expense of the rural areas.”

Colgan said he believes the state’s rural outlying communities “have a lot of life left in them.”

“We’re going to face a point in the next 10 or 20 years where you’re looking at a group of very small towns with almost entirely elderly people in them, and we may have to make some decisions about how much in the way of resources we want to devote to those places,” the economist said. “But we tend not to say as a first order of business we’re going to abandon those places. I think we talk about maybe combining them and about how we’re going to serve them more efficiently.”

About 150,000 people combined live in the 108 towns Woods described Tuesday as “underperforming,” at an average population of less than 1,400 per municipality cited. That means more than 1.1 million Mainers would not be initially affected by the plan, Woods said.

“For every mile that you separate people from important services, like education and health care, you add resources and time,” he said. “Everything about the new economy — whether you’re talking about banking, labor, commerce or technology — is tied to speed and efficiency. The farther you go away [from urban hubs], the less speed and efficiency you have.”

In his document, Woods notes that the resource-based industries that motivated the dispersed settlement of Maine 100 or 200 years ago, such as timber harvesting and commercial fishing, have fallen on hard times, and the new science- and technology-driven economy depends on clusters of highly educated skilled workers.

In addition to his Yarmouth Town Council service, Woods is CEO of the Falmouth technology and marketing firm TideSmart Global, which lists powerful international clients such as the Lowe’s home improvement store chain, Walmart and digital camera maker Olympus.

Woods ran as an independent in 2012 for the U.S. Senate seat ultimately won by former Gov. Angus King and now he’s running as a Democrat for the Blaine House.

Incumbent Republican Gov. Paul LePage and independent Eliot Cutler also have registered as potential 2014 gubernatorial candidates with the Maine Ethics Commission, while Democratic 2nd District U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud and former Gov. and Rep. John Baldacci have said they are mulling runs for the job.

Democrat David Slagger and Alex Hammer, who is unenrolled, also have filed with the ethics commission.

The upcoming gubernatorial race could be crowded, but with his newly released — somewhat radical — economic platform, Woods is hoping to differentiate himself from many of the better-known candidates in the pack. For better or for worse.

“This is the ultimate inconvenient truth,” Woods said. “Every time I bring it up, people say, ‘You’re absolutely right, but people aren’t going to vote for you,’ or ‘People are going to be angry.’ I’m not trying to make people angry, but our elected officials should be expected to make decisions that are sometimes uncomfortable. There’s nobody in the political landscape who wants to do this, because in my opinion, it’s the hard path.”

Milo Town Manager Maynard had a warning for Woods and any other candidate who plans to reduce state aid to municipalities.

“Any candidate who thinks he can run roughshod over the rural part of Maine probably has another thing coming,” he said. “They vote in the cities, but if you stomp on the rural population, you’ll likely know it at the polls.”


TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events; US: Maine
KEYWORDS: agenda21; un21; unagenda21
Democrat wants to close small towns and move their people to "More Urban Areas". I'm shocked.

I'd never heard of this clown. And, (again, I'm shocked) you really need to dig through the article to learn that he's a Dem.

1 posted on 03/13/2013 5:57:24 AM PDT by wbill
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To: wbill

Dominoes to the Big Crash...


2 posted on 03/13/2013 5:58:41 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: wbill

So the government will tell you where to live and what to eat. Surely doesn’t sound like freedom to me.


3 posted on 03/13/2013 5:59:23 AM PDT by txrefugee
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To: wbill
This is straight out of Agenda 21, the Communist/Globalist playbook.
4 posted on 03/13/2013 6:01:03 AM PDT by Count of Monte Fisto
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To: wbill
closure of more than 100 small Maine towns and redirect their state dollars — and potentially their residents — toward more urban centers.

Here's a crazy idea. How about leaving their tax dollars local and letting the residents decide for themselves.
5 posted on 03/13/2013 6:05:10 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: wbill
Good, now let's look at individuals who receive more then they pay in taxes!

“You can have your no work life [in an underperforming area of town], but some taxpayer shouldn’t have to be subsidizing it.”

6 posted on 03/13/2013 6:07:01 AM PDT by Lockbox
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To: cripplecreek
Here's a crazy idea. How about leaving their tax dollars local and letting the residents decide for themselves.

That's crazy talk, all right. Are you trying to put Big Brother out of a job?

7 posted on 03/13/2013 6:12:00 AM PDT by Hoodat (I stand with Rand.)
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To: wbill

Damn those roads and bridges bringing that food from the rural centers to the cities! Turn those grain trucks around! Stop those produce trucks! No livestock trucks or refrigerated vans should dare enter those sacred cities! What a putz.


8 posted on 03/13/2013 6:12:12 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: Count of Monte Fisto

Count of Monte Fisto ~:” This is straight out of Agenda 21, the Communist/Globalist playbook “.

Exactly right !!

When the smaller local government becomes insolvent ,
then all financial local taxes and aid gets sent to the larger metropolitan areas
assuring the local towns’ further demise
and forcing residents to relocate to urban areas for fire and police protection ,water treatment ,schools , etc.
This also means that accountability and responsibility is taken away from local citizenry
and invested into larger ‘centralized districts’ which are further removed from oversight,
thus creating a new “sustainable” elite class of urban bureaucrats. (ie.: Bloomie ,R. Emanuel , etc.)


9 posted on 03/13/2013 6:17:52 AM PDT by Tilted Irish Kilt (“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.” - Ronald Reagan)
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To: wbill

“basically”? either they are or aren’t . make up yer mind


10 posted on 03/13/2013 6:17:59 AM PDT by InvisibleChurch (the mature Christian is almost impossible to offend)
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To: wbill

The things government is supposed to do, like build roads, they refuse to do, yet insist on doing things they aren’t supposed to do, like having a war on guns.

I forgot that food is produced in cities and that roads outside cities are luxuries for conservatives, racists, and homophobes.

This is what Obama has wrought: Hatred and division.


11 posted on 03/13/2013 6:20:52 AM PDT by ecomcon
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To: wbill
And, (again, I'm shocked) you really need to dig through the article to learn that he's a Dem.

I only had to read the first sentence to know that he was a democRAT.

12 posted on 03/13/2013 6:21:17 AM PDT by Fresh Wind (The last remnants of the Old Republic have been swept away.)
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To: wbill

There goes the Larry, his brother Darrell and his other brother Darrell vote.


13 posted on 03/13/2013 6:23:04 AM PDT by ConservaTexan (February 6, 1911)
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To: wbill

Thats interesting because I understood that Lewiston is a welfare mecca, especially for Somalis.If it were not for federal welfare spending, it would have been bankrupted years ago when Bates Mill left.

I understand the “animal farm” type of argument he is attempting to make but imagine his surprise when the rural areas abandon the cities. Won’t be long before they starve.

Cities are basicly a cancer. They take and take but they don’t accomplish much.They USED to make things like steel and ships. But now they are program service centers, handing out welfare vouchers, medical services gratis and food stamps/ebt cards.


14 posted on 03/13/2013 6:23:17 AM PDT by Adder (No, Mr. Franklin, we could NOT keep it.)
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To: wbill

This stuff scares me more then losing my guns. I realize that they have to take the guns first in order to force us into their city sewers.


15 posted on 03/13/2013 6:25:46 AM PDT by winodog
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To: cripplecreek
How about leaving their tax dollars local and letting the residents decide for themselves.

That's the point of the article - over half of the residents are drawing SS and state aid - they aren't paying taxes, they are a net drain.

16 posted on 03/13/2013 6:29:28 AM PDT by glorgau
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To: cripplecreek

Read the article and it sounds like he would go along with that. Certainly ends the conversation at any rate.


17 posted on 03/13/2013 6:30:25 AM PDT by wiggen (The teacher card. When the racism card just won't work.)
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To: Fresh Wind
I only had to read the first sentence to know that he was a democRAT.

Well, yeah, me too. But the writer tooks pains to bury that.

If LePage proposed something like this, the headline would have been "Evil Republican takes time off from kicking puppies to promote closure of our bedrock, salt-of-the-earth small town communities".

18 posted on 03/13/2013 6:30:30 AM PDT by wbill
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To: wbill
state now invests too much maintaining infrastructure to reach a widely dispersed population and it’s unsustainable...

In 1770 the population of the ENTIRE United Colonies, and then in These States United, was 3 millions. Maine wasn't even among them at the time. Seems to me the dispersion at the time worked just fine; there was no call to Tyranny then. So, what's different now that requires the call to Tyranny?

19 posted on 03/13/2013 6:31:15 AM PDT by C210N (When people fear government there is tyranny; when government fears people there is liberty)
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To: wbill
The headline is interesting. “basically insolvent” is the argument presented. That is not a word to appeal to liberals but to business.
20 posted on 03/13/2013 6:34:34 AM PDT by PeterPrinciple
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To: Adder
I understood that Lewiston is a welfare mecca

When I lived in Maine (a long, long time ago) ... A lot of towns had their own - non-state or federal subsidized - "Welfare". It was called "Going on the Town" and there was a massive stigma to it. It was pretty much your last resort.

I don't know for sure, but I'd guess that Lewiston's welfare may have been a remnant of some of those old programs. I know for sure that the Somalis took full advantage of every penny that they could, and that Lewiston's social services have been stretched to the limit (more drug, more crime, for instance) by the influx of "refugees".

21 posted on 03/13/2013 6:35:31 AM PDT by wbill
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To: C210N

Notice that if they permitted LUMBERING again.........

And allowed commercial fishing AGAIN..........

The problem might go away.


22 posted on 03/13/2013 6:38:05 AM PDT by Flintlock ("The British are coming" to TAKE OUR GUNS!--Paul Revere)
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To: wbill

Have the small cities not send any taxes to support the state and keep them in the community. Gas, state income, sales taxes.

Big cities are ready to use government force to squeeze small communities out of existence so that they can be returned to their “natural” state. We don’t need no stinkin’ farms or farmers!

(Is the sarcasm tag necessary?)


23 posted on 03/13/2013 6:44:10 AM PDT by listenhillary (Courts, law enforcement, roads and national defense should be the extent of government)
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To: cripplecreek

Lot of those townspeople would starve to death or die of easily curable diseases/afflictions if left to their own finances.

Maine’s largest employer is the Maine Department of Health and Human Services, i.e. the welfare office.

Maine is a national leader in welfare spending.

Maine ranks second in percent of households getting cash benefits.

The state is really really broken since the forestry industry and river town manufacturing crashed.

Parts of Maine would look like the deserted interior of the Russian Caucuses, if left to their own devices.


“Fix the System,” The Maine Heritage Policy Center’s 2012 report on Maine’s welfare system, show that Maine is the only state in the country to rank in the top 10 of three major areas of welfare: Maine ranks sixth in percent of households receiving food stamps; second in the nation in percent of households receiving cash assistance; and third in the country in percent of population enrolled in Medicaid.

Only California and Vermont have a higher percentage of their populations enrolled in Medicaid. Download the report here.
http://www.mainepolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/Fix-the-System-2012.pdf


I absolutely love the state, but the idea of plowing 30 miles of 2 lane road so 100 cars can commute 60 miles a day to a barely above minimum wage jobs or another government job, is considered the norm.


24 posted on 03/13/2013 6:50:29 AM PDT by JerseyHighlander
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To: wbill

I once went to a two day seminar of ‘Kansas City and County Planning and Zoning Administrators’.

It was eye opening. There was a panel discussion, on how to prevent people from moving out of the large cities. Some ideas are already in place - minimum acreage to own before getting a building permit (up to 40 acres in some places). Some were off the wall - a surtax on riding lawnmowers to discourage ownership of large lots, etc.

The most enlightening panel discussion was based on the premise that elected leaders were too stupid to know what was best for the people, and how to circumvent the ‘eleceted leadership’, which was seen as an impedimanet to progress.


25 posted on 03/13/2013 6:53:45 AM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: listenhillary
No need for a /sarc tag. :-)

I grew up in small town Maine, and still have a lot of friends and family in small town Maine.

This fool is correct in the assertion that there's a lot of poverty in the small towns. (My family was pretty poor when I was a kid, but I never knew it because everyone else was in the same boat.) However, his assertion that moving people from rural to urban areas will somehow "fix" the problem is beyond the pale. There aren't any more jobs in the urban areas of Maine, than in the rural areas. By promoting such a hostile business climate, libs from Boston and points south have chased all of the Maine industries away.

All his plan will do is pick up the problem and move it somewhere else. After the rural areas are well-destroyed, I'm sure that he has a "DE-Centralization" plan, as well. And, he'll only need four more years to implement it, so please vote for him in 2020......

26 posted on 03/13/2013 6:53:55 AM PDT by wbill
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To: WXRGina

agenda 21 ping

“Woods then would seek to support programs that would make it easy for residents in those targeted towns to pack up and move to more populated areas, perhaps through giveaways of publicly owned properties and tax waivers.”

WOW!


27 posted on 03/13/2013 6:55:51 AM PDT by logitech (Who's here so vile, that will not love his country? If any speak, for him I have offended)
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To: glorgau
That's the point of the article - over half of the residents are drawing SS and state aid - they aren't paying taxes, they are a net drain.

The people drawing SS are not a drain on the state. I don't even know why they're in this guy's equation.

I do think he makes a good point about the single mother waitress whose goal is subsidized housing - that's no way to live. And it's a crying shame that anyone in the land of the free should have that as their goal. Since I'd prefer no government subsidized housing at all, I would have no problem if subsidized housing were only available in urban areas.

28 posted on 03/13/2013 6:56:12 AM PDT by old and tired
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To: wbill

Fight Americans..please fight


29 posted on 03/13/2013 6:58:42 AM PDT by rrrod (at home in Medellin Colombia)
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To: listenhillary

The farms would still exist, the farm districts, water districts would still exist, the roads would still exist, power lines, the few gas lines, etc would still exist.

Anyways, until you spend some time in rural Maine and sit stunned in disbelief in the whacked out economies at almost all scales in the region, it’s hard to explain.

Some of those 100 towns don’t even have grocery stores anymore, the Walmarts upward of 40 miles away killed all retail for dozens of miles into the backwoods. People regularly drive 80 miles roundtrip for groceries. Nothing wrong with those who make a living in the backwoods, but many of those people are on permanent gov benefits, and are spending huge sums just to transport to/from the Walmart.

People do this cause the few remaining local markets are charging 150% to 200% of Walmart retail to cover their own business and transportation costs.

Hospitals, car parts, fuel, every damn thing, costs alot to transport in Maine, more in winter.


30 posted on 03/13/2013 7:02:34 AM PDT by JerseyHighlander
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To: wbill

“Redirecting” residents to urban areas? You mean, like Agenda 21 resettlement? Surely not. Do you think?


31 posted on 03/13/2013 7:09:14 AM PDT by theBuckwheat
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To: C210N
So, what's different now that requires the call to Tyranny?

Somebody figured out that giving the feds to power to tax gave them the power to decide.

I grew up in a small town where they used to take care of their own streets but that eventually got shuffled off to the county and the cost of that got shuffled off to the state and eventually the feds.

As it is I live on a dirt street that hasn't seen a snowplow in a decade but I still pay taxes for it. I'd just as soon not pay the taxes for a job they aren't bothering to do.
32 posted on 03/13/2013 7:17:12 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: wbill

Must be an Agenda 21er. He needs to be tarred and feathered.


33 posted on 03/13/2013 7:20:12 AM PDT by Rusty0604
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To: wbill
“I don’t want to say, ‘Hey, I want to close down 108 towns,’” Woods said. “My plan is to give people in those towns more options."

Practically a cut-and-paste from the template of Mayor Doomberg's "not a ban" lie.

34 posted on 03/13/2013 7:45:58 AM PDT by jiggyboy (Ten percent of poll respondents are either lying or insane)
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To: JerseyHighlander
"...Nothing wrong with those who make a living in the backwoods, but many of those people are on permanent gov benefits, and are spending huge sums just to transport to/from the Walmart. ..."

I visit a Wal-Mart in northern New Hampshire: most of the cars in the parking lot are from Maine!

≡≡8-O

35 posted on 03/13/2013 7:49:09 AM PDT by Does so (Progressives Don't Know the Meaning of INFRINGED...)
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To: wbill

Woods has provided the conservatives, if there are any left in the state of Maine to bring up Obama’s energy policy master plan while campaigning.

That plan was mentioned once by Romney during the 2012 campaign and quickly forgotten. Calls for relocation minimizing the need to use “fossil fuels” fast trains urban transport and massive social engineering.

It is a major part of the reason for the rising costs of energy which includes production of electricity, transport of goods and foodstuffs and one reason why Maine is where it’s at in state rankings.


36 posted on 03/13/2013 7:49:47 AM PDT by mosesdapoet ("It's a sin to tell a lie", in telling others that , got me my nickname .Ex Chi" mechanic"ret)
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To: wbill

The con men have left the back alleys, and moved to government. I guess most Americans have never seen a “Small Con”. That’s the guy with the box in the back alley with the three cards. He wants you to follow that one card....you know.....the one with the crimp in it. He wants you to think that you are smarter or more clever than he is. That’s how he makes his money. “These small towns are costing too much.” That’s the crimped card. That’s what he wants you to follow while his henchmen pick your pocket.


37 posted on 03/13/2013 7:50:02 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: cripplecreek
I still pay taxes for it. I'd just as soon not pay the taxes for a job they aren't bothering to do....

I live on a 400 yard cul-de-sac that has a sidewalk along its first 300 yards. The endpoints of this sidewalk connects to nowhere. With upwards of 10 homes, there is little to no cars on this cul-de-sac (ie, Dead-end), and NO pedestrian usage whatsoever of the sidewalk. Didn't stop the town from paving said sidewalk, patching its cracks last year.

Sidewalk currently full of snow from the recent snowstorms...

Seems like things like this exist so there is infrastructure for work for repair crews.

38 posted on 03/13/2013 8:01:12 AM PDT by C210N (When people fear government there is tyranny; when government fears people there is liberty)
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To: jiggyboy
Exactly... ‘Hey, I want to close down 108 towns,’” Woods said. “My plan is to give people in those towns more options

"HEY!! I'm from the government and I'm here to help!"

39 posted on 03/13/2013 8:24:56 AM PDT by wbill
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To: lacrew

so much goes on that we don’t know about...


40 posted on 03/13/2013 8:53:31 AM PDT by squarebarb ( Fairy tales are basically true.)
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To: wbill
you really need to dig through the article to learn that he's a Dem

You mean to confirm that he's a Dem.

41 posted on 03/13/2013 10:09:01 AM PDT by BfloGuy (The final outcome of the credit expansion is general impoverishment. -Ludwig von Mises)
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