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The hero always gets the girl: Victoria Cross winner Johnson Beharry marries...
Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 18th March 2013 | Kerry McDermott

Posted on 03/18/2013 3:33:21 PM PDT by naturalman1975

War hero Corporal Johnson Beharry, who saved the lives of 30 soldiers in Iraq, has married his girlfriend in a ceremony at a London registry office today.

The decorated soldier and his glamorous bride Mallissa Venice Noel were photographed leaving Old Marylebone Town Hall after today's service, which took place under a veil of military-style secrecy.

Guests at the wedding were ordered to hand over their phones before the ceremony after Cpl Beharry and his fiancee signed a magazine deal.

Friends and family who attended the wedding had to give in their phones to make sure photographs of the happy couple weren't leaked. The couple have signed a photo deal with Hello! magazine for an undisclosed sum.

Dressed in full military uniform, the 33-year-old soldier arrived for the ceremony just before 11am via a back entrance.

The waiting media didn't catch a glimpse of 27-year-old bride-to-be Mallissa's arrival as she was also ushered into the venue through a side entrance.

Further efforts were made to keep Mallissa's dress under wraps when she left after the hour-long service.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; United Kingdom; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: oifveterans; weddingbells Comment #1 Removed by Moderator

To: naturalman1975

A Corporal Sargent????


2 posted on 03/18/2013 3:35:27 PM PDT by SkyDancer (Live your life in such a way that the Westboro church will want to picket your funeral.)
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To: SkyDancer

There are actually a few regiments in the British Army which make these things confusing, for reasons of tradition - Household Cavalry have ‘Corporals of Horse’ with three stripes and an equivalent position to Sergeants in other regiments, and a couple of regiments have Lance Sergeants with three stripes who are actually the same as corporals in other regiments.

But he is in the Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment and I am 99% sure they do in the ‘normal’ way, and therefore he’s clearly a Sergeant.


3 posted on 03/18/2013 3:45:06 PM PDT by naturalman1975 ("America was under attack. Australia was immediately there to help." - John Winston Howard)
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To: naturalman1975

Unfortunately, Daily Mail pictures cannot be posted.


4 posted on 03/18/2013 3:47:09 PM PDT by Admin Moderator
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To: Admin Moderator

They’re both originally from Grenada, apparently.


5 posted on 03/18/2013 3:52:37 PM PDT by Argus
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To: Admin Moderator

Thanks for the information. I’ll avoid doing so in future.


6 posted on 03/18/2013 3:54:53 PM PDT by naturalman1975 ("America was under attack. Australia was immediately there to help." - John Winston Howard)
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To: naturalman1975

You’re welcome, your articles are appreciated.


7 posted on 03/18/2013 3:56:05 PM PDT by Admin Moderator
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To: naturalman1975

Right - the Brits do have confusing rank designations.


8 posted on 03/18/2013 4:08:45 PM PDT by SkyDancer (Live your life in such a way that the Westboro church will want to picket your funeral.)
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To: SkyDancer

Victoria Cross winner?


9 posted on 03/18/2013 4:11:34 PM PDT by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: SkyDancer

Whew, for a minute I was afraid it was another homo “marriage” story about some chick named Victoria Cross getting the girl.


10 posted on 03/18/2013 4:12:38 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (HRC:"Sometimes she looks like a primary schoolgirl and sometimes a pensioner going shopping,"-NKorea)
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To: mountainlion

Britain’s highest military decoration. Like the Medal of Honor.


11 posted on 03/18/2013 4:13:19 PM PDT by x
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To: x
You have to earn a Medal of Honor. You probably do not win the Victoria Cross. Probably a nonmilitary media.
12 posted on 03/18/2013 4:17:24 PM PDT by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: mountainlion

Winner? Right. Aren’t they awarded? Just like our MOH is awarded not fought over as a prize.


13 posted on 03/18/2013 4:22:34 PM PDT by SkyDancer (Live your life in such a way that the Westboro church will want to picket your funeral.)
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To: mountainlion

So take it up with the newspaper editor. It doesn’t change anything about the medal.


14 posted on 03/18/2013 4:29:58 PM PDT by x
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To: SkyDancer

‘Winner’ isn’t quite correct - but it’s not considered as incorrect as it would be when referring to the Medal of Honor. Again, different traditions - in this case dating to the colonial period, up until about World War I, when quite a lot of VCs went to young officers who had set out deliberately to ‘win’ a medal and engaged in foolhardy - though brave - actions to do so. Not something encouraged in a professional Army, but especially in World War I, a lot of these young officers were amateurs.

(Privates sometimes did the same - NCOs and more senior officer had more sense - you may risk your life when you need to, and if that means facing the type of risk that gets a decoration, that’s brave and part of the job - but you don’t deliberately set out to get yourself into those situations).

Anyway, end result is that saying VC winner, though not strictly correct, is not considered a major faux pas - as it should be with the Medal of Honor.


15 posted on 03/18/2013 4:30:51 PM PDT by naturalman1975 ("America was under attack. Australia was immediately there to help." - John Winston Howard)
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To: mountainlion
Probably a nonmilitary media.

See my comment above. But, yes, a nonmilitary media - they can't even count his stripes correctly.

16 posted on 03/18/2013 4:31:47 PM PDT by naturalman1975 ("America was under attack. Australia was immediately there to help." - John Winston Howard)
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To: naturalman1975
good on him...

you really should have a ping list, and i'd like to be on it if you do

17 posted on 03/18/2013 4:50:54 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: naturalman1975

I’m just thinking that in combat soldiers don’t go out thinking they’ll try to get an MOH or VC. Of the many stories I’ve read about our military it’s always been a spur of the moment thing, seeing a situation developing then doing something about it. Matter of seconds or a bit of planning. But to go out intentionally thinking “Today I’m gonna get me an MOH” don’t think so ...


18 posted on 03/18/2013 4:53:58 PM PDT by SkyDancer (Live your life in such a way that the Westboro church will want to picket your funeral.)
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To: SkyDancer

An hour long ‘service’ at the Registry Office?


19 posted on 03/18/2013 6:15:54 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: SuziQ

Well I suppose there’s lots of formalities and goings on to take up that much time. Paper work and all that.


20 posted on 03/18/2013 6:25:09 PM PDT by SkyDancer (Live your life in such a way that the Westboro church will want to picket your funeral.)
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To: SkyDancer
Modern day, you are right - but the world was a different place 100 years ago.

Winston Churchill gives a hint of the mindset I am talking about:

In the closing decade of the Victorian era the Empire had enjoyed so long a spell of almost unbroken peace, that medals and all they represented in experience and adventure were becoming extremely scarce in the British Army. The veterans of the Crimea and the Indian Mutiny were gone from the active list. The Afghan and Egyptian warriors of the early eighties had reached the senior ranks. Scarcely a shot had been fired in anger since then, and when I joined the 4th Hussars in January, 1895, scarcely a captain, hardly ever a subaltern, could be found throughout Her Majesty's forces who had seen even the smallest kind of war. Rarity in a desirable commodity is usually the cause of enhanced value and there has never been a time when war service was held in so much esteem by the military authorities or more ardently sought by officers of every rank. It was the swift road to promotion and advancement in every arm. It was the glittering gateway to distinction. It cast a glamour upon the fortunate possessor alike in the eyes of elderly gentlemen and young ladies. How we young officers envied the senior Major for his adventures at Abu Klea! How we admired the Colonel with his long row of decorations! We listened with almost insatiable interest to the accounts which they were good enough to give us on more than one occasion of stirring deeds and episodes already melting into the mist of time. How we longed to have a similar store of memories to unpack and display, if necessary repeatedly, to a sympathetic audience! How we wondered whether our chance would ever come whether we too in our turn would have battles to fight over again and again in the agreeable atmosphere of the after-dinner mess table? Prowess at polo, in the hunting-field, or between the flags, might count for something. But the young soldier who had been on active service and 'under fire' had an aura about him to which the Generals he served under, the troopers he led, and the girls he courted, accorded a unanimous, sincere, and spontaneous recognition.

The want of a sufficient supply of active service was therefore acutely felt by my contemporaries in the circles in which I was now called upon to live my life. This complaint was destined to be cured, and all our requirements were to be met to the fullest extent. The danger as the subaltern regarded it which in those days seemed so real of Liberal and democratic governments making war impossible was soon to be proved illusory. The age of Peace had ended. There was to be no lack of war. There was to be enough for all. Aye, enough and to spare. Few indeed of the keen, aspiring generations of Sandhurst cadets and youthful officers who entered the Royal Service so light-heartedly in these and later years were to survive the ghastly surfeit which fate had in store. The little tidbits of fighting which the Indian frontier and the Soudan were soon to offer, distributed by luck or favour, were fiercely scrambled for throughout the British Army. But the South African War was to attain dimensions which fully satisfied the needs of our small army. And after that the deluge was still to come!

from 'My Early Life: A Roving Commission' by Winston Churchill. 1930.

21 posted on 03/18/2013 6:41:32 PM PDT by naturalman1975 ("America was under attack. Australia was immediately there to help." - John Winston Howard)
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To: naturalman1975

Nice post. Thank you. I’ve read about the British overseas military from the Zulu’s to Afghanistan. Interesting reading. I read Churchill’s writings about his escapades during the Boer War then when he was an up and coming star in British politics. Fascinating gentleman he was.


22 posted on 03/18/2013 6:54:17 PM PDT by SkyDancer (Live your life in such a way that the Westboro church will want to picket your funeral.)
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To: SkyDancer
Well I suppose there’s lots of formalities and goings on to take up that much time. Paper work and all that.

Seems odd calling it a 'service', like it's a religious gathering.

23 posted on 03/19/2013 4:19:11 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: SkyDancer

I was hoping she isn’t a world-class bitch, but it looks likes she is, so good luck to the soldier.


24 posted on 03/19/2013 4:27:33 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (I am a dissident. Will you join me? My name is John....)
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To: SkyDancer
Right - the Brits do have confusing rank designations.

It's no more confusing than it is for the Army lance corporal I met. He was telling tales of his service in Iraq the first time he showed up at a local bar. (I guess being a plain corporal just wasn't enough for him.) He did get more than a bit embarrassed and left quite hurriedly when I pointed out that while the Army doesn't have lance corporals, the Marines do. Funny thing, nobody's seen him since that first time.

25 posted on 03/19/2013 4:36:55 PM PDT by Bob
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