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A Maryland inventor’s big energy ideas have promise, and big ifs
mcclatchydc ^ | May 27, 2014 | Greg Gordon

Posted on 06/08/2014 8:31:40 AM PDT by ckilmer

Ronald Ace, photographed at his home in Laurel, Maryland, May 4, 2013, said his flat-panel "Solar Traps," which can be mounted on rooftops or used in power plants, will shatter barriers that have stymied efforts to make solar energy cheap, clean and reliable. His claimed discoveries, which exist only on paper so far, would represent such a leap that they're sure to draw skepticism.

(Excerpt) Read more at mcclatchydc.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; US: Maryland
KEYWORDS: maryland; solar; solarpower; solartraps
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(Is there a thermo electrical engineer or solar engineer in the house--who can speak intelligently about this?)
1 posted on 06/08/2014 8:31:40 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

A Maryland inventor’s big energy ideas have promise, and big ifs

By Greg Gordon

McClatchy Washington BureauMay 27, 2014 

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US NEWS SOLAR-ENERGY 1 MCT

Ronald Ace, photographed at his home in Laurel, Maryland, May 4, 2013, said his flat-panel "Solar Traps," which can be mounted on rooftops or used in power plants, will shatter barriers that have stymied efforts to make solar energy cheap, clean and reliable. His claimed discoveries, which exist only on paper so far, would represent such a leap that they're sure to draw skepticism.

MARY F. CALVERT — MCT

 

— While scientists are engaged in an all-out, worldwide scramble to avert the energy and climate change crises, the biggest discoveries could come from a surprising quarter: a modest redwood home on a wooded, five-acre tract in rural Maryland, where a lone inventor toils day and night.

Ronald Ace lacks hefty academic credentials or any of the billions of dollars that have flowed to other researchers. That hasn’t diminished his zeal in a years-long crusade to accomplish what many scientists deem unattainable.

If the 73-year-old inventor is right, he is on the brink of two historic breakthroughs.

If his novel ideas are validated and take hold, they could change the world.

Those are big ifs.

Ace has applied for patents for two inventions that he believes could speed a dramatic transition to cheap and abundant clean energy, shrink oil consumption to a gurgle and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to a smidgen of today’s levels.

His “Solar Trap,” first reported by McClatchy in May 2013, has gained some credence from a former solar engineer at the Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M., who did a confidential review and found “no apparent deficiencies.”

Ace calls his flat-panel trap “a fundamental scientific and environmental discovery” and contends that it could collect sunlight at high enough temperatures to shatter the barriers to a solar age. The device can capture more than 90 percent of the rays that hit it, as much as 10 times more than sun-tracking photovoltaic panels being installed around the globe, he said.

More recently, Ace filed a second patent application, for an invention that he touts as likely able to transform heat into electricity with nearly 100 percent efficiency, 20-fold that of comparable devices in the clean-as-you-can-get field of thermoelectrics.

His claim is especially astounding, because it seems to defy the second law of thermodynamics, a pillar of physics that emanated from the work of French scientist Nicolas Leonard Sadi Carnot 190 years ago.

But Carnot’s equation dictating heat loss in steam engines has long been interpreted too broadly and doesn’t apply to this device, said Ace, who as a young man worked for over a decade in the University of Maryland’s molecular physics laboratory.

Andrew Masters, who has spent over 20 years as a U.S. thermoelectrics industry engineer, came to the same conclusion after confidentially reviewing Ace’s patent application and Carnot’s work. Masters, who has built prototypes for world-renowned research institutions, said he “couldn’t find a flaw” in Ace’s concept.

In a letter to Ace last month, Masters said he’s seen hundreds of proposals to harness the waste heat in thermoelectric devices but never one so “conceptually simple and yet potentially game changing.”

Another review came from John Darnell, a recently retired congressional energy adviser who privately analyzed both inventions and concluded, before becoming critically ill, that each would far surpass today’s technology.

Ace’s problem is that neither of his inventions has been validated in customary ways, such as in published, peer-reviewed papers or by constructing prototypes, for which he needs financing. The costly patent applications, filed in 148 countries, are still secret and will remain so for nine months or more. So despite his rare blend of expertise in physics, optics and thermal energy, Ace’s expansive claims are sure to draw skepticism, if not disbelief, from the scientific community.

To grasp the dimensions of what Ace is proposing, consider this:

If the thermoelectric invention works as he hopes, it could offer a way to build affordable electric cars that don’t require recharging and can travel up to 300 miles on two gallons of gas.

If both ideas were to perform as envisioned, the devices could be combined to create power plants that have no moving parts, emit no greenhouse gases, deliver electricity for no more than a third of today’s cost and do so reliably with more than 90 percent efficiency _ a feat heretofore considered beyond reach.

Ace’s chances of success hinge not only on the validity of his scientific conclusions, but also on whether investors, governments, institutions or potential patent licensees put money behind his tiny company, Pinnacle Products LLC, which promotes his energy-saving ideas on the website H2OPE.US.

He hopes that the comments from expert reviewers will help attract financing.

Ace retained Nathan Siegel, the former Sandia solar engineer who is now an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Bucknell University, to analyze whether his Solar Trap could overcome the obstacles that for decades have stunted progress in solar energy.

A central issue is long-term energy storage, so that solar plants can reliably provide power at night and during long bouts of cloudy weather.

Battery storage for photovoltaic panels, which directly convert solar energy to electricity, is expensive and generally measured in hours, not days.

Storing solar thermal energy has also been a problem, because scientists haven’t found a way to operate a solar power plant cost-effectively at temperatures above roughly 900 degrees Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures are needed to ensure that enough energy can be stored in cheap materials, such as sand, to fuel a plant when there’s no sunlight.

Siegel, in conclusions shared with McClatchy, wrote that in 10 years in the solar field he’s never encountered an approach like Ace’s trap, designed to concentrate energy at 2,400 degrees Fahrenheit and higher for affordable long-term storage.

Known as “angular selectivity,” the design capitalizes on largely unnoticed properties of sunlight: it arrives in almost perfectly parallel rays, but when heated, radiates at angles spanning 180 degrees, Ace said.

Precisely how the invention works will remain secret until a patent is published. But Ace said he designed it to geometrically ensnare solar rays to prevent diffuse radiation and conduction losses as temperatures hit extremes _ a vexing problem for the solar industry.

“In my opinion, this approach is unique” and worthy of more comprehensive analysis, Siegel wrote, noting that the device has the potential to collect solar energy at soaring temperatures without a hugely expensive field of thousands of mirrors like those that concentrate sunlight in federally subsidized solar plants.

Siegel did not extensively analyze Ace’s lower-temperature, rooftop Solar Trap, designed to power homes and businesses by collecting energy at up to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, hot enough to meet much of the world’s energy needs. However, he said Ace’s predictions that it could perform at greater than 90 percent efficiency “are likely accurate.”

Discovery of the second possible breakthrough, in thermoelectrics, grew from Ace’s determination to find a way to convert solar energy into electricity in homes and offices without the roar of a turbine or engine. He also sought an alternative to the back-end design of most power plants, which waste 60 percent or more of the heat generated from burning fossil fuels or from nuclear fuel.

He lit on thermoelectrics, a little-used process in which an electric current is created when heat flows through certain materials, most commonly the substance bismuth telluride. The thermoelectric industry manufactures the devices primarily for exotic purposes, such as producing electricity in spacecraft.

Conventional thinking is that these devices are limited by Carnot’s equation governing unavoidable heat waste. However, when Carnot died in 1832 at age 36, the thermoelectrics phenomenon was little more than a curiosity.

As Ace tossed around ideas, he questioned why the waste heat had to be lost. He scoured a book about Carnot, published in 1897, that traced a debate over his equation between two famed physicists: William Thomson of Scotland, known later in life as Lord Kelvin, and James Prescott Joule of England.

Joule never accepted Carnot’s argument that a heat engine couldn’t be 100 percent efficient and sowed similar doubts in Kelvin. Neither of the two, however, could produce a heat engine that debunked Carnot.

Ace reasoned that Carnot’s theory is ironclad when applied to solids, liquids and gases that expand when heated, as does steam, but that his own thermal-electric design doesn’t expand or contract and “is not a Carnot engine.” Thus, while typical thermal-electric devices waste 95 percent of the heat run through them, Ace said that his can regenerate nearly all of it.

Masters, a vice president of Custom Thermoelectric LLC in Bishopville, Md., wrote Ace:

“I have gone over your heat exchanger concept many times looking for the flaw that collapses its premise. I cannot find it. . . . This concept could offer system conversion efficiencies far in excess of anything we have seen to date.”

In a phone interview, Masters said that Ace’s concept allows heat to pass through a conductive material not just once, as thermoelectric devices do now, but “over and over again. That’s what makes it unique.”

“I believe he really, really has something,” Masters said.

While Ace has yet to draw a large investor, he hasn’t applied for an Energy Department grant, mainly because federal grant money cannot be used to finance patents.

Nor has he gotten a dime from charitable foundations doling out funds for technology that cuts carbon emissions.

Former Republican Rep. Roscoe Bartlett of Maryland, who quietly championed Ace’s efforts until losing his seat in Congress in 2012, said he suspects some investors have balked because Ace is “somewhat eccentric, and what he’s proposing seems too good to be true,” perhaps prompting them to dismiss him as “loony.”

But Bartlett, a scientist himself, calls Ace a “national treasure.”

Ace said he’s now inviting potential investors to support his work by financing consumer devices he’s invented, fearing that his high-tech energy solutions and planetary-scale talk might frighten people.

“America doesn’t have an energy solution,” Ace said. “The world doesn’t have an energy solution yet. That’s my dream. It has always been my dream, but I scare people because I think too big. Somebody has to. We can’t get there from here thinking small.”


2 posted on 06/08/2014 8:33:02 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

I’m reading background on this...and basically the only thing the guy has is a patent application that a couple experts in the field say look good on paper.

so never mind.

we’ll see.


3 posted on 06/08/2014 8:38:02 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

If I read it correctly, he says he has a collector that will heat up to a 1000 degrees in direct sunlight with the use of mirrors. Then he says he can convert almost 100% of the sun’s energy to electricity. I am mailing my check to him tomorrow.


4 posted on 06/08/2014 8:41:33 AM PDT by TexasGator
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To: ckilmer

That’s like putting an ad in the paper saying “Steal this idea and make a million”...maybe more.


5 posted on 06/08/2014 8:45:40 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: ckilmer

If these inventions work as planned, they could take a large chunk out EPA’s justification for existence. They need to kill this quick.


6 posted on 06/08/2014 8:46:34 AM PDT by umgud
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To: ckilmer

He’d better move out of Freak-State Maryland before he rolls out his invention. The entrepreneur-hating socialists running the state will demand the ultimate penance for his “sin” of daring to innovate for profit.


7 posted on 06/08/2014 8:48:58 AM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: ckilmer

“While scientists are engaged in an all-out, worldwide scramble to avert the energy and climate change crises,”

Oh please.


8 posted on 06/08/2014 8:49:03 AM PDT by headstamp 2 (What would Scooby do?)
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To: ckilmer
OK. So how do the bureaucrats tax it? If it doesn't emit CO2 or carbon in any form, it doesn't commit a sin to tax. Do we have to rewrite the unscience of global warming?
9 posted on 06/08/2014 8:50:54 AM PDT by LoneRangerMassachusetts (The meek shall not inherit the Earth)
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To: ckilmer

The key to saving energy is to DEFLECT solar power, not capture it. We already have special solar deflecting paint for rooftops which reflects a good deal of sunlight therefore preventing solar heat from being absorbed by homes. The greatest part of electric bills during much of the year is to power air conditioners so less absorption of solar heat means less energy needed to cool down homes. Why the use of solar deflecting treatment of rooftops is not more widespread, I don’t know.


10 posted on 06/08/2014 8:53:55 AM PDT by PJ-Comix (Boko Haram was enabled by Buku Huma)
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To: ckilmer

I don’t believe the oil oligarchy, which has bought up and sequestered literally hundreds of patents which held promise of dramatically reducing oil use, will allow this to be introduced into the global energy use and industry if it is correct in the assumptions underlying these.


11 posted on 06/08/2014 8:54:36 AM PDT by MHGinTN
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To: ckilmer

BFL


12 posted on 06/08/2014 9:01:41 AM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: ckilmer
So this kinda like the gizmo you put on your power panel “That Utility Companies HATE”?
13 posted on 06/08/2014 9:05:02 AM PDT by Boiler Plate ("Why be difficult, when with just a little more work, you can be impossible" Mom)
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To: ckilmer
Solar has not reached energy out greater than energy in.

14 posted on 06/08/2014 9:10:14 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (Psalm 119:174 I long for Your salvation, YHvH, Your teaching is my delight.)
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To: MHGinTN

Been hearing that for as long as I can remember, but that still does not make it fact.

Do you have any specific instances to back up the conspiracy theory? I am honestly curious about this.


15 posted on 06/08/2014 9:12:10 AM PDT by X-spurt (CRUZ missile - armed and ready.)
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To: ckilmer

The technical term for these supposedly new deivces is “money vacuum traps”

The ultimate design specification is “DOE development grant. “

The devics alone or in series are intended to vacuum money from the US and possibly state treasuries and trap the funds in an off shore bank account to where it is expensed for imported engineering design consultant fees


16 posted on 06/08/2014 9:14:30 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... History is a process, not an event)
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To: PJ-Comix

We have a huge window in our living room that faces west. We have never really used the living room before so never really noticed it except that it was always a little warmer in there. I recently put a new sofa and a big tv in there and started using the room. Wow! When sitting on the sofa in the afternoon you can feel the heat coming in the window behind you. Am currently looking for solar screens to fit that window.


17 posted on 06/08/2014 9:14:44 AM PDT by sheana
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To: ckilmer

IMO, this guy is a loon. Here is one of his patent applications: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1&p=1&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=((Ronald+AND+Ace).IN.+AND+solar.AB.)&OS=in/(Ronald+and+Ace)+and+abst/solar&RS=(IN/(Ronald+AND+Ace)+AND+ABST/solar)


18 posted on 06/08/2014 9:14:50 AM PDT by piytar (The predator-class is furious that their prey are shooting back.)
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To: ckilmer

Sounds much like the carburater that allows a car to go 200 miles on a gallon of gas.


19 posted on 06/08/2014 9:15:19 AM PDT by ully2
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To: X-spurt

Do a Youtube search on Tom Valone. He worked in the US patent office and has seen the patens get bought up or sequestered by the US government on grounds of national security.


20 posted on 06/08/2014 9:22:29 AM PDT by MHGinTN
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To: PJ-Comix
Why the use of solar deflecting treatment of rooftops is not more widespread, I don’t know.

It was widely in use in the south prior to the advent of widespread residential air conditioning. White shingle roofs, white gravel roofs and silver metal roofs were quite common. They're not so common anymore. Dimensional architectural shingles in stylish colors, most not very light in color, are the norm now.

21 posted on 06/08/2014 9:23:30 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: sheana
We have a huge window in our living room that faces west.

In the past, houses were fitted with awnings, which would deflect most of the sunlight from coming in during summer. After summer, you would take down the awning, and sunlight would be able to come in and keep you warmer in the winter.

22 posted on 06/08/2014 9:30:43 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: PJ-Comix

Didn’t one of Obama’s EPA guys suggest painting all rooftops and roads white?


23 posted on 06/08/2014 9:32:01 AM PDT by VanShuyten ("a shadow...draped nobly in the folds of a gorgeous eloquence.")
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To: ckilmer

It’s thermoelectric rather than photovoltaic, and he claims to utilize a material that neither expands nor contracts due to heat. The electricity comes from the heat rather than the light, and the heat is greatly intensified rather like a parabolic mirror. The heat is passed through the thermoelectric “generator” repeatedly, thereby minimizing or hopefully eliminating waste energy in the form of heat. There are functional thermoelectric units available on the market now, people are attaching them to stove flues and the like. Not very common, not yet, but they’re pretty cheap all things considered and there are so many sources of waste heat to capitalize upon. If you’re unfamiliar, those camp stoves that have a USB port for charging cellphones, tablets and laptops contain a thermoelectric generator that powers a fan to make a hotter, cleaner burn as well as sending electricity to the USB port. One brand is BioLite. He’s just concentrating the heating effect of sunlight upon these generators and claims to have a material that greatly enhances the utility of the heat generated. Does it work? Heck if I know, sounds good but the proof is in the execution.


24 posted on 06/08/2014 9:32:08 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: X-spurt; MHGinTN

This “Big Oil” has bought the patents conspiracy makes absolutely no sense.

The patents are public information.

Just build it. NOBODY needs permission to build it.

They would however, need permission to sell it.

If any of these devices worked, there would be hundreds or thousands of them actually working and there would be as many people showing off how they built them and how they work. All for free.


25 posted on 06/08/2014 9:32:51 AM PDT by Zeneta (Thoughts in time and out of season.)
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To: ckilmer

At first I thought his article was written by The Onion. Then I thought it was written by a fool. But then I realized it’s a simple, fact-free “Progressive” propaganda piece.

First, I love how “avert the energy and climate change crises” is stated as a fact, you know, like gravity and the Earth spinning on it axis.

But wait, there’s more! We next follow that premise with a “credible” account of a miracle invention by a crackpot inventor that is still “on paper only”, apparently defies the laws of thermodynamics (you know, like a perpetual motion machine would), but wait, the laws of thermodynamics don’t apply in this particular case after all, the “invention” has some “credence” because ONE other solar researcher says it MIGHT, produces 10 times more energy than current solar panels (which must mean no existing panel is currently more than 10% efficient or we run into that “impossible” issue again), and yet is not just TEN times better, but somehow is also TWENTY times better also.

Whew. OK, I could go on, but got tired. Still, I think you see my drift here.


26 posted on 06/08/2014 9:46:36 AM PDT by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Vote Republican in 2012 and only be called racist one more time!)
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To: catnipman

Thermoelectric “generator” units create electricity due to temperature differential. Hot on one side cold on the other, etc.

They exist, and are cheaper and far more reliable over time than solar panels. There appears to be little to fail, they’re mostly ceramic from what I can tell.

If this guy’s efforts end up creating a solar thermoelectric device that’s cheaper and more reliable than a solar panel as well as producing more electricity, it’s a good thing in my mind, whether or not the theoretically ultra-efficient nature of the invention pans out fully or turns out to be exaggerated.


27 posted on 06/08/2014 10:00:18 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: ckilmer

Obama and his globalist Saudi royal masters will never permit it.


28 posted on 06/08/2014 10:01:26 AM PDT by WKUHilltopper (And yet...we continue to tolerate this crap...)
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To: sheana

You should plant a large tree by that window. Almost all our exterior area is covered by shadows due to the many trees so only a small area is hit by sunlight. It makes a big difference.


29 posted on 06/08/2014 10:03:54 AM PDT by PJ-Comix (Boko Haram was enabled by Buku Huma)
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To: sheana

Design a nice-looking trellis to put up a few feet away from that window. Plant a fast-growing leafy vine, hopefully one that blooms for aesthetic value, to cover it in summer months. Cut it back and let the sun in, in cooler months. Deciduous trees will do the same thing, but it takes a whole lot longer to shade the whole side of a house than a vine.


30 posted on 06/08/2014 10:08:00 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: bert

“The ultimate design specification is “DOE development grant. “”

You are behind the times. The new ‘design specification’ is “Crowd Funding”.


31 posted on 06/08/2014 10:10:31 AM PDT by TexasGator
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To: catnipman
ONE other solar researcher says it MIGHT, produces 10 times more energy than current solar panels (which must mean no existing panel is currently more than 10% efficient or we run into that “impossible” issue again), and yet is not just TEN times better, but somehow is also TWENTY times better also.
Current efficiencies:
Amorphous Si ~6-8%
Crystalline Si ~15%
Triple Junction ~39%

Amorphous is really cheap to make, Crystalline is what you usually see and the Triple Junction is very expensive and seen in research environments.

Fight the Free Sh☭t Nation
I, for one, welcome our new Cybernetic Overlords /.

32 posted on 06/08/2014 10:12:29 AM PDT by Mycroft Holmes (<= Mash name for HTML Xampp PHP C JavaScript primer. Programming for everyone.)
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To: MHGinTN

In your post 11 you emphatically state “oil oligarchy, which has bought up and sequestered literally hundreds of patents “. Now which is it, big oil or big gubmit?

Somehow your switcheroo when questioned, lends little confidence in your conspiracy claim.

National security could be a legitimate reason, but without knowing which patents were hidden, its hard to know.


33 posted on 06/08/2014 10:14:24 AM PDT by X-spurt (CRUZ missile - armed and ready.)
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To: RegulatorCountry

“Does it work? Heck if I know, sounds good but the proof is in the execution.”

Thermoelectric has a very low efficiency. He is claiming near 100%.


34 posted on 06/08/2014 10:17:28 AM PDT by TexasGator
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To: TexasGator

He’s “recycling” intense heat created by concentrating sunlight. If you had a means of getting to the temps cited, what was it, 2400 degrees, and cooling fins on the other side or outside to create a large temperature differential, I suspect the efficiency would increase substantially.

Inefficient as existing thermoelectric units are, they’re still cheaper than solar photovoltaics. I just don’t know of many who have commercialized the things yet, not for specific use in generating residential electricity. They’re chiefly known from those camp stoves as I mentioned. Outside of that, you’ve got inventors and tinkerers who appear not to be well funded selling them to order in low volume.


35 posted on 06/08/2014 10:22:53 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: X-spurt

Patents grant rights because the invention will become known and imitated. Developers don’t live in a vacuum, parallel researchers will be on to it in a few years regardless of imposed secrecy.

Can anyone think of an economically advantageous invention that remained a secret? (Aside from the current conspiracies, of course).


36 posted on 06/08/2014 10:24:19 AM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: RegulatorCountry

“He’s “recycling” intense heat created by concentrating sunlight.”

Uh huh. Sort of a perpetual motion machine?


37 posted on 06/08/2014 10:27:46 AM PDT by TexasGator
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To: RegulatorCountry

“Inefficient as existing thermoelectric units are, they’re still cheaper than solar photovoltaics. I just don’t know of many who have commercialized the things yet, not for specific use in generating residential electricity. They’re chiefly known from those camp stoves as I mentioned. Outside of that, you’ve got inventors and tinkerers who appear not to be well funded selling them to order in low volume.”

They are used in remote locations where reliable generation is required.


38 posted on 06/08/2014 10:30:01 AM PDT by TexasGator
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To: TexasGator

Sounds more like a snowballing effect to get to a higher temperature, to me.


39 posted on 06/08/2014 10:34:30 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: TexasGator

I’ve played around with the idea of an “array” like a sleeve over a flue from a wood stove. You’d need a ventilated cavity within a chimney surrounding the flue and “array” in order to create the necessary temperature differential. The stove would need to be fired up at all times for electricity. That led to wood cookstove and an area that could be converted into a “summer kitchen” on a screened porch of sorts. Retractable walls could be as simple as insulated garage doors. If the heat could come from concentrated sunlight in warmer months, that problem goes away, but the flue would get *way* fancier, lol.


40 posted on 06/08/2014 10:42:25 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: piytar

Quick, notify liberals that he is proposing injecting large amounts of superheated liquid underground at incredible pressures near major cities. Wonder how long the anti fracking argument survives.


41 posted on 06/08/2014 11:11:47 AM PDT by kingu (Everything starts with slashing the size and scope of the federal government.)
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To: sheana; RegulatorCountry
We have a huge window in our living room that faces west.

I planted a cherry tree in front of our living room window that faces west. I have a couch against that wall. In spring and summer it's full of leaves but not so many that I can't see through it, but it blocks most of the heat from the sun. In the fall and winter the leaves fall away, allowing all the sunlight in. And it's pretty seeing all the blossoms and cherries in spring.

42 posted on 06/08/2014 11:32:01 AM PDT by roadcat
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To: jjotto

When a patent is granted it publishes every minute detail of components and describes how it works. The patent grants 17 years of “legal protection”, not actual “secret” protection. If someone copies the patent the government does not prosecute the violator, you have to sue them in Federal Civil Court at your own expense.

I know some inventors and chemists that prefer to not patent and instead hold the secret to themselves. Of course that secret is easier kept with chemical formulas than with mechanical things.


43 posted on 06/08/2014 11:51:30 AM PDT by X-spurt (CRUZ missile - armed and ready.)
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To: RegulatorCountry

“It was widely in use in the south prior to the advent of widespread residential air conditioning. White shingle roofs, white gravel roofs and silver metal roofs were quite common. They’re not so common anymore. Dimensional architectural shingles in stylish colors, most not very light in color, are the norm now.”

Naa, vented attic (i.e., vented soffits and ridge vents) and Polar Play (foil-lined plywood, with the foil facing down, into the attic) do just fine - I only have about a 10 degree increase in my attic versus outside temperature.

(of course being in Houston, that is still a toasty attic much of the year)


44 posted on 06/08/2014 12:10:34 PM PDT by BobL
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To: BobL

“Naa, vented attic”

Access to attic is in garage. Feels like a wind tunnel when open and garage door open a few inches.


45 posted on 06/08/2014 12:13:05 PM PDT by TexasGator
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To: X-spurt

Ah, so you were trolling for an argument. Have nice day, bug someone else. ...


46 posted on 06/08/2014 12:22:14 PM PDT by MHGinTN
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To: PJ-Comix

There is an uncovered courtyard on the other side of that window. No room for a tree.


47 posted on 06/08/2014 12:22:56 PM PDT by sheana
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To: RegulatorCountry

No room for a tree and I don’t want anything I have to take care of. That window also faces the street and I don’t want anything blocking it.


48 posted on 06/08/2014 12:24:10 PM PDT by sheana
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To: roadcat

Window faces an uncovered courtyard. No room for a tree.


49 posted on 06/08/2014 12:24:55 PM PDT by sheana
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To: PapaBear3625

An awning would not look right where that window is. I am buying solar shades for all three windows that face west. The other 2 are not that bad since there is an olive tree in front of them. The huge window is in an uncovered court yard so solar shades are the best option.


50 posted on 06/08/2014 12:27:55 PM PDT by sheana
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