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Teleportation Takes Another Step
Discovery News ^

Posted on 02/06/2003 10:11:45 AM PST by Sir Gawain

Jan. 31 — From an idea that was only considered practicable 10 years ago, scientists say they have succeeded in teleporting laser photons over two kilometers (1.25 miles), the biggest distance yet achieved.

In science fiction, teleportation entails taking someone and creating a replica of him or her a long distance away, and destroying the original. It remained confined to pulp literature until a decade ago. The perceived barrier to it was something called the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. This principle states that the more accurately you try to scan or measure an atom or other object in order to teleport it, the more you disrupt its original quantum state, and so you cannot create a true replica.

Things changed in 1993 with a landmark paper by a team led by an IBM scientist, Charles Bennett, who thought up a way of getting around this problem using photons, or particles of light, as the object to be transported.

Their answer was to exploit something called "quantum entanglement," in which a laser beam is squeezed and split in such a way that it creates two particles of light at the same time.

Particles created in this exotic process behave like psychic twins. Even if they are far apart, a disturbance to one particle affects the other, a phenomenon once dubbed "spooky interaction" by Einstein.

Their idea was to use these "entangled" particles as transporters. By introducing a third "message" particle into the light stream, one could transfer its properties to both sets of particles.

It would work like this: One of the "twin" beams is scanned, which in the process destroys its quantum state. The information is sent to the recipient via a classical communications channel, and is transformed back into a light beam. The recipient then combines this light beam with the second entangled beam he has received, and in so doing "unwraps" the original message in its virgin state.

The first concrete results from this idea began emerging in 1997, with a couple of labs in Europe and the United States transporting a small unit of information, called a quantum bit (qubit), a distance of about one meter (3.25 feet).

But, in a study reported Thursday in the British weekly journal Nature, scientists at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and the University of Aarhus, Denmark, have teleported data to another lab 55 meters (178 feet) away through a 2-kilometer (1.25-mile) roll of standard fibre-optic cable.

Kirk, Scotty and Bones still remain in the distant, sci-fi distance, however.

In spite of the breakthrough, teleportation is still restricted to light particles. No-one is even close to teleporting an atom or a bacteria, even less a human being.

Where there could be an early use is in secret communications — creating encrypted messages, each of which would have a unique, unbreakable key and whose interception would be a obvious giveaway to the recipient.

"The first (and, with foreseeable technologies, the only) application of quantum teleportation is in quantum communication, where it could help extend quantum cryptography to larger distances," the authors, led by Geneva University's Nicolas Gisin, said.



TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: realscience
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1 posted on 02/06/2003 10:11:45 AM PST by Sir Gawain
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To: Sir Gawain
It will never work!
2 posted on 02/06/2003 10:15:15 AM PST by biblewonk
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To: Sir Gawain
I always wondered how the Enterprise communicated instantly with Starfleet when they were light years away. Now I know!
3 posted on 02/06/2003 10:19:21 AM PST by Arkie2
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To: Sir Gawain
Think of how this could affect our society. If teleportation were to become reality:

-no more need for cars
-no more need for oil (besides heating)
-no more stores, you just order it online, and it gets zapped into your living room from the warehouse.
-no more semi-trucks, trains, or airplanes
-travel anywhere from next door to the moon in seconds.
-many jobs would disappear. A few would spring up.

It is just mind boggling to think of the consequences.

4 posted on 02/06/2003 10:20:52 AM PST by cdefreese
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To: cdefreese
and no more US - Saddam would teleport us full of toxic sludge/germs/radioactive waste.
5 posted on 02/06/2003 10:22:45 AM PST by Krafty123
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To: Arkie2
Actually, the Enterprise communicates through subspace; which functions 30 orders of magnitude faster than warp speed. Or to it goes...
6 posted on 02/06/2003 10:23:41 AM PST by Krafty123
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To: AriOxman
Yeah, well who's to say we won't name this form of communication subspace?
7 posted on 02/06/2003 10:24:47 AM PST by Arkie2
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To: Sir Gawain
I always wished I could beam to work every morning. Someday...
8 posted on 02/06/2003 10:24:52 AM PST by stanz
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To: cdefreese
you just order it online, and it gets zapped into your living room

Would this work with Ann Coulter....?

9 posted on 02/06/2003 10:25:21 AM PST by ErnBatavia ((Bumperootus!))
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To: Sir Gawain
"quantum entanglement," in which a laser beam is squeezed and split in such a way that it creates two particles of light at the same time.

Who wants to be the first HUMAN volunteer to test this application on people?

10 posted on 02/06/2003 10:27:48 AM PST by Lunatic Fringe (I drank what?)
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To: biblewonk
Of course it'll work! We've got a teleportation device in our office. It's called a fax machine. But it's better than what these scientists have done, 'cause it preserves the original copy. Seriously, I think some practical uses in the near future may be in 3D holography, nano-machine building, and art.
11 posted on 02/06/2003 10:28:17 AM PST by roadcat
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To: Sir Gawain
You'll put your eye out!
12 posted on 02/06/2003 10:28:18 AM PST by TC Rider (The United States Constitution 1791. All Rights Reserved.)
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To: biblewonk
It will never work!

Aside from the fact that it does work, it will be useful to transfer information at least.

Instantaneously between stars and across the galaxy.

13 posted on 02/06/2003 10:28:49 AM PST by RightWhale
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To: Arkie2
I always wondered how the Enterprise communicated instantly with Starfleet when they were light years away. Now I know!

Sometimes they could contact them immediately, and sometimes Kirk had to make his own decisions because they had no immediate contact.
14 posted on 02/06/2003 10:30:47 AM PST by Arkinsaw
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To: Arkie2
Is this another case of the elite sucking the pot dry with overblown salaries and bonuses while the working people end up with nothing.

I always wondered why Stafleet needed a fleet? Why not just teleport everywhere? I'm sure some Trekkie will clue me in...

15 posted on 02/06/2003 10:31:30 AM PST by RoughDobermann
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To: *RealScience; sourcery; Ernest_at_the_Beach
http://www.freerepublic.com/perl/bump-list
16 posted on 02/06/2003 10:32:29 AM PST by Libertarianize the GOP (Ideas have consequences)
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To: Arkinsaw
Yes- actually several ST episodes had to deal with the fact that communications still took some time to reach Earth. The "instant messages" we see in some episodes usually took place when Enterprise was relatively close to Earth.
17 posted on 02/06/2003 10:33:24 AM PST by Lunatic Fringe (I drank what?)
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To: RoughDobermann
Because transport devices had a short range.... A very interesting book is called the "Technical Guide to Star Trek" and it has very interesting scientific theories to back up the fantasy world of ST.
18 posted on 02/06/2003 10:34:54 AM PST by Lunatic Fringe (I drank what?)
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To: RoughDobermann
Why not just teleport everywhere?

Another thing: Why not just travel at Warp Ten all the time? Is it that they needed to take up a complete week to their next destination? If the next port was nearby, they would take their time at low Warp factor. If it was far away, they would hump over there at high Warp factor. Just so it took exactly a week.

19 posted on 02/06/2003 10:35:25 AM PST by RightWhale
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To: Sir Gawain
In spite of the breakthrough, teleportation is still restricted to light particles. No-one is even close to teleporting an atom or a bacteria, even less a human being.

Was there a scene in one of those "Fly" remakes in which the guy walks into a fancy restaurant with his girl friend and orders a bowl of dog $#!t? I'd heard that and never knew whether or not to believe it.

20 posted on 02/06/2003 10:37:54 AM PST by martianagent
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To: RightWhale
Why not just travel at Warp Ten all the time?

Laddie, dinna ye know wha' that does to the dilithium crystals, and the skin 'o the ship? Why, Warrp Ten ... me engines, me beautiful engines [sobbing] ...

21 posted on 02/06/2003 10:38:39 AM PST by Campion
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To: RightWhale
The same reason why you don't drive 100 miles an hour everywhere you go- lol.

Again, in the "TGST" the reason is time synchronization, fuel, and various other minor reasons.

22 posted on 02/06/2003 10:39:06 AM PST by Lunatic Fringe (I drank what?)
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Inertial dampeners is the reason why going from 0 to Warp 9.5 didnt instantly turn the crew into chunky salsa.
23 posted on 02/06/2003 10:41:00 AM PST by Lunatic Fringe (I drank what?)
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To: biblewonk
Hmm...I'm not so sure, at least on this level which could have profund implications for cryptogragphy and secure communications.

But I've also been thinking about quantum process lately within the human brain, and hence the mind, and Genesis.

That God evidently created the universe as a quantum system, the measurement problem, i.e., the outcomes of possibilites, would prima facie seem to undermine predestination.

God seems disappointed and sad with Adam and Eve, then prior to The Flood and yet again with human arrogance stemming from Babel. The suggestion is that God didn't know the outcome of events within the mind of Man at the quantum level until their wave-functions had collapsed in the process of their protagonists having made choices.

Not that I'd like this thread moved over to "Religion", but I personally find it comforting that at least part of God's purpose for creating free will in humanity seems affirmed by quantum theory. Why should he otherwise be occupied with wanting us to do good, if he already knows what the outcome will be.

Of course, if I knew Him, I'd be Him. But it's curious to otherwise ponder the point of creation.

24 posted on 02/06/2003 10:42:27 AM PST by onedoug
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To: Sir Gawain
Yes, but can it be used to beam Jim Traficant from prison?
25 posted on 02/06/2003 10:51:24 AM PST by Cyber Liberty ( 2003, Raving Lunatic LLC)
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To: Lunatic Fringe
Thanks...
26 posted on 02/06/2003 10:58:36 AM PST by RoughDobermann
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To: Sir Gawain
In science fiction, teleportation entails taking someone and creating a replica of him or her a long distance away, and destroying the original.

Which means that, once you go through the device, you are dead. Sure, there's a walking, talking simulacrum of you at the other end, but it ain't you, as you've been "destroyed."

27 posted on 02/06/2003 11:00:14 AM PST by Junior (Put tag line here =>)
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To: ErnBatavia
Would this work with Ann Coulter....?

Probably not. Ann doesn't weigh as much as a photon.

28 posted on 02/06/2003 11:01:14 AM PST by r9etb
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To: Howlin; Ed_NYC; MonroeDNA; widgysoft; Springman; Timesink; AntiGuv; dubyaismypresident; Grani; ...

"Hold muh beer 'n watch this!" PING....

If you want on or off this list, please let me know!

29 posted on 02/06/2003 11:02:49 AM PST by mhking ("Two to beam up, Mr. Scott...")
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To: RoughDobermann
You seem to be quoting me in your post but I didn't say that and can't find it in the article or any replies. Where'd you get that? Maybe it's a garbled subspace transmission! :^)
30 posted on 02/06/2003 11:06:10 AM PST by Arkie2
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To: ErnBatavia
Would this work with Ann Coulter....?

If her "pattern" were sold, say, on the black market, you could buy it, feed it into your receiver, and recreate one of your own.

Of course, this would apply to anything. However, since destroying just a minute amount of matter creates a huge amount of energy (fusion energy), it would take an incredible amount of energy to create even a toothbrush.

31 posted on 02/06/2003 11:06:22 AM PST by MrB
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To: Junior
That's what Dr McCoy always complained about.
32 posted on 02/06/2003 11:07:28 AM PST by MrB
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To: Arkie2
That is TOO funny. Forgot the old no-ctrl-c, no ctrl-v rule... :-)
33 posted on 02/06/2003 11:08:11 AM PST by RoughDobermann
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To: martianagent
Was there a scene in one of those "Fly" remakes in which the guy walks into a fancy restaurant ...

You might check here to find out the answer to your question.

34 posted on 02/06/2003 11:13:39 AM PST by new cruelty
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To: Sir Gawain
Won't work the transporter was the most absurd idea on star trek. I'd be superstitious whether I'd have the same consciousness or be killed and have a replica if my molecular structure was torn apat and then reassembled.
35 posted on 02/06/2003 11:14:14 AM PST by weikel (Your commie has no regard for human life not even his own)
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To: RightWhale
It works for molecules... couldn't transfer people.
36 posted on 02/06/2003 11:15:18 AM PST by weikel (Your commie has no regard for human life not even his own)
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To: weikel
if my molecular structure was torn apat and then reassembled

That's not how MY transporter would work. There might be a sensation of rotation 90 degrees clockwise and upward, but otherwise there would be no conversion to an atomic cloud, or quarks, or whatever primary particles we invent during the next cycle.

37 posted on 02/06/2003 11:30:51 AM PST by RightWhale
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To: Arkie2
Cuz this method already has a name; its called an ansible.
38 posted on 02/06/2003 11:32:05 AM PST by Krafty123
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To: weikel
Human souls are non-transportable. If any human is ever unfortunate to volunteer as the first guinea pig for a transporter, the experiement will end up with nothing but a dead body.

It might possibly work for inanimate objects someday, though. But I would imagine that the amounts of energy required will be so extreme that it would hardly be worthwile except for highly unusual circumstances. E=MC2, thus to transport the matter at the speed of light, you will need huge amounts of energy.

39 posted on 02/06/2003 11:34:53 AM PST by Stefan Stackhouse
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To: Cyber Liberty
Yes, but can it be used to beam Jim Traficant from prison?

Only back to his home on another planet.

40 posted on 02/06/2003 11:38:12 AM PST by Stefan Stackhouse
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To: RightWhale
Is "spooky interaction" instantaneous?
41 posted on 02/06/2003 11:38:17 AM PST by robertpaulsen (Love is kinda crazy with a spooky little girl like you.)
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To: cdefreese
-no more stores, you just order it online, and it gets zapped into your living room from the warehouse.

Nah. All you need is some bulk matter. Then you just program it into whatever you desire.

Talk about leftovers! You could make yesterday's garbage into today's dinner.

SD

42 posted on 02/06/2003 11:38:34 AM PST by SoothingDave
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To: Stefan Stackhouse
E=MC2, thus to transport the matter at the speed of light, you will need huge amounts of energy.

We don't have enough math to even know that. The complex plane is great for working with potential fields, but it is limited to two dimensional fields, hardly a real-world situation. Yet the complex plane has not been successfully extended to three dimensions or four dimensions of the natural universe. Quaternions was a nice try, but failed. If someone has an idea how to extend the complex plane to three or four dimensions, speak up, we'll get rich and famous when it works. No one has had the right idea and possessed the ability to do the math at the same time.

43 posted on 02/06/2003 11:41:42 AM PST by RightWhale
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To: robertpaulsen
"quantum entanglement,"

It doesn't matter where the photons are. One can be in New Jersey, the other gone out for bagels in the Andromeda Galaxy. Once they are entangled,, distance is not a factor. Instantaneous, simultaneous, immediate.

44 posted on 02/06/2003 11:44:33 AM PST by RightWhale
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To: Stefan Stackhouse
Dunno what effect it would have on the consciousness... I would always be too superstious to use anything that ripped my molecular structure apart and reassembled it.... BAD MAGIC LOL
45 posted on 02/06/2003 11:47:07 AM PST by weikel (Your commie has no regard for human life not even his own)
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To: RightWhale
Postulating certain theories about interconnectedness of all particles in the universe and the universe being a projection of a higher dimension then yes. Otherwise...
46 posted on 02/06/2003 11:48:48 AM PST by weikel (Your commie has no regard for human life not even his own)
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To: AriOxman
and no more US - Saddam would teleport us full of toxic sludge/germs/radioactive waste.

Assuming that he could get his hands on the technology in the first place and that we hadn't already accidently lost his signal.

47 posted on 02/06/2003 11:52:13 AM PST by DannyTN (Note left on my door by a pack of neighborhood dogs.)
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To: weikel
interconnectedness of all particles

There is only one particle. There can be only one. See it correctly.

48 posted on 02/06/2003 11:58:22 AM PST by RightWhale
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To: RightWhale
"Rogue Moon", by Algis Budrys

The year is 1959 (ie, when the book was written), and an alien artifact has been found on the moon. No, it's not an alternate-history novel. The public doesn't know that the moon is reachable via matter transmitter. There are problems with the transmitter: The device doesn't move you; it duplicates you. For a short time, before differing experiences cause you to diverge, you and your duplicate are so similar (call it nineteen decimal places' similarity :) that you are telepathically linked. Then there are two of you. One goes home for supper; one remains on the moon.

The artifact? The artifact is *very* alien, incomprehensible. And people who enter it die. For practical purposes, it's a maze: If you do the right things at the right times, you can get through it. Mapping that maze, however, costs lives at both ends. The duplicates on the moon map out a bit more of the artifact before being killed -- and the telepathically linked originals on Earth are broken by the experience.

Edward Hawks, the developer of the matter transmitter, needs someone who can survive the experience. He turns to Al Barker -- an adventurer with a bit of a death wish -- and talks him into joining the project. Again and again Barker goes through the maze -- farther each time -- and dies.

49 posted on 02/06/2003 11:58:26 AM PST by robertpaulsen (Excellent read!)
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To: Sir Gawain
And idiots endlessly prattle on as if the comparison has any grounding in reality. One might as well complain, "Gee, we breath oxygen, why shouldn't we be allowed to breath methane?" I'm sure Thieves are upset that they get arrested for stealing. Shall we next hear about how theft isn't really that bad afterall....
50 posted on 02/06/2003 12:03:30 PM PST by Havoc ((Honor above convenience))
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