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Will classic rock last for all eternity?
Oak Lawn (IL) Reporter ^ | 4/17/03 | Michael M. Bates

Posted on 04/15/2003 4:46:52 PM PDT by mikeb704

Eva Narcissus Boyd was buried in North Carolina earlier this week. The name may not be familiar, but her music certainly is.

Under the name "Little Eva," she recorded "The Locomotion." The song was a giant hit in 1962.

Forty years is a very long time, even if Baby Boomers recall the era as though it were last week. I thought of Little Eva a few of months ago while driving. Her hit was playing on the radio and I wondered how many times I’d heard it over the decades. Surely hundreds of times. Maybe even thousands.

I began conjecturing if "The Locomotion" will still be listened to in yet another 40 years. Given how pervasive 60s music is today, I think there’s a possibility of that happening.

It’s not just on oldies stations. Turn on the TV and chances are you’ll hear 60s music in commercials.

Donovan, the Sunshine Superman, sings "Colours" in a Kohl’s commercial. A Gap ad uses his "Mellow Yellow." The same company features another commercial with The Troggs’ "Love Is All Around." What, you thought "Wild Thing" was their only groovy ditty?

Admittedly, some of the music in TV ads emanated from one hit wonders. Flowers.com runs a spot with "Concrete and Clay," a 1965 hit for the legendary Unit Four + Two. GMC’s Yukon included "Our Day Will Come." The first song released by Ruby and the Romantics, it was also the only one for which the group is remembered. Old Navy used "California Sun," a hit by the Rivieras. The band made the Golden State sound like heaven, which was quite an accomplishment for some Indiana boys who’d never personally been out there a’havin’ fun in that warm California sun.

It’s surprising to me that, given their sheer number and popularity, more Beatles tunes aren’t incorporated in advertising. Possibly it’s because of legal impediments. Michael Jackson has owned the rights to over 200 Beatles songs. Of course, Michael is always busy with either not getting plastic surgery or being named in multimillion-dollar lawsuits, so perhaps he just hasn’t had the time necessary to exploit his ownership.

Another consideration is that some Boomers consider Beatles music sacrosanct. These folks feel disgust with what’s perceived as tawdry commercialization of their heroes’ works. They must have not paid much attention when the group cranked out barkers like "Dig A Pony" just to fill up an album.

The mid-80s marked the first use of a Beatles song in an ad. Lincoln-Mercury had a sound-alike group singing "Help." A couple of years later, Nike featured "Revolution" performed by the Beatles and the company credited it with increased sales. Apple Records sued Nike, but until the case was settled kept employing it.

In the late 90s, Nortel Networks licensed "Come Together" for a new marketing campaign. H&R Block latched on to "Taxman" for commercials last year. Around the same time, an Allstate Insurance ad included "When I’m 64." Julian Lennon performed the tune, which added a nice touch of irony I thought.

Car companies especially look back to the golden age of rock. Steppenwolf does a heavily mixed version of "Magic Carpet Ride" for Dodge Viper. "Unchained Melody" was a 60s hit for the Righteous Brothers and Mercedes Benz incorporated it in a commercial last year. The Kinks’ "You Really Got Me" has been used in other ads for Mercedes Benz.

A song I’ve heard in several commercials is the great "Time Has Come Today" by the Chambers Brothers. It’s pitched beer, cars, and even an investment company.

One advertisement highlights "It’s A Beautiful Morning," a hit for the Young Rascals. The product being sold is Vioxx, an arthritis pill purchased by many Boomers, possibly even the not so young anymore Rascals.

When most of my generation finally leave this vale of tears – if they ever do – maybe then the 60s music will fade away. But what will take its place? The Insane Clown Posse, Eminem, Twisted Sister?

You know, The Locomotion keeps getting better with age.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; US: Illinois
KEYWORDS: beatles; commercials; littleeva; locomotion; rock
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Do it holdin' hands if you get the notion. . .
1 posted on 04/15/2003 4:46:52 PM PDT by mikeb704
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2 posted on 04/15/2003 4:48:48 PM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
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To: mikeb704
Eva Narcissus Boyd was buried in North Carolina earlier this week

She was living in Kinston. That's like a holding pattern for death.

3 posted on 04/15/2003 4:53:30 PM PDT by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: mikeb704
Do we really want to be listening to bands like Bad Company when we're in the retirement home?
4 posted on 04/15/2003 4:56:36 PM PDT by billorites
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To: mikeb704
First off, "Locomotion" was written by Carole King and her first husband. Eva Boyd was the family babysitter. King's songs will probably last as long as Cole Porter's.

Paul McCartney should be classified next to Richard Rodgers because both of them knew how to craft a memorable tune and weren't ashamed of it. Will McCartney's songs last as long as Rodgers'? Probably.

A century from now, I could see people listening to classic rock the way we listen to preserved performances of classic jazz (Armstrong, Ellington, Reinhart & Grappelli). The Beatles and especially the Rolling Stones will have listeners long after the bodies of their members have turned to dust.

There are other classic acts out there, probably too many to mention. (I'm a member of the Moody Blues cult myself.) But lasting to the end of time? Puleeze!

5 posted on 04/15/2003 4:58:04 PM PDT by Publius
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To: mikeb704
When most of my generation finally leave this vale of tears – if they ever do – maybe then the 60s music will fade away. But what will take its place? The Insane Clown Posse, Eminem, Twisted Sister?

Maybe if the 'Boomers one day, before they pass into the vale of tears, realize that their music lead to Eminem and the Insane Clown Posse, they'll reconsider statements like that.

Sincerely,

Gen-X Freeper.

6 posted on 04/15/2003 4:58:07 PM PDT by HumanaeVitae (Tolerance is a necessary evil.)
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To: Publius
The Beatles and especially the Rolling Stones will have listeners long after the bodies of their members have turned to dust.

Judging by the way the Strolling Bones look, they're already turning to dust.

7 posted on 04/15/2003 5:06:38 PM PDT by mikeb704
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To: billorites
Do we really want to be listening to bands like Bad Company when we're in the retirement home?

As Sam Goldwyn said, include me out.

8 posted on 04/15/2003 5:08:40 PM PDT by mikeb704
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To: billorites
Do we really want to be listening to bands like Bad Company when we're in the retirement home?

No, playing air guitar.




9 posted on 04/15/2003 5:09:59 PM PDT by Sabertooth
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To: AppyPappy
She was living in Kinston. That's like a holding pattern for death.

Well, there goes this summer's vacation plans.

10 posted on 04/15/2003 5:10:02 PM PDT by mikeb704
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To: mikeb704
From the article: "Turn on the TV and chances are you’ll hear 60s music in commercials"

10-15 years from now it will be 80's music. God help us all.

11 posted on 04/15/2003 5:13:05 PM PDT by Rebelbase
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To: billorites
Do we really want to be listening to bands like Bad Company when we're in the retirement home?

What's wrong with Bad Company?
12 posted on 04/15/2003 5:15:51 PM PDT by Arkinsaw
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To: Rebelbase
It's happening now!

Gary Newman "cars" used in some ad recently.

13 posted on 04/15/2003 5:32:35 PM PDT by ffusco ("Essiri sempri la santu fora la chiesa.")
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To: mikeb704
Yeah, yeah, you guys were laughing yesterday, but you're gonna be begging to borrow my Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs 8-tracks now...

"Woolah Boolah...Woolah Boolah...Woolah Boolah...watch it now, watch it..."

14 posted on 04/15/2003 5:36:26 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: billorites; mikeb704
"Do we really want to be listening to bands like Bad Company when we're in the retirement home?"

No, but some Allman brothers seems appropriate. Think "Stormy Monday".

15 posted on 04/15/2003 5:37:48 PM PDT by Vigilantcitizen
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To: mikeb704
The Who's 'Overture' is used in an allergy pill commerical
16 posted on 04/15/2003 5:38:19 PM PDT by tiggs
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To: viligantcitizen
Whippin' POST!
17 posted on 04/15/2003 5:40:57 PM PDT by Lurking Libertarian (Non sub homine, sed sub Deo et lege)
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To: Rebelbase
Here are some that the powers-that-be have (thankfully) chosen to be remembered for a long, long, long time:

The Beatles
Led Zeppelin
The Rolling Stones
Pink Floyd
The Doors
Jimi Hendrix
The Who
Van Halen

Here are some that should be, but might not be:

Yes
Jethro Tull
Deep Purple
Black Sabbath
Rush

And here are some that might be remembered, and which therefore require immediate, violent action to burn and destroy all evidence of their existence (including the burning and the crushing-by-bulldozer) of existing CDs, tapes and vinyl discs:

Eminem
Sheryl Crow
P. Diddy
The Sex Pistols
The Pretenders (featuring Chrissy Hynde)

And for fellow guitarists, here are some who will NEVER be remembered, but ought to be appreciated now:

Joe Satriani
Tony MacAlpine
Vinnie Moore
Yngwie Malmsteen
John Petrucci
18 posted on 04/15/2003 5:41:03 PM PDT by Burr5
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To: ffusco
Numan
19 posted on 04/15/2003 5:41:04 PM PDT by Polonius
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To: mikeb704
As timeless as the sun rising from the east is the music of Led Zeppelin. There will never be another band like Zep; their music has stood the test of time and stands up to ANYTHING being produced today or the past twenty years.

Look at the number of albums produced by the Who, Beatles or Stones...Zeppelin had eight studio albums during their storied twelve year stint.

They are absolutely amazing and will be shaping generations to come.
20 posted on 04/15/2003 5:45:21 PM PDT by God luvs America
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