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"OUR NATION'S GODLY HERITAGE"
PresidentialPrayerTeam ^ | Presidential Prayer Team

Posted on 04/30/2003 6:31:18 PM PDT by webber


"OUR NATION'S GODLY HERITAGE"

Since the earliest moments of our nation?s history, our leaders have called for national days of prayer, repentance and fasting. When an impasse had been reached at the Continental Congress, Benjamin Franklin called for prayer with these words:

"I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid? I therefore beg leave to move--that henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessings on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly every morning before we proceed to business"

Less than 100 years later, a concerned Abraham Lincoln called for national prayer in the midst of the Civil War:

"WHEREAS, The Senate of the United States; devoutly recognizing the Supreme authority and just government of Almighty God in all the affairs of men and nations, has, by a resolution, requested the president to designate and set apart a day for National prayer and humiliation. And

"WHEREAS, it is the duty of nations, as well as of men, to owe their dependence upon the overruling power of God, to confess their sins and transgressions, in humble sorrow, yet with assured hope that genuine repentance will lead to mercy and pardon, and to recognize the sublime truth announced in the Holy Scriptures and proven by all history, that those nations only are blessed whose God is the Lord."

Many other statesmen, presidents and leaders have called on the nation to turn to God in prayer. In 1952, President Truman signed a joint resolution of Congress, creating the National Day of Prayer, and in 1988 it became a law under the signature of President Ronald Reagan.

During the earliest days of the conflict in Iraq, Congress called for a day of humiliation, fasting and prayer. Recently, congressional leaders asked evangelical leaders what would be a good day for this effort. It was decided that the themes of gratitude, fasting and prayer could be incorporated into the National Day of Prayer in a meaningful way.

So today, the yearly observance takes on new meaning as our country unites in gratitude, fasting and prayer for the blessings God has granted our nation.




TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: natldayofprayer

1 posted on 04/30/2003 6:31:18 PM PDT by webber
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To: webber
His eye is on the sparrow, and I know He watches me.
2 posted on 04/30/2003 6:35:05 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: webber
Great post, thanks.
3 posted on 04/30/2003 6:47:23 PM PDT by cake_crumb (UN Resolutions=Very Expensive, Very SCRATCHY Toilet Paper)
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To: webber
John Quincy Adams
Vice-President of the American Bible Society; Member of the Massachusetts Bible Society
(Report of the Executive Committee of the Bible Society of Massachusetts, Prepared for the Anniversary of the Society, June 4, 1818 (Boston: John Eliot, 1818), p. 7.)

Abraham Baldwin (Signer of the Constitution)
Chaplain in the American Revolution for two years.
(Parker C. Thompson, The United States Army Chaplaincy: from its European Antecedents to 1791 (Washington D.C.: Office of the Chief of Chaplains, Dept. of the Army, 1978), Vol. I, p. 246)

Joel Barlow (Diplomat under Washington and Adams)
Chaplain in the American Revolution for three years.
(Parker C. Thompson, The United States Army Chaplaincy: from its European Antecedents to 1791 (Washington D.C.: Office of the Chief of Chaplains, Dept. of the Army, 1978), Vol. I, p. 246)

Joseph Bloomfield (Governor of New Jersey)
Member of the New Jersey Bible Society
(The Second Report of the managers of the new Jersey Bible Society, Read before the Society at Their Annual Meeting at New Brunswick, August 27, 1811 (Trenton: George Sherman, 1811), p. 11)

Elias Boudinot (President of the Continental Congress)
Founder and First President of the American Bible Society, President of the New Jersey Bible Society, Member of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, member of the Massachusetts Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
(Constitution of the American Bible Society (New York: Printed for the American Bible Society, 1816), p. 7.)
(Address of the New Jersey Bible Society to the Publick: with Appendix, Containing the Constitution of Said Society (New Brunswick: Abraham Blauvelt, 1810), P. 15)
(Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (Boston: Crocker & Brewster, 1835), P. 5)
(Rev. Eliphalet Pearson, A Sermon Delivered in Boston Before the Massachusetts Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, November 27, 1811 (Cambridge: Hilliard & Metcalf, 1811), p. 36)

James Bowdoin (Governor of Massachusetts)
Member of the Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and Others
(Abiel Holmes, A Discourse Delivered Before the Society for Propagating the Gospel Among the Indians and Others in North America, November 3, 1808 (Boston: Farrand, Mallory, and Co., 1808), p. 66)

John Brooks (Governor of Massachusetts, Revolutionary General)
President of the Middlesex County Bible Society

James Brown (U.S. Senator, and Diplomat)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

James Burrill, Jr. (Chief-Justice of Rhode Island Supreme Court & U. S. Senator)
President of the Providence Auxiliary Bible Society

Dewitt Clinton ( Governor of New York, U. S. Senator, Introduce the 12th Amendment)
Manager and Vice-President of the American Bible Society

Francis Dana (Member of the Continental Congress, Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, U.S. Minister to Russia)
Member of the Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and Others

John Davenport (Revolutionary Officer; U.S. Congress)
Member of the Missionary Society of Connecticut

Samuel Dexter (Secretary of War under Adams, U.S. Congressman, U.S. Senator)
Member of the Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and Others

Jonas Galusha (Governor of Vermont)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

William Gaston (Chief-Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, U. S. Representative)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

Charles Goldsborough (Governor of Maryland, U. S. Representative)
Vice-President of the American Bible Society

William Gray (Lt. Governor of Massachusetts, U.S. Senator)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

Felix Grundy (U.S. Attorney General, U.S. Senator, U.S. Congressman)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

Alexander Hamilton (Signer of the Constitution)
Proposed formation of the Christian Constitutional Society to spread Christian Government to other nations.

John Hamilton (Major-General in the Revolution, U.S. Congress)
Member of the New Jersey Bible Society

John Jay (Original Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court)
President of the American Bible Society, Member of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions

William Jones (Governor of Rhode Island)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

Francis Scott Key (Attorney, Author of the Star Spangled Banner)
Manager and Vice-President of the American Sunday School Union

Rufus King (Signer of the Constitution)
Selected as Manager of the American Bible Society

Andrew Kirkpatrick (Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court)
Vice-President of the New Jersey Bible Society, Vice-President of the American Bible Society

Marquis De Lafayette (Revolutionary General)
Member of the American Sunday School Union

John Langdon (Signer of the Constitution)
Vice-President of the American Bible Society
Benjamin Lincoln (Revolutionary General, Lt. Governor of Massachusetts)
Member of the Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and Others

John Lowell (Revolutionary Officer, Member of the Continental Congress)
Member of the Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and Others

George Madison (Governor of Kentucky)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

John Marshall (Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, Secretary of State, Revolutionary General)
Vice-President of the American Bible Society, officer in the American Sunday School Union

James McHenry (Signer of the Constitution)
President of the Baltimore Bible Society

David Lawrence Morril (Governor of New Hampshire, U.S. Senator)
Vice-President of the American Bible Society, Manager of the American Sunday School Union.

Joseph Nourse (Revolutionary Officer, U.S. Treasury)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

Robert Treat Paine (Signer of the Constitution)
Military Chaplain

Albion Parris (Governor of Maine)
Manager of the American Sunday School Union.

William Phillips (Lt. Governor of Massachusetts for 11 terms)
President of the Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians, President of the Massachusetts Bible Society, a member of the American Board of Foreign Missions, Vice-President of the American Bible Society, President of the American Society for Educating Pious Youth for the Gospel Ministry

Charles Cotesworth Pickney (Signer of the Constitution)
President of the Charleston Bible Society, Vice-President of the American Bible Society

Thomas Posey (Revolutionary Officer, Governor of Indiana, U.S. Senator)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

Rufus Putnam (Revolutionary General, Federal Judge)
President of the Ohio Bible Society

Benjamin Rush (Signer of the Constitution)
Founder and Manager of the Philadelphia Bible Society

Isaac Shelby (Revolutionary Officer, Governor of Kentucky)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

John Cotton Smith (Governor of Connecticut, U.S. Congressman)
President of Litchfield County Foreign Missionary Society,, first President of the Connecticut Bible Society, President of the American Bible Society, President of the American Board of Foreign Missions

Caleb Strong (Constitutional Convention, U.S. Senator, Governor of Massachusetts)
Vice- President of the American Bible Society

James Sullivan (Governor of Massachusetts, U.S. Congressman)
Member of the Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and Others

Increase Sumner (Governor of Massachusetts)
Member of the Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and Others

William Tilghman (Federal Judge, Chief Justice of Pennsylvania Supreme Court)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society

Smith Thompson (U.S. Supreme Court, Secretary of the Navy)
Vice- President of the American Bible Society

Daniel Tompkins (Governor of New York, Vice President of the U.S.)
Vice- President of the American Bible Society

John Treadwell (Governor of Connecticut, Member of Continental Congress)
Member of the Missionary Society of Connecticut

Robert Troup (Federal Judge, Secretary of War)
President of the American Bible Society

Peter Vroom (Governor of New Jersey, U.S. Congressman)
Vice-President of the American Bible Society, Member of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions

Bushrod Washington (U.S. Supreme Court Justice)
President of the American Bible Society, Vice- President of the American Sunday School Union

William Wert (U.S. Attorney General under 2 Presidents)
Manager of the American Sunday School Union, Vice- President of the American Bible Society

Thomas Worthington (Governor of Ohio, U.S. Senator)
Original Officer of the American Bible Society
4 posted on 04/30/2003 6:50:00 PM PDT by ICE-FLYER (God bless and keep the United States of America)
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To: Ciexyz
His eye is on the sparrow, and I know He watches me.

The reference, of course is to Matthew 10:29, "Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father."

You can expect, therefore, the same attention. God will watch while you fall.

Hank

6 posted on 04/30/2003 7:02:33 PM PDT by Hank Kerchief
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To: walkingman
You are correct. It is all about your relationship with God. Therefore, if you have a relationship with God you ought to get to know Him, what His Word says..."and all that jazz." You will find out that God not only governs the affairs of man but He also establishes and sets forth those who are in authority. (Romans 13:1 abd 1 Peter 2:13)
7 posted on 04/30/2003 7:12:30 PM PDT by Montana4Jesus
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To: webber
Excellent. THANK you!
8 posted on 04/30/2003 7:15:55 PM PDT by Bradís Gramma (Now taking recommendations for new dsl servers!!!!!!!!)
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To: webber
Please be reminded that May 1 is our National Day of Prayer –

I urge then, first of all, that requests, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for everyone—for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all men to be saved, and to come to a knowledge of the truth.
1 Timothy 2:1-4

Can we agree in prayer for our wonderful and free nation, and the Lord’s church living here…

That we might find our feet – and rise up to full stature (Eph 4:13)

That we might find our ears to hear, and eyes to see-- God’s redemptive purpose in these troubled times

That we might find our voice, and say “thanks” for all God has given us

That we might find our appetite, and ask God to give us more of the bread of life, and pour out the river of the Holy Spirit to slake our thirst for all that is righteous and true

That we might find the heart of God for the hopeless, the helpless, the hungry the dispossessed, disowned, and disaffected; the poor and afflicted, all those with no where else to turn but to a compassionate and forgiving God.

All the Lord’s blessings,
Wings

9 posted on 04/30/2003 8:35:03 PM PDT by Wings-n-Wind
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To: webber
"Statesmen, my dear Sir, may plan and speculate for liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand. John Adams

"The only foundation of a free Constitution is pure Virtue, and if this cannot be inspired into our People in a greater Measure, than they have it now, they may change their Rulers and the forms of Government, but they will not obtain a lasting liberty." John Adams

"We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other." John Adams

"Religion and virtue are the only foundations, not only of all free government, but of social felicity under all governments and in all the combinations of human society." John Adams

"The highest glory of the American Revolution was this; it connected in one indissoluble bond the principles of civil government with the principles of Christianity. John Quincy Adams

"From the day of the Declaration...they (the American people) were bound by the laws of God, which they all, and by the laws of The Gospel, which they nearly all, acknowledge as the rules of their conduct." John Quincy Adams

"Man, considered as a creature, must necessarily be subject to the laws of his Creator, for he is entirely a dependent being....And, consequently, as man depends absolutely upon his Maker for everything, it is necessary that he should in all points conform to his Maker's will...this will of his Maker is called the law of nature. These laws laid down by God are the eternal immutable laws of good and evil...This law of nature dictated by God himself, is of course superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe, in all countries, and at all times: no human laws are of any validity if contrary to this... Sir William Blackstone

"Blasphemy against the Almighty is denying his being or providence, or uttering contumelious reproaches on our Savior Christ. It is punished, at common law by fine and imprisonment, for Christianity is part of the laws of the land. Sir William Blackstone

"The preservation of Christianity as a national religion is abstracted from its own intrinsic truth, of the utmost consequence to the civil state, which a single instance will sufficiently demonstrate. Sir William Blackstone

"I have carefully examined the evidences of the Christian religion, and if I was sitting as a juror upon its authenticity I would unhesitatingly give my verdict in its favor. I can prove its truth as clearly as any proposition ever submitted to the mind of man. Alexander Hamilton

"It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists, but by Christians; not on religions, but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ. For this very reason peoples of other faiths have been afforded asylum, prosperity, and freedom of worship here." Patrick Henry

"The Bible is worth all other books which have ever been printed." Patrick Henry

"Bad men cannot make good citizens. A vitiated state of morals, a corrupted public conscience are incompatible with freedom." Patrick Henry

"It is when people forget God that tyrants forge their chains." Patrick Henry

"Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers, and it is the duty, as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian nation to select and prefer Christians for their rulers. John Jay

"Religion is the only solid basis of good morals; therefore education should teach the precepts of religion, and the duties of man toward God." Gouverneur Morris

"If thou wouldst rule well, thou must rule for God, and to do that, thou must be ruled by him....Those who will not be governed by God will be ruled by tyrants." William Penn

"By removing the Bible from schools we would be wasting so much time and money in punishing criminals and so little pains to prevent crime. Take the Bible out of our schools and there would be an explosion in crime." Benjamin Rush

Supreme Court of New York 1811, in the Case of the People V Ruggles, 8 Johns 545-547, Chief Justice Chancellor Kent Stated:

The defendant was indicted ... in December, 1810, for that he did, on the 2nd day of September, 1810 ... wickedly, maliciously, and blasphemously, utter, and with a loud voice publish, in the presence and hearing of divers good and Christian people, of and concerning the Christian religion, and of and concerning Jesus Christ, the false, scandalous, malicious, wicked and blasphemous words following: "Jesus Christ was a bastard, and his mother must be a whore," in contempt of the Christian religion. .. . The defendant was tried and found guilty, and was sentenced by the court to be imprisoned for three months, and to pay a fine of $500.

The Prosecuting Attorney argued:

While the constitution of the State has saved the rights of conscience, and allowed a free and fair discussion of all points of controversy among religious sects, it has left the principal engrafted on the body of our common law, that Christianity is part of the laws of the State, untouched and unimpaired.

The Chief Justice delivered the opinion of the Court:

Such words uttered with such a disposition were an offense at common law. In Taylor's case the defendant was convicted upon information of speaking similar words, and the Court . . . said that Christianity was parcel of the law, and to cast contumelious reproaches upon it, tended to weaken the foundation of moral obligation, and the efficacy of oaths. And in the case of Rex v. Woolston, on a like conviction, the Court said . . . that whatever strikes at the root of Christianity tends manifestly to the dissolution of civil government. . . . The authorities show that blasphemy against God and . . . profane ridicule of Christ or the Holy Scriptures (which are equally treated as blasphemy), are offenses punishable at common law, whether uttered by words or writings . . . because it tends to corrupt the morals of the people, and to destroy good order. Such offenses have always been considered independent of any religious establishment or the rights of the Church. They are treated as affecting the essential interests of civil society. . . .

We stand equally in need, now as formerly, of all the moral discipline, and of those principles of virtue, which help to bind society together. The people of this State, in common with the people of this country, profess the general doctrines of Christianity, as the rule of their faith and practice; and to scandalize the author of these doctrines is not only ... impious, but . . . is a gross violation of decency and good order. Nothing could be more offensive to the virtuous part of the community, or more injurious to the tender morals of the young, than to declare such profanity lawful.. ..

The free, equal, and undisturbed enjoyment of religious' opinion, whatever it may be, and free and decent discussions on any religious subject, is granted and secured; but to revile ... the religion professed by almost the whole community, is an abuse of that right. . . . We are a Christian people, and the morality of the country is deeply engrafted upon Christianity, and not upon the doctrines or worship of those impostors [other religions].. .. [We are] people whose manners ... and whose morals have been elevated and inspired . . . by means of the Christian religion.

Though the constitution has discarded religious establishments, it does not forbid judicial cognizance of those offenses against religion and morality which have no reference to any such establishment. . . . This [constitutional] declaration (noble and magnanimous as it is, when duly understood) never meant to withdraw religion in general, and with it the best sanctions of moral and social obligation from all consideration and notice of the law. . . . To construe it as breaking down the common law barriers against licentious, wanton, and impious attacks upon Christianity itself, would be an enormous perversion of its meaning. . . . Christianity, in its enlarged sense, as a religion revealed and taught in the Bible, is not unknown to our law. . . . The Court are accordingly of opinion that the judgment below must be affirmed: [that blasphemy against God, and contumelious reproaches, and profane ridicule of Christ or the Holy Scriptures, are offenses punishable at the common law, whether uttered by words or writings].

The Supreme Court in the case of Lidenmuller V The People, 33 Barbour, 561 Stated:

Christianity...is in fact, and ever has been, the religion of the people. The fact is everwhere prominent in all our civil and political history, and has been, from the first, recognized and acted upon by the people, and well as by constitutional conventions, by legislatures and by courts of justice.

The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania 1817, in the Case of The Commonwealth V Wolf stated the courts opinion as follows:

Laws cannot be administered in any civilized government unless the people are taught to revere the sanctity of an oath, and look to a future state of rewards and punishments for the deeds of this life, It is of the utmost moment, therefore, that they should be reminded of their religious duties at stated periods.... A wise policy would naturally lead to the formation of laws calculated to subserve those salutary purposes. The invaluable privilege of the rights of conscience secured to us by the constitution of the commonwealth, was never intended to shelter those persons, who, out of mere caprice, would directly oppose those laws for the pleasure of showing their contempt and abhorrence of the religious opinions of the great mass of the citizens.

The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania 1824, in the Case of Updegraph V The Commonwealth 11 Serg. & R. 393-394, 398-399, 402, 507 (1824) recorded the Courts Declaration that:

Abner Updegraph . . . on the 12th day of December [1821] . . .not having the fear of God before his eyes . . . contriving and intending to scandalize, and bring into disrepute, and vilify the Christian religion and the scriptures of truth, in the Presence and hearing of several persons ... did unlawfully, wickedly and premeditatively, despitefully and blasphemously say . . . : "That the Holy Scriptures were a mere fable: that they were a contradiction, and that although they contained a number of good things, yet they contained a great many lies." To the great dishonor of Almighty God, to the great scandal of the profession of the Christian religion.

The jury . . . finds a malicious intention in the speaker to vilify the Christian religion and the scriptures, and this court cannot look beyond the record, nor take any notice of the allegation, that the words were uttered by the defendant, a member of a debating association, which convened weekly for discussion and mutual information... . That there is an association in which so serious a subject is treated with so much levity, indecency and scurrility ... I am sorry to hear, for it would prove a nursery of vice, a school of preparation to qualify young men for the gallows, and young women for the brothel, and there is not a skeptic of decent manners and good morals, who would not consider such debating clubs as a common nuisance and disgrace to the city. .. . It was the out-pouring of an invective, so vulgarly shocking and insulting, that the lowest grade of civil authority ought not to be subject to it, but when spoken in a Christian land, and to a Christian audience, the highest offence conna bones mores; and even if Christianity was not part of the law of the land, it is the popular religion of the country, an insult on which would be indictable.

The assertion is once more made, that Christianity never was received as part of the common law of this Christian land; and it is added, that if it was, it was virtually repealed by the constitution of the United States, and of this state. . . . If the argument be worth anything, all the laws which have Christianity for their object--all would be carried away at one fell swoop-the act against cursing and swearing, and breach of the Lord's day; the act forbidding incestuous marriages, perjury by taking a false oath upon the book, fornication and adultery ...for all these are founded on Christianity--- for all these are restraints upon civil liberty. ...

We will first dispose of what is considered the grand objection--the constitutionality of Christianity--for, in effect, that is the question. Christianity, general Christianity, is and always has been a part of the common law . . . not Christianity founded on any particular religious tenets; not Christianity with an established church ... but Christianity with liberty of conscience to all men.

Thus this wise legislature framed this great body of laws, for a Christian country and Christian people. This is the Christianity of the common law . . . and thus, it is irrefragably proved, that the laws and institutions of this state are built on the foundation of reverence for Christianity. . . . In this the constitution of the United States has made no alteration, nor in the great body of the laws which was an incorporation of the common-law doctrine of Christianity . . . without which no free government can long exist.

To prohibit the open, public and explicit denial of the popular religion of a country is a necessary measure to preserve the tranquillity of a government. Of this, no person in a Christian country can complain. . . . In the Supreme Court of New York it was solemnly determined, that Christianity was part of the law of the land, and that to revile the Holy Scriptures was an indictable offence. The case assumes, says Chief Justice Kent, that we are a Christian people, and the morality of the country is deeply engrafted on Christianity. The People v. Ruggles.

No society can tolerate a willful and despiteful attempt to subvert its religion, no more than it would to break down its laws--a general, malicious and deliberate intent to overthrow Christianity, general Christianity. Without these restraints no free government could long exist. It is liberty run mad to declaim against the punishment of these offences, or to assert that the punishment is hostile to the spirit and genius of our government. They are far from being true friends to liberty who support this doctrine, and the promulgation of such opinions, and general receipt of them among the people, would be the sure forerunners of anarchy, and finally, of despotism. No free government now exists in the world unless where Christianity is acknowledged, and is the religion of the country.... Its foundations are broad and strong, and deep. .. it is the purest system of morality, the firmest auxiliary, and only stable support of all human laws. . . .

Christianity is part of the common law; the act against blasphemy is neither obsolete nor virtually repealed; nor is Christianity inconsistent with our free governments or the genius of the people.

While our own free constitution secures liberty of conscience and freedom of religious worship to all, it is not necessary to maintain that any man should have the right publicly to vilify the religion of his neighbors and of the country; these two privileges are directly opposed.

The Supreme Court of the State of South Carolina in 1846 in the case of City of Charleston V S.A. Benjamin cites an individual who broke the Ordinance that stated: "No Person or persons whatsoever shall publicly expose to sale, or sell... any goods, wares or merchandise whatsoever upon the Lord's day." The court convicted the man and came to the conclusion: "I agree fully to what is beautifully and appropriately said in Updengraph V The Commonwealth.... Christianity, general Christianity, is an always has been, a part of the common law; "not Christianity with an established church... but Christianity with liberty of conscience to all men."

10 posted on 04/30/2003 8:52:29 PM PDT by FF578 (Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just and His justice cannot sleep forever)
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To: FF578
Thanks for all these good quotes - I'm saving them for future reference!
11 posted on 04/30/2003 11:55:43 PM PDT by First Amendment
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To: webber
Oh boy, the "you-know-who" types aren't gonna like this! No, not one bit!

Thanks for the post.

12 posted on 05/01/2003 12:14:31 AM PDT by FormerLib
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To: webber
Beautiful. BUMP for One Nation Under God!
13 posted on 05/02/2003 4:05:14 AM PDT by TonyRo76
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To: walkingman
You really, really, really know how to miss the point entirely, don't you. You just keep your faith private. I'll just keep truckin' on doing the Lord's command to "Spread the gospel to every creature."
14 posted on 05/02/2003 7:43:06 PM PDT by webber (winning a lost soul to Christ Jesus will cover a multitude of sins!)
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Comment #15 Removed by Moderator

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