Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Does marijuana lead to hardcore drugs?
Louisville.com ^

Posted on 05/16/2003 10:40:57 AM PDT by Stew Padasso

Does marijuana lead to hardcore drugs?

by Will Siss Snitch Contributing Writer March 20, 2003

It's been the U.S. drug enforcement strategy for decades: Stop marijuana use and you slow addiction to hard drugs.

Marijuana, the government says, leads users to try drugs that kill, such as cocaine and heroin. Drug warriors say it's a simple jump: Surveys show users of cocaine or heroin almost invariably begin by smoking pot.

But what has become known as the "gateway theory" of marijuana has no shortage of critics. To them, the theory is at best a hypothesis, at worst it's a lie.

They include University of Kentucky sociology professor Richard Clayton and Dan Seum Jr. (son of the state senator), who heads the new Louisville chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). They say the gateway theory is based more in government-run "Reefer Madness" than hard science.

Studies in contrast Two recent studies have re-ignited the gateway debate. One done on Australian twins found that early marijuana smokers were up to five times more likely to later use harder drugs than the twin who didn't smoke pot. Researchers worked with 311 sets of same-sex twins, including 136 sets of identical twins, in which just one twin had smoked marijuana before age 17. The early marijuana smokers, the researchers found, were about twice as likely to use opiates like heroin, and five times as likely to use hallucinogens. About 46 percent of the early marijuana users reported that they later abused or became dependent on marijuana, and 43 percent had become dependent on alcohol.

The study, however, did not say how marijuana, or cannabis, might lead to harder drugs. "It is often implicitly assumed that using cannabis changes your brain or makes you crave other drugs," said lead researcher Michael Lynskey, but he insisted that's not the only reason one might use hard drugs.

"There are a number of other potential mechanisms, including access to drugs, willingness to break the law and likelihood of engaging in risk-taking behavior," said Lynskey.

Another study, conducted by the RAND Drug Policy Research Center, suggested that data typically used to support the gateway theory could be re-evaluated. The influences of genetics and peer pressure to snort cocaine or smoke crack are at least as strong as that first joint. Opportunities to smoke marijuana may simply come earlier in life than the opportunity to use hard drugs.

RAND researchers looked at drug-use patterns reported by more than 58,000 U.S. residents between the ages of 12 and 25 who participated in the National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse, conducted between 1982 and 1994. They saw all the facts that point to the gateway theory: Marijuana users were much more likely than non-users to progress to hard drugs; almost all who had used marijuana and hard drugs used marijuana first; and the greater the frequency of marijuana use, the greater the likelihood of using hard drugs later.

The researchers concluded, "It is not marijuana use, but individuals' opportunities and unique propensities to use drugs that determine their risk of initiating hard drugs." They said the study did nothing to suggest the gateway theory is the only path to hard drugs. The researchers said it's just one of many possibilities.

Alternative perceptions "The gateway issue has been hotly debated for four decades, and there have been dozens of studies," said Allen St. Pierre, executive director of NORML. "The nature of these drug studies is that they'll never make a conclusion. There will never be a definitive study on the gateway drug, and no one will say, ‘No, I don't need another dollar for research.'"

St. Pierre argued that the gateway theory is a government-sponsored myth, perpetuated by Partnership for a Drug-Free America television commercials and federally sponsored Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) programs in fifth-grade classrooms.

"The propaganda and misinformation about marijuana is rampant: ‘If you smoke marijuana, you'll get pregnant, you'll blow your friend's head off, you support terrorism,'" he said. "If those claims aren't credible, when you tell a child not to take methamphetamine, it loses all credibility."

There are no morphological changes in the brain that entice people and change brain chemistry so that they want hard drugs, St. Pierre said. "It's only because marijuana and heroin are sold in the same distribution channels — illegally trafficked — that they are related. And it's about risk-taking behavior."

If anyone knows about risk-taking behavior, it's the project coordinator for the new Louisville NORML office, Dan Seum Jr. The 44-year-old son of Dan Seum Sr., of Fairdale, Republican state senator from District 38, said he spent time in jail for selling marijuana, but not before dabbling in hard drugs, which he said he's given up.

"I've seen some good people be punished for" possessing marijuana, Seum said. "I know an 18-year-old who was raped in jail, where he was put after he was arrested for trafficking. I've been in the streets and I know what's worse."

According to the state's Department of Corrections, the number of drug offenders committed to Kentucky's prisons has increased 11.8 percent from 3,166 to 3,539 between 1999 and 2002, and nearly tripled from 1992 to 2002. The 3,539 residents incarcerated for drug offenses in 2002 made up 23 percent of Kentucky's total prison population. Only violent offenders, at 39 percent, made up a larger portion.

Seum said he places no faith in a gateway theory, since the cravings for hard drugs and marijuana are so different. "You don't graduate from one to another," he said. "I think there are a lot of underlying circumstances to hard drug use. Broken hearts, broken families, broken egos. Drug use is a symptom of something deeper."

The front line of the drug war Before a Kentucky child faces the decision to smoke that first joint, he probably sits in a classroom and listens to an "Officer DARE." One such officer is Lt. John Branscum, vice president of the Kentucky DARE Association and member of the Nicholasville Police Department.

"When you talk about the first drug that kids use, it's usually tobacco," he said. "Then they'll try alcohol and marijuana. Any step of the way that you can stop a child from taking drugs is good. The drug war is the longest war we've fought on American soil, and we're just touching the tip of it."

The DARE organization, which started in Los Angeles in 1983 and branched into Kentucky starting in Lexington in 1986, is careful not to make any statements about marijuana that it can't back up scientifically. In its "Parents' Guide Book," DARE writes that gateway drugs "are those drugs people are first exposed to and experiment with. Traditional gateway drugs are alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana. The significance of gateway drugs is that most people with a drug dependency began their cycle of addiction by experimenting with a gateway drug. While not everyone who tries alcohol, cigarettes, or marijuana becomes addicted to drugs, most addicts began their habits with one of these drugs."

Branscum said the term "gateway drug" is inaccurate. He also stressed that while alcohol is a more immediate danger to children, any use of marijuana is abuse. "We want to stop marijuana use at all costs," he said.

Thanks to a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the DARE program will expand from fifth grade to include area middle schools, a step that Branscum applauds. "The grant gives us the boost we need. Fifth graders were being educated on how to avoid temptation when they became teen-agers, but we weren't able to be with them as they got older."

Professor sees it differently UK professor Richard Clayton argues that for all its effort, DARE has not reduced drug use for kids. "I think it operates on a flawed theory," Clayton said. "It makes adults feel really great. Parents see that there's a policeman in the school and they think that their kids won't act up." Clayton co-wrote a study that found DARE had almost no impact on teen-age drug use.

As far as the gateway theory goes, Clayton is equally skeptical. "It's hard to find anything more strongly correlated with cocaine than marijuana," he said. "But you're talking about probability, not causality."

Clayton said the gateway theory is more likely a gateway "hypothesis."

"We accept that smoking causes cancer, for example," Clayton said. "You need to show that what is caused is statistically correlated with the effect, meaning if this is higher, than this is higher."

Clayton said that framing this argument for quitting cigarettes has proven to be effective because smokers have stopped smoking. The argument that marijuana causes users to try cocaine cannot be proven, he said, and is ultimately an approach that can't be validated.

As a scientist, Clayton said he could not condone legalizing marijuana because of the physical damage it causes in users, particularly after extended use. But, he said, dependency on any drug, be it pot or cocaine, stems from a person's behavior.

"Getting people to not use marijuana in the first place makes sense," he conceded. "So we should be asking what is the better predictor of marijuana use, and it's often a conduct disorder. The U.S. could consider funding a study of conduct disorder. There are no easy answers."


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: addiction; wodlist
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-56 next last
fyi
1 posted on 05/16/2003 10:40:58 AM PDT by Stew Padasso
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
Does marijuana lead to hardcore drugs?

Duh!
2 posted on 05/16/2003 10:46:53 AM PDT by Cedric
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #3 Removed by Moderator

To: Stew Padasso
I must be an idiot. I always thought what led to drug use was poor parenting or poor parental supervision, lack of self discipline, lack of motivation and such. Hmm.
4 posted on 05/16/2003 10:49:14 AM PDT by luckodeirish (Hillary, go away.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cedric
Does owning a gun lead to murder?
5 posted on 05/16/2003 10:50:46 AM PDT by BrooklynGOP
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
In court its almost a universal truth. All hardcore defendants used pot at least once before moving up. (admitted at least once)

How would you effectivly test for DUI/DWI for pot? Roadsides are not accurate enough alone.
6 posted on 05/16/2003 10:53:14 AM PDT by longtermmemmory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
Coincidence and causality are two different things. As somebody pointed out, almost everybody's first experience with an intoxicant is beer. That doesn't mean beer leads to drug use.
7 posted on 05/16/2003 10:55:06 AM PDT by Wolfie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
Does marijuana lead to hardcore drugs?

Only for the lucky ones! In all seriousness, I think it's a matter of correlation more than causation. You can probably assert that over 90% of hard drug users have used marijuana, but the percentage of marijuana users who move to hard drugs is nowhere near that high.

The bottom line is that marijuana is much more accessible, so someone with an inclination to heroin may start with marijuana for reasons of availability and cost, while the casual pothead starts and ends with marijuana because that's what they like.

I would think that most Ferrari drivers started out with something slower and less expensive. Does that mean that the Geo Metro is a gateway car to Ferrari?

8 posted on 05/16/2003 11:00:24 AM PDT by Mr. Bird
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso; jmc813; *Wod_list
"It's only because marijuana and heroin are sold in the same distribution channels — illegally trafficked — that they are related. And it's about risk-taking behavior."

Reduce the risk ...

RE-LEGALIZE! NOW!


9 posted on 05/16/2003 11:01:09 AM PDT by bassmaner (Let's take back the word "liberal" from the commies!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
LOL.
The author's name is WILL SNITCH!
10 posted on 05/16/2003 11:02:52 AM PDT by John Beresford Tipton
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
I knew a lot of hard core druggies in my younger days. Almost all were cigerette smokers. I guess tobacco is the real gateway drug.
11 posted on 05/16/2003 11:05:47 AM PDT by Hugin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Wolfie
absolutly true. There may be a correlation with the hard drug users and pot but not causation. It does not change the correlation to illegal use.
12 posted on 05/16/2003 11:14:03 AM PDT by longtermmemmory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
That's all well and good. Except that the government has propagandized for the last 60 years that there is some inherent chemical aspect of marijuana that causes hard drug use, and justifies arresting people (in part) on that basis.
13 posted on 05/16/2003 11:15:55 AM PDT by Wolfie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
I think that if we take a good hard look at the evidence... it is indisputable that drug prohibition leads to drug use.
14 posted on 05/16/2003 11:22:12 AM PDT by thoughtomator (Road Map = Road Kill)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
You know what they say, "Free your mind, and your a$$ will follow."
15 posted on 05/16/2003 11:24:52 AM PDT by vpintheak (Our Liberties we prize, and our rights we will maintain!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mr. Bird
Does that mean that the Geo Metro is a gateway car to Ferrari?

Yes.

16 posted on 05/16/2003 11:26:20 AM PDT by cinFLA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Wolfie; vin-one; WindMinstrel; philman_36; Beach_Babe; jenny65; AUgrad; Xenalyte; Bill D. Berger; ..
WOD Ping
17 posted on 05/16/2003 11:27:18 AM PDT by jmc813 (After two years of FReeping, I've finally created a profile page. Check it out!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cedric
Does marijuana lead to hardcore drugs?

According to many Freepers, marijuana is a hard drug.

18 posted on 05/16/2003 11:30:08 AM PDT by Labyrinthos
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: BrooklynGOP
Does owning a gun lead to murder?

Nope, but since almost all murderers own a gun, that logic has been accepted as gospel.

19 posted on 05/16/2003 11:30:19 AM PDT by Lunatic Fringe (When news breaks, we fix it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Wolfie
there is, the problem you have is people do not all use drugs for the same reason.

Those who are self medicating to escape problems of the real world are most assuridly going to move up the latter of drug use. There are no more adaptive safe behaviors. Boys are prohibited from being rowdy. Alcohol is redily available and quite abused but the after effects can be dissipated over time. (work release prisoners drink in the morning and are clean by the time they return in the evening.) The long term effects of cocain in all its forms (this includes ritalin) are harder to disipate. LSD and extasy are well known for having flashbacks. Prolonged pot use has been linked to MS like symptoms in the brain.

How is amsterdam doing with their legal pot experiment? not so good.
20 posted on 05/16/2003 11:33:34 AM PDT by longtermmemmory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Hugin
I knew a lot of hard core druggers in my younger days as well. Likewise, almost all of them were cigarette smokers prior to any drug use, including alcohol. Prior to that, almost 100% of them had drank milk on a fairly regular basis. Any connection?
21 posted on 05/16/2003 11:36:06 AM PDT by D. Brian Carter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Lunatic Fringe
last two murder trials I saw did not involve a gun. Poison and a blunt instument.
22 posted on 05/16/2003 11:39:01 AM PDT by longtermmemmory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
Fact: Marijuana users are less likely to use heroin, meth or coke.

My source? My wife. She's an RN who works in drug and alcohol rehab in northern Cal.
23 posted on 05/16/2003 11:40:25 AM PDT by LittleJoe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
Two recent studies have re-ignited the gateway debate. One done on Australian twins found that early marijuana smokers were up to five times more likely to later use harder drugs than the twin who didn't smoke pot. Researchers worked with 311 sets of same-sex twins, including 136 sets of identical twins, in which just one twin had smoked marijuana before age 17. The early marijuana smokers, the researchers found, were about twice as likely to use opiates like heroin, and five times as likely to use hallucinogens.

What nonsense. All a twin study ever proves is the extent to which the studied behavior or condition is genetic. So all they proved is that hard drug use is not genetic. This study in no way disproves that marijuana use and hard drug use are correlated simply because they both spring from a pre-existing propensity to use drugs (whether because one is a risk-taker, or has a mental problem one is seeking to medicate, or whatever).

24 posted on 05/16/2003 11:40:25 AM PDT by MrLeRoy (The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. - Jefferson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
How is amsterdam doing with their legal pot experiment? not so good.

Provide evidence for your claim.

25 posted on 05/16/2003 11:42:11 AM PDT by MrLeRoy (The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. - Jefferson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Lunatic Fringe
Nope, but since almost all murderers own a gun, that logic has been accepted as gospel.

Check out jointogether.org, funded by the same Robert Wood Johnson Foundation referenced in the article.

RWJF was also a major contributor and participant in Hillary's Health Care Task Force, and paid a half million dollars for air time to broacast her "Town Hall Meetings" uninterupted.

26 posted on 05/16/2003 11:43:45 AM PDT by tacticalogic (Controlled application of force is the sincerest form of communication.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: MrLeRoy; longtermmemmory
How *is* Amsterdam doing with their legal pot experiment?

Any good links I could check out?

Thanks in advance.

27 posted on 05/16/2003 11:47:48 AM PDT by k2blader (Haruspex, beware.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

Oh come on. How much better is Zoloff than Pot? Bored housewives in 8,000lbs trucks hopped up on a prescription of Valium... I'll take a pot head anyday.

Don't legalize Pot. Decriminalize it. Don't send some 18 y/o college student to jail for 5 years over a couple of joints. Give him a ticket.

Far more damage is done with leagal drugs like alcohol and tobacco than will ever be done with Pot or Heroin.

And no, I don't smoke dope
28 posted on 05/16/2003 11:53:04 AM PDT by forktail
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: forktail
Don't legalize Pot.

Why not?

29 posted on 05/16/2003 12:02:06 PM PDT by MrLeRoy (The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. - Jefferson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: John Beresford Tipton
Will Siss Snitch? The author must suspect that his female sibling is a narc.
30 posted on 05/16/2003 12:09:50 PM PDT by Whit
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
The Dutch are more than happy with decriminalized marijuana (its not fully legal). They have some of the lowest rates of marijuana and hard drug use in Western Europe. Far lower, even, than the U.S.
31 posted on 05/16/2003 12:26:45 PM PDT by Wolfie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: MrLeRoy
When people claim the Dutch policy isn't working, they usually mean that people are smoking pot and not getting arrested for it, and, dammit, that ain't right.
32 posted on 05/16/2003 12:32:59 PM PDT by Wolfie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Wolfie
Have any good links for k2blader?
33 posted on 05/16/2003 12:39:13 PM PDT by MrLeRoy (The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. - Jefferson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: MrLeRoy; k2blader
The following is a nice analysis of the "Dutch-bashing" phenomenon. Not sure if this is worth it, since its from a pro-legalization site, and we all know that if you are pro-legalization, then you have no right to comment. However, the article links, stats, and presentation of the Dutch governments response is straight from news sources.

Top Story: "The failure of Dutch drug policy" An Examination of Prohibitionist Propaganda and the Official Dutch Government Response

34 posted on 05/16/2003 12:50:23 PM PDT by Wolfie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Wolfie
Thank you!

I've bookmarked this and plan to read through some of it later.
35 posted on 05/16/2003 1:03:13 PM PDT by k2blader (Haruspex, beware.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: forktail
Don't legalize Pot. Decriminalize it. Don't send some 18 y/o college student to jail for 5 years over a couple of joints. Give him a ticket.

I agree with you point but not with your premises, the only people going to jail for 5 years are the ones cultivating or selling large quantities.

With some in the pot debate it’s about the freedom to do what they want and I can accept that libertarian argument, however with a lot of people it’s really about making easy money.

Decriminalization is the worst of all choices because it keeps intact the criminal profits and the associated crime that accompanies it. Make no mistake good people and bad are killed over pot money every day.

Legalize and regularize it or keep it illegal. IMO a wink and nod approach would only further enrich the drug traders and lead to further crime.

36 posted on 05/16/2003 1:09:49 PM PDT by usurper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
How would you effectivly test for DUI/DWI for pot?
 Roadsides are not accurate enough alone.


If you're not sufficiently impaired to be roadside
tested, that you aren't really DUI, are you?
37 posted on 05/16/2003 9:01:37 PM PDT by gcruse (Vice is nice, but virtue can hurt you. --Bill Bennett)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
Hmmm, the twins study indicates marijuana is a gateway drug for those who started using it before the age of 17?

Does this mean it's a gateway drug for adults who try it? I think the government can do more to stop teenage drug abuse-- like we ban the sales of alcohol to minors-- and should be less concerned about adults who use it.

It's hard to justify liquor being legal for adults and marijuana being illegal. I've never heard of a marijuana user dying of an overdose, and I personally know of people who've died of alcohol poisoning.

Lest you think I'm hitting a bong while I type this, I am not and have never been a smoker-- of tobacoo or marijuana.
38 posted on 05/17/2003 3:13:55 AM PDT by Maximum Leader (run from a knife, close on a gun)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
All hardcore defendants used pot at least once before moving up. (admitted at least once)

Yeah but did they inhale?

39 posted on 05/17/2003 3:30:01 AM PDT by WKB (If all you're gonna do is ride in the wagon, at least pickup your feet!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
The link is really a cutural one. I know may people who smoke dope (many of them over 40's. They essentially will try anything. It seems that once you have crossed the threshold of doing something illegal. Then it is no big deal which drug you take. Also all these people seem to be experts on what effect these drugs have on you short and long term. The only problem with that is they only seem to read the studies that are pro-drugs. Most of these guys are hardworking successful types not the stereotypical gutter type. Try to get them to give up or take there bong from them and they will literally turn into very angry monsters. Hey but dope's not addictive or nuthin'. Yeah Right!

Mel

40 posted on 05/17/2003 3:54:41 AM PDT by melsec
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gcruse
They are legally not even tests they are exercises. In fact the HGN is generally not allowed in trial because it is so inacurate and undependable.

The roadsides have a 40% falure rate in sober people. Would you get on an airplane if 40% of the passengers were going to die?

In trial roadsides are only a minor challenge. I advise people to always refuse EVERYTHING. There may be a 1 year administrative suspension but that can be disputed in an administrative hearing. (again if you know the system not so hard)
41 posted on 05/17/2003 9:58:11 AM PDT by longtermmemmory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Wolfie
LOL.
42 posted on 05/23/2003 5:55:53 AM PDT by dmz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: BrooklynGOP
Does owning a gun lead to murder?

Does owning a gun lead to shooting? Usually.

43 posted on 05/23/2003 5:57:07 AM PDT by biblewonk (Spose to be a Chrissssstian)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: biblewonk
Does owning a gun lead to murder?

Does owning a gun lead to shooting? Usually.

What's wrong with shooting?

44 posted on 05/23/2003 6:58:18 AM PDT by BrooklynGOP
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: BrooklynGOP
What's wrong with shooting?

Nothing at all. Does shooting a 22 lead to shooting larger calliber guns? Usually. What's wrong with that? Nothing at all. My analogy is better than yours is my only point. Using my analogy then you can be more reasonable and say "Does weed lead to stronger drugs? pretty often".

45 posted on 05/23/2003 7:14:42 AM PDT by biblewonk (Spose to be a Chrissssstian)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
"Beer leads to heroin."
46 posted on 05/23/2003 7:21:59 AM PDT by Manic_Episode
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: biblewonk; Texaggie79
Nothing at all. Does shooting a 22 lead to shooting larger calliber guns? Usually. What's wrong with that? Nothing at all. My analogy is better than yours is my only point. Using my analogy then you can be more reasonable and say "Does weed lead to stronger drugs? pretty often".

Your analogy fails. Shooting a .22 will not necessarily lead you to firing heavy artillery. Your analogy was:

Does owning a gun lead to shooting? Usually.

A correct analogy to that would be:

Does posessing weed lead to smoking it? Usually.

47 posted on 05/23/2003 8:41:44 AM PDT by BrooklynGOP
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: BrooklynGOP
not necessarily = usually. So I'm still right.
48 posted on 05/23/2003 8:53:08 AM PDT by biblewonk (Spose to be a Chrissssstian)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Stew Padasso
I can't remember
49 posted on 05/23/2003 8:54:03 AM PDT by Principled
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: biblewonk
not necessarily = usually. So I'm still right.

not necessarily != usually. Does .22 "usually" lead to firing heavy artillery? tanks?

50 posted on 05/23/2003 8:59:50 AM PDT by BrooklynGOP
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-56 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson