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Bills to keep jobs in USA create uproar
USA TODAY ^

Posted on 07/29/2003 7:09:27 AM PDT by Mick2000

Just three years ago, Congress voted to allow more foreign workers into the United States. Times have changed.

Politicians are proposing tough — opponents say misguided — steps to keep jobs at home in the face of rising unemployment, a growing number of white-collar jobs being transferred to India and other countries and lingering anger over some U.S. allies' opposition to the war in Iraq.

The House has passed measures to require the Defense and State departments to buy a larger share of equipment from U.S. firms. The measure, which has provoked a corporate and political uproar, has not been approved by the Senate.

Legislators in several states are trying to bar the export of government jobs to foreign companies.

Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., chair of a Judiciary subcommittee, plans a hearing today on possible problems in the L-1 visa program, which allows companies to bring workers to the USA from their foreign operations. Workers complain that firms are using the program as a backdoor way to replace domestic employees with cheaper labor.

(Excerpt) Read more at usatoday.com ...


TOPICS: Breaking News; Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: anotherstupidexcerpt; buyamerican; cantreadinstructions; catholiclist; doesntknowhowtopost; idontreadexcerpts; jobmarket; l1; outsourcing; postthefullarticle; saxbychambliss; stopexcerptmadness; thisisntlucianne; visas; wheresthefullarticle; whytheexcerpt
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Some U.S. congressmen are actually trying to do something about the jobs loss to H1B, L1, and outsourcing
1 posted on 07/29/2003 7:09:28 AM PDT by Mick2000
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To: Mick2000
Let's just hope that the cure isn't worse than the disease.
2 posted on 07/29/2003 7:10:44 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Mick2000
Which is opposed by a Corporate America more concerned about the bottom line than the welfare of the country it supposedly resides in.
3 posted on 07/29/2003 7:11:08 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: Mick2000
Congress can start by abolishing the federal income tax and eliminating the junk science environmental regulations and antiquated labor laws from the 1930s.
4 posted on 07/29/2003 7:13:05 AM PDT by Extremely Extreme Extremist (EEE)
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To: Mick2000
I sent an email to the GOP asking them what their stance was going to be a few days ago with regard to offshoring. I got a reply back that it was being added to the Chairman's daily report. If I get a more definitive response I plan on sharing it with the rest of Free Republic.
5 posted on 07/29/2003 7:13:16 AM PDT by RockyMtnMan
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To: Mick2000
It would be good if the Administration got out in front of this issue before some of the "Gang of Seven" steal it.
6 posted on 07/29/2003 7:13:43 AM PDT by Semper Paratus
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To: Willie Green
BUMP
7 posted on 07/29/2003 7:14:01 AM PDT by ServesURight (FReecerely Yours,)
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To: goldstategop
Which is opposed by a Corporate America more concerned about the bottom line than the welfare of the country it supposedly resides in.

Well said.

BUMP!

8 posted on 07/29/2003 7:17:47 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Pray for our Troops)
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To: Semper Paratus
Yes it would be good - but I wouldn't count on it.

If Bush cared about border and immigration issues, we'd know it by now.
9 posted on 07/29/2003 7:18:23 AM PDT by adam_az
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To: snippy_about_it
They see themselves as "multinational" now and have no loyalty.

These "multinationals" should be stopped from making campaign contributions and buying influence then, since they are beholden to foreign powers!
10 posted on 07/29/2003 7:19:45 AM PDT by adam_az
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To: goldstategop
"Which is opposed by a Corporate America more concerned about the bottom line than the welfare of the country it supposedly resides in."

Many in "Corporate America" view themselves as global "citizens of the world" and don't care about anything having to do with their own nation or culture. The people who assend in Corporate America are made from the same cloth as those who go to Washington and look the other way as our culture is destroyed. They are all, for the most part, the scum of the earth.


11 posted on 07/29/2003 7:21:19 AM PDT by vigilo (I have spoken. (har, har, snicker, snicker))
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To: Extremely Extreme Extremist
And the Food and Drug Administration, too.
12 posted on 07/29/2003 7:22:00 AM PDT by snopercod
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To: Mick2000
"The Department of Defense provision is what we call a unicorn provision — because what they want to buy doesn't exist. Flat-panel screens are no longer made in the United States," says Harris Miller, president of the Information Technology Association of America. "You would have to recreate those industries in the United States, and those industries would exist for only one client, the Department of Defense," he says.

Gee I guess the Springfield and Harpers ferry arsenals should never have been established and the uSA from 1789 to 1812 should haver bought all its cannon and muskets from England. Becdause teh flat pannels are not currently manufactured in the USA and they actually are critical to the defense of the USA maybe we do need some production capability here. What a concept.

13 posted on 07/29/2003 7:22:17 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: Semper Paratus
Wasn't this Pat Buchanan's platform?

The problem is that the the power brokers within the GOP were terrified that someone like Pat Buchanan would get the GOP nomination so they went on a smear campaign to ruin his chances at winning more than New Hampshire. Such was the origins of the policy of screwing Americans through the practice of job exportation. Ironic though that in their infinite wisdom they thought it was OK to push factories out the country since union rats weren't going to vote 'R' anyway, but in their philosophical position that "free trade" meant that all jobs were subject to exportation (a position designed to marginalize Pat) they ended up screwing their own voter base.
14 posted on 07/29/2003 7:23:13 AM PDT by Dr Warmoose
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To: clamper1797; sarcasm; BrooklynGOP; A. Pole; Zorrito; GiovannaNicoletta; Caipirabob; Ed_in_NJ; ...
Domestic content and offshoring ping.
15 posted on 07/29/2003 7:23:15 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: adam_az
Then they can be multinational and not US companies but when their offices overseas are blown up and their employees are killed by terrorists, don't ask for the military of the United States, to step in and help, they can just go f... themselves. You either pay taxes here with employees here or go to hell.
16 posted on 07/29/2003 7:24:03 AM PDT by samuel_adams_us
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To: Mick2000
My Toyota is made in the US. My Honda is made in the US. What is wrong with having foreign companies setting up manufacturing facilities in the US?

Where Congress comes in is to make sure that the business environment in the US is good. This includes taxes, environmental laws, labor laws, educational levels, etc, and maybe occasionally over-riding state laws on occasion.IMHO

17 posted on 07/29/2003 7:24:49 AM PDT by Citizen Tom Paine (The Union forever!)
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To: harpseal
Its too hard for businesses to manufacture in America. <sarcasm
18 posted on 07/29/2003 7:24:59 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: Mick2000
This will kill the JSF..
19 posted on 07/29/2003 7:25:10 AM PDT by a_Turk (Lookout, lookout, the candy man..)
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To: vigilo
The fact is, the US is considered a mature and saturated market, with the emerging markets in Asia and the former Eastern Bloc countries. So companies are doing whatever they can to gain a foothold into these markets. Part of that price is using local workers. Add in the recent technological advances and there you go. I don't think that much can be done about this, other to adapt. Sometimes all you have is a bad choice and an even worse choice to choose from. I think protectionism is the "even worse choice."
20 posted on 07/29/2003 7:26:29 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: RockyMtnMan
I got a reply back that it was being added to the Chairman's daily report.

That's actually pretty good.

21 posted on 07/29/2003 7:26:38 AM PDT by Lazamataz (PROUDLY POSTING WITHOUT READING THE ARTICLE SINCE 1999!)
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To: dfwgator
What do you do for a living?
22 posted on 07/29/2003 7:27:11 AM PDT by RockyMtnMan
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To: Mick2000
Some U.S. congressmen are actually trying to do something about the jobs loss to H1B, L1, and outsourcing

Thanks God, but I hope we can get this through and make it a law, that will be a challenge unto itself but I'm glad to see something moving here.
23 posted on 07/29/2003 7:27:19 AM PDT by Nowhere Man ("Laws are the spider webs through which the big bugs fly past and the little ones get caught.")
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To: goldstategop
But of course investors and Wall St. will cry about reduced profits and hence a lower the stock price which is how public companies are judged.

The fault lies with us.
24 posted on 07/29/2003 7:28:42 AM PDT by misterrob
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To: Mick2000
This is a Good Thing.
25 posted on 07/29/2003 7:28:47 AM PDT by sauropod ("Come over here and make me. I dare you. You little fruitcake, you little fruitcake.")
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To: Mick2000
If the American people could have successfully stopped manufacturing jobs from going overseas by boyocotting any company that closed upo shop here and moved, then this problem now with "white collar" jobs leaving probably would never have happened. But we as a people opted for slightly lower prices on shoes and VCR's rather than help keep our own families and friends employed.

I am all for a free market. We are reaping what we have sown. I have little sympathy for an out-of-work techie who is sitting around in his/her appartment full of junk made in thrid world countries complaining about not being able to find a job.

26 posted on 07/29/2003 7:28:59 AM PDT by HurkinMcGurkin
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To: Lazamataz
This issue is a powder keg for both parties. The GOP claims they are creating jobs for Americans. To have a positive effect we have to create more jobs than we lose.
27 posted on 07/29/2003 7:29:17 AM PDT by RockyMtnMan
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To: adam_az
These "multinationals" should be stopped from making campaign contributions and buying influence then, since they are beholden to foreign powers!

The horses are out of the barn. It was because our corporate income tax schemes taxed companies for profits made in foreign countries. There aren't too many countries that do that. Stanley Tools wanted to relocate their corporate headquarters to tax friendly Bermuda so that they could be competitive in the global market. Nope. The tax dependant congress critters were horrified at the thought that tax money would leave this country. Notice these politicians aren't horrified when jobs leave this country. Corporate taxes and regulations cause multinational corporations to come into being. Wouldn't it be better for a company to be in the most business friendly country? When the businesses of the world decide that the US is no friendlier than India or Communist China, then that should be a wake-up call to the rest of us to reconsider our legislative priorities.

28 posted on 07/29/2003 7:31:46 AM PDT by Dr Warmoose
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To: Mick2000
I would take a close look at this. The vast majority of Repubs and Demos are "Free Traders" (maybe that should be traitors)which means the elimination of all middle classes. The critical mass of the world is peasantry so when you compete third world standards of living against middle classes you don't get the middle classes lifting up the third world peasantry but the third world peasantry eliminating the middle classes. Then you just have the elitists left to rule the world granted a morally depraved and more impoverished world.

Ravenstar
29 posted on 07/29/2003 7:33:01 AM PDT by Ravenstar (Reinstitute the Constitution as the Ultimate Law of the Land)
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To: HurkinMcGurkin
It's not easy to buy American, unfortunately. I don't know of any stereo or TV made in the US at any price.

I had to buy a new refrigerator last week and bought a Maytag, made in Iowa. But computer monitors? Motherboards? Microwave oven?

We sold ourselves out.
30 posted on 07/29/2003 7:35:25 AM PDT by adam_az
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To: Dr Warmoose
When the businesses of the world decide that the US is no friendlier than India or Communist China, then that should be a wake-up call to the rest of us to reconsider our legislative priorities

BUMP
31 posted on 07/29/2003 7:37:04 AM PDT by adam_az
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To: Dr Warmoose
BUMP that!!
32 posted on 07/29/2003 7:37:15 AM PDT by Ayn Rand wannabe (Veritas vos Liberabit)
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To: dfwgator
The fact is, the US is considered a mature and saturated market, with the emerging markets in Asia and the former Eastern Bloc countries.

Of course, in a perverse way one can say that our peace-keeping missions around the globe are contributing to the destruction of the US economy. Not only are we footing the bill to protect other countries infrastructure, we are making it safe and profitable for US companies to move their operations to historically warring countries.

In other words we are using our military to destroy ourselves. And the Communists thought it would be our rope, when it ends up being our guns.

33 posted on 07/29/2003 7:37:28 AM PDT by Dr Warmoose
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To: adam_az
We sold ourselves out.

Yep. And I doubt it can be undone. It could have been stopped thrity years ago, or even slowed down twenty years ago. I'm afraid its way too late. An entire generation has now grown up under these circumstances of pretty much accepting and not caring that most value added items are made elsewhere, only enriching a very small minority of wealthy elite(and I am definitely not playing the "class warfare" card) while a segment of American people have little oportunity to to better themselves.

34 posted on 07/29/2003 7:40:16 AM PDT by HurkinMcGurkin
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To: harpseal
Becdause teh flat pannels are not currently manufactured in the USA and they actually are critical to the defense of the USA maybe we do need some production capability here. What a concept.

Well, who's "we"? Start the sucker up, why don't you? Your government is trying to create a market for you, so why not take advantage? I'm sure you can convince me and the rest of the taxpayers that paying exhorbitant prices for your product, thanks to everything from payroll taxes to unionized labor, is a good thing.

Why don't we just shut the borders and start up all of the industries that have left? No imports, no exports, just one big happy country? Because it would suck, that's why. Feel free to peruse the history of Soviet command economies to get a taste.

35 posted on 07/29/2003 7:41:09 AM PDT by Mr. Bird
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To: Ravenstar
Bingo. And it didn't happen by chance or accident.
36 posted on 07/29/2003 7:41:12 AM PDT by HurkinMcGurkin
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To: Mick2000
I don't like the government getting involved with regulating what businesses do. This however, is a good thing because these companies have outsourced so much at the expense of the U.S. worker. The best thing our government can do is create a better corporate climate for industry. They need to tell the eco-nuts, along with the rest of the anti-business idiots to f*ck off.
37 posted on 07/29/2003 7:41:48 AM PDT by wjcsux
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To: goldstategop
”Which is opposed by a Corporate America more concerned about the bottom line than the welfare of the country it supposedly resides in”

To be fair, this is exactly what Corporate America is about and if not then something is wrong with their business model. Generating profit and accountability to share holders is what should matter to companies.

It is the Fed that is responsible for governing international trade and it’s nice to hear that there are finally some rumblings in congress about this.

38 posted on 07/29/2003 7:42:03 AM PDT by SouthParkRepublican
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To: adam_az
Right after Sept. 11, there was a big debate at our company about whether or not to display an American flag in the lobby.

An uproar ensued, and Old Glory won out.

The argument had been that we were a "multi-national" organization.
39 posted on 07/29/2003 7:42:52 AM PDT by SerpentDove (Visit my profile page. Steal my graphics.)
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To: goldstategop
"Which is opposed by a Corporate America more concerned about the bottom line than the welfare of the country it supposedly resides in."

Funny that the CEO's and Board Chairman who comprise "corporate America" haven't figured out they have to live in the same communities as the rest of us.

40 posted on 07/29/2003 7:42:58 AM PDT by Redbob
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To: Dr Warmoose
Why do you think Bush is going to Africa? When India gets too expensive, Africa is the next low-cost frontier. Don't forget, much of that continent speaks English as well.
41 posted on 07/29/2003 7:43:25 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Semper Paratus
Maybe too late. I heard Chris Dodd talking to Imus this morning. He was talking about the damage done by outsourcing and H1B visas.

A smart dem would run on this issue.
Guaranteed their solution will end up being the worst possible, probably the last nail in America's coffin, but it will resonate with the mass of uninformed panicked sheeple.
42 posted on 07/29/2003 7:43:38 AM PDT by the gillman@blacklagoon.com
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To: adam_az
I'm ok with buying products from 1st world countries like Japan because we can compete with them in emerging markets. Those markets are stable and generally are our allies. In most cases we negotiate a reasonably fair-trade agreement with them as well.

We need to separate the issue of labor from trade because the two are not compatible. Government represents the people; therefore the government must act in our best interests if corporations fail to do so. If they both fail to represent us then we have a serious social upheaval headed our way.
43 posted on 07/29/2003 7:44:01 AM PDT by RockyMtnMan
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To: adam_az
And should be denied any DOD related contracts.
44 posted on 07/29/2003 7:44:04 AM PDT by Dead Dog (There are no minority rights in a democracy. 51% get's 49%'s stuff.)
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To: Dead Dog
Which is corporate welfare for the corporations.
45 posted on 07/29/2003 7:44:56 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: Mick2000
I have the solution. For every job that is exported to another country, or for every job that is filled with an H1B applicant, the company should be required to pay a Foreign Worker Tax equivalent to the money "saved" by exporting the job.
46 posted on 07/29/2003 7:45:08 AM PDT by Lunatic Fringe (When news breaks, we fix it.)
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To: the gillman@blacklagoon.com
The democrats and the republicans are both in bed to whoever can write the fattest checks. Everybody else is screwed.

Take my wonderful governor Gray Davis for example. He will allow big business to dump dioxin into the San Francisco Bay if they write him a big enough check. He will give a 7% pay raise to prison guards, once they hand him $1,000,000.

If any of you think that your representative will take a call from you in their district, or a big money splurger from out of state, think again. It's all about the benjamins.

47 posted on 07/29/2003 7:46:51 AM PDT by dogbyte12
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To: HurkinMcGurkin
Boy,you said it. We are all guilty because of our constant search for the lowest prices,but even that has changed.

I buy a lot of my clothes from fairly expensive stores and catalogues and even those pricy things are either made outside the country or the fabric comes from elsewhere.


48 posted on 07/29/2003 7:47:23 AM PDT by Mears
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To: Mick2000
It is true that it would cause some short term pain for the government if they had to buy from the US, and for US companies if we tried to stop the outsourcing.

The easy answer to this is to pass the bills now, but not have them kick in for two years. That way US investors can plan production facilities, and corporations can plan moving their operations back home.

49 posted on 07/29/2003 7:47:40 AM PDT by Rodney King (No, we can't all just get along.)
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To: Mick2000
This is such BS. Corporations outsource because shareholders demand to see its short term results in SEC filings.

CEO's and BoDs are held completely by the balls by short-term shareholders, and will be fired themselves if they don't do these popular outsourcing moves.

If congresscritters want to do something, try to restructure reporting requirements to focus investor atention on long-term corporate viability, and you will see less of these short-sighted moves.
50 posted on 07/29/2003 7:48:05 AM PDT by sam_paine (X .................................)
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