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'Smart-bomb' technology moving to China
WorldNetDaily.com ^ | Tuesday, August 12, 2003 | Sherrie Gossett

Posted on 08/12/2003 2:23:14 AM PDT by JohnHuang2

Citing national-security concerns, two Democratic lawmakers are engaged in a last-ditch effort to halt plans for the transfer of an Indiana factory that produces critical technology used in the guidance systems of U.S. "smart bombs" to the People's Republic of China.

The Department of Defense denies any impropriety, but some observers are asking: Is it a case of politics as usual, or a cover-up?

The Magnequench factory (originally known as UGIMAG) was sold in August 2000 to a consortium that included Chinese interests. In 2001, it was announced the plant would be shut down.

The factory is responsible for producing 80 percent of the rare-earth permanent magnets used in the guidance systems of U.S. "smart bombs," according to lawmakers.


Sen. Evan Bayh, D-Ind.

On Aug. 1, the office of Rep. Pete Visclosky, D-Ind., issued a statement indicating he and Sen. Evan Bayh, D-Ind., were mounting a "last-ditch" effort to halt the factory move to China. Citing the loss of 225 northwest Indiana jobs, Visclosky also expressed concern over the "transfer of sensitive defense technology to the People's Republic of China."

"We deserve answers not only about the economic impact of this move, but also about the potential threat to national security that it creates," Bayh said.

Both Bayh and Visclosky previously lobbied President Bush and administration officials to look into the Magnequench matter, but received no response.

"We're still trying to get a response," Visclosky press secretary Clifton Brown told WND.

"The congressman is very concerned about the transfer of this kind of technology to a foreign power," Brown said, stating that a supply chokepoint could result "in the event the U.S. becomes involved in a conflict that the Peoples Republic of China doesn't approve of."

"The congressman is very unhappy the administration has taken no interest in this issue at all," he added.

Inquiries go unanswered

The two lawmakers reportedly received no response from letters sent to President Bush on March 6 and May1.

Two letters sent to Treasury Secretary John Snow (on May 20 and June 5) received a response turning down a request from the congressman for a meeting. Several phone calls also have received no response.


Rep. Pete Visclosky, D-Ind.

Visclosky sent a letter July 31 to the U.S. House of Representatives Armed Services Committee, requesting the committee review the contracts Magnequench currently holds with the U.S. Department of Defense.

"These contracts must be reviewed in order to verify the legality of the pending move to China," he said.

Bayh, who is a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, backs the request for a review.

WorldNetDaily contacted the office of Sen. John Warner, R-Va., head of the Senate Armed Services Committee, and asked whether the committee was moving on this issue. At the time of the publication of this report, WND had not received a response.

On Aug. 1, Bayh and Visclosky also sent a letter to the U.S. Department of the Treasury demanding all the facts of its investigation into its review of Magnequench's 1995 sale to a consortium that included Chinese interests and Magnequench's 2000 acquisition of the Valparaiso facility.

To date, they have not received a response. WorldNetDaily contacted Snow's office and had not received a response by press time.

A controversial sale

In 1995, Beijing San Huan New Material High-Tech Inc. and China National Non-Ferrous Metals Import & Export Corporation partnered with investment firm the Sextant Group Inc. to acquire Magnequench and established the new entity as Magnequench International Inc.

Magnequench, a high-tech company created in 1986 by General Motors, pioneered the development and production of sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) – magnets used in the guidance system of "smart bombs."

Beijing San Huan New Materials High-Tech Inc. is a holding of the Chinese Academy of Science Business Group and was established in 1985. China National Non-Ferrous Metals – previously described by the Wall Street Journal as a "high-flying state company" – operates under the control of the State Council, one of the major organs of the Chinese government.

The 1995 sale required approval from the Committee on Foreign Investments in the U.S., or CFIUS. The CFIUS is an inter-agency committee chaired by the secretary of treasury, tasked with conducting reviews of foreign acquisitions that might threaten national security.

"Concerns raised by American officials about what they considered a clear case of the PRC attempting to obtain control of vital U.S. weapons technology were shot down, and CFIUS permitted the buyout," reported Insight magazine and WND.

WorldNetDaily has learned that in the same year the CFIUS approved the sale, the U.S. International Trade Commission had initiated an investigation into San Huan New Materials and found they were associated with the Chinese government and were engaged in illegal practices that harmed domestic industry.

Investigation into San Huan

That finding was part of an investigation into San Huan New Materials High Tech Inc., Ningbo Konit Industries Inc. and Tridus International Inc. regarding the importation of certain NdFeB magnets that infringed upon U.S. patents held by YBM Magnex Inc. (successor in interest to Crucible Materials Corporation).

The investigation was launched in response to a February 1995 complaint lodged by YBM.

San Huan, Tridus and Ningbo are related companies. Tridus is San Huan's exclusive representative for the sale of NdFeB magnets in the United States; Tridus obtained the imported magnets from San Huan and Ningbo; and San Huan and Tridus own a controlling interest in Ningbo.

The companies were referred to collectively as the "San Huan Respondents" in a later enforcement proceeding.

Following the announcement of the investigation, San Huan voluntarily entered into a consent order that forbade the company from continuing to import the infringing magnets unless under consent or license from Crucible. The consent order became effective Oct. 10, 1995.

It was soon found that San Huan continued illegal importation and sales unabated.

Citing "bad faith" and "harm to domestic industry," the commission argued San Huan's actions deserved a "significant penalty," and a $1.55 million fine was levied against the company.

Magnequench sale goes through

In 1995, the Magnequench sale was completed, and San Huan told investors it chose to acquire the General Motors company because "it possessed the best technology, biggest production capability and sole patent for rapidly quenched NdFeB powder."

The powders are used in the manufacturing of state-of-the-art sintered neodymium-iron-boron magnets.

The move was said to "set San Huan firmly on the road toward international expansion."

In 1998, Magnequench moved on to acquire GA Powders to capitalize on its breakthrough gas atomization process for making NdFeB powder. The technology was designed to create superior materials at lower costs. At the time it was created, the Ames National Laboratory estimated the $250 million market for these bonded magnets was expected to grow by more than 20 percent annually into the next century.

GA Powders was in fact a spin-off innovation company created by the Ames National Laboratory, which is managed by Lockheed Martin.

At the time, Ames said, "The new venture will strengthen the economy, create jobs and provide a return on taxpayer investment in government-sponsored research and development."

Ironically, as a sign of the times the Rare-earth Information Center at the Ames National Laboratory was later forced to shut down, after more than 36 years of providing scientific and technical information to industry, government, universities and individuals. The center cited consolidation in the rare-earth and magnet industries as a factor in the shutdown. Private corporations had previously provided significant sponsorship to the RIC, supplementing government funding. The RIC closed on July 1, 2002.

After acquiring GA Powders, Magnequench opened a new powder plant in Tianjin, China, in June 2000, moving production closer to the source of raw materials and driving down the overall cost of the NdFeB magnets. San Huan's close association with the rare-earth ore mining provinces of Inner Mongolia and Jiangsi gives it a guaranteed stable source of raw materials.

As previously reported by WND and Insight, a second effort to halt technology transfer to China from Magnequench failed in 1999. Company officials sought U.S.-government approval to export equipment from the Magnequench plant in Anderson, Ind., that could enhance China's ability to enrich uranium for a nuclear weapon.

"Stronger opposition to the transfer within government ranks again was stymied, and the high-tech computerized machine tools were moved to the company's new plant in mainland China." Insight writer Scott Wheeler reported.

The "new" Magnequench then went on to purchase the Valparaiso, Ind., factory (then known as UGIMAG) in August 2000, which then became known as Magnequench UG.

The people behind Magnequench

The successful 1995 Magnequench sale was followed by an interesting series of management changes that primed the company for successful expansion.

The chairman of San Huan New Materials, Mr. Hong (Harry) Zhang, then also became chairman of Magnequench.


Archibald Cox Jr., president and CEO of Magnequench

Archibald Cox Jr., founder of the Sextant Group, was appointed president and chief executive officer.

And Shannon Song, the former finance director of state-run China National Non-Ferrous Metals Import & Export Corporation, was appointed as a member of the board of directors. Song is now senior vice president strategic planning and is also responsible for China operations.

Zhang is the husband of Deng Nan, second daughter of China's former premier, Deng Xiaoping.


Deng Nan, wife of Hong Zhang and daughter of Deng Xiaoping

Deng Nan serves on the PRC State Council as vice minister of state for the Ministry of Science and Technology. Broad technology policy directives originating in the upper levels of the Communist Party hierarchy are fine-tuned and implemented by the State Council and its institutions.

The ministry oversees the "863 Program," an aggressive science and technology acquisition program first launched by Deng Xiaoping and funded and controlled by the Chinese government. It is formally known as the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China. Its name comes from the month (March) and year (1986) it was implemented.


Hong (Harry) Zhang, chairman of Magnequench

U.S. government reports indicate the "Super 863 Program" (as it was called after 1996) calls for continued acquisition and development of technology in a number of areas of military concern, including machine tools, electronics, petrochemicals, electronic information, bioengineering, and nuclear research, aviation and space.

The 863 Program continues to be focused on technology research and acquisition in eight specific fields.

The 863 Program

Rare-earth metals and products, including NdFeB magnets, are one of the chief target areas of focus of the 863 Program. They fall under the category of "exotic materials." In addition to rare-earths, materials sought in this category include optical-electronic information materials, new energy compound materials and high-capacity engineering plastics.

Despite the wide range of consumer-market uses for NdFeB magnets, the possible military applications of "dual-use" sintered NdFeB magnets concern critics.

About the 863 Program, the 1999 congressional Cox Report noted, "These projects could advance the PRC's development of materials, such as composites, for military aircraft and other weapons."

Potential dual-use of exotic materials acquisitions were said to be a key area of military concern."

San Huan has undertaken various research projects in national government programs such as the Torch Program (another sci/tech development program), the Assault Program, and the 863 Program, which the company says "has greatly enhanced and upgraded San Huan's technology and products."

San Huan Materials is mentioned repeatedly in 863 annual reports, which also applaud significant advancements in neodymium-iron-boron magnet engineering.

For the English-speaking public, 863 states it's goals are to aid military and civilian industry with an emphasis on civilian uses and subsequent economic growth.

According to Russia/China expert Dr. Alexandr V. Nemets, Chinese language explanations of 863 emphasize military goals above civilian goals.

As an example, Nemetz quotes a translated sentence from Chinese media stating the 863 Program was necessary for "the development of new advanced technologies for defensive and offensive warfare."

It is Nemetz's opinion that since 1986, through its 863 Program, China has been developing post-nuclear superweapons using knowledge gained from the "dragnet" of the eight fields of research.

Nemetz, who refers to the West as "geo-strategically lobotomized," has been highly critical of the Bush administration's war on Iraq, faulting it for not focusing on what he considers to be the far greater threat of strategic developments in China.

"Project 863 has at its disposal not only everything necessary for its development of non-machine post-nuclear superweapons, but also the scientific manpower of the entire world," said Nemetz.

Nemetz is a consultant to the American Foreign Policy Council and co-author of "Chinese-Russian Military Relations, Fate of Taiwan and New Geopolitics." A former student of the Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys, Nemetz worked at the Presidium of Academy of Sciences USSR as an expert on the economic and technological development of China and Japan, and published several dozen articles and booklets in the Soviet scientific media.

Power and the 'princelings'

Deng Nan was not the only high-placed figure in Chinese politics that was connected to the new Magnequench. At the time of the sale, the president of China Nonferrous Metals Industrial was Wu Jianchang, who is married to Deng Lin, the eldest daughter of the late Deng Xiaoping. Jianchang headed what was China's key state monopoly in metals trading and was also a director of listed companies in Hong Kong such as Silver Grant.

The two daughters are part of the "Crown Prince Party" – descendants, usually second-generation, of prominent and influential senior Communists of the People's Republic of China. By virtue of their lineage, the descendants wield significant political and business influence. Members of the Crown Prince Party are commonly referred to in the West by the colloquial terms "princelings" and "princesses."

In January 1998, Zhang Wule, a senior Communist Party official who had served as governor of Gansu province and more recently headed the State Economic and Trade Commission, was named president of China Nonferrous Metals.

By 1999, San Huan Materials had become the top publicly traded Chinese manufacturer of sintered magnetics, the biggest company for producing NdFeB magnets in China and the world's third-largest volume producer.

Pentagon weighs in

WorldNetDaily spoke to several spokespersons and weapons experts with the Pentagon, the Department of Defense and the Air Force regarding the concerns raised by Bayh and Visclosky. Upon initial contact, none of those contacted knew anything about the Magnequench situation.

Although not familiar with the details, Pentagon spokesman Glenn Flood told WND: "Would we go to China for this? No. If you recall we didn't buy them [sic] berets."

Gloria Cales, a spokeswoman for the Air Force and a weapons expert, and Maj. Paul Swiergosz offered to have the issue researched.

A statement was later given to WND by Pentagon spokesperson Cheryl Irwin.

The same statement is slated to be given to members of Congress who inquire about the issue. It said in part, "The Department of Defense does not keep records on the percentage of rare-earth magnets which we have procured from the Indiana facility. However, that plant at one time did make rare-earth magnets used in motors for tail fins on certain U.S. precision-guided munitions."


Boeing image of a JDAM from it's Asian Aerospace 2002 conference site.

In a January 2003 interview with Wheeler, Magnequench President Cox initially denied but later confirmed having a contract for the production of rare-earth magnets for the JDAM – the U.S. Joint Direct Attack Munitions project commonly referred to as "smart bombs."

When asked how DoD could not know the percentage, since the magnets were obtained under contract, Irwin declined further comment, refusing to answer any of WorldNetDaily's specific questions.

DoD: 'Department of Dodging?'

Visclosky's office labeled the DoD's response to WND an "artful dodge." "A very large amount of these products are still made there. … It's a mistake to allow such a large production to go overseas," said Brown.

Regarding the vagueness of the DoD's response and their failure to answer critical and specific questions, Jake Swinson, a weapons expert earlier recommended to WND by the Pentagon, said, "[Irwin's] up there with Rumsfeld's people," adding, "They probably don't know what to do about it. They're probably in shock. That's a pretty serious thing."

Swinson added that complex situations arise "when these mergers take place and sales get up to a pretty high level."

"They're probably having trouble deciding what to say and what to do to investigate it," he added.

Said Brown from Visclosky's office: "It's clear that they are trying to avoid answering these questions. The public wants to know. There's something that they don't want to tell people about what's going on."

2 down - 1 to go

The DoD statement also said, "Nor has China cornered the manufacturing market for such magnets, as numerous alternate suppliers exist (40 percent of world production in Japan, 5.8 percent in the U.S., and 4.8 percent in Europe). Additionally, there are substitute materials for these components available from other sources. "

The response failed to answer questions regarding contracts already in place and whether those would be honored, resulting in the U.S. purchasing 80 percent of the magnets used in JDAMs from China.

According to Walter Benecki, a consultant to the worldwide magnetics industry, there are only three firms in the U.S. licensed to sell sintered NdFeB magnets. The second firm – a Kentucky plant belonging to Germany's Vacuumschmelze GmbH, Hanau – has now announced it is closing as well.

"Today we're down to one – and that one is owned by Japan," he said.

That firm is the Hitachi Magnetics Corporation in Edmore, Mich., part of Hitachi Metals America.

In terms of the raw materials used to make the permanent magnets, the country's foremost supplier (80 percent) of rare-earth materials (Molycorp) went bankrupt in 1998 and shut down after spending millions to remake its mining facilities following Bureau of Land Management complaints that it was endangering the desert-tortoise environment.

Until 1998, there were essentially two active mines in the world producing rare earths for the exotic magnets – the Molycorp mine in Mountain Pass, Calif., and China's Baotou mine.

The year after the U.S. mine shutdown, China met 88 percent of the world demand for rare earths.

No risk – no monopoly?

The DoD statement went on to deny the lawmakers' assertion there was risk involved in the situation: "Thus, implication of a risk to DoD due to a Chinese monopoly on these magnets is incorrect," adding, "The Department has no plans to alter our current purchasing practices of these magnets. "

Dr. Peter Leitner, a senior strategic-trade adviser to the DoD, had previously told Wheeler, "The Chinese are clearly trying to monopolize the world supply of rare-earth materials such as neodymium that are essential to the production of the militarily critical magnets that enable precise guidance and control of our most advanced weapons and aircraft," adding that "rare-earth magnets lie at the heart of many of our most advanced weapons systems, particularly rockets, missiles and precision-guided weapons such as smart bombs and cruise missiles."

"By controlling the access to the magnets and the raw materials they are composed of, U.S. industry in general and the auto industry in particular can be held hostage to PRC blackmail and extortion in an effort to manipulate our foreign and military policy," Leitner said. "This highly concentrated control – one country, one government – will be the sole source of something critical to the U.S. military and industrial base."

Benecki believes within the next five years China will dominate the world market for sintered NdFeB magnets, but doesn't see it as problematic or "conspiratorial."

"It's just the natural evolution of technology and manufacturing driven by raw materials," he told WND, referring to China's low labor costs and abundance of rare-earth materials.

"I honestly don't know how big a national-security issue this is," Bencki said, "but I hate to see the point where there are no producers of these products in the U.S."

Benecki is sought after for his expertise in creating strategic alliances with China.

In May, Benecki addressed the Transformer Association on "How to Efficiently Establish an Operation in China." In October, he will be presenting a seminar in Detroit on Survival Strategies for Western NdFeB Producers.

His advice? Companies must establish some sort of China capability to remain profitable.

"The whole magnet industry is seeing these types of pressures," he said. "It's a very difficult equation."

On July 17, minerals expert Hugh Hanes testified before the Subcommitee on Energy and Mineral Resources and warned that the U.S. was in need of a "well-conceived minerals and metals policy." Calling them "hidden commodities," he emphasized how integral they were to the aerospace/defense and critical civilian infrastructure. Among those areas listed were JDAMs, F-22 stealth systems, reconnaissance satellites, battlefield surveillance, missile and ground-based laser systems, telecommunications, electronic transmission and medical applications.

After faulting "a series of unwise political decisions largely over the last 10 years, which discounted the importance of a U.S. minerals base," Hanes warned, "We have lost or are losing these capabilities as we speak."

'Going nuts' over intel

The diminishing U.S. base for strategic minerals, sensitive technology-transfer issues and espionage can all combine to form a particularly complex concern for the intelligence sector.

The bipartisan "Cox Committee Report" found that two of the methods used by the PRC to acquire advanced U.S. military technology included:

The scores of legitimate Chinese mergers, combined with what U.S. officials say are opaque Chinese intelligence operations buried deep within other legitimate-appearing mergers, make such technology-transfer questions murky at best.

According to James Lilley, former U.S. ambassador to the PRC, U.S. agencies are "going nuts" trying to discern where Chinese intelligence links to the PRC's military science and technology collection are. Such links either are typically buried beneath layers of bureaucracy or later turn out to not exist at all.

Sun sets on Indiana workers

Meanwhile, in Indiana, a crowd of 150 angry Magnequench workers recently vented their frustrations at a Valparaiso protest, jeering the mention of Magnequench President Archibald Cox Jr.'s name.

Wearing t-shirts that read "No More Lousy Trade Deals," they cheered when union organizer Mike O'Brien called Cox "a traitor to this country," according to Northwest Indiana News.


Magnequench workers protest.

"I would say Archibald Cox and company are committing a criminal act," by moving to China the manufacturing of internal workings of U.S. defense system self-guided bombs, O'Brien said.

Visclosky, standing on a pickup truck bed at the end of the march, called for the ouster of elected officials who've "made it easier to move U.S. jobs out of the country, " the newspaper reported.

"We're giving our enemies our defense technology and your 225 jobs," Visclosky said.

Magnequench has already begun dismantling some equipment in the plant and moving it to China, according to Indiana media.

The plant is set to close by Sept. 30, with most workers to be gone by Aug. 15.


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; News/Current Events; US: Indiana
KEYWORDS: china; magnequench; smartbombs; strategicindustry
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Tuesday, August 12, 2003

Quote of the Day by MEG33

1 posted on 08/12/2003 2:23:14 AM PDT by JohnHuang2
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To: Jeff Head
Nudging this your way, amigo..
2 posted on 08/12/2003 2:24:34 AM PDT by JohnHuang2
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To: harpseal
ping
3 posted on 08/12/2003 2:27:42 AM PDT by sarcasm (Tancredo 2004)
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To: JohnHuang2
What's the problem?

We're a global economy now, you silly rabbits!

4 posted on 08/12/2003 2:28:38 AM PDT by StatesEnemy
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To: sarcasm; backhoe
This seems so familiar....
5 posted on 08/12/2003 3:04:02 AM PDT by Arthur Wildfire! March (There's no fighting the Ultimate Conspiracy-- God's)
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To: JohnHuang2
We've been hearing about the move of Magnequench's mfg. to China for a while now, maybe since Clinton was in office. I'm surprised that nothing's been done yet.
6 posted on 08/12/2003 3:05:31 AM PDT by risk
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To: StatesEnemy; sarcasm; backhoe
I have to wonder: no Burton or Barr mentioned? No Cox mentioned? Hm.... I am not going to condemn anyone just yet. We are talking about rat accusers, and 99 times out of a hundred, rat accusers play shell games to try to get a phony 'pay back'. Every time I bash Bush, I feel silly two weeks later.
7 posted on 08/12/2003 3:07:20 AM PDT by Arthur Wildfire! March (There's no fighting the Ultimate Conspiracy-- God's)
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To: Arthur Wildfire! March
I'll be. Cox is mentioned: "About the 863 Program, the 1999 congressional Cox Report noted, "These projects could advance the PRC's development of materials, such as composites, for military aircraft and other weapons.""
8 posted on 08/12/2003 3:10:57 AM PDT by Arthur Wildfire! March (There's no fighting the Ultimate Conspiracy-- God's)
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To: JohnHuang2
What's wrong with the employees getting a low-interest loan and forming their own company to compete with the Chinese?

Let's show some American ingenuity for a change.

They already know the business!

I'm sure that French-looking rich guy, Senator Kerry would loan them some start-up cash!

9 posted on 08/12/2003 3:43:05 AM PDT by CROSSHIGHWAYMAN
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To: sarcasm
Very important ping.

Lets hope this thread does not get pulled.

as always on or off let me know

10 posted on 08/12/2003 4:07:13 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: CROSSHIGHWAYMAN
What's wrong with the employees getting a low-interest loan and forming their own company to compete with the Chinese?

Who is going to give a loan to keep a Company in the USA paying Americaqn wages.

Let's show some American ingenuity for a changeAmerican ingenuity was developing the technology. The Chinese already bought the rights to the technology under Clinton now they are just moving their property home.

I do not like this solution but I would suggest a take over of the assetts of this Company by the Federal government would be in order whether or not the current owners want to sell.

11 posted on 08/12/2003 4:12:57 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: JohnHuang2; #1CTYankee; .303 Brit; Agamemnon; AGBRUHN; always vigilant; Anarchist; Andonius_99; ...
More information than before on this bump
12 posted on 08/12/2003 4:17:22 AM PDT by RaceBannon
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To: JohnHuang2
If (when) the fit really hits the shan, we're cooked.
13 posted on 08/12/2003 4:29:40 AM PDT by metesky ("Brethren, leave us go amongst them." Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnston Clayton - Ward Bond- The Searchers)
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To: JohnHuang2
The DoD statement also said, "Nor has China cornered the manufacturing market for such magnets, as numerous alternate suppliers exist (40 percent of world production in Japan, 5.8 percent in the U.S., and 4.8 percent in Europe). Additionally, there are substitute materials for these components available from other sources. "

On th e thread that was pulled the other day it was pointed out that just about every substitute to Magnaquench's products does not do the job anywhere near as well. I owuld have posted the reference but the thread got pulled after over a hundred replies. No reason was given.

14 posted on 08/12/2003 4:39:14 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: harpseal
On th e thread that was pulled the other day it was pointed out that just about every substitute to Magnaquench's products does not do the job anywhere near as well. I owuld have posted the reference but the thread got pulled after over a hundred replies. No reason was given.

Kinda makes ya wonder.

15 posted on 08/12/2003 4:42:39 AM PDT by Lazamataz (PROUDLY POSTING WITHOUT READING THE ARTICLE SINCE 1999!)
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To: Jim Robinson
May we please keep this thread on this subject. The last thread on this subject was pulled (no reason given) after over a hundred replies. There was a great deal of useful information on that prior thread hopewfully this will garner as much.
16 posted on 08/12/2003 4:45:36 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: Lazamataz
Kinda makes ya wonder.

It does but lets see what happens with this one. Personally I think a few treason trials are in order along with nationalization fo assetts of this company.

By the way I do agree Free Traitor should be painted on the rope used to habg the traitors but of course it should be an American made rope if we can still buy one.

17 posted on 08/12/2003 4:55:57 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: LS
I would appreciate a reprise of your comments about why even Free Trade advocates find this appalling.

Thank you.
18 posted on 08/12/2003 4:57:55 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: Willie Green; Wolfie; ex-snook; Cacophonous; Poohbah; Jhoffa_; FITZ; arete; FreedomPoster; ...
Until 1998, there were essentially two active mines in the world producing rare earths for the exotic magnets – the Molycorp mine in Mountain Pass, Calif., and China's Baotou mine.
[...]
The year after the U.S. mine shutdown, China met 88 percent of the world demand for rare earths.
[...]
"It's just the natural evolution of technology and manufacturing driven by raw materials," he told WND, referring to China's low labor costs and abundance of rare-earth materials.
[...]
Companies must establish some sort of China capability to remain profitable.

"The whole magnet industry is seeing these types of pressures," he said. "It's a very difficult equation."

Free trade bump.

19 posted on 08/12/2003 5:15:01 AM PDT by A. Pole
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To: A. Pole
Free trade bump.

I realize some consider the term harsh but in this case I think we can give this a Free Traitor bump.

20 posted on 08/12/2003 5:17:10 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: A. Pole
That's right, just keep selling 'em the rope, boys. For a country that invented the Smart Bomb, we're pretty damned stupid sometimes.
21 posted on 08/12/2003 5:38:13 AM PDT by andy58-in-nh
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To: JohnHuang2
I've been watching this one for some time, amigo.

Crazy, isn't it?

...and very dangerous in the long run. It's one of the types of things that convinced me to write The Dragon's Fury Series.

22 posted on 08/12/2003 5:48:07 AM PDT by Jeff Head
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To: StatesEnemy
We're a global economy now, you silly rabbits!

Indeed. Now consumers will be able to buy smart bombs for less than they'd pay for them if they were made in the U.S. A win/win situation all around!

23 posted on 08/12/2003 5:50:31 AM PDT by RogueIsland
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To: JohnHuang2
Hmmmmmm......

From here:

http://www.manufacturingtalk.com/news/mag/mag102.html

Additional equipment to meet demand for rare earth permanent magnets cut to close tolerances has been installed at Magnequench's new UK factory.

That was from approximately 1.5 years ago.

Also look here:

http://www.magnequench.com/tech_resources/index.htm

"The Technology Center is a 30,000 sq. ft. laboratory, built in 1999 specifically to meet the needs of Magnequench's clients for neodymium-iron-boron powders, magnets, and added-value components. A client can present his requirement for an optimum magnetic device design, for a magnet assembly, or for a challenging new material specification, and expect a complete solution from within this self-contained facility. He can even stay here and work alongside the Technology Center staff as his problem is solved."

"Magnequench selected the Raleigh/Durham region of North Carolina for its proximity to major industrial centers worldwide, allowing easy access for clients. The Southern climate and its consequent lifestyle has also allowed the Technology Center to attract some of the world's best magnet scientists and engineers. Because this region is a national center of excellence for science and technology, the Technology Center is able to draw upon considerable local resources to augment its own capabilities."

"The Technology Center is a unique, world-class engineering resource for the design and development of neodymium-iron-boron alloys, powders, compounds, magnets, production processes, permanent magnet components and devices. Having attracted some of the world's best permanent magnet scientists and engineers, and provided them with the latest process equipment and analytical tools, the Technology Center has everything in-house needed to provide a client with the optimum powder, magnet or added-value component."

Also look here:

http://www.magnequench.com/mag_news/releases/letter%20to%20president0429.pdf

The Anderson plant was permanently closed by April 29, 2002


24 posted on 08/12/2003 5:55:56 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: Eaker
cool magnets, lousy politician, job lose, scary Chinese ping

25 posted on 08/12/2003 6:00:50 AM PDT by thackney (Life is Fragile, Handle with Prayer)
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To: thackney
lose=loss :-(
26 posted on 08/12/2003 6:01:44 AM PDT by thackney (Life is Fragile, Handle with Prayer)
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To: JohnHuang2
Let it go. I'm more of a carpet bombing/napalm fan myself, anyway.
27 posted on 08/12/2003 6:11:03 AM PDT by squidly
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To: thackney
Dragging us down a little further everyday!
28 posted on 08/12/2003 6:15:22 AM PDT by Eaker (This is OUR country; let's take it back!!!!!)
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To: risk
We've been hearing about the move of Magnequench's mfg. to China for a while now, maybe since Clinton was in office. I'm surprised that nothing's been done yet.

Look at post #24

29 posted on 08/12/2003 6:26:45 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: harpseal
but the thread got pulled after over a hundred replies. No reason was given.

I do not know if this was the reason, but look here:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/961830/posts

Post #32

30 posted on 08/12/2003 6:30:36 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: HighRoadToChina
Both Bayh and Visclosky previously lobbied President Bush and administration officials to look into the Magnequench matter, but received no response.
"We're still trying to get a response," Visclosky press secretary Clifton Brown told WND.

They could get no answers from DoD either. No one can get any response from anyone. So, we are left to speculate and connect dots. The previous thread on this same subject was pulled; I hope this one isn't.
31 posted on 08/12/2003 6:32:26 AM PDT by LibertyAndJusticeForAll
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To: RogueIsland
Indeed. Now consumers will be able to buy smart bombs for less than they'd pay for them if they were made in the U.S. A win/win situation all around! ROFLMAOACMHO!! (rolling on floor laughing my a$$ off AND crying my heart out)
32 posted on 08/12/2003 6:33:36 AM PDT by murdoog (i just changed my tag line)
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To: LibertyAndJusticeForAll; murdoog
See my posts. Form what I have been able to find, this plant is long closed.
33 posted on 08/12/2003 6:35:54 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
Sigh Form = From :-(
34 posted on 08/12/2003 6:36:45 AM PDT by RadioAstronomer
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To: harpseal
Adam Smith said there were certain sectors that should be immune from free trade, most notably defense. One cannot be dependent for critical weapons systems on another country due to lag time---in WW II, we built a tank in about four hours from scratch, a carrier in about 18 months from scratch, but today, a carrier is a 10-year building process.

Parts that you can easily start up quickly are fine to be outsourced, and indeed, to pay higher costs here at home to make a simple part that can be outsourced is, to use your term, "traitorous."

But it would be equally dangerous to allow the U.S. commercial aircraft or shipbuilding industry deteriorate because when we need those planes---possibly to fight the Chinese---we need them. Now, that raises real-world questions, and not just polemic sound bites. For example, how MANY commercial air manufacturers should we subsidize/support? Any? All? How many shipbuilders? Our solution to the present has been to have one layer of competition (i.e., at least two in each category), so we have EB and Newport News. If there are more, fine, but we don't want to be stuck with one, nor do we want to subsidize 50.

This has resulted in some mergers that I think are pretty sensible, because they allow the U.S. to subsidize one company on the basis of its major product (say, rockets) while nevertheless keeping its minor products (say, airframes, or jet engines) "in play" enough that it can be competitive.

It is, however, impossible to be totally self-sufficient, particularly in some national defense items, because the U.S. simply has NO natural resources of chrome, titanium, or even large resources of bauxite, lead, tungsten, diamonds, and so on. So one must embrace free trade if one wants an army or navy, unless you want an army or navy of the 1700s.

35 posted on 08/12/2003 6:49:07 AM PDT by LS
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To: RadioAstronomer
Here's a local article with the dates for 2003:
"The Magnequench plant employed about 225 workers in two buildings. The plant is set to close by Sept. 30, with most workers to be gone by Aug. 15. Magnequench has begun dismantling some equipment in the plant and moving it to China."
http://www.thetimesonline.com/articles/2003/07/31/news/top_news/ce801739a3dffb8f86256d74000cba22.txt
I previously found this link from Senator Bayh's office:
http://bayh.senate.gov/releases/2003/03/A06March03pr.htm

Someone had pointed out (on the previous thread) that when Bayh was governor he didn't care what Clinton was doing under his nose at this plant. And, that was when the worst damage was done. So, no thanks to Senator Bayh now.
36 posted on 08/12/2003 6:53:27 AM PDT by LibertyAndJusticeForAll
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To: LS
While we disagree on many issues on this at least we agree.

Thank you.

37 posted on 08/12/2003 6:55:06 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: LS
Well, I followed your reasoning right up to your last sentence:
"So one must embrace free trade if one wants an army or navy, unless you want an army or navy of the 1700s."

Trade with other nations does not necessarily mean it must be "free trade". A fair exchange between nations has always been a good idea. What is going on today is not fair, although it has been described as free by some.
Trade with China in particular, has not been fair. So, unless you want to continue to give them advantages in trade and technology I would not recommend embracing the current trade policies.
38 posted on 08/12/2003 7:00:51 AM PDT by LibertyAndJusticeForAll
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To: RadioAstronomer
That could well be the case. However when I went to the source there was no such worm. Maybe the worm came after it was posted to Free Republic in which case it becomes even more suspicous.
39 posted on 08/12/2003 7:04:47 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: LS
So one must embrace free trade if one wants an army or navy, unless you want an army or navy of the 1700s.

Clearly the US as a nation must import some raw materials if it is to maintain its defense industries. The need to import some things is a whole lot different than a need to import everything. when I was stating my agreement I was referring to the specific instance of this company and this exporting of technology. Further i woudl point absolutely no one has ever suggested tariffs on items that can not be produced in teh USA due to climate and or natural resources. So stating the need for certain raw materials or saying those who want some tariffs for protection want a complete shutdown of international trade is a straw man argument.

40 posted on 08/12/2003 7:09:31 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: CROSSHIGHWAYMAN
Magnequench holds 90% of all the relevant patents in this field. When the Chinese bought the company for a song in 1995, they picked up the whole enchilada...not just factories and engineers, but those patents, and intellectual property rights. They literally could sue their own workers to keep them from 'infringing' on 'their' technology.
41 posted on 08/12/2003 7:11:16 AM PDT by Paul Ross (A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master, and deserves one!-A. Hamilton)
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To: JohnHuang2
Operation Sumbeam anyone?


Russia Darkening Into A Tragic Phase?


by J.R. Nyquist, Worldnet Daily, May 8, 2000

Yesterday Vladimir Putin officially began his term as Russia's second elected president. Officially Putin is not a Communist, but unofficially he admires Lenin and has a good opinion of the KGB. What have we learned about Putin since Boris Yeltsin appointed him as acting Russian president?

According to Putin's inauguration speech, Russian history has light phases and tragic phases. The heavy-drinking Yeltsin provided Russia with a light phase after the long and humorless Soviet era. Yeltsin was a man who wrote in his memoirs of breast-feeding his own daughter while riding on a train. There was no milk in Yeltsin's breast, but the baby girl felt comforted anyway -- and it kept her quiet.

Now things in Russia are different. The empty comfort of a liberalism without milk, without substance, is no longer offered. The new Russian president wants to strengthen the security services and the Army. He is tough and serious. The facade of phony liberalism has been torn away. A stiff and humorless little man from the bowels of the KGB now takes power. There is nothing funny about Mr. Putin. In fact, he was once nicknamed the "little Andropov" (after the late KGB chief and one-time Soviet dictator).

Putin came from Leningrad, which is now called St. Petersburg. After graduating college Putin joined the KGB. Then he was sent as a spy to West Germany in 1975. Before the 1970s ended, Putin fell under suspicion of espionage and was booted from West Germany. A few years later, in 1984, Putin was sent to East Germany. For several years prior to the tearing down of the Berlin Wall, Putin worked on a secret project called Operation Sunbeam.

According to Horst Jemlich, a thirty year veteran of the East German secret police, Operation Sunbeam anticipated the collapse of the Warsaw Pact -- Russia's East European military alliance. Last January Jemlich told the London Sunday Times (Jan. 16) that the plan was "to prepare one day to let us fall and have new guys supply them [the KGB] with information."

According to Jemlich, the Russian Communists planned to abandon their German comrades. The overt Communist structures in East Germany would be replaced with covert KGB structures. Once the secret structures were in place, the Kremlin's German pawn would be offered to the West.

It was not a happy fate for the pawn. Coincidentally, in the same year that Vladimir Putin joined Operation Sunbeam, KGB defector Anatoliy Golitsyn predicted the future liberalization of the Soviet bloc. Golitsyn said that the liberalization "would be spectacular and impressive." But, he warned, it "would be calculated and deceptive in that it would be introduced from above." Jemlich's testimony indirectly supports Golitsyn's testimony. The collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe was conceived beforehand by planners in Moscow. It was part of a grand strategy. And Putin had a leading role in preparing that strategy.

In 1982 another defector, named Jan Sejna, wrote about a long range Russian strategy that involved the fake collapse of the Warsaw Pact alliance. He wrote of Russia's plan to erode NATO. He wrote of "progressive" or left wing governments coming to power in Europe. "To this end," wrote Sejna, "we envisaged that it might be necessary to dissolve the Warsaw Pact, in which event we had already prepared a web of bilateral defense arrangements, to be supervised by secret committees of Comecon."

The leaders of the West have yet to understand the significance of Sejna's statement about the fake dissolution of the Warsaw Pact. Americans and West Europeans are far from grasping the truth in Golitsyn's 1984 statement that the Kremlin was contemplating the demolition of the Berlin Wall. As Horst Jemlich suggested in his statement to the Times, Operation Sunbeam was initiated with the collapse of East Germany in mind. The KGB, however, was not giving up. It was creating an alternate channel to continue operations against the West under cover of a supposed Cold War defeat.

In all probability Vladimir Putin is still an agent of the KGB -- and still following a secret plan that will culminate in the defeat of the United States.

Putin's rise to power is no accident. His elevation to Russia's presidency was accomplished by intrigue. His popularity was created through a war crisis called into existence by Moscow's double agents in Chechnya and Dagestan. Yeltsin's sudden resignation at the end of last year meant that an early presidential election would be held, before the Russian people could catch their breath. Opposing candidates were not given time to prepare their campaigns. The votes were not counted properly. The entire process was fraudulent, but the West never protested. Putin's legitimacy has been accepted in Washington, London, Paris and Berlin.

Putin was chosen by somebody, and elevated by somebody -- for a reason. And it is significant that he comes from Leningrad, which is known as Russia's most "reactionary city." According to Vladimir Solovyov and Elena Klepikova, writing in their biography of Yuri Andropov, Leningrad was "the proving ground of the KGB, where all its undertakings and experiments are pioneered -- under the complete control of the Soviet police."

It is also significant that Putin has been called the "little Andropov." It is noteworthy that Andropov's publicized traits coincided with Lenin's canonical traits: efficiency, personal modesty, simplicity, seriousness and a knowledge of foreign languages. These are traits that have been assigned to Putin.

The current grand strategy of Russia now comes into full view. It is a program of sly restoration and re-strengthening. The West has sold Russia the rope, so to speak. And the rope will be used to hang the world's bourgeoisie (i.e., the American middle class). To facilitate this process Putin's first major act as president of Russia was to name Mikhail Kasyanov as prime minister. Kasyanov is the Kremlin's chief economic strategist. He has been responsible for negotiating with Russia's creditors in the West.

Perhaps the best way to understand what is happening, is to realize that there are two primary forces at work in the world. One force is the world's financial and industrial elite, which wants to make money. The other force is revolutionary socialism, which has been playing possum for the last decade.

The Kremlin game, in this respect, has been a very simple one: namely, use the greed of Western business men to destroy the West's defenses. Use this greed to move auto factories from America to Poland -- to move missile and bomber plants to Communist China. As Pat Buchanan said in his recent book, "The Great Betrayal," China treats America "like a colony, a source of raw materials and a dumping ground for manufacturers."

This has all been manipulated for a reason. And Russia's alliance with China, in this respect, is no accident.

The business of America is business. Latter-day trade theory sees the weakening of nationalism and the erasing of borders as a positive development, which accelerates economic growth. Business people see "win-win" equations everywhere. They often see themselves as eradicating poverty, disease, backwardness and war. But they are mainly eradicating America's heavy industry. Soon we will not be able to build the tanks and ships and aircraft we need to wage war. Soon we will be totally dependent on foreign suppliers -- perhaps on Communist suppliers.

President Putin smiles at the prospects. His war machine is building its strength. His heavy industry is involved in a rapid modernization and expansion. Last Dec. 7 Putin spoke of bringing the former Soviet states together. But he was careful in his statement. He would not alarm the West with the overt return of the Soviet Union. That would be counterproductive.

The Soviet Union will be put back together only after a crisis, when America has offended Russia's honor. As Vladimir Putin said during a Feb. 7 interview on Russian television: "Whoever offends us will last not longer than three days."

After this fashion, a light phase of Russian history darkens into a tragic phase.
42 posted on 08/12/2003 7:26:21 AM PDT by Dead Dog (There are no minority rights in a democracy. 51% get's 49%'s stuff.)
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To: RadioAstronomer
Thanks for that find! However did you spot this? It was 180 posts, btw.
43 posted on 08/12/2003 7:28:55 AM PDT by Paul Ross (A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master, and deserves one!-A. Hamilton)
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To: A. Pole
Thanx for the ping.

This seems only fair...we already have Belgium manufacturing our military small arms...and we wouldn't want China to be left out.

</sarcasm off>
44 posted on 08/12/2003 7:46:54 AM PDT by stylin19a (is it vietnam yet ?)
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To: CROSSHIGHWAYMAN
What's wrong with the employees getting a low-interest loan and forming their own company to compete with the Chinese?

Ummm, the Chinese bought the patents...

45 posted on 08/12/2003 7:49:00 AM PDT by null and void
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To: LS
I agree with your post for the most part. I think the US should keep defense manufacturing in the Continental US where possible.

As for raw materials, the US should attempt to source them from friendly nations wherever possible. For example, a key American ally, Australia, does have Titanium and Chrome resources ( http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:XcfiPhrXb1AJ:www.bemax.com.au/AusIMMArticleMarApr02.pdf+mining+chrome+titanium+exports&hl=en&ie=UTF-8 ); I'm not sure what US - South African relations are like post-Mandella, but that country, too, is very resource rich...
46 posted on 08/12/2003 7:59:05 AM PDT by ThinkFreedom (Well, that's my 2c, take or leave.)
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To: JohnHuang2
Hmmm... So why aren't we mining neodymium here? Oh yeah...

The little red star (pardon the pun) marks the mine location in Mountain Pass, CA. Thank you DiFi! Though, of course, I'm sure that her hubby's Chinese pals thanked her first.

47 posted on 08/12/2003 8:38:01 AM PDT by Redcloak (All work and no FReep makes Jack a dull boy. All work and no FReep make s Jack a dul boy. Allwork an)
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To: A. Pole
The year after the U.S. mine shutdown, China met 88 percent of the world demand for rare earths

Thank Senator Diane Feinstein and her financial relationship with China for this. She authored the desert wilderness initiative that included this working mine within its boundaries.
48 posted on 08/12/2003 8:42:55 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer
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To: Redcloak
Why don't we petition the government to reopen this area to mining?

On second thought, they'd probably bid it out to a Chinese company :-(
49 posted on 08/12/2003 8:49:00 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer
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To: RadioAstronomer
Oh, BTW, an improved pointing to the above FR link is here. Click on the post number when you snag your address.
50 posted on 08/12/2003 9:31:43 AM PDT by Paul Ross (A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master, and deserves one!-A. Hamilton)
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