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Archbishop Sheen Today! -- The glorious assumption
Catholic Online (Renew America web site) ^ | August 10, 2004 | Barbara Kralis

Posted on 08/11/2004 5:25:21 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA

" We sat in class 'alphabetically,' that is, according to our last names. My last name, 'Arthur' consigned me to the first row of old wooden desks that ran parallel to the hot water radiators along the windowed wall.

The Blessed Mother stood approximately 5 feet from my face. She was a statue, of course, and she regally stood on top of the metal radiator cover. As 'Queen of Heaven and Earth,' a gold crown lay on her lovely head.

For the next nine months, I looked at her, and she looked at me. That is when I first fell in love. The Blessed Mother captured my heart."

(Excerpt) Read more at renewamerica.us ...


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Theology
KEYWORDS: assumption; blessedvirginmary; mary; sheen
The assumption of our Mother! Whatever differences people in this forum have with each other - I hope everyone can agree that Mary is a wonderful gift and treasure given to us from Jesus. She is His last will and testament - so to speak - to us before He finished His sacrifice on the Cross for all of us. She is the greatest created gift Jesus could give to us poor sinners. And for me personally, she is my mother that He gave to me. She captured my heart and became a delight to me two and a half years before I crossed the Tiber.
1 posted on 08/11/2004 5:25:21 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA
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To: Convert from ECUSA
We find unity in Adoration of Our Blessed Lord and in consecration to His Blessed Mother. Those who deny Her, deny Him. Those who deny His Real and True Presence, deny Her as well. But we who struggle in the confusions flung from the claws of satan and the mean lusts of men can find solace, stability, and hope under Her mantle.

The vision of St. John Bosco is true. The Most Blessed Sacrament and Our Most Blessed Mother are the two pillars which, when we are anchored to them, keep us safe from the demon and his minions.

2 posted on 08/11/2004 7:11:33 AM PDT by Maeve (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!)
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To: Convert from ECUSA
One of best questions about the misunderstanding of the Catholic love for our Blessed Mother was posed by Archbishop Sheen:  What would you think of one who professed to be a true friend of yours and yet who never spoke to your mother?  That is what our Lord thinks of those who have no veneration to His Virgin Mother.

My mother had a chronic hip problem in her older years, and on the Feast of Assumption, she waded into the surf (it was an abnormally cold Atlantic Ocean on that day, and an overall lousy "beach day"), and said a prayer to our Lady for her intercession.  From that day forward, she never experienced the hip pain again.

The goodness of our Lord... the gifts we really and truly have received in, and through our Blessed Mother!  Pax et bonum.
3 posted on 08/11/2004 7:19:42 AM PDT by GirlShortstop (« O sublime humility! That the Lord... should humble Himself like this... »)
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To: GirlShortstop

Thank you for that excellent post.


4 posted on 08/11/2004 7:21:57 AM PDT by Maeve (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!)
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To: Maeve; GirlShortstop
Two of the things that stunned me when I first started studying Mary in late 2000/early 2001 were:

1. The long history of great love and devotion to Mary from the start of the Church. All the great Fathers, Doctors and Saints whose writings thrilled this-then-at-the-time Anglican consistently spoke of Mary in terms of greatest love and affection. That carried a lot of weight with me.

2. That in the past 40 years there seems to have been in many parts of the Church, a discarding of Mary as though people were ashamed of her, treating her like she was an unwanted relative at a family reunion. That horrified me! How in the heck could "catholics" toss her aside?! Didn't they ever read Liguori's "The Glories of Mary!?" (one of my all time favorites that I'm currently rereading again)

This-at-the-time-still-Anglican reacted to number 1 with delight and it spurred me on to further study. My reaction to number 2 was to tell Mary and Jesus, "if those so-called 'catholics' don't want her, you tell her she is welcome to come by my house any time she likes, if she won't be ashamed to be in the house of a semi-Catholic-Anglican. I'll be delighted to be a son of hers, and I hope she isn't ashamed to have a son like me." I meant it then, and I mean it even more now as a new Catholic.

My earthly mother was (sadly) a piece of work, and Jesus personally gave His mother to me to be my mother and fill a hole in my life. She is my momma (and I mean that term with the greatest love, affection, and respect); how could I not love her?

When I was asked last spring before my reception to choose a patron saint, for me, there was nobody else but Mary and Joseph. For me it was a no-brainer. Mary and Joseph go together, you can't have one without the other. You should have seen the twinkle in the eye and the smile on my pastor's face when he saw the card where I'd written my choice (he knew in RCIA the story of how I came to love her so much when I was still Anglican)!

Oh, get me started - I can go on when I talk about Mary.
5 posted on 08/11/2004 7:46:09 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (tired of shucking and jiving)
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To: Convert from ECUSA
Even as an Anglican you had a love of Mary sort of hidden but present within that tradition through great lights like Thomas Ken, Jeremy Taylor, Lancelot Andrewes, Pusey, Keble, John Mason Neale. The witness is in the host of Anglican Nativity, Annunciation, and Marian hymns. Even that great Anglican hymn "Ye watchers and ye holy ones" with its stunning verse to Mary "O higher than the Cherubim, more glorious than the Seraphim, lead their praises, Alleluia."

It is a stretch for this Irish Catholic at times, but I know that when England was Our Lady's Dowry, She loved England then and never stopped loving the English people or their decedents even after the Reformation. Her gentle hand guided generations who have found their way back into the Catholic Church, and you are one of those souls cherished by her and guided to safety. Perhaps because of her love for Walsingham, but clearly because of her love for you.

6 posted on 08/11/2004 8:47:02 AM PDT by Maeve (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!)
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To: Convert from ECUSA
My earthly mother was (sadly) a piece of work, and Jesus personally gave His mother to me to be my mother and fill a hole in my life. She is my momma (and I mean that term with the greatest love, affection, and respect); how could I not love her?

There is another thing I must say. Your post and your witness to your love of your Mother Mary, our Mother Mary, makes me weep tears of profound joy and love. Thank you for telling your story. It renews my heart.

7 posted on 08/11/2004 8:51:13 AM PDT by Maeve (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!)
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To: Convert from ECUSA

Beautifull reply!
aahhhhh, The Glories of Mary, I have not read that book in some 15 years but it left an everlasting impression on me.
Can you imagine St. Alphonsus' reward?

Please, consider this as "getting you started" if you wish.


8 posted on 08/11/2004 8:54:11 AM PDT by Stubborn ( O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria!)
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To: Convert from ECUSA; Maeve
Thank you Convert for telling us how Mary assisted your conversion experience. Speaking of Walsingham, I am making a pilgrimage there in the Sept. 6-8 time frame. I will be in England from Sept. 3-10. Sept. 8th is Our Lady's birthday, so I want to be there for that. I probably will leave that area later that day. I can't wait to get there. Besides Walsingham, I plan to go to Brompton Oratory in London on Sunday the 5th for the Traditional Latin Mass, and go to Tyburn (also in London) to see where so many martyrs met their fate.
9 posted on 08/11/2004 10:08:36 AM PDT by Pyro7480 (Sub tuum praesidium confugimus, sancta Dei Genitrix.... sed a periculis cunctis libera nos semper...)
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To: Stubborn

I'm sure that when it was time for St. Alphonsus to pass from this earth, Mary came herself, escorted by Gabriel and Michael, to personally take that wonderful saint's soul into the presence of Jesus, where I'm even more certain he heard his Master say "Alphonsus, well done good and faithful servant, enter into the joy of your master."

I have believed strongly for some time that anyone who is devoted to Mary and loves her will be welcomed into Heaven by Jesus with open arms. None of her children are ever lost.


10 posted on 08/11/2004 10:54:38 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (tired of shucking and jiving)
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To: Pyro7480
When you are in Walsingham, ask at the Slipper Chapel (the English National Catholic Shrine of Our Lady of Wlasingham) about the Carmelites who are there nearby.

In Walsingham there are also an Eastern Orthodox Shrine to Our Lady of Walsingham and the Anglican Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham. It is the only Marian apparition site in the world where these three come together to honor the Mother of God and her Divine Son, to honor the Annunciation, to honor the Holy Family of the Holy House. Awesome.

11 posted on 08/11/2004 11:20:41 AM PDT by Maeve (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!)
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To: Maeve

Should I visit the Carmelites?


12 posted on 08/11/2004 11:22:17 AM PDT by Pyro7480 (Sub tuum praesidium confugimus, sancta Dei Genitrix.... sed a periculis cunctis libera nos semper...)
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To: Pyro7480

If you can, they are a powerhouse of prayer. They prayed for a seemingly impossible intention of mine that came to pass fourfold (my children!). Of course, nothing is impossible with God. But we who believe in the Lord need Him to help our unbelief. And when we need the prayers of others, there are the Carmelites - the Praying Heart of the Church.


13 posted on 08/11/2004 11:29:01 AM PDT by Maeve (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!)
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To: Maeve

The Carmelites in Walsingham prayed for you, or several different Carmels?


14 posted on 08/11/2004 11:37:07 AM PDT by Pyro7480 (Sub tuum praesidium confugimus, sancta Dei Genitrix.... sed a periculis cunctis libera nos semper...)
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To: Pyro7480

The ones near Walsingham. My husband was stationed in England and we went to Walsingham to beg Our Lady's help. The Carmelites are a just a tiny bit from Little Walsingham (in Langham I think), but they can tell you at the Slipper Chapel how to find them.


15 posted on 08/11/2004 11:41:19 AM PDT by Maeve (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!)
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To: Convert from ECUSA

Your writing about our Blessed Mother is very beautiful. Thanks.


16 posted on 08/12/2004 11:47:36 AM PDT by NeoCaveman (Why some Republicans want to give up before the fight is beyond me)
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To: dubyaismypresident

Thanks! I have personal reasons for having a special affection for her. She is my momma, given to me by Jesus when He was on the Cross.

At least this posting did not bring out all the Mary-hating, Catholic-hating fundies like the one I posted earlier today (the article on the assumption taken from Christ or Chaos). Shoot on that one, the carpetbaggers have come out faster than Jackson going after Pope at Second Manassas! At least for once it isn't Catholics going after each other with hammer and tongs on a thread. Maybe I did a good deed after all in posting it.

At any rate, thanks for your kind words, and as is sometimes said in the really deep South - God bless y'all real good.


17 posted on 08/12/2004 12:12:22 PM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (tired of shucking and jiving)
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To: Convert from ECUSA

BTTT of the Feast of the Assumption, 08-15-04!


18 posted on 08/15/2004 8:07:43 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Thanks. Yesterday was a wonderful day of remembering that she has gone before us not only to model perfect discipleship, but to show us what awaits us when we come Home.


19 posted on 08/16/2004 5:53:17 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (tired of shucking and jiving)
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To: Convert from ECUSA

BTTT, Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, August 15, 2005!


20 posted on 08/15/2005 8:37:03 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Convert from ECUSA
EWTN

21 posted on 08/15/2005 8:40:24 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Convert from ECUSA
THE ASSUMPTION OF MARY: A BELIEF SINCE APOSTOLIC TIMES
Father Clifford Stevens
The Assumption is the oldest feast day of Our Lady, but we don't know how it first came to be celebrated.

Its origin is lost in those days when Jerusalem was restored as a sacred city, at the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine (c. 285-337). By then it had been a pagan city for two centuries, ever since Emperor Hadrian (76-138) had leveled it around the year 135 and rebuilt it as <Aelia Capitolina> in honor of Jupiter.

For 200 years, every memory of Jesus was obliterated from the city, and the sites made holy by His life, death and Resurrection became pagan temples.

After the building of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in 336, the sacred sites began to be restored and memories of the life of Our Lord began to be celebrated by the people of Jerusalem. One of the memories about his mother centered around the "Tomb of Mary," close to Mount Zion, where the early Christian community had lived.

On the hill itself was the "Place of Dormition," the spot of Mary's "falling asleep," where she had died. The "Tomb of Mary" was where she was buried.

At this time, the "Memory of Mary" was being celebrated. Later it was to become our feast of the Assumption.

For a time, the "Memory of Mary" was marked only in Palestine, but then it was extended by the emperor to all the churches of the East. In the seventh century, it began to be celebrated in Rome under the title of the "Falling Asleep" ("Dormitio") of the Mother of God.

Soon the name was changed to the "Assumption of Mary," since there was more to the feast than her dying. It also proclaimed that she had been taken up, body and soul, into heaven.

That belief was ancient, dating back to the apostles themselves. What was clear from the beginning was that there were no relics of Mary to be venerated, and that an empty tomb stood on the edge of Jerusalem near the site of her death. That location also soon became a place of pilgrimage. (Today, the Benedictine Abbey of the Dormition of Mary stands on the spot.)

At the Council of Chalcedon in 451, when bishops from throughout the Mediterranean world gathered in Constantinople, Emperor Marcian asked the Patriarch of Jerusalem to bring the relics of Mary to Constantinople to be enshrined in the capitol. The patriarch explained to the emperor that there were no relics of Mary in Jerusalem, that "Mary had died in the presence of the apostles; but her tomb, when opened later . . . was found empty and so the apostles concluded that the body was taken up into heaven."

In the eighth century, St. John Damascene was known for giving sermons at the holy places in Jerusalem. At the Tomb of Mary, he expressed the belief of the Church on the meaning of the feast: "Although the body was duly buried, it did not remain in the state of death, neither was it dissolved by decay. . . . You were transferred to your heavenly home, O Lady, Queen and Mother of God in truth."

All the feast days of Mary mark the great mysteries of her life and her part in the work of redemption. The central mystery of her life and person is her divine motherhood, celebrated both at Christmas and a week later (Jan. 1) on the feast of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. The Immaculate Conception (Dec. 8) marks the preparation for that motherhood, so that she had the fullness of grace from the first moment of her existence, completely untouched by sin. Her whole being throbbed with divine life from the very beginning, readying her for the exalted role of mother of the Savior.

The Assumption completes God's work in her since it was not fitting that the flesh that had given life to God himself should ever undergo corruption. The Assumption is God's crowning of His work as Mary ends her earthly life and enters eternity. The feast turns our eyes in that direction, where we will follow when our earthly life is over.

The feast days of the Church are not just the commemoration of historical events; they do not look only to the past. They look to the present and to the future and give us an insight into our own relationship with God. The Assumption looks to eternity and gives us hope that we, too, will follow Our Lady when our life is ended.

The prayer for the feast reads: "All-powerful and ever-living God: You raised the sinless Virgin Mary, mother of your Son, body and soul, to the glory of heaven. May we see heaven as our final goal and come to share her glory."

In 1950, in the Apostolic Constitution <Munificentissimus Deus>, Pope Pius XII proclaimed the Assumption of Mary a dogma of the Catholic Church in these words: "The Immaculate Mother of God, the ever-virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heaven."

With that, an ancient belief became Catholic doctrine and the Assumption was declared a truth revealed by God.

Father Clifford Stevens writes from Tintern Monastery in Oakdale, Neb.


This article was taken from the July-August 1996 issue of "Catholic Heritage".


Provided Courtesy of:
Eternal Word Television Network


22 posted on 08/15/2005 8:43:04 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation; NYer; Maeve; Pyro7480

Salvation, you're going to get me started! :)))) Although I'm not around the FR Catholic forum much, it seems you've remembered me! Thanks, and may today be especially blessed for you!


23 posted on 08/15/2005 9:27:26 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (tired of all the shucking and jiving)
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To: Convert from ECUSA

BTTT on the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, August 15, 2006!


24 posted on 08/15/2006 8:51:49 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

:)


25 posted on 08/15/2006 10:13:57 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (Olmert - Israel's Laval)
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