Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Reflections for Lent (February, March and April, 2007)
EWTN ^ | Lent 2007 | EWTN staff/various

Posted on 02/20/2007 6:14:51 PM PST by Salvation

Click on the day for your Daily Lenten Reflection

 

Click here for the February reflections.


TOPICS: Catholic; Evangelical Christian; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholiclist; lent
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-80 next last
Click on the day for your Daily Lenten Reflection

 

Click here for the March reflections

1 posted on 02/20/2007 6:14:51 PM PST by Salvation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: All
Click on the day for your Daily Lenten Reflection

 

Click here for the April reflections

2 posted on 02/20/2007 6:16:58 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ...
EWTN
 

Catholic Prayer Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Prayer Ping List.

3 posted on 02/20/2007 6:18:29 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: All
< href="http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-religion/1788297/posts">Reflections for Lent (February, March and April, 2007)

Pre-Lent through Easter Prayer and Reflections -- 2007

Stations of the Cross [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

For study and reflection during Lent - Mind, Heart, Soul [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

Ash Wednesday and the Lenten Fast-Family observance Lenten season [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

Pre-Lenten Days -- Family activities-Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras)[Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

40 Ways to Get the Most Out of Lent! [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

Lenten Fasting or Feasting? [Catholic Caucus]

Pope's Message for Lent-2007

THE TRUE NATURE OF FASTING (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

The Three Practices of Lent: Praying, Fasting. Almsgiving

The History of Lent

The Holy Season of Lent -- Fast and Abstinence

The Holy Season of Lent -- The Stations of the Cross

Lent and Fasting

Mardi Gras' Catholic Roots [Shrove Tuesday]

Ash Wednesday

All About Lent

Kids and Holiness: Making Lent Meaningful to Children

Why We Need Lent

MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI FOR LENT 2006

Lent a Time for Renewal, Says Benedict XVI

Why You Should Celebrate Lent

Getting the Most Out of Lent

Lent: A Time to Fast From Media and Criticism Says President of Pontifical Liturgical Institute

Give it up (making a Lenten sacrifice)

The Triduum and 40 Days

4 posted on 02/20/2007 6:27:30 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Hi, Salvation! I am giving up alcolhol, and will be attempting to increase my prayer time each day. My husband and I will also be attending the Stations of the Cross each Friday and they scriptural study afterwards.

I hope to make this Lent more meaningful than last year's. I was getting ready to enter the Church, my mother was sick and then passed away, and all the while I had a very bad case of the flu. By the time I recovered, it was almost Easter. I feel like last year all I did was mark time during Lent, and I want to make it count for something this year.

5 posted on 02/20/2007 6:31:31 PM PST by Miss Marple (Prayers for Jemian's son,: Lord, please keep him safe and bring him home .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

The other thing I will be striving to do during Lent is to USE SPELLCHECK! Sorry for the typos!


6 posted on 02/20/2007 6:32:24 PM PST by Miss Marple (Prayers for Jemian's son,: Lord, please keep him safe and bring him home .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Miss Marple

I have promised to fast at least twice a week for the clergy in this diocese and try to get me and hubby in the habit of doing morning and evening prayer. I went out and bought two copies of the Shorter Christian prayer so I can give it a try. My theme is disciplined following of Jesus this lent...I am not nearly as disciplined and efficient as I could be...That's a hard thing for me.


7 posted on 02/20/2007 6:48:29 PM PST by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

Bump for Lent.


8 posted on 02/20/2007 8:14:50 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Knitting A Conundrum

May I add a note of levity here: I'm looking forward to the delicious fish fries at church. It's a great place to get healthy baked fish dinners. We should all eat more fish for good health.


9 posted on 02/20/2007 8:18:36 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Ciexyz

I've stocked up some..but we eat a fair amount of fish anyway, and try hard to keep all Fridays meatless. Hubby I believe, could eat fish 4 days a week and chili on the other three....


10 posted on 02/20/2007 8:35:57 PM PST by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Knitting A Conundrum

In reference to fish, I like to poach salmon or tilapia is a little water in a pan on the stove, then serve it with steamed veggies. The fish just flakes off the fork and is very tasty.


11 posted on 02/20/2007 8:42:03 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Miss Marple

Sound like you will have a wonderful Lent this year. Goodness, with everything that happened last year............what can I say?

Glad you're here!

Spellcheck -- me too. Did you see where I goofed on the one link above. Oh, well, I'll fix it.

God bless.


12 posted on 02/20/2007 8:57:05 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Knitting A Conundrum

**fast at least twice a week for the clergy in this diocese**

That is an outstanding prayer intention. Maybe the rest of us can join you in that! (Only praying for our diocese -- LOL!)


13 posted on 02/20/2007 8:58:39 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Ciexyz

Fish is one of my favorite proteins, so in no way is it a sacrifice to eat it. I try to give up another food in its stead. I love Mexican food -- so I think that's what I will give up this year.


14 posted on 02/20/2007 9:00:50 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Ciexyz

Salmon is so good. I bake it, broil it, poach it...I think I like it broiled best.

There is a fish the local store is selling called Bassa that is really nice...firm and white-fleshed.

I've been coating it in Shake and Bake and baking it, and it's good. Want to try doing that with tilapia.

Maybe we should create a thread: Lenten recipes.


15 posted on 02/20/2007 9:02:04 PM PST by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Knitting A Conundrum; All
ASH WEDNESDAY

" Dust thou art, and into dust thou shalt return."
                                                 Gn. 3:19

Rend your hearts, not your garments, and return to the Lord, your God. (Joel 2:13)


Reflection.
The liturgical use of ashes originated in the Old Testament times. Ashes symbolized mourning, mortality and penance. In the Book of Esther, Mordecai put on sackcloth and ashes when he heard of the decree of King Ahasuerus to kill all of the Jewish people in the Persian Empire (Esther 4:1). Job repented in sackcloth and ashes (Job 42:6). Prophesying the Babylonian captivity of Jerusalem, Daniel wrote, "I turned to the Lord God, pleading in earnest prayer, with fasting, sackcloth, and ashes" (Daniel 9:3).
Jesus  made reference to ashes, "If the miracles worked in you had taken place in Tyre and Sidon, they would have reformed in sackcloth and ashes long ago" (Matthew 11:21).
In the Middle Ages, the priest would bless the dying person with holy water, saying, "Remember that thou art dust and to dust thou shalt return."
The Church adapted the use of ashes to mark the beginning of the penitential season of Lent, when we remember our mortality and mourn for our sins. In our present liturgy for Ash Wednesday, we use ashes made from the burned palm branches distributed on the Palm Sunday of the previous year. The priest blesses the ashes and imposes them on the foreheads of the faithful, making the sign of the cross and saying, "Remember, man you are dust and to dust you shall return," or "Turn away from sin and be faithful to the Gospel." As we begin this holy season of Lent in preparation for Easter, we must remember the significance of the ashes we have received: We mourn and do penance for our sins. We again convert our hearts to the Lord, who suffered, died, and rose for our salvation. We renew the promises made at our baptism, when we died to an old life and rose to a new life with Christ. Finally, mindful that the kingdom of this world passes away, we strive to live the kingdom of God now and look forward to its fulfillment in heaven.


Lenten Question
Q: What is Lent?
A: Lent is the forty day period before Easter, excluding Sundays, which begins on Ash Wednesday and ends on Holy Saturday (the day before Easter Sunday). [This traditional ennumeration does not precisely coincide with the calendar according to the liturgical reform. In order to give special prominence to the Sacred Triduum (Mass of the Lord's Supper, Good Friday, Easter Vigil) the current calendar counts Lent as only from Ash Wednesday to Holy Thursday, up to the Mass of the Lord's Supper. Even so, Lenten practices are properly maintained up to the Easter Vigil, excluding Sundays, as before.]

Lenten Action.
Invite a non-practicing friend to Mass with you.


Prayer
Almighty and everlasting God, you despise nothing you have made and forgive the sins of all who are penitent.
Create and make in us new and contrite hearts, that we, worthily lamenting our sins and acknowledging our brokenness, may obtain of you, the God of all mercy, perfect remission and forgiveness;
through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

Ash Wednesday is a day of both fasting and abstinence.


16 posted on 02/20/2007 9:05:10 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Knitting A Conundrum
Maybe we should create a thread: Lenten recipes.

"The Bean Dish with the Noodles" and "The Noodle Dish with the Beans"! (Also, "That Lentil Stuff Again.")

I don't consider any of this penitential, actually ... the "suffering" part is listening to the rest of the family's complaints!

17 posted on 02/21/2007 4:57:59 AM PST by Tax-chick (Every "choice" has a direct object.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Tax-chick

LOL!

I was thinking of 20 ways to make boiled cabbage and potato soup, myself! LOL!


18 posted on 02/21/2007 5:11:59 AM PST by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Knitting A Conundrum

That's not a favorite of mine. I think I have a cauliflower in the refrigerator, so I can make cauliflower curry.


19 posted on 02/21/2007 6:06:20 AM PST by Tax-chick (Every "choice" has a direct object.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Ciexyz

While you're at it, any good non-fish, non-dairy recepies?

I can't do fish, hubby can't do milk...Fridays in lent are kind of hard, and he's not too impresses pb & j.


20 posted on 02/21/2007 6:24:35 AM PST by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: mockingbyrd; All; NYer; narses; sandyeggo

This is priceless. Be sure to have a "look-see". It says it all. I hope you have a fast connection!

http://kansascitycatholic.blogspot.com/2007/02/lenten-fare.html

Frank


21 posted on 02/21/2007 8:26:20 AM PST by Frank Sheed ("It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged." --G.K. Chesterton)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

Comment #22 Removed by Moderator

To: Frank Sheed

sweet!


23 posted on 02/21/2007 8:45:58 AM PST by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Tax-chick

see #21


24 posted on 02/21/2007 8:47:44 AM PST by Frank Sheed ("It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged." --G.K. Chesterton)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Frank Sheed

That was cute! Maybe I'll let Bill make one :0).


25 posted on 02/21/2007 9:14:53 AM PST by Tax-chick (Every "choice" has a direct object.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Tax-chick

Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord!

;-o)


26 posted on 02/21/2007 9:39:47 AM PST by Frank Sheed ("It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged." --G.K. Chesterton)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: mockingbyrd

Since you're asking for non-fish, non-dairy recipes, I'd recommend "Go Veggie!" This is how I eat for at least one meal a day, to get my eight servings of veggies a day: Throw any combination of veggies into a pot and boil, include a sliced onion for taste, drain and add add a pat of non-dairy butter substitute for taste and sprinkle with oregano. I really like frozen veggie combinations such as peas, carrots, broccoli, pinto beans, chick peas, and white beans. This tastes really good to me, and I'll eat it with a small roll with a teaspoon of all-natural peanut butter, and a half cup of no-fat cottage cheese on salad greens and a sliced apple.


27 posted on 02/21/2007 9:03:28 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Ciexyz

Oooh....sounds good. Especially after a day a fasting. (I swear the only two days I ever get like really hungry, Ash Wednesday and Good Friday)

Thanks so much!


28 posted on 02/21/2007 9:07:10 PM PST by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: mockingbyrd; All
Thursday After Ash Wednesday
"Whoever wishes to be my follower must deny his very self, take up his cross each day, and follow in my steps." (Luke 9:23)


Reflection.
WHAT TO GIVE UP . . .

Give up complaining. . . . . . . .focus on gratitude.
Give up pessimism. . . . . . . . . become an optimist.
Give up harsh judgments . . .think kindly thoughts.
Give up worry. . . . . . . . . . . . . trust Divine Providence.
Give up discouragement. . . . .be full of hope.
Give up bitterness. . . . . . . . . . turn to forgiveness.
Give up hatred. . . . . . . . . . . . . return good for evil.
Give up negativism . . . . . . . . .be positive.
Give up anger. . . . . . . . . . . . . .be more patient.
Give up pettiness. . . . . . . . . . .become mature.
Give up gloom. . . . . . . . . . . . . .enjoy the beauty that is all                                                      around you.
Give up jealousy. . . . . . . . . . . .pray for trust.
Give up gossiping. . . . . . . . . . .control your tongue.
Give up sin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . turn to virtue.
Give up giving up. . . . . . . . . . . hang in there!


Lenten Question
Q: Why are the forty days called Lent?
A: They are called Lent because that is the Old English word for spring, the season of the year during which they fall. This is something unique to English. In almost all other languages its name is a derivative of the Latin term, or "the forty days."

Lenten Action.
Think of a person with whom you have a strained relationship and make some gesture toward improving that relationship.


Prayer
Direct our actions, Lord, by your holy inspiration and carry them forward by your gracious help, that all our works may begin in you and by you be happily ended.

We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God for ever and ever.
Amen.


29 posted on 02/21/2007 9:20:39 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: mockingbyrd

Abstinence of Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. Fasting on every day of Lent, correct?


30 posted on 02/21/2007 9:21:21 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

Abstinence on every Friday in Lent, and Ash Wednesday.

The only two days Catholics are required to fast are Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

I give up snacking and coffee and alcohol and stuff like that, but that's not really fasting, IMO.


31 posted on 02/21/2007 9:32:32 PM PST by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

I needed this. Thank you.


32 posted on 02/21/2007 9:33:50 PM PST by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: mockingbyrd
Thanks so much!

Glad I could oblige. Bon appetit. Here's wishing you Lenten blessings.

33 posted on 02/22/2007 8:19:46 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: mockingbyrd
Many Catholics choose to fast the entire time of Lent -- this used to be the rule when I was growing up.

Jere's the Canon Law link from EWTN:

The Holy Season of Lent -- Fast and Abstinence

34 posted on 02/23/2007 8:01:57 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

Comment #35 Removed by Moderator

To: All
Friday After Ash Wednesday

The Fridays of  Lent are days of abstinence from meat.

This, rather, is the fasting that I wish: releasing those bound unjustly, untying the thongs of the yoke; Setting free the oppressed. (Isaiah 58:6)


Reflection.
We must always remember what God tells us in Scripture: "Even if a mother could forget the child in her womb" - something impossible, but even if she could forget - "I will never forget you."
And so here I am talking with you. I want you to find the poor here, right in your own home first. And begin love there. Be that good news to your own people first. And find out about your next-door neighbors. Do you know who they are?
I had the most extraordinary experience of love of neighbor with a Hindu family. A gentleman came to our house and said: "Mother Teresa, there is a family who have not eaten for so long. Do something." So I took some rice and went there immediately. And I saw the children - their eyes shining with hunger. I don't know if you have ever seen hunger. But I have seen it very often. And the mother of the family took the rice I gave her and went out. When she came back, I asked her: "Where did you go? What did you do?" And she gave me a very simple answer: "They are hungry also." What struck me was that she knew - and who are they? A Muslim family - and she knew. I didn't bring any more rice that evening because I wanted them, Hindus and Muslims, to enjoy the joy of sharing. ..... Mother Teresa


Lenten Question
Q: What is a day of fast and abstinence?
A: Under current canon law in the Western Rite of the Church, a day of fast is one on which Catholics who are eighteen to sixty years old are required to keep a limited fast. In this country, one may eat a single, normal meal and have two snacks, so long as these snacks do not add up to a second meal. Children are not required to fast, but their parents must ensure they are properly educated in the spiritual practice of fasting. Those with medical conditions requiring a greater or more regular food intake can easily be dispensed from the requirement of fasting by their pastor. A day of abstinence is a day on which Catholics fourteen years or older are required to abstain from eating meat (under the current discipline in America, fish, eggs, milk products, and condiments or foods made using animal fat are permitted in the Western Rite of the Church, though not in the Eastern Rites.) Again, persons with special dietary needs can easily be dispensed by their pastor.


Lenten Action.
Schedule a fifteen minute period of silence today to listen to your heart and to the Lord speaking to you..


Prayer
Lord, with your loving care guide the penance we have begun. Help us to persevere with love and sincerity.
Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, Your Son, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.

Stations Of The Cross


36 posted on 02/23/2007 8:46:33 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

Thanks for the reminder. I have to say, fasting has been way off my radar for the last four years. Each Lent, I've been either pregnant or nursing. And I'm kind of thinking that this might just be year five. But it's good the remember, because a modified fast could still be very good.


37 posted on 02/23/2007 11:22:16 AM PST by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: mockingbyrd
Saturday After Ash Wednesday
If you bestow your bread on the hungry and satisfy the afflicted; Then light shall rise for you in the darkness. (Isaiah 58:10)


Reflection.
"Repent, and believe in the gospel," Jesus told the crowds (Mark 1:15).
Perhaps at times we listen to sermons or read the gospels and apply the message to others. Often we can think of many people who need to repent. However we must be careful not to apply the gospel only to others. This call to repentance applies first of all to you and me. Recall that Jesus often preached in the synagogues and at the temple. He was preaching to the church goers and church workers. The call to repentance was not just to those sinners out there. The message of repentance is for Church leaders and workers. It is for you and me.


Lenten Question
Q: When does Lent begin?
A: Lent begins on Ash Wednesday, which is the day on which the faithful have their foreheads signed with ashes in the form of a Cross. It is also a day of fast and abstinence. 


Lenten Action.
Make a note on your calendar to participate in the Sacrament of Penance.

Prayer
Father,
look upon our weakness and reach out to help us with your loving power.
Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, Your Son, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.


38 posted on 02/24/2007 9:25:14 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: All
First Sunday of Lent
"I set my bow in the clouds to serve as a sign of the covenant between me and the earth." (Genesis 9:13)


Reflection.
“The whole life of Christ was a cross and a martyrdom, and dost thou seek rest and joy? If thou carry the cross unwillingly, thou makest it a burden to thee. If thou fling away one cross, without doubt thou shalt find another, perhaps a heavier”
...." (Thomas de Kempis -- Imitation of Christ).


Lenten Question
Q: Why are Sundays excluded from the reckoning of the forty days?
A: Because Sunday is the day on which Christ arose, making it an inappropriate day to fast and mourn our sins. On Sunday we must celebrate Christ's resurrection for our salvation. It is Friday on which we commemorate his death for our sins. The Sundays of the year are days of celebration and the Fridays of the year are days of penance. 


Lenten Action.
Phone a long lost friend and relive old memories. Visit a sick person. Feed the birds.

Prayer
O Jesus, I withdraw in spirit with You into the desert; teach me how to fight the triple concupiscence of the flesh, pride, and avarice.

Stations Of The Cross


39 posted on 02/25/2007 5:42:03 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: All
Monday, First Week of  Lent
"I assure you, as often as you did it for one of my least brothers, you did it for me." (Matthew 25:40)


Reflection.
It is not enough for us to say: "I love God," but I also have to love my neighbor.
St. John says that you are a liar if you say you love God and you don't love your neighbor. How can you love God whom you do not see, if you do not love your neighbor whom you see, whom you touch, with whom you live? And so it is very important for us to realize that love, to be true, has to hurt. I must be willing to give whatever it takes not to harm other people and, in fact, to do good to them. This requires that I be willing to give until it hurts. Otherwise, there is not true love in me and I bring injustice, not peace, to those around me. It hurt Jesus to love us.
We have been created in His image for greater things, to love and to be loved. We must "put on Christ" as Scripture tells us. And so, we have been created to love as He loves us. Jesus makes Himself the hungry one, the naked one, the homeless one, the unwanted one, and He says, "You did it to Me." On the last day He will say to those on His right, "whatever you did to the least of these, you did to Me, and He will also say to those on His left, whatever you neglected to do for the least of these, you neglected to do it for Me."
When He was dying on the Cross, Jesus said, "I thirst." Jesus is thirsting for our love, and this is the thirst of everyone, poor and rich alike. We all thirst for the love of others, that they go out of their way to avoid harming us and to do good to us. This is the meaning of true love, to give until it hurts ...Mother Teresa


Lenten Question
Q: Is there a biblical basis for abstaining from meat as a sign of repentance?
A: Yes. The book of Daniel states: "In the third year of Cyrus king of Persia . . . 'I, Daniel, mourned for three weeks. I ate no choice food; no meat or wine touched my lips; and I used no lotions at all until the three weeks were over.'" (Daniel 10:1-3)  


Lenten Action.
Give a donation to charity.

Prayer
Healer of body and soul, cure the sickness in my spirit so that I may grow in holiness through your constant care. Amen


40 posted on 02/26/2007 9:25:46 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: All
Tuesday, First Week of  Lent
"Your Father knows what you need before you ask him. This is how you are to pray: ‘Our Father....’" (Matthew 6:8-9)


Reflection.
. . .AND GOD SAID "NO."

I asked God to take away my pride,
And God said "No."
He said it was not for Him to take away,
But for me to give up.

I asked God to make my handicapped child whole,
and God said, "No."
He said her spirit is eternal,
While her body is only temporary.

I asked God to grant me patience,
And God said, "No."
He said patience is a by-product of tribulation.
It isn't granted - it is earned.

I asked God to give me happiness,
And God said "No."
He said He gives blessings,
Happiness is up to me.

I asked God to spare me pain,
And God said "No."
He said, "Suffering draws you apart from
Worldly cares and brings you close to Me."

I asked God to make my spirit grow,
And God said "No."
He said I must grow on my own,
But he will prune me to make it fruitful.

I asked God if He loved me,
And God said "Yes."
He gave me His only Son, who died for me,
And I will be in heaven someday
Because I believe.

I asked God to help me love others
As much as He loves me,
And God said,
"Ah, finally you have the idea."

.....by Claudia Minden Welsz


Lenten Fact
The word "lent" means "lengthen" and stands for that time in spring when the days grow longer.


Lenten Action.
Schedule a fifteen minute period of silence today to listen to your heart and to the Lord speaking to you.

Prayer
God our Savior,
bring us back to you and fill our minds with your wisdom.
May we be enriched by our observance of Lent. Amen


41 posted on 02/26/2007 11:06:47 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: All
Wednesday, First Week of  Lent
"For at the preaching of Jonah they reformed, but you have a greater than Jonah here." (Luke 11:32)

Reflection.

"Go through the world unnoticed if you can. Secret privations, secret sacrifices of your own will, which will never be known until all things are revealed, are surer instruments of perfection than chains and shirts of hair."
...Fr. Lasance

Lenten Fact

The original period of Lent was 40 hours. It was spent fasting to commemorate the suffering of Christ and the 40 hours He
spent in the tomb.
In the early 3rd century, Lent was lengthened to 6 days. About 800 AD it was changed to 40 days.


Lenten Action.

Plant a seed or bulb and watch it develop through the spring. Pray for your own spiritual growth.


Prayer

O Jesus, humbled to abjection for me, teach me to humble myself for love of You.

42 posted on 02/28/2007 9:48:57 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: All
Thursday, First Week of  Lent
"Ask, and you will receive. Seek, and you will find. Knock, and it will be opened to you." (Matthew 7:7)


Reflection.

The object of our prayer-life is to empty ourselves and be filled with the Trinity. The first thing Jesus did when He became Man was to empty Himself.
"His state was Divine, yet He did not cling to His equality with God, but emptied Himself to assume the condition of a slave and become as men are; and as all men are, He was humbler yet." (Phil. 2:6,7)
Our mission in life, then, is to cooperate with God's Grace and empty ourselves and be filled with the Trinity.
We are not to seek detachment to be free of responsibility, but to enable us to love both God and man with a pure love.
We are not to withdraw from the world to be alone, but to be with God.
We are to do penance, not because it erases our guilt, but because it wipes away the traces of sin.
We are to empty ourselves, not for the sake of self-control, but to be filled with God- transformed into Jesus.
There is no definite method by which we can become selfless. Each one of us has a particular virtue and faults that make the process of becoming like Jesus different. We must look at Jesus, read His Word in Scripture and ask His Spirit to enlighten our minds and give us that particular way by which we can best attain the goal He has set for us ....
Mother Angelica

Lenten Question

Q: Why is giving up something for Lent such a salutary custom?
A: By denying ourselves something we enjoy, we discipline our wills so that we are not slaves to our pleasures. Just as indulging the pleasure of eating leads to physical flabbiness and, if this is great enough, an inability to perform in physically demanding situations, indulging in pleasure in general leads to spiritual flabbiness and, if this is great enough, an inability to perform in spiritually demanding situations,  when the demands of morality require us to sacrifice something pleasurable (such as sex before marriage or not within the confines of marriage) or endure hardship (such as being scorned or persecuted for the faith). By disciplining the will to refuse pleasures when they are not sinful, a habit is developed which allows the will to refuse pleasures when they are sinful. There are few better ways to keep one's priorities straight than by periodically denying ourselves things of lesser priority to show us that they are not necessary and focus our attention on what is necessary.


Lenten Action.

Pray a rosary for the conversion of all who are far from the Lord.


Prayer

Lord, look upon us and hear our prayer. By the good works You inspire, help us to discipline our bodies and to be renewed in spirit. Amen.


43 posted on 03/01/2007 9:54:56 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: All
Friday, First Week of  Lent
The Fridays of  Lent are days of abstinence from meat.
"Unless your holiness surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees you shall not enter the kingdom of God." (Matthew 5:20)


Reflection.

HOW TO FAST

Fast from judging others;
Feast on Christ dwelling in them.

Fast from apparent darkness;
Feast on the reality of light.

Fast from pessimism;
Feast on optimism.

Fast from thoughts of illness;
Feast on the healing power of God.

Fast from words that pollute;
Feast on phrases that purify.

Fast from anger;
Feast on patience.

Fast from worry;
Feast on Divine Providence.

Fast from unrelenting pressure;
Feast on unceasing prayer.

Fast from negatives;
Feast on positives.

Fast from complaining;
Feast on appreciation.

Fast from hostility;
Feast on non-resistance.

Fast from bitterness;
Feast on forgiveness.

Fast from anxiety;
Feast on hope.

Fast from yourself;
Feast on a silent heart.


Lenten Question

Q: Why are the forty days called Lent?
A: They are called Lent because that is the Old English word for spring, the season of the year during which they fall. This is something unique to English. In almost all other languages its name is a derivative of the Latin term , or "the forty days."

Lenten Action.

Be generous with your compliments today, especially to those who appear to be "down".


Prayer

I enter on this path of repentance so that in dying to self I might rise to new life.


44 posted on 03/02/2007 9:45:51 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: All
Saturday, First Week of  Lent
"If you love those who love you, what merit is there in that?" (Matthew 5:46)


Reflection.
St. Dominic Savio was born in Italy in 1842. One day when he was just four, he disappeared and his good mother went looking for him. She found the little fellow in a corner praying with his hands joined and his head bowed. He already knew all his prayers by heart! At five, he was an altar boy.
When he was seven, he received his First Holy Communion. On that solemn day, he chose a motto: "Death, but not sin!" and he kept it always.   "A teenager such as Dominic, who bravely struggled to keep his innocence from Baptism to the end of his life, is really a saint," said Pope St. Pius X. At the age of twelve, Dominic entered the school run by St. John Bosco. Don Bosco examined him first and at the end of the questions, Dominic asked,  "What do you think of me?"
"I think you're good material," answered the priest, with a big smile.
"Well, then," said Dominic, "You are a good tailor, so if the material is good, take me and make a new suit out of me for Our Lord!"
Everyone in the school saw from the way he prayed that this boy was different. He greatly loved all the boys, and even though he was younger, he used to worry about them. He was afraid that they would lose the grace of God by sinning. 
One day, a fellow brought a magazine full of bad pictures to school. In a minute, a group of boys had gathered around him to see it. 
"What's up?" wondered Dominic, and he, too, went to look. Just one peek was enough for him. He grabbed the magazine and tore it to pieces! "Poor us!" he cried in the meantime, "Did God give us eyes to look at such things as this? Aren't you ashamed?" 
"Oh, we were just looking at these pictures for the fun of it," said one boy.  
"Sure, for fun," answered Dominic, "and in the meantime you're preparing yourselves to go to hell!" 
"Oh, what's so wrong about looking at these pictures anyway?" another fellow demanded. 
Dominic had a ready answer. "If you don't see anything wrong," he said sadly, "this is even worse." It means you're used to looking at shameful things!"  
No one said anything after that. They all realized that Dominic was right. Another time he stopped a terrific stone-throwing fight between two angry boys. Holding up a little crucifix between them, he said, "Before you fight, look at this and say, 'Jesus Christ was innocent and He died forgiving His murderers. I am a sinner, and I am going to hurt Him by not forgiving my enemies.' Then you can start - and throw your first stone at me!"
The two boys were so ashamed of themselves that they apologized, and promised to go to confession too.

One day Dominic began to feel sick and was sent home to get better. While at home he grew worse, instead, and received the last Sacraments. He was only fifteen then, but he did not fear
death. In fact, he was overjoyed at the thought of going to Heaven. Just before he died, he tried to sit up.
"Goodbye," he murmured to his good father. Suddenly his face lit up with a smile of great joy and happiness. "I am seeing such wonderful things!" he exclaimed. Then he spoke no more, for he had gone to Heaven.
Dominic is the patron saint of choir boys and of the falsely accused.
This latter title was given to him due to the following incident. One time, two boys filled the school stove with snow and garbage during the cold winter months. When the teacher came back into the room, they falsely accused Dominic of doing the "dirty" deed. Although disciplined in front of the entire class, Dominic refused to tell on the two mischievous boys. When the truth was later revealed, Dominic was asked why he didn't confess to his innocence. He remarked that he was imitating Our Lord, Who remained silent during His persecutions and crucifixion.


Lenten Fact
Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday, is celebrated in many parts of the world with feasting. The French call it
"Mardi Gras". The Germans call it "Fausching". The feasting comes from the custom of using up household fats prior to the
40 days of Lenten fasting, when no fat is used.


Lenten Action.

In a prayerful spirit, get up early and watch the sun rise.


Prayer

Lord Jesus, you spoke peace to a sinful world and brought mankind the gift of reconciliation by the suffering and death you endured. I love you and joyfully bear the name 'Christian.' Teach me to follow your example. Increase my faith, hope and charity so that I may struggle to turn hatred to love and conflict to peace.


45 posted on 03/03/2007 9:12:18 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: All
Sunday, Second Week of  Lent
He was transfigured before their eyes and his clothes became dazzlingly white. (Mark 9:2-3)


Reflection.

"This is the remedy to fix my gaze on You, Incarnate Word, hanging on the Cross. As soon as You see a humble soul looking at You in this way, you are quickly moved to look at it, and the effect of Your divine glance is like that of a ray of sunshine on the earth; it warms it and prepares it to bring forth fruit. This is the way You act, O Divine Word, who by the light of Your glance, drain my soul of all its pride, and consume it in Your fire. No one acquires humility if he does not fix his gaze on You, O Word, on the Cross."
... St. Mary Magdalen dei Pazzi

Lenten Fact

During Bach's day, often the organ and choirs were silent during Lent.


Lenten Action.

Talk about today's scriptures with a friend after Mass.

Prayer

Father of light,
in you is found no shadow of change but only the fullness of life and limitless truth.
Open our heart to the voice of Your Word. and free us from the original darkness that shadows our vision.
Restore our sight that we may look upon your Son who calls us to repentance and a change of heart, for He lives and reigns with you for ever and ever.


46 posted on 03/04/2007 9:53:02 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: All
Monday, Second Week of  Lent
"Be compassionate, as your Father is compassionate." (Luke 6:36)


Reflection.

LENT: A TIME FOR FORGIVENESS AND RECONCILIATION

By Jennifer Jordan
Lent is a time for forgiveness and reconciliation. An acquaintance of mine recently shared an experience that shows the beauty reconciliation can bring. Mrs. Winston's story begins with an automobile accident that nearly claimed the life of her 35-year-old son, Robert.
After seven weeks of daily visits to the hospital and many "life and death" complications, it looked as if Robert was going to survive. Despite the hardship, Mrs. Winston, a gentle, spiritual woman, was quick to be positive about her situation. She believed in the power of prayer and was confident God was healing her son. "The doctors, the nurses--they were the Lord's instruments, and they were good instruments," she said. "The people at the hospital were all as nice as they could be," she said. Then with hesitation, she added, "except for a problem I had with one nurse." She continued to explain the incident. Robert had been in the hospital a long time, and his mother was hoping he could leave to attend their family reunion. "Well, I asked this nurse about it, and she just blew up at me," she said. "The nurse called my request 'unreasonable,' and said there was 'no way' the doctors would approve it." Mrs. Winston, a soft-spoken woman in her 60s, was shocked and hurt by the woman's cold response. "I couldn't understand why she was so nasty," she said. Another nurse who witnessed the encounter added, "Ignore her, she's just temperamental."
When Mrs. Winston went home, she couldn't forget the incident. She returned to the hospital the next day and the same nurse was in her son's room. She called her aside and said to her, "I think a great deal of you and the other nurses here." She then went a step further. "I don't think I have ever done anything to hurt you or offend you. But, if I have, I apologize." She continued to tell the nurse that she didn't understand what provoked her angry tone. "I hugged her and told her how much we appreciated her work with Robert." "Well, she just melted," Mrs. Winston said in her soft southern voice. "It seems she was going through some hard times, and it hadn't been a good day." As I listened to her story, I thought about how others might respond to the rude nurse. Some might report the incident to the woman's supervisor; some might reply in the same tone the nurse used; and, some might vindictively walk away and wish the woman a flat tire on her way home. Then, there are rare souls--such as Mrs. Winston--people who inspire us to reach for the Christ within us and to treat others with love and compassion. I reflected on her wonderful example. She put aside her anger and pride and offered forgiveness. Christ invites each of us to reconcile with those who hurt or disappoint us. It is a call to forgive the stranger who cuts you off in traffic; the family member who has been a bit "too honest"; and, the ex-spouse who may continue to drive you crazy.
After Mrs. Winston left my home I wondered why this acquaintance had shared such a personal story. She had come to my home on business --to repair my washing machine. Then, as I reflected on it, I knew why our paths had crossed. She was bringing a wonderful example of how to deal with hurt in our lives. This Lent, take the big step. Surrender any "eye for an eye" notions and pray for help in learning to love and forgive the way our Lord taught us.

Lenten Question

Q: Is the custom of giving up something for Lent mandatory?
A: No. However, it is a salutary custom, and parents or caretakers may choose to require it of their children to encourage their spiritual training, which is their prime responsibility in the raising of their children.

Lenten Action.

Wear a cross or other religious article; you will be surprised how many times this will start a conversation about your faith.

Prayer

Father of light,
in you is found no shadow of change but only the fullness of life and limitless truth.
Open our heart to the voice of Your Word and free us from the original darkness that shadows our vision.
Restore our sight that we may look upon your Son who calls us to repentance and a change of heart, for he lives and reigns with you for ever and ever.


47 posted on 03/05/2007 8:42:12 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: All
Tuesday, Second Week of  Lent
Come now, let us set things right, says the Lord. (Isaiah 1:18)


Reflection.

If most problems come from unforgiveness, we can understand why Jesus emphasizes forgiveness to an extreme degree. When Peter suggested to  Jesus that we should forgive seven times, he was correct. (Mt 18:21)  Seven in the Bible stands for an indefinite number of times, so Peter  was saying we should forgive indefinitely. This is the correct answer  but not the correct emphasis. Jesus proclaims we should forgive "seventy times seven," indefinitely times indefinitely. (Mt 18:22) Jesus further  emphasizes forgiveness by saying God's kingdom is a matter of forgiveness  and those who do not forgive are handed over to torturers. (Mt 18:23, 34)
And when the disciples asked Him to teach them how to pray, Jesus told  them to pray they be forgiven as they forgive. (Mt 6:12) This means prayer  will hurt rather than help us if we do not forgive. This is the only point  in the Lord's prayer on which Jesus commented.  He reiterated: "If you  forgive the faults of others, your heavenly Father will forgive you yours.
If you do not forgive others, neither will your Father forgive you." (Mt   6:14-15) Jesus insists on forgiveness. We must pass on the forgiveness He has given us by the shedding of His blood on Calvary ...
Father Al Lauer

Lenten Question

Q: Are acts of repentance appropriate on other days during Lent?
A: Yes. Thus the states: "All Fridays through the year and he time of Lent are penitential days and time throughout the universal Church" (CIC 1250).

Lenten Action.

Forgive someone who has wronged you; Ask for forgiveness from someone you wronged.


Prayer

Forgive my sins against the unity of your family; make me love as you loved me.

 

 


48 posted on 03/06/2007 6:33:29 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: All
Wednesday, Second Week of  Lent
"Anyone among you who aspires to greatness must serve the rest." (Matthew 20:27)


Reflection.

Deny
oneself
Carry
one's cross
To follow
Jesus Christ
If you are ashamed of the Cross of Jesus Christ
he will be ashamed of you before his Father
Love
the Cross
Desire:
crosses
contempt
pain
abuse
insults
disgrace
persecution
humiliations
calumnies
illness
injuries
May Jesus prevail
May his Cross prevail
Divine love
Humility
Submission
Patience
Obedience:
complete
prompt
joyful
blind
persevering

.....St. Louis de Montfort



Lenten Question

Q: Is the balance  of  fasting  the same for all people?
A: No. For example, with the good of food, people who are by nature physically larger need more food than people who are physically smaller. Similarly, people who have higher metabolisms or who do manual labor for a living need more food than people with slower metabolisms or who have less active lifestyles. The same is true with regard to other goods than food.  St. Paul speaks of this in regard to the good of married life: "I wish that all were as I myself am. But each has his own special gift from God, one of one kind and one of another. To the unmarried and the widows I say that it is well for them to remain single as I do. But if they cannot exercise self-control, they should marry. For it is better to marry than to be aflame with passion" (1 Corinthians 7:7-9). Thus some are given the gift of being able to live without the good of married life in order that they may pursue greater devotion to God (1 Cor. 7:32-34) or to pursue greater ministry for others (2 Timothy 2:3-4), as with priests, monks, and nuns. God gives these people special graces to live the life which they have embraced, just as he gives special graces to the married to live the life they have embraced.

Lenten Action.

Read for 20 minutes from Scripture or an inspirational book.


Prayer

Lord, watch over Your Church, and guide it with Your unfailing love. Protect us from what could harm us and lead us to what will save us. Help us always, for without You we are bound to fail.


49 posted on 03/08/2007 9:24:48 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: All
Thursday, Second Week of  Lent
"At his gate lay a beggar named Lazarus." (Luke 16:20)


Reflection.
Lent is a time for each of us to increase our knowledge of the "faith that is in us" in order that we can fulfill our vocation as Christians to extend this rich blessing of faith to others. We accomplish personal renewal and revitalization of our faith through penance, prayer and instruction.


Lenten Question

Q: On what basis does the Church have the authority to establish days of fast and abstinence?
A: On the authority of Jesus Christ. Jesus told the leaders of his Church, "Whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven" (Matthew 16:19, 18:18). The language of binding and loosing  was a rabinnic way of referring to the ability to establish binding  or rules of conduct for the faith community. It is thus especially appropriate that the references to binding and loosing occur in Matthew, the "Jewish Gospel."
Thus the states: "BINDING AND LOOSING (Hebrew,  . . . Rabinnical term for 'forbidding and permitting.' . . . "The power of binding and loosing as always claimed by the Pharisees. Under Queen Alexandra the Pharisees, says Josephus (1:5:2), 'became the administrators of all public affairs so as to be empowered to banish and readmit whom they pleased, as well as to loose and to bind.' . . . The various schools had the power 'to bind and to loose'; that is, to forbid and to permit ( 3b); and they could also bind any day by declaring it a fast-day ( . . .  12a . . . ). This power and authority, vested in the rabbinical body of each age of the Sanhedrin, received its ratification and final sanction from the celestial court of justice (9; 23b). "In this sense Jesus, when appointing his disciples to be his successors, used the familiar formula (Matt. 16:19, 18:18). By these words he virtually invested them with the same authority as that which he found belonging to the scribes and Pharisees who 'bind heavy burdens and lay them on men's shoulders, but will not move them with one of their fingers'; that is 'loose them,' as they have the power to do (Matt. 23:2-4). In the same sense the second epistle of Clement to James II ('Clementine Homilies,' Introduction [A.D. 221]), Peter is represented as having appointed Clement as his successor, saying: 'I communicate to him the power of binding and loosing so that, with respect to everything which he shall ordain in the earth, it shall be decreed in the heavens; for he shall bind what ought to be bound and loose what ought to be loosed as knowing the rule of the Church.'" ( 3:215). Thus Jesus invested the leaders of this Church with the power of making  for the Christian community. This includes the setting of fast days (like Ash Wednesday). To approach the issue from another angle, every family has the authority to establish particular family devotions for its members. Thus if the parents decide that the family will engage in a particular devotion at a particular time (say, Bible reading after supper), it is a sin for the children to disobey and skip the devotion for no good reason. In the same way, the Church as the family of God has the authority to establish its own family devotion, and it is a sin for the members of the Church to disobey and skip the devotions for no good reason (though of course if the person has a good reason, the Church dispenses him immediately).

Lenten Action.

Pray for  RCIA Catechumens and Candidates.


Prayer

O Jesus, Divine Strength, I come to You to seek support for my weakness, and infirmity.


50 posted on 03/08/2007 9:27:42 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-80 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson