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Pope calls Catholics to daily meditation on the Bible
CNA ^ | Vatican City, Oct 28, 2009

Posted on 10/28/2009 12:12:40 PM PDT by GonzoII

www.catholicnewsagency.com

Pope calls Catholics to daily meditation on the Bible


Pope Benedict XVI

.- At today's General Audience in St. Peter's Square, Pope Benedict provided a lesson on the theological renaissance of the 12th century, advising Christians to learn from the monks and set aside time every day to meditate on the Bible, “so that the Word of God will be the lamp that illuminates our daily path on earth."

Benedict XVI began his address to the 15,000 faithful by recalling how the 12th century was a time of a spiritual, cultural and political rebirth in the West. In that time, theology “flourished, refining methods, advancing towards new problems, in contemplation of the mystery of God,” he said.

As fruits of this development, figures such as St. Thomas and St. Bonaventure would appear in the thirteenth century. The two different environments in which this theological activity flourished were monasteries and schools, which would soon gave birth to universities, an invention of medieval Christianity.

Monastic theology, the Pope added, was due to abbots gifted with evangelical fervor and dedicated to inspire and nurture the desire for God. The method was primarily linked to the prayerful contemplation of Holy Scripture and the texts of the Church Fathers. The monks, he expounded, "were devoted to the Sacred Scriptures and one of their main activities consisted in lectio divina, that is, a meditative reading of the Bible." The Holy Father noted the Synod on the Word of God last year recalled the importance of reading Scripture and said it must be built on monastic theology.

"As monastic theology is listening to the Word of God," the Pontiff said, "it is necessary to purify one's heart to welcome it and, above all, one must be full of fervor to encounter the Lord. Theology therefore becomes meditation, prayer, a song of praise, and the impetus for sincere conversion."

The Holy Father emphasized "it is important to reserve a certain time each day for meditation on the Bible so that the Word of God will be the lamp that illuminates our daily path on earth."

Scholastic theology, the Pontiff explained, was formed "around a master and his disciples, to train professionals of culture in an era in which knowledge was increasingly appreciated." The method involves the placement of a "quaestio," a question around which "the discussion between teacher and students revolved."

"The organization of the ‘quaestiones’ led to the compilation of evermore extensive syntheses, the so-called ‘summae’ that were vast dogmatic-theological treatises,” Pope Benedict said. “Scholastic theology sought to present the unity and harmony of Christian Revelation with a method, called precisely 'scholastic,' that grants faith in human reason."

"Echoing the invitation of the First Epistle of Peter scholastic theology invites us to be always ready to answer whoever asks the reason for the hope that is in us," he noted. It "reminds us that between faith and reason there is a natural friendship, founded in creation itself." Faith liberates reason, enabling the human spirit to rise to the loving contemplation of that fullness of truth which is God himself.

Let us pray, Benedict XVI concluded, "so that the path of knowledge and exploration of the mystery of God is always enlightened by divine love."

In his Italian-language greeting to young people, the sick and newlyweds, Pope Benedict XVI said, “Today the liturgy remembers the Holy Apostles Simon and Jude Thaddeus. Let their evangelical testimony sustain you, dear young people, in the commitment of daily faithfulness to Christ. Let it encourage you, dear sick, to always follow Jesus along the road of trial and suffering. Let it help you, dear newlyweds, to make your family a place of constant encounter with the Love of God.”



TOPICS: Catholic; Prayer
KEYWORDS: bible; catholic; pope; scripture
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" Ignorance of Scripture is Ignorance of Christ."


1 posted on 10/28/2009 12:12:41 PM PDT by GonzoII
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To: GonzoII

But, but, I thought we weren’t allowed to read the Bible!!


2 posted on 10/28/2009 12:13:49 PM PDT by Carpe Cerevisi
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To: GonzoII

he needs to get tot he north east and start telling these so called catholics that they are voting against their supposed faith and they should be ashamed.


3 posted on 10/28/2009 12:13:52 PM PDT by manc (Marriage is between a man and a woman, end of. -end racism end affirmative action)
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To: GonzoII

Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Read them for yourself.

You have a decision to make.


4 posted on 10/28/2009 12:13:52 PM PDT by mbarker12474 (If thine enemy offend thee, give his childe a drum.)
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To: GonzoII

Thanks GonzoII for the post!


5 posted on 10/28/2009 12:20:43 PM PDT by GOP Poet (Obama is an OLYMPIC failure.)
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To: GonzoII
Get Cracking, Catholics!
A formative, family-friendly factoid from a recent study or survey in the news.
November 19-25, 2006 Issue
Posted 11/16/06 at 8:00 AM

According to a study released in September by Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion, evangelical Protestants are a whopping eight times more likely than Catholics to read the Bible on a weekly basis. Of course, the survey only looked at private Bible reading; it did not take into account the Scripture passages Catholics take in at every Mass. Still, we tip our hats to our separated brothers and sisters in Christ for their zeal for the Word of God.

Related threads:
Synod: Christianity not a 'Religion of the Book'
Yesterday saw...a forceful plea from a key papal advisor [Bishop Salvatore Fisichella, the rector of the Lateran University and President of the Pontifical Academy for Life] to reject the idea of Christianity as a “Religion of the Book.”

Synod to Focus on Proper Use of Scripture
The Church should combat widespread "Biblical illiteracy" among the Catholic faithful, Archbishop Eterovic said

A Literate Church: The state of Catholic Bible study today
...while fewer believers know much about the Bible, one-third of Americans continue to believe that it is literally true, something organizers of the Synod on the Word of God called a dangerous form of fundamentalism that is “winning more and more adherents…even among Catholics.” Such literalism, the synod’s preparatory document said, “demands an unshakable adherence to rigid doctrinal points of view and imposes, as the only source of teaching for Christian life and salvation, a reading of the Bible which rejects all questioning and any kind of critical research”....
....The flip side of this embarrassment is the presumption among many Catholics that they “get” the Bible at Mass, along with everything else they need for their spiritual lives. The postconciliar revolution in liturgy greatly expanded the readings, with a three-year cycle in the vernacular that for the first time included Old Testament passages. Given that exposure, many think they do not need anything else. As Mr. McMahon put it, “The majority still say you go to Mass, you get your ticket punched, and that’s it for the week.”

Barna Survey: The God Gap in American Politics Alive and Well

By the numbers:

Percentage of "liberals" who:
33%: read the Bible, other than at church events, during the past week
35%: attended a religious service during the past week
76%: prayed to God, other than at a religious service, during the past week
39%: shared their religious beliefs with others, during the past year (among the born again Christians interviewed)
06%: have ever participated in a short-term missions trip, either within the U.S. or in another country

Percentage of "conservatives" who:
57%: read the Bible, other than at church events, during the past week
62%: attended a religious service during the past week
91%: prayed to God, other than at a religious service, during the past week
56%: shared their religious beliefs with others, during the past year (among the born again Christians interviewed)
12%: have ever participated in a short-term missions trip, either within the U.S. or in another country

Percentage of "liberals" who believe:
27%: "the Bible is totally accurate in all of the principles it teaches"
17%: that Satan is real
23%: have a personal responsibility to share their religious beliefs with others
54%: their religious faith is very important in their life
23%: a person cannot earn their way into Heaven by doing good deeds or being a good person
38%: faith is becoming an increasingly important moral guide in their life
37%: their church is very important in helping them find direction and fulfillment in life
33%: Jesus Christ did not commit sins during His time on earth
43%: their primary purpose in life is to love God with all their heart, mind, strength and soul

Percentage of "conservatives" who believe:
63%: "the Bible is totally accurate in all of the principles it teaches"
36%: that Satan is real
48%: have a personal responsibility to share their religious beliefs with others
82%: their religious faith is very important in their life
37%: a person cannot earn their way into Heaven by doing good deeds or being a good person
70%: faith is becoming an increasingly important moral guide in their life
62%: their church is very important in helping them find direction and fulfillment in life
55%: Jesus Christ did not commit sins during His time on earth
76%: their primary purpose in life is to love God with all their heart, mind, strength and soul


6 posted on 10/28/2009 12:23:01 PM PDT by Alex Murphy ("Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him" - Job 13:15)
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To: Alex Murphy

7 posted on 10/28/2009 12:24:37 PM PDT by Petronski (In Germany they came first for the Communists, And I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist...)
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To: GonzoII
"The organization of the ‘quaestiones’ led to the compilation of evermore extensive syntheses, the so-called ‘summae’ that were vast dogmatic-theological treatises,” Pope Benedict said. “Scholastic theology sought to present the unity and harmony of Christian Revelation with a method, called precisely 'scholastic,' that grants faith in human reason."

"Echoing the invitation of the First Epistle of Peter scholastic theology invites us to be always ready to answer whoever asks the reason for the hope that is in us," he noted. It "reminds us that between faith and reason there is a natural friendship, founded in creation itself." Faith liberates reason, enabling the human spirit to rise to the loving contemplation of that fullness of truth which is God himself.

Ping for later

8 posted on 10/28/2009 12:25:53 PM PDT by Alex Murphy ("Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him" - Job 13:15)
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To: Alex Murphy
Wow. Interesting data.

One thing I was wondering though would be the portion of Catholics who go to Mass 3 or more time per week and/or pray t he Liturgy of the Hours. Some of us get a pretty decent chunk o' Scripture daily>

Probably most of us could stand to study a lot more. One of my favorite things to do at adoration is to read the Bible.

9 posted on 10/28/2009 12:29:59 PM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin: pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Alex Murphy
"that grants faith in human reason."

Indeed, I have faith (human) that God's existence can be known by the "natural light" of reason.

Don't go off the deep end Murphy.

10 posted on 10/28/2009 12:30:25 PM PDT by GonzoII ("That they may be one...Father")
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To: Mad Dawg
One thing I was wondering though would be the portion of Catholics who go to Mass 3 or more time per week and/or pray the Liturgy of the Hours. Some of us get a pretty decent chunk o' Scripture daily

When I put that together Monday, I had recalled someone telling me that hearing the entire Bible in three years involved attending every Mass, i.e. attending Mass daily. I couldn't find where I'd heard that, however. What you've described sounds a lot like what I recalled being told. I don't think you can hear the entire Bible in three years by only attending one Mass a week (i.e. in 156 readings). But something is far better than nothing, and more is always better than less!

One former church I'd attended used maybe 4-5 verses of scripture total per worship. Total, and that includes the readings mid-service, and all citations actually provided/read within the sermon! Please note that I do not fault Catholic parishes for their Scripture readings during Mass. I think this is a good thing (Philippians 1:15-18). From my own experience, the only denominations/congregations that provide a regular reading/exposition of Scripture during worship have been Reformed. I can honestly say that I wish other Protestant churches would do likewise!

Calvin's preaching was of one kind from beginning to end: he preached steadily through book after book of the Bible. He never wavered from this approach to preaching for almost twenty-five years of ministry in St. Peter's church of Geneva - with the exception of a few high festivals and special occasions. "On Sunday he took always the New Testament, except for a few Psalms on Sunday afternoons. During the week . . . it was always the Old Testament". The records show fewer than half a dozen exceptions for the sake of the Christian year. He almost entirely ignored Christmas and Easter in the selection of his text.

To give you some idea of the scope of the Calvin's pulpit, he began his series on the book of Acts on August 25, 1549, and ended it in March of 1554. After Acts he went on to the epistles to the Thessalonians (46 sermons), Corinthians (186 sermons), pastorals (86 sermons), Galatians (43 sermons), Ephesians (48 sermons) - till May 1558. Then there is a gap when he is ill. In the spring of 1559 he began the Harmony of the Gospels and was not finished when he died in May, 1564. During the week of that season he preached 159 sermons on Job, 200 on Deuteronomy, 353 on Isaiah, 123 on Genesis and so on.

One of the clearest illustrations that this was a self-conscious choice on Calvin's part was the fact that on Easter Day, 1538, after preaching, he left the pulpit of St. Peter's, banished by the City Council. He returned in September, 1541 - over three years later - and picked up the exposition in the next verse.

-- excerpted from John Piper's The Divine Majesty Of The Word


11 posted on 10/28/2009 12:59:56 PM PDT by Alex Murphy ("Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him" - Job 13:15)
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To: Alex Murphy
There is no way you're going to get ALL the Bible in current Cahtolic worship. Great chunks of Leviticus and Numbers will be left out. Similarly -- full disclosure -- the current psalter in the Liturgy of the Hours (For those of you in Rio Linda that's matins, lauds, nones, sext, terce, vespers and compline in the old lingo - though most of us just pray lauds, matins, vespers, and compline) has some of the "difficult" verses sort of left out a little bit. No shock ending to 137, for example. Some of us don't approve.

In three years of Masses you will get the 4 gospels almost in their entirety. (Maybe the genealogies of Mt. and Lk ares skimmed a little. Add to that the two year cycle of daily Mass readings and you've got a heavy NT dose and a decent amount of OT.

Still, important as that is, it won't replace time spent with the Bible and on the Bible.

I LOVE the notion of Calvin's picking up at the next verse after the hiatus! On the other hand, I think devotion MUST include Bible study but ought not to be limited to it and I'm a great fan of the "seasons" of the Church year. So I'm not all about going from one end to the other of the Bible in public worship.

12 posted on 10/28/2009 7:18:10 PM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin: pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Mad Dawg
In three years of Masses you will get the 4 gospels almost in their entirety. (Maybe the genealogies of Mt. and Lk ares skimmed a little. Add to that the two year cycle of daily Mass readings and you've got a heavy NT dose and a decent amount of OT.

Weekend Mass = Four gospels over 156 readings
Daily Mass = heavy dose NT, smaller dose OT (a recent addition) over 730 readings

Thanks for the explanation. You do realize that's a long way from the "Catholics hear the entire Bible in three years" apologetic that I hear from other Catholics, don't you?

Still, important as that is, it won't replace time spent with the Bible and on the Bible....I think devotion MUST include Bible study but ought not to be limited to it and I'm a great fan of the "seasons" of the Church year.

One hundred percent in agreement with you on every point above, Mad Dawg. I myself am "all about going from one end to the other of the Bible in public worship", hence the Calvin anecdote, but I think we're in agreement that JUST readings in public worship or JUST private study should NOT be the ONLY exposure for believers. Thanks for everything in your post!

13 posted on 10/28/2009 7:46:22 PM PDT by Alex Murphy ("Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him" - Job 13:15)
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To: GonzoII; informavoracious; larose; RJR_fan; Prospero; Conservative Vermont Vet; ...
+

Freep-mail me to get on or off my pro-life and Catholic List:

Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to note-worthy Pro-Life or Catholic threads, or other threads of interest.

Obama Says A Baby Is A Punishment

Obama: “If they make a mistake, I don’t want them punished with a baby.”

14 posted on 10/28/2009 7:49:42 PM PDT by narses ("These are the days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed except his own.")
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To: Mad Dawg

For my part, I’ll gladly cheer anyone encouraging folks to read the Scriptures...even if his version has more books than mine!

;>)


15 posted on 10/28/2009 7:58:34 PM PDT by Mr Rogers (I loathe the ground he slithers on!)
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To: Mr Rogers; Alex Murphy
Well, just to keep my Catholic street cred, I want to say that the BEST place for up close and personal immersion in the Scriptures is in the Presence of the Blessed Sacrament. The Word in the Presence of the Word! It doesn't get a lot better than that, this side of the Kingdom.

For example, since mid-September and until the beginning of Advent, I am just savoring Ephesians. Sometimes it's explicitly devotional reading, but sometimes it's more scholarly in focus. But I'm enjoying a nice relationship with that letter.

Alex, what I've heard which is, I think, pretty true, is that attentive Catholics end up with a LOT of scripture kind of sneaking into their consciousness. They haven't done enough formal study (though I think more do these days than did before Vatican II) but a lot is sort of clanging around in there.

Perhaps because I'm in a Dominican parish, there is almost always a brief homily at every Mass, and often they are a brief exposition du texte, though sometimes the homilist will draw a moral or a piece of spiritual advice.

16 posted on 10/28/2009 8:15:37 PM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin: pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Mr Rogers

I guess maybe it’s an acquired taste, but I really, really love it. I wish more people had a sense of what a kick it is to read the Bible.


17 posted on 10/28/2009 8:17:49 PM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin: pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Mad Dawg

One of the blessings of these online discussions is that it has driven me to read more and study more, and the more I study, the more I enjoy reading and studying.

May God bless your studies!


18 posted on 10/28/2009 8:27:47 PM PDT by Mr Rogers (I loathe the ground he slithers on!)
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To: Mr Rogers
Yeah! I have the same experience. I'm really glad to be refreshing my kind of rusty and creaky Greek.

And Blessings to you, also.

I may have mentioned I am going to take a week away from home at a small Dominican Priory and research the word "emeth"= "truth" in the OT. I had been toying with the idea for this project (which I'm sure wiser, holier, and better scholars than I have already done) for a while before I had the "duh" moment of remembering that the motto for Dominicans is "Veritas".

And I mention that as intro to say that, as we Christians 'know', THE Truth is a person who calls out to us in love, and says "seek my face." So I rejoice in the kinship that all share who respond, "Your face, O Lord, will I seek."

I have to thank Him for His promise that those who seek will find.

19 posted on 10/28/2009 8:50:21 PM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin: pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Mad Dawg
I guess maybe it’s an acquired taste, but I really, really love it. I wish more people had a sense of what a kick it is to read the Bible.

Youbetcha! It's like drinking from the firehose!


20 posted on 10/28/2009 9:29:50 PM PDT by Alex Murphy ("Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him" - Job 13:15)
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To: GonzoII; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...

Ping!


21 posted on 10/29/2009 3:32:21 AM PDT by NYer ( "One Who Prays Is Not Afraid; One Who Prays Is Never Alone"- Benedict XVI)
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To: Mad Dawg

I try to go to adoration daily. I discovered it during a difficult period, and it was a blessing.

I also read the bible in adoration. I either open up the bible and decide that that page has a message for me from God, or read the daily Gospel from the Magnificat.

Love it!


22 posted on 10/29/2009 4:02:24 AM PDT by mgist
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To: Mad Dawg
Sidelight on the word "emeth" -- C.S. Lewis made that the name of his Good Calormene in The Last Battle.

Scripture during Mass is a Good Thing, since of course the same lectionary and the same basic pattern of readings went on in my former denomination, nothing has changed as far as the quantity (but of course, Everything has changed, on a different level.)

But, given the variable audibility or intelligibility on the part of the readers (although our deacons have good strong voices so nobody misses the Gospel), not to mention screaming babies and the inevitable distractions (especially if you sing in the choir and you're not quite sure what the offertory anthem is going to be) I think reading/study at home is a very good idea.

My Greek is pretty rusty too, with the additional disadvantage of having learned it as Classical and then Homeric Greek -- I will say that koine is very straightforward (mostly - St. Paul gins up some pretty complicated clauses sometimes, even in English).

But I'm going to get a GOOD dose of Greek this evening. The Patriarch of Constantinople is in town, and our choir is participating in the Ecumenical Service, representing the Latins. There will also be the Greek Cathedral choir as well as a brave buncha Bible Baptists (who will no doubt sing rings around the rest of us). We're going to sing the Litany of the Saints, as a species of compliment to our hosts and the guest of honor with all the Greek Church Fathers inserted, then the chant Ave Maria and the Victoria Ave Maria.

23 posted on 10/29/2009 4:56:29 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary - (recess appointment))
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To: mgist; Mad Dawg

I will carry along a Bible the next time I go to Adoration. That’s a really good idea.


24 posted on 10/29/2009 4:57:21 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary - (recess appointment))
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To: AnAmericanMother

Yeah - I caught that when that word came up in Hebrew Vocab mumble mumble years ago.

I got my wife a subscription to Magnificat which she brings to Sunday Mass so I can always follow along. This helps with the varying quality of the lectors.

I wish I could be at this service you describe. Wow! IT sounds beautiful.


25 posted on 10/29/2009 5:33:58 AM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin: pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: mgist

Do you know about Lectio Divina? It’s da Bomb!


26 posted on 10/29/2009 5:42:16 AM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin: pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Mad Dawg
I'll give a full report when I get back.

His full title is "His All Holiness Bartholomew I, Archbishop of Constantinople, New Rome and Ecumenical Patriarch".

27 posted on 10/29/2009 6:04:40 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary - (recess appointment))
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To: Mad Dawg; AnAmericanMother; mgist
"One of my favorite things to do at adoration is to read the Bible."

Me too MD. A new Church was just built about 200 yards from my place of work and its always open when I punch out!! And I usually go in with Bible (big Douay Rheims) in hand or pocket (little King James Version New Testament with Psalms and Proverbs) to read.

When I think about going in without my Bible I hear Bp. Sheen's voice ringing in my ears "Always, always the Scriptures!", words he spoke when he talked about how to make a Holy Hour in front of the Blessed Sacrament. He left room for just about anything during it, but the Scriptures should always be included.

Freegards.

28 posted on 10/29/2009 6:28:09 AM PDT by GonzoII ("That they may be one...Father")
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To: GOP Poet

Thanks GonzoII for the post!

You’re welcome!


29 posted on 10/29/2009 6:32:31 AM PDT by GonzoII ("That they may be one...Father")
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To: GonzoII

OH, my! Please blast this to all the people on FR who continually try to throw the old “Catholics don’t read the Bible” in our faces.

We read the Bible as a community ever Sunday at Mass (4 passages) and the list of scriptures to read for the week is printed in our weekly bulletins. Then add in what we should be doing on our own, parish Bible studies, etc.

Will any of them have the courage to let go of that old stereotype and look at these facts?


30 posted on 10/29/2009 6:59:47 AM PDT by Melian ("frequently in error, rarely in doubt")
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To: Carpe Cerevisi; Petronski; Mr Rogers
But, but, I thought we weren’t allowed to read the Bible!!

We Catholics are supposed to read the Bible. dunno about others... :-P
31 posted on 10/29/2009 7:46:14 AM PDT by Cronos (Nuke Mecca NOW!!!)
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To: GonzoII
Full text of Pope's catechesis
32 posted on 10/29/2009 7:51:40 AM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: AnAmericanMother
the chant Ave Maria and the Victoria Ave Maria

Victoria's Ave Maria, like many works of sacred music of the Renaissance, begins with a chant intonation and then continues with a chant influence. Victoria's Ave Maria is one of my favorite versions.

33 posted on 10/29/2009 7:56:47 AM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: ELS
Yep, and our choirmaster's standard performance practice is to lead with the chant and then transition into the motet. It's easy with the Victoria, although you either have to pitch the chant quite high or do a little noodling on the organ to get into the proper key for the Victoria. A true soprano melody is a bit high for the rest of us . . . .

Fortunately for our choirmaster that's not a problem. He can sight read and transpose at the same time, and also create musically- and historically- appropriate transitional filler between two works on the fly.

We were torn between the Victoria "Ave Maria" and the Hassler "Dixit Maria" for this venture, decided the Victoria was more appropriate since we're not quite into Advent yet.

34 posted on 10/29/2009 8:09:35 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary - (recess appointment))
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To: Alex Murphy
Weekend Mass = Four gospels over 156 readings

There are epistle readings and Old Testament* readings at Sunday Mass as well.

*Except during the Easter season, when we read from Acts.

The readings for each month are posted on the USCCB site.

The "Revised Common Lectionary" used by a number of Protestant denominations is based on ours.

35 posted on 10/29/2009 8:14:45 AM PDT by Campion ("President Barack Obama" is an anagram for "An Arab-backed Imposter")
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To: Mr Rogers

I encourage you to read all of Scripture not just the heavily abridged and edited copy you possess.


36 posted on 10/29/2009 9:02:35 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham (Barry Soetoro is a Kenyan communist)
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To: GonzoII

Have you considered an iPhone? I have the entire Bible (complete with a boolian search feature), Catholic calendar with daily readings, a compendium of prayers, the Stations of the Cross, the Rosary, etc. in an app called iPieta. It’s fabulous. I still use a missal at Mass though because when I’m using the phone people might think I’m just checking my messages or something!


37 posted on 10/29/2009 5:06:03 PM PDT by Melian ("frequently in error, rarely in doubt")
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To: Melian

Does it have the Little Office of the Virgin Mary?


38 posted on 10/29/2009 8:17:04 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary - (recess appointment))
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To: AnAmericanMother

My dear, the iPhone app iPieta has so much I can’t even begin to write it:

For Mary alone, it has Basic prayers- Hail Mary, Hail Holy Queen, Memorare, Angeles, Regina Caeli, Litany of Loretto, Sub Tuum, Magnificat, Ave Maris Stella and Jesus Living In Mary.

For Devotions, it has- The Rosary, Little Office of BVM I, Fatima Prayers, Our Lady of Victory, Chaplet of Mount Carmel, the Tessera, Mt. Carmel Novena, and the Fatima Novena.

iPieta also has a nice examination of conscience, many prayers and novenas to different saints (St. Philomena!), a simple exorcism blessing and other blessings, the Chaplet of Padre Pio, the Complete Catechism of the Catholic Church, the Summa Theologica, the Baltimore Catechism, the Imitation of Christ, and the Lives of the Saints. There’s more than this, but you get the idea! Keep in mind that you are carrying all this wealth around in your pocket, along with your music, your calendar, your address book etc. It all weighs a few ounces. You can also download free audio files from iPieta.

It is priceless. If you want to see a bit more about it, you can go to iTunes and look it up in the Apps section. I’ve been very happy with it. Like the Faith, it is bottomless!


39 posted on 10/29/2009 8:37:53 PM PDT by Melian ("frequently in error, rarely in doubt")
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To: AnAmericanMother

I forgot to mention you get all that in the iPieta app for $2.99!


40 posted on 10/29/2009 8:41:44 PM PDT by Melian ("frequently in error, rarely in doubt")
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To: Mad Dawg
Back and pretty exhausted . . . just got finished putting the Tandoori chicken in to marinate because the Parochial Vicar #2 is coming to dinner tomorrow night and he likes Indian food . . . Tandoor chicken plus lamb korma, sweet saffron rice, naan bread, Gujarati green beans, and sherbet with fruit for dessert. I do pretty well with it for a Scots/Irish girl (thanks to Madhur Jaffrey's outstanding cookbook).

I arrived early (3:30 for a 4:30 rehearsal, 5:30 service) because Atlanta traffic can be treacherous but it wasn't this time. Haven't been to the Orthodox Cathedral in years, when I was a preteen and young teenager we had several good family friends who were pillars of this church (more on that later!) It is not a large sanctuary, but the associated buildings ramble down a hill and cover several acres of ground on the north side of Decatur, on Clairmont Road. Wandered in through the main entrance, past several barricades manned by DeKalb County sheriffs (His All Holiness is the equivalent of a head of state). Asked directions of a young man with a name tag, who pointed me to the choir loft (which I never would have found as it is reached by an obscure winding staircase behind two doors off to one side). The Orthodox choir was already assembling, they have two sections, a more conventional SATB group with an organist, and an a capella male schola which they call a 'chant choir'. Our folks started trickling in around 4:30, and while the Orthodox choir was warming up we dashed downstairs to a small courtyard outside. Albert gave us the pitch and we ran the chant, the Victoria, and part of the Litany of the Saints very quickly, and it all sounded quite well even though our tenor had not showed up yet . . . he's always late and we're almost used to it . . . . Back upstairs to sit and wait for things to begin. Then of course our tenor showed up.

The sanctuary is simply magnificent. It is round in form, with many tall narrow windows and a huge dome. Beautiful full length mosaics on all the walls, depicting iconic scenes from the Life of Christ -- the Crucifixion, Resurrection, Ascension, Pentecost, the Harrowing of Hell -- the Dormition of the Virgin on the wall above the choir loft, and in the top of the great dome Christ Pantocrator. The iconostasis (in the position of a roodscreen, but made of brass or some other gold-colored metal, with beautiful full-length icons of Christ, the Virgin Mary, and saints and angels) is very modern in form, with elaborate doors leading to the high altar, which were open for the service.

The bells began to ring, and the various priests, bishops, archbishops and metropolitans, from all over the world, began to process. There must have been nearly 100 various clerics, all dressed in deepest black. Our Archbishop Emeritus relieved the general gloom in his purple choir vestments (ok, that's the Episcopalian term for vestments worn when not celebrating, is there a separate Catholic term?), attended by two priests in cassocks and their best surplices (one of whom is our 1st Parochial Vicar who has been instrumental in getting the local ecumenical effort started).

Then His All Holiness Bartholomew I appeared upon the scene, a very handsome man with a beautiful long white beard, very dignified, in brilliant red vestments with gold embroidery and a long train, which was carried by two deacons. The cameras in the nave were going off continuously (and no wonder). As he processed, the Orthodox Choir began to sing a series of anthems in Greek - very close harmony and very beautiful. He took his seat on the episcopal throne to the right of the area before the iconostasis.

The master of ceremonies (a local Greek politician!) greeted all the various guests, and then our Archbishop gave the first reading from the Church Fathers. Then we sang . . . and really it went quite well. The acoustics were excellent, there were about 10 of us because most folks couldn't get off work, but it sounded very nice. Then there was a second Patristic Reading by the local metropolitan (who looks exactly like Santa Claus, only in black). Then the Baptist Choir, who were positioned down on the floor to the left front with their own electronic keyboard (there were too many of them to sit in the small choir loft - probably 50 I would say). They sang a roof-raising unison hymn in perfect blend, then a second hymn where the verses were sung in unison but the chorus went into parts, then a call and response form with the female soloist ad libbing over and above the response . . . you could see from the expressions of some of the primates on the dais in front that they had never heard anything quite like THAT before - some of them actually turned around and stared!

There was a long address in Greek from His All Holiness, of which I could catch about every 10th word, then he was kind enough to read a prepared statement in English regarding the ecumenical effort and the theme of his pastoral visit to the U.S.: stewardship of the environment. He thanked all the dignitaries and visitors (including us!) and then the Greek choir sang the Small Doxology in honor of the Theotokos . . . and one of the ladies who was sitting beside us shoved some music at those of us who could reach, so we just joined in. It wasn't hard, except trying to read the Greek and the alto part at the same time! The pronunciation was close enough for us to fake it though.

Then we adjourned downstairs for Great. Greek. Food.

The tale I mentioned above is this -- I was just chatting beforehand with the lady who was sort of a coordinator for the choirs (not the musical director, but in some sort of management position). Turns out she is the daughter of a (sadly deceased) local judge here who was very popular and well thought of by the bar, a pillar of this cathedral and a very close friend of my dad's. In fact, dad was his campaign manager. So we fell on each other's necks (we hadn't seen each other since we were little bratty kids). You meet people you know in the STRANGEST places . . . .

That's all from the front lines of the Ecumenical Prayer Service!

41 posted on 10/29/2009 8:58:43 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary - (recess appointment))
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To: Melian
Wow! I JUST got my iPhone (I have been living with a clunky cellphone that was about the size of an old walkie-talkie and just made phone calls, that's all. But it died last week) and have been making do with free apps, but it sounds like this one is well worth the price!!!!!

Thanks! (I wanted to properly receive the Brown Scapular but wasn't able to obtain a copy of the Little Office locally).

42 posted on 10/29/2009 9:01:07 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary - (recess appointment))
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To: Melian
"Have you considered an iPhone? "

No I haven't. Can you read it in the dark? How many Bibles fit in it?

43 posted on 10/30/2009 5:44:58 AM PDT by GonzoII ("That they may be one...Father")
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To: GonzoII

Yes you can read it in the dark! And you can fit an astounding number of Bibles in it, not to mention that you can access the internet from anywhere, so you can waste more time on FR (if you don’t mind typing s...l...o...w...l...y . . . .


44 posted on 10/30/2009 7:03:29 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary - (recess appointment))
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To: AnAmericanMother

Thanks for the info!


45 posted on 10/30/2009 8:15:45 AM PDT by GonzoII ("That they may be one...Father")
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To: Alex Murphy
one-third of Americans continue to believe that it is literally true, something organizers of the Synod on the Word of God called a dangerous form of fundamentalism that is “winning more and more adherents…even among Catholics.” Such literalism, the synod’s preparatory document said, “demands an unshakable adherence to rigid doctrinal points of view and imposes, as the only source of teaching for Christian life and salvation, a reading of the Bible which rejects all questioning and any kind of critical research”....

So, the Pope wants Catholics to read it, but not believe it.

Where would Catholics and Orthodox be without the nineteenth century liberal Lutherans who invented "critical research" on the Bible?

46 posted on 10/30/2009 8:24:32 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (Va'avarekhah mevarekheykha umeqallelkha 'a'or; venivrekhu vekha kol mishpechot ha'adamah.)
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To: GonzoII
Pope calls Catholics to daily meditation on the Bible
What Are the "Apocrypha?"
The Accuracy of Scripture
US Conference of Catholic Bishops recommendations for Bible study

CNA unveils resource to help Catholics understand the Scriptures
The Dos and Don’ts of Reading the Bible [Ecumenical]
Pope to lead marathon Bible reading on Italian TV
The Complete Bible: Why Catholics Have Seven More Books [Ecumenical]
Beginning Catholic: Books of the Catholic Bible: The Complete Scriptures [Ecumenical]

Beginning Catholic: When Was The Bible Written? [Ecumenical]
The Complete Bible: Why Catholics Have Seven More Books [Ecumenical]
U.S. among most Bible-literate nations: poll
Bible Lovers Not Defined by Denomination, Politics
Dei Verbum (Catholics and the Bible)

Vatican Offers Rich Online Source of Bible Commentary
Clergy Congregation Takes Bible Online
Knowing Mary Through the Bible: Mary's Last Words
A Bible Teaser For You... (for everyone :-)
Knowing Mary Through the Bible: New Wine, New Eve

Return of Devil's Bible to Prague draws crowds
Doctrinal Concordance of the Bible [What Catholics Believe from the Bible] Catholic Caucus
Should We Take the Bible Literally or Figuratively?
Glimpsing Words, Practices, or Beliefs Unique to Catholicism [Bible Trivia]
Catholic and Protestant Bibles: What is the Difference?

Church and the Bible(Caatholic Caucus)
Pope Urges Prayerful Reading of Bible
Catholic Caucus: It's the Church's Bible
How Tradition Gave Us the Bible
The Church or the Bible

47 posted on 10/30/2009 8:30:40 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Alex Murphy

No the genealogies are in the three year cycle.


48 posted on 10/30/2009 8:35:48 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: AnAmericanMother

Our Adoration Room has about six Bibles in it — all with pieces of paper in them where people have marked their place!


49 posted on 10/30/2009 8:36:56 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: GonzoII

Yes, the screen is bright and you can read it in the dark. It has at least two versions of the Bible and one is the DR. The other is the Latin Vulgate. See my posts to American Mother in this thread to learn more about what the iPieta iPhone application offers.

It’s great and it only costs $2.99 (’course, you have to buy an iPhone). But that’s just one app. I also have several books, the complete works of Shakespeare, and many hundreds of songs on my iPhone.

It’s a wonderful tool!


50 posted on 10/30/2009 4:29:32 PM PDT by Melian ("frequently in error, rarely in doubt")
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