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Mexico: 2 kids, woman killed in Saint Death ritual
Associated Press (Miami Herald) ^ | 3/30/12 | Staff

Posted on 03/30/2012 4:08:58 PM PDT by ruralvoter

Eight people have been arrested for allegedly killing two 10-year-old boys and a 55-year-old woman in ritual sacrifices by the cult of La Santa Muerte, or Saint Death, prosecutors in northern Mexico said Friday.

Jose Larrinaga, spokesman for Sonora state prosecutors, said the victims' blood was poured around an altar to the saint, which is depicted as a skeleton holding a scythe and clothed in flowing robes.

The grisly slayings recalled the notorious "narco-satanicos" killings of the 1980s, when 15 bodies, many of them with signs of ritual sacrifice, were unearthed at a ranch outside the border city of Matamoros, across from Brownsville, Texas.

While Saint Death has become the focus of a cult among drug traffickers and criminals in Mexico in recent years, there have been no confirmed cases of human sacrifices in Mexico to the scary-looking saint, which is not recognized by the Roman Catholic Church. Worshippers usually offer candy, cigarettes and incense to the skeleton-statue.

(Excerpt) Read more at miamiherald.com ...


TOPICS: Current Events; Other non-Christian; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: cult; mexico; ritual; sacrifice

1 posted on 03/30/2012 4:09:13 PM PDT by ruralvoter
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To: ruralvoter

I’ve seen that and cannot understand how anybody can worship that thing.


2 posted on 03/30/2012 4:15:03 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: ruralvoter
Santa Muerte is female, and is yet another example of the syncretism so often found in Catholicism, in South and Central America, in Mexico and in the Caribbean Islands.

I would not be surprised at all to learn that this “saint” is equated with an actual saint in magical rituals, as certainly is the case in Voodoo.

3 posted on 03/30/2012 4:18:44 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

http://somewhereelse.com.au/?p=8785


4 posted on 03/30/2012 5:16:10 PM PDT by Lera (Proverbs 29:2)
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To: RegulatorCountry

“Santa Muerte” has nothing to do with Catholicism, sorry.


5 posted on 03/30/2012 6:41:36 PM PDT by Campion ("Social justice" begins in the womb)
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To: ruralvoter

Santa Muerte is pure Aztec, the goddess of the underworld Mictecacihuatl, with Catholic trappings. With an estimated 2m or more believers of some extent or other, this cult represents an extremely grave threat, one that only the Catholic church so far seems to appreciate.

Death worshiping cults are inherently extremely dangerous, and when they turn murderous, they become very murderous, and indiscreet about who they murder.

The best comparison to Santa Muerte is probably the Indian Thuggee, who at their peak were just a fraction of the size of the Santa Muerte cult, yet came close to paralyzing all of India. The British had to militarily wipe them out, in a war of extermination, *twice*. Much to the relief of about everyone else in India.

All Santa Muerte really needs is a charismatic leader, and they could throw much of North America into confusion. Anyone of a Hispanic or Mexican Indian background, anywhere, would have to be looked at as suspicious. Men, women, even children could without warning become homicidal.


6 posted on 03/30/2012 6:51:33 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy ("Be Brave! Fear is just the opposite of Nar!")
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To: RegulatorCountry
Santa Muerte is female, and is yet another example of the syncretism so often found in Catholicism, in South and Central America, in Mexico and in the Caribbean Islands.

Sad to say but those folks DO practice non-Catholicism. Some of them bring it to the USA. Yuck.

Those south-of-the-border folks who ARE syncretistic in their Catholic faith are Catholics in name only....NOT practicing Catholics. Adding ANYTHING from their culture which changes Church doctrine and morality is a grevous sin--no animal/human sacrifice, no voodoo, no real blood, no dancing, just the facts, ma'am way the faith (Mass, sacraments, Scripture, catechism) is taught by Church fathers.

Got caught up in the Sergeant Friday mode there for a moment.

7 posted on 03/30/2012 6:53:59 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Campion
“Santa Muerte” has nothing to do with Catholicism, sorry.

Amen.

8 posted on 03/30/2012 6:56:04 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: RegulatorCountry
From wiki

As the cult of Santa Muerte was clandestine until recently, most prayers and other rites are done privately in the home. However, for the past ten years or so, worship has become more public, especially in Mexico City.[4][6] The cult is condemned by the Catholic Church in Mexico, but it is firmly entrenched among Mexico’s lower classes and criminal worlds.

9 posted on 03/30/2012 7:08:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Campion; RegulatorCountry
“Santa Muerte” has nothing to do with Catholicism, sorry.

That's true, but it's also not, exactly. The cult of Lady Death isn't Catholic, but it's part of the culture of some Catholics. There's a woman in our congregation who has a tattoo of Santa Muerte on her arm! Now, it may be a remnant of her life pre-conversion, but I also think that some of our people have been so isolated from docrinally-sound Catholicism that they don't see a contradiction between worshipping God, honoring the saints, and propitiating what they recognize as powerful forces of evil.

It's textbook paganism, of course, but they don't realize it. The Church has been struggling in Mexico for over 100 years, and many of the people are genuinely devout, *as they understand it*, but tragically untaught. The Salvadorans have some of the same problems with violence and drugs as Mexico, but they don't have the same issues with religious syncretism. They're the backbone of the Spanish-speaking Charismatic Renewal, great Bible-readers and very evangelical.

10 posted on 03/30/2012 7:16:10 PM PDT by Tax-chick (The Commie Plot Theory of Everything. Give it a try - you'll be surprised how often it makes sense.)
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To: Campion
I'm reasonably certain that it's only associated with Catholicism, Campion.

It's just odd how all these magical, ritualistic practices get tacked onto Catholicism all across Mexico, Central and South America and in the Caribbean.

Wonder why that might be? Can you think of a single one of these syncretist beliefs associated with, say, Baptists for instance? I can't. It's always Catholicism.

11 posted on 03/30/2012 7:19:49 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Tax-chick

I’ve known a few people who somehow managed to get paganism or even occult tangled in with their professed Christianity. Most are sincere, but misguided as you note. But, there are others who are rather more cynical, who recognize the power of Christianity only so far as it’s of service to self, and they’re the ones who really bother me. It verges upon satanic. In the US at least, these aren’t always Catholic, some are failed Protestants and usually out of the more liturgically oriented demominations, others really had no professed belief prior, but they’re always nihilists with a dark cloud following them.


12 posted on 03/30/2012 7:29:33 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry; Campion; Anoreth
Can you think of a single one of these syncretist beliefs associated with, say, Baptists for instance?

The mixture of traditional and Protestant Christian beliefs in Africa has many elements in common with the mixture of traditional and Catholic Christian beliefs in Latin America. Read up on Liberia, for example.

And what about the Prosperity Gospel movement, so prominent in current American Protestantism? Isn't that, in many ways, similar to a pagan understanding of man's relationship to divinity? In its American incarnation, it lacks the "color" of Mexican distortions of Catholicism, but in Africa ...

13 posted on 03/30/2012 7:31:02 PM PDT by Tax-chick (The Commie Plot Theory of Everything. Give it a try - you'll be surprised how often it makes sense.)
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To: Tax-chick

Aah, the “money churches.”. Fair enough, but I’ve never regarded them as particularly pagan, just crass.


14 posted on 03/30/2012 7:37:28 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry; Campion
but they’re always nihilists with a dark cloud following them.

Like Barack Obama? I don't think that he and the Black Liberation Theology (pass the Islam!) movement are an outgrowth of "liturgical denominations." At least not a proximate outgrowth! "African Methodist Episcopal" doesn't look like Methodist or Episcopal services I've attended, not that some of them aren't nice people, and they throw a heck of a barbecue fundraiser.

I think you're drawing an erroneous conclusion from insufficient data. I think it's less a question of Catholic or Protestant than of historical factors, which Christian communion first interacted with a pagan, tribal society first. Even Eastern Orthodoxy gets rather unusual, in Africa and Southeast Asia.

After that, there are a batch of other historical factors. We think of Mexico as a "Catholic country," but for well over a hundred years it's had an anti-Catholic government beyond (well, in reach of ...) Obama's wildest dreams. Some of our Mexican parishioners, especially from the northern states, went many years without regular Mass, without seeing a priest, without any catechesis. All they knew was what their parents and grandparents remembers, and cultural accretions of who-knows-what.

15 posted on 03/30/2012 7:41:18 PM PDT by Tax-chick (The Commie Plot Theory of Everything. Give it a try - you'll be surprised how often it makes sense.)
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To: RegulatorCountry
I’ve never regarded them as particularly pagan ...

Then you weren't looking at the essence. The essence of paganism is, "I give you, you give me," or "I pay you, you don't Zot me." One version or the other characterizes most overtly pagan religions and most distortions of Christianity or of Judaism.

16 posted on 03/30/2012 7:44:12 PM PDT by Tax-chick (The Commie Plot Theory of Everything. Give it a try - you'll be surprised how often it makes sense.)
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To: Tax-chick

“Name it and claim it” is at base magical thinking, so point taken.

No rituals let alone bloodletting or sacrifice associated with it, though, so it doesn’t jump out as such. No strange gods, just money and more stuff.

Crass.


17 posted on 03/30/2012 8:02:52 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry
St. Paul says all greed is idolatry. You'll find the bloodletting and sacrifice in Africa, though. Try V.S. Naipaul, "The Mask of Africa." It's in Meck. library, so probably in yours, too. Or this, which I read recently:


18 posted on 03/30/2012 8:08:22 PM PDT by Tax-chick (The Commie Plot Theory of Everything. Give it a try - you'll be surprised how often it makes sense.)
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To: RegulatorCountry
I'm reasonably certain that it's only associated with Catholicism, Campion.

No, it's only associated with Mexicans, because it's a direct carryover of the Aztec god of the underworld.

It was there before Catholicism arrived. External trappings may have changed, but it's the same pagan belief all along.

And it's been condemned by the Church.

19 posted on 03/31/2012 1:47:20 PM PDT by Campion ("Social justice" begins in the womb)
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To: RegulatorCountry
No strange gods, just money and more stuff.

"Money and more stuff" is a "strange god". It's one of the more pernicious idols you'll find, all the moreso because it doesn't necessarily come with any exotic pagan trappings.

20 posted on 03/31/2012 1:49:46 PM PDT by Campion ("Social justice" begins in the womb)
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To: Campion

Well, maybe the early, Indian evangelizing Protestant churches in North America were just lucky, lol. There don’t appear to be corresponding examples of syncretic belief carrying over there.

Or, could it be that there was no pantheon of saints to swap out on the surface for their old pagan pantheist gods, possibly?

Cherokee beliefs were compatible to a degree that was startling to Moravian missionaries, I’ve read some of their accounts. They were apparently monotheists before ever being evangelized.


21 posted on 03/31/2012 2:43:48 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Tax-chick; RegulatorCountry; Campion
"There's a woman in our congregation who has a tattoo of Santa Muerte on her arm!"

So, by the logic of some on this thread, your congregation is tangled up with and at least tolerant of pagan death cults. The only way someone can believe stuff like that is if they really, really want to.

22 posted on 03/31/2012 3:27:02 PM PDT by Natural Law (If you love the Catholic Church raise your hands, if not raise your standards.)
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To: Natural Law

Well, NL, why would she have such a thing by your “logic?”

Because she just thought it was pretty?


23 posted on 03/31/2012 3:48:44 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry
"Well, NL, why would she have such a thing by your “logic?”"

I don't know and don't care, but if you are without sin, keep throwing.

24 posted on 03/31/2012 7:58:19 PM PDT by Natural Law (If you love the Catholic Church raise your hands, if not raise your standards.)
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To: RegulatorCountry; Natural Law; Campion

It’s probably that among our group of Mexicans, there are some who had drug-cartel involvement. We have people from Sinaloa, the homeland of some of the cartels and of the Santa Muerte cult. Whatever they did in the past, they wouldn’t be attending our church now if they weren’t serious about being Christians.

I’m sure RC can look at the experiences of African Protestants and see that Catholic faith is not the key factor in mixing occult belief with Christianity ... because this is simply a verifiable fact, and we conservatives live with facts, instead of dismissing them like the “progressives” do.

Native Americans are no more monolithic than Europeans, from Ireland to Russia. The religion of Cherokees was cleaner than that of indigenous Mexicans or the tribes of Liberia. Some anthropologists suggest an environmental component - the harder life is, the more demanding the “gods,” in terms of blood and cruelty - but that’s just a theory.


25 posted on 03/31/2012 8:19:30 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Read "Radical Son" by David Horowitz to understand the Left.)
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To: Campion

Whenever I hear these reports, then consider the academic queries regarding the fate of the Anasazi’s, I’m led to consider that God not only judges individuals but also by group as with Sodom and Gomorrah. There might be very good reasons why some of these groups disappear from human history.


26 posted on 04/01/2012 11:29:05 AM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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