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Some images from Benedict XVI’s final day as pope (nice summation of the day)
Catholic World Report ^ | February 28, 2013 | Catherine Harmon

Posted on 03/01/2013 2:29:12 PM PST by NYer

Below are some of the most striking images from today, Pope Benedict XVI’s last day as Supreme Pontiff. All images are courtesy Catholic News Service:

Pope Benedict XVI addresses the College of Cardinals at the Vatican Feb. 28, the final day of his papacy. In attendance were 144 cardinals, including many of the 115 younger than 80 who are eligible and expected to vote in the upcoming conclave.

 

A poster erected by the city of Rome thanking Pope Benedict XVI is seen near the Vatican Feb. 28. The poster says in Italian: "You will remain always with us. Thanks."

 

A woman and a Missionaries of Charity nun react as they watch a giant screen showing the departure of Pope Benedict XVI from the Vatican to the papal summer residence at Castel Gandolfo, Feb. 28.

 

A helicopter carrying Pope Benedict XVI takes off from inside the Vatican on its way to Castel Gandolfo.

 

Clergy and seminarians from the Pontifical North American College in Rome watch from the school's rooftop as the helicopter carrying Pope Benedict XVI departs the Vatican.

 

Pope Benedict XVI greets a crowd gathered for his arrival in Castel Gandolfo. It was his final public appearance before he drew to a close his papacy. "I am a simple pilgrim who begins the last stage of his pilgrimage on this earth," he said.

 

People watch from windows before Pope Benedict XVI's final public appearance as pope in Castel Gandolfo.

 

A member of the Swiss Guard closes the main door of the papal villa at Castel Gandolfo at 8 p.m. Feb. 28. The Swiss Guard concluded its protective service to Pope Benedict XVI, signaling the end of his papacy.

 

Vatican workers seal the doors leading to the pope's private apartment in the Apostolic Palace at the Vatican Feb. 28. Pope Benedict XVI ended his reign pledging unconditional obedience to whoever is elected to succeed him.

 

The statue of Christ the Redeemer, flanked by ones of St. John the Baptist and St. Andrew, is seen in a nighttime view of St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican Feb. 28.

 

This is the Vatican insignia representing a the "sede vacante" (vacant see).


TOPICS: Catholic; Current Events
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 03/01/2013 2:29:19 PM PST by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; SumProVita; ...

Ping!


2 posted on 03/01/2013 2:30:07 PM PST by NYer (“Beware the man of a single book.” - St. Thomas Aquinas)
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To: NYer

Thanks very much, NYer.
I watched all LIVE on EWTN.


3 posted on 03/01/2013 2:48:20 PM PST by onyx (FREE REPUBLIC IS HERE TO STAY! DONATE MONTHLY! IF YOU WANT ON SARAH PALIN''S PING LIST, LET ME KNOW)
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Upon his election, Pope Benedict implored the faithful to, "Pray for me, that I may not flee for fear of the wolves."

It's too bad he didn't get enough of those prayers.

4 posted on 03/01/2013 4:15:04 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: NYer

I’m not a Catholic, but I do enjoy watching all the pomp and circumstance surrounding the Pope and the goings-on at the Vatican. I’ve got my issues with Catholic theology... But I think Jesus was serious when he told Peter “upon this Rock...” And such. So... I look forward to the process. Pope Benedict was a good man, a smart and thoughtful leader.

I have my own take on why he’s stepping down, that seems so obvious but nobody seems to be saying it-— it’s because he wants to set a new precedent. He has written at length before he was Pope that he believed that Pontiffs were all hanging on too long, waiting to die in office, long after their bodies and minds had let them down. That it was a better service to the Church to step down -before- you became an invalid. That the Church deserved someone with their full energy and vitality.

A sensible and defensible argument, whether you agree or not. I think he’s taking this step to make precedent— and make it that much easier or perhaps -expected- of future Popes. Anyway... My .02


5 posted on 03/01/2013 4:41:00 PM PST by Ramius (Personally, I give us one chance in three. More tea anyone?)
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To: ebb tide

You really think he resigned because he was afraid? You don’t think it might have been because he’d had two strokes, is functionally blind in one eye, is losing sight in the other eye, has intractable arthritis pain, and now has a heart condition that will prevent him from flying? The people around him, including someone I know, have noted his exhaustion, weakness, illness, and pain. That is not fear but a realistic knowledge of one’s own shortcomings.


6 posted on 03/01/2013 5:51:09 PM PST by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: Ramius

I agree. There should be a separation between the man and the office. Furthur, I am sure that the Holy Father knew that his age led to make too many judgement based on friendship ,and his personal kindness would not let tell his friends, you are not cutting it in this role. Take another chair in the choir. He was not at all well served by his staff. It think of the Regenburg Speech where the staff was blind to the need to get the speech to friendly journalists in advance so they could get its substance out before the speech was delivered.


7 posted on 03/01/2013 6:41:25 PM PST by RobbyS (Christus rex.)
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To: ottbmare
Yes, I do think so.

Do you think Pope John Paul II did wrong by not resigning in his last years?

8 posted on 03/01/2013 6:44:20 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: ottbmare

I think he feared his personal collapse into the same state as John Paul II in his last years. At a time when the Church needed him at full strength. If John Paul had resigned in 2000, I think the College would not have chosen Ratzinger, who would have made it clear he would not take the job.


9 posted on 03/01/2013 6:45:46 PM PST by RobbyS (Christus rex.)
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To: ebb tide

I need prayers every day. Don’t you?


10 posted on 03/01/2013 6:47:42 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: ottbmare

Pray for this Holy Father that we do lose not the gifts he still has to share with us.


11 posted on 03/01/2013 6:48:29 PM PST by RobbyS (Christus rex.)
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To: RobbyS
There should be a separation between the man and the office.

I strongly disagree. Previous popes have suffered martyrdom rather than separating from their "office". St. Peter didn't renounce his office.

Nor did Pope Leo XIII who remained Christ's Vicar until he died at the age of 93.

12 posted on 03/01/2013 6:59:22 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: Salvation

I have no idea what you are babbling about.


13 posted on 03/01/2013 7:04:33 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: ebb tide

Why is it so terrible to ask for prayers as the Pope did. I ask for prayers and need prayers practically everyday.


14 posted on 03/01/2013 7:46:14 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
I'm all for prayers.

I only said I didn't think the pope received the benefit of enough prayers (that he had requested) to keep him from fleeing the wolves.

15 posted on 03/01/2013 8:14:57 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: ebb tide
You are referring to two different things. Being concerned for the future of the beloved Church, knowing that one is going to be unable to defend it, is very different from being afraid, having fear, of the wolves that assail her. I am sure he felt no fear. Resigning and leaving the fight to someone younger and stronger, someone who could actually fly to distant cities, is prudence and wisdom, not fright.
16 posted on 03/01/2013 8:44:22 PM PST by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: ebb tide

And none of those Popes were flying around the world, nor did they have the kind of schedule that the modern Popes have had.


17 posted on 03/02/2013 6:27:54 AM PST by Not gonna take it anymore (If Obama were twice as smart as he is, he would be a wit)
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To: RobbyS

I knew from the time that he was elected that he was going to become a “transition” Pope.

May God Bless and be with Pope Benedict XVI, Emertius for the remaining time he has.


18 posted on 03/02/2013 3:16:41 PM PST by Biggirl ("Jesus talked to us as individuals"-Jim Vicevich/Thanks JimV!)
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To: Biggirl

I think of his as a continuation pope. His reign was an extension of John Paul II’s and a continuation of his own initiatives. JohnPaul trusted him implicitly, and he accepted the papacy as his cross to bear.


19 posted on 03/02/2013 6:20:02 PM PST by RobbyS (Christus rex.)
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To: ebb tide

Leo XIII was a prisoner of the Vatican. he didn’t do half the stuff that Benedict has had to do. Leo had the luxury of writing in a quiet study, as Benedict did before he became a bishop and up until the time that John Paul became ill. There is a reason why this scholar pope has written so few encyclicals.


20 posted on 03/02/2013 6:29:19 PM PST by RobbyS (Christus rex.)
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To: RobbyS

“Leo XIII was a prisoner of the Vatican. he didn’t do half the stuff that Benedict has had to do.”

Yeah, you’re right. Those World Youth Days and Assisi Lovefests really take their toll on a pope.


21 posted on 03/02/2013 7:42:49 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: NYer

Thanks


22 posted on 03/02/2013 7:45:50 PM PST by P.O.E. (Pray for America)
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To: Not gonna take it anymore

What’s your definition of a “modern pope”? St. Peter didn’t fly around the world and he’s responsible for more Catholic converts than the modern popes.


23 posted on 03/02/2013 7:49:31 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: ebb tide

No, he is expected to govern the Church in a way that Leo never was and in a Vatican divided. Even the Liberals are Ultra Montanes, which was why they so desperately wanted Martini as pope. Now Benedict has filled the college with men he—right, I hope—he trusts.


24 posted on 03/02/2013 7:58:40 PM PST by RobbyS (Christus rex.)
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To: ottbmare

Two questions:

1. How are you so sure the pope felt no fear?

2. Who told you the next pope will be someone younger, stronger, be able to fly to distant cities and leap tall buildings in a single bound?

With the likes of you, and your predictions, who needs the Holy Spirt’s guidance.


25 posted on 03/02/2013 8:03:19 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: RobbyS

Cardinals O’Malley and Wuerl? They are Pope Benedict’s “men”.


26 posted on 03/02/2013 8:11:03 PM PST by ebb tide
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To: ebb tide
Two questions:

1. How are you so sure the pope felt no fear?

Becausse he has and had nothing to fear. What reason would he have had for personal fear? Do you think some homosexual was going to break into the papal apartments and beat him up? Say even nastier things to him than were said to him on Twitter? Be tougher than the Nazis and Communists he had to contend with in his youth? It's pretty difficult to envision a scenario in which he would have faced any physical risk. What earthly thing might have struck fear into the heart of a man who is 86 and has already looked death in the eye several times?

2. Who told you the next pope will be someone younger, stronger, be able to fly to distant cities and leap tall buildings in a single bound?

I can't find the place in my post in which I suggested that the next pope will be able to leap tall buildings in a single bound; perhaps you would be kind enough point that bit out to me if you find it. However, it's safe to say that the next pope will be younger than 86-year-old Benedict, since only those cardinals under 80 can even vote. Almost anyone would be stronger than Benedict, who has, as mentioned, suffered two strokes and can barely get through the day. And since most of the cardinals had to fly to arrive at the conclave, they are apparently all capable of flying.

I do not know, and none of us can know, that the next pope will be a better theologian, a better administrator, a better logician, or a better Christian. For that we can only pray, asking the Lord to direct the hearts and votes of the cardinals.

With the likes of you, and your predictions, who needs the Holy Spirt’s guidance.

I and the other readers on the thread are at a loss to know what has generated such snarkiness on your part, but whatever it is I apologize for it.

27 posted on 03/02/2013 8:58:00 PM PST by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: ebb tide; ottbmare; Not gonna take it anymore; RobbyS; Salvation; Biggirl
I and the other readers on the thread are at a loss to know what has generated such snarkiness on your part, but whatever it is I apologize for it.

Thank you for all your comments. Freeper ebb tide, it is patently wrong to compare popes. Each one has borne a cross, out of love for Jesus Christ. It is no secret that Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger wished to retire at age 75. JPII reminded him that he was older and asked him to stay on. He selflessly complied. When the cardinals elected him to succeed JPII, he was asked "Do you accept?" He had the option to say no but acceded to the will of God. He addressed this at his final audience last Wednesday:

When, almost eight years ago, on April 19th, [2005], I agreed to take on the Petrine ministry, I held steadfast in this certainty, which has always accompanied me. In that moment, as I have already stated several times, the words that resounded in my heart were: “Lord, what do you ask of me? It a great weight that You place on my shoulders, but, if You ask me, at your word I will throw out the nets, sure that you will guide me” – and the Lord really has guided me. He has been close to me: daily could I feel His presence. [These years] have been a stretch of the Church’s pilgrim way, which has seen moments joy and light, but also difficult moments. I have felt like St. Peter with the Apostles in the boat on the Sea of Galilee: the Lord has given us many days of sunshine and gentle breeze, days in which the catch has been abundant; [then] there have been times when the seas were rough and the wind against us, as in the whole history of the Church it has ever been - and the Lord seemed to sleep. Nevertheless, I always knew that the Lord is in the barque, that the barque of the Church is not mine, not ours, but His - and He shall not let her sink. It is He, who steers her: to be sure, he does so also through men of His choosing, for He desired that it be so. This was and is a certainty that nothing can tarnish. It is for this reason, that today my heart is filled with gratitude to God, for never did He leave me or the Church without His consolation, His light, His love. - See more at: http://www.news.va/en/news/pope-final-general-audience-full-text#sthash.UUFifWrG.dpuf

As several others have pointed out, it is also unfair to compare contemporary society with the past. Throughout history, the Catholic Church has always been under attack. These sieges have come from without but now they are also coming from within. Government and the mainstream media whip up public sentiment against the "antiquated teachings" of the Catholic Church; internally, as some of us have experienced first hand, a network of dissenters have launched their attacks through progressivist policies. JPII began the clean up but passed away before it was finished. It has recently come to light that over the past year, pope Benedict has eliminated hundreds of bishops around the globe, done quietly through suggestion to step down or immediate termination upon retirement. I know of one bishop in NY whose retirement letter was accepted upon submission last year. Normally, the bishop is asked to remain until a new one can be appointed. In that particular instance, he was told to step down and the diocese has been temporarily turned over to another bishop.

In the past century, communications have rapidly expanded and the popes have responded, first with the radio, then television, jet travel, a web site, Facebook and now, Twitter.

I posted a thread yesterday from a Vatican reporter who provides great insight into how all of these factors have aligned with the pope's decision to pass the torch to another. He writes:

In the face of an Enemy who seeks to destroy the human couple of Adam and Eve, distorting that couple and transforming their offspring into merchandise at the mercy of merciless laws and governments, the Church, supreme protectress of a free humanity, though attacked from without and betrayed from within, remains nevertheless the best, last hope humanity has to escape from the enslaving chains now being forged against our race.

Benedict’s decision to resign must be seen in this perspective, the perspective of a man who wishes to hand on, while he yet breathes, the weapons to fight a colossal battle.

The battle has not ended. Indeed, it is only now about to begin in earnest.

Please take a few minutes to read through this report and examine the content. You will find it at THIS LINK.

28 posted on 03/03/2013 6:01:57 AM PST by NYer (“Beware the man of a single book.” - St. Thomas Aquinas)
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