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The FReeper Foxhole Profiles Combat Medics - Feb. 6th, 2004
see educational sources

Posted on 02/06/2004 4:06:48 AM PST by snippy_about_it



Lord,

Keep our Troops forever in Your care

Give them victory over the enemy...

Grant them a safe and swift return...

Bless those who mourn the lost.
.

FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer
for all those serving their country at this time.



...................................................................................... ...........................................

U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues

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Army Combat Medics



Brief history of the Medical Corps


The Medical Service Corps traces its beginnings to the establishment of an Apothecary General during the American Revolution, and the creation of the Ambulance Corps and US Army Storekeepers in the Civil War. It was during the Civil War that Surgeon Jonathan Letterman, Director of the Army of the Potomac, realized a need for an integrated medical treatment and evacuation system with its own dedicated vehicles, organizations, facilities, and personnel. The Letterman plan was first implemented in September 1862 at the battle of Antietam, Maryland, and has continued as the basis of Army medical doctrine ever since.



The next major development of the Medical Service Corps occurred in World War I. The Army’s requirement for medical and scientific specialty officers to support combat operations resulted in the creation of two temporary components: the US Army Ambulance Service established on 23 June 1917 as a descendent of the Ambulance Corps, and the Sanitary Corps, established on 30 June. Today the Medical Service Corps mirrors the Sanitary Corps, which quickly expanded to nearly 3,000 officers during World War I. The Sanitary Corps enabled the Medical Department to make available to itself a group of officers commissioned in specialties which were at the forefront of the medical technology of the day. Officer’s of the Sanitary Corps served in medical logistics, hospital administration, patient administration, resource management, x-ray, laboratory engineering, physical reconstruction, gas defense, and venereal disease control. They were dedicated members of the medical team that enabled American generals to concentrate on enemy threats and not epidemic threats.



Between World War I and World War II. it became apparent that the Army needed a permanent source of medical administrative specialty officers. This led to the establishment of the Medical Administrative Corps in June 1920. The Medical Administrative Corps expanded to include a variety of administrative positions and freed the physicians, dentists, and veterinarians for medical care responsibilities. Following World War II, Congress established a permanent component in the Army for medical administrative and scientific specialty officers. On 4 August 1947, Congress created the Medical Service Corps. For the first time, the Medical Department had a permanent home for both its administrative and scientific specialty officers. Since 1947, U.S. military actions have demonstrated the efficiency of that decision.



The Medical Service Corp have been important members of the U.S. military medical support team for combat operations in Korea, the Dominican Republic, Vietnam, Grenada, Panama, and Iraq. The story of the Army’s operations in Vietnam would not be complete without mention of the magnificent record of the evacuation helicopter pilots, who carried on in the tradition begun in the Civil War.

World War II and the Combat Medic

It wasn’t any different to be killed in World War II then it was during the Civil War or World War I. However, if the World War II GI was wounded by a bullet, shrapnel or fallen by a disease such as malaria, without killing him, his chances for survival were much greater then his ancestor in the Civil War. During the Civil War, 50 percent or more of the men admitted to hospitals died, during World War I, it was 8 percent, World War II, 4 percent.



During World War II drugs such as sulfa (Sulfanilamide) and penicillin were discovered and advanced surgical techniques were introduced to make these improvements possible, but the first reason for such successes in improving the mortality rate was the speed with which wounded men were treated. It began with the frontline combat medics. In the beginning of the war at training camps, medics had been mildly despised because many of them were conscientious objectors and often ridiculed. Sometimes called "Pill Pushers" or worse. But in combat they were loved, respected and admired. Medic Buddy Gianelloni recalls, ‘Overseas it becomes different. They called you medic and before you know it, it was Doc. I was 19 at the time."



The main objective of the medic was to get the wounded away from the front lines. Many times this involved the medic climbing out from the protection of his foxhole during shelling or into no-man’s-land to help a fallen comrade. Once with the wounded soldier, the medic would do a brief examination, evaluate the wound, apply a tourniquet if necessary, sometimes inject a vial of morphine, clean up the wound as best as possible and sprinkle sulfa powder on the wound followed by a bandage. Then he would drag or carry the patient out of harms way and to the rear. This was many times done under enemy fire or artillery shelling. In most cases, the Germans respected the Red Cross armband.

Evacuation of Wounded During World War II

The evacuation process of the wounded during World War II is best described by Pfc. Keith Winston, a combat medic during WW2 for the 398th Infantry Regiment, 100th Infantry Division. He explains the evacuation process in a letter to his wife during the war;



"You asked me to describe the exact function of the Aid Station. First let me tell you how evacuation works: A boy gets hurt on the line. Within a minute or less a telephone message is sent back to our forward Aid Station, a distance of 300 to l000 yards from the front where a Sgt. and 4 litter-bearers are always on hand. They rush right up to thc line with a litter. During this time, thc Company in which the casualty is a member, has their Aid-man administering first-aid on the spot—usually consisting of stopping the bleeding with Sulfanilamide powder, bandaging and giving wound pills internally.



By that time, another litter team is there and carries the casualty to thc nearest point where a jeep can travel--anywhere from 25 to 3000 yards, depending on conditions. The injured boy is then rushed to the Aid Station, one to three miles behind the line. Here the physician removes the first-aid bandage, makes a proper diagnosis and applies a more permanent bandage, administers blood plasma if needed, and in severe cases, gives morphine; makes the patient comfortable, warm, gives coffee, etc. Whereupon he's rushed back to a point known as Clearing Company, pretty far in thc rear--this time by a comfortable ambulance which stands ready for action at thc Aid Station's door.



Now--here, if the wound requires it, he's given emergency operation or attention. This place is well-staffed and well-equipped. Then the casualty is taken by ambulance to an Evacuation hospital further back where first-class attention is administered. If thc case is one whereby the wound or casualty is so severe and he won't get better very soon, he's shipped back even further to a General Hospital, and eventually back to the States. Reason for the continual moves? One of room. As the patient warrants a further move back, he leaves space for another boy, and needed room is of the essence. The Aid Station has no beds. Its job is the most important--to evacuate the wounded boy from place of incident to the rear, after essential treatment is administered to save his life. The well-equipped rear station the soldier and bandage him with the skill that is possible only in a quiet hospital".



The combat medic was one of the unsung heroes of World War II. He lived with the front line infantrymen and was the first to answer a call for help. He gave first aid to his wounded comrades and helped them out of the line of enemy fire. More often than not, he faced the enemy unarmed and was the foundation of the medical system with hundreds of thousands of surgeons, nurses, scientists, and enlisted medics.



As stated by Stephen Ambrose, "It was the universal opinion of the frontline infantry that the medics were the bravest of all".




FReeper Foxhole Armed Services Links




TOPICS: VetsCoR
KEYWORDS: army; combatmedic; doc; freeperfoxhole; samsdayoff; veterans
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Medics, A Brief History



During Ancient times if a soldier was wounded, he laid in the field where he had fallen. There was no one to come to his aid. Napoleon's Army was the first to assign people to help the wounded. They were called the litter-bearers, made up mostly of inept and expendable soldiers. The American Colonel Army lead by George Washington, also had litter-bearers during the Revolutionary War.



In 1862, due to the unexpected size of casualty lists during the battle of Manassas where it took one week to remove the wounded from the battlefield, Dr. Jonathan Letterman, Head of Medical Services of the Army of the Potomac, revamped the Army Medical Corps. His contribution included staffing and training men to operate horse teams and wagons to pick up wounded soldiers from the field and to bring them back to field dressing stations for initial treatment. This was our Nation's first Ambulance Cops. Dr. Letterman also developed the 3 tiered evacuation system which is still used today.

Field Dressing (Aid) Station - located next to the battlefield. Dressings and tourniquets

Field Hospital - Close to the battlefield (during the Civil War it would be Barns or Houses, today they are known as MASH units). Emergency surgery and treatment.

Large Hospital - Away from the battlefield. For patients' prolonged treatment.

Dr. Letterman's transportation system proved successful. In the battle of Antietam, which was a 12 hour engagement and the bloodiest one day battle in the entire Civil War, the ambulance system was was able to remove all the wounded from the field in 24 hours. Dr. Jonathan Letterman is known today as the Father of Modern Battlefield Medicine. Unfortunately, amputation was the primary method of treatment for wounds to extremities during the Civil War with over 50,000 resulting amputees.



During the Spanish American War in the 1890's Nicholas Sin stated: Fate of the wounded soldier is determined by the hand which applies the dressing. Field dressings are now applied by litter-bearers in the field.

World War I required millions of casualties to be treated at the front. Unlike previous wars, battles did not stop to retrieve the wounded or the dead. World War I saw, for the first time, medics rushing forward with the troops, finding the wounded, stopping their bleeding and bringing the wounded soldier to the aid station. In World War I medics were no longer expendable and were well trained.

After World War I, Military Medicine advanced. Training became a priority both in fighting and medical care. Medics were trained along side infantry soldiers, learning how to use the lay of the land for their protection and that of their patients. Medics were also trained in the use of pressure dressings, plasma IV's, tracheotomy, splints, and administering drugs.



During World War II a wounded soldier had an 85% chance of surviving if he was treated by a medic within the first hour. This figure was three times higher than World War I survival statistics. The red cross worn by medics on their helmet and arm bands became visible targets for enemy snipers during World War II and Korea.



Korea saw the advent of the helicopter being used to bring men from the front lines to M*A*S*H units (Mobile Army Surgical Hospital).

In Vietnam, the medic's job was to treat and evacuate. Medevac helicopters now could bring medics on board to continue treating the wounded while transporting them back to the Field Hospitals.



There was a 98% survival rate for soldiers who were evacuated within the first hour. Vietnam was the first time medics were armed and carried firearms and grenades into combat. Red crosses on helmets and arm bands were no longer worn.

I haven't forgotten Navy Corpsmen. They will be covered on an upcoming thread of their own. ;-)




Today's Educational Sources and suggestions for further reading:

http://home.att.net/~steinert/#Brief%20History%20of%20the%20Medical%20Corps www.1stcavmedic.com/
http://home.att.net/~steinert/wwii.htm
www.cr.nps.gov/museum/exhibits/revwar/guco/gucomedicine.html
1 posted on 02/06/2004 4:06:48 AM PST by snippy_about_it
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To: All

We yelled for them and they appeared, like smoke above a fire.
They came to us through battles roar, with only one desire.
They came to treat our wounds or give us comfort our last hour
They came to us and risk their lives, through deadly hails of fire.

The Medics came to patched us up and tell us “You’re OK.”
Whatever made them think that they could save us anyway?
But save they did! And lost their own, in Honor and in Valor.
How many men would we have lost if they had stopped to cower?


A “CMB” is just a badge to many who don’t know.
To those who humped the jungle trails, it is a Medal of its own.
These men who wear the “CMB” are heroes to us all.
Heroes to the men who had to give the “MEDIC!” call.

©John S. Garrison -2002
2 posted on 02/06/2004 4:08:43 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: All


Synopsis of Army Regulation 600-8-22 (Military Awards - CMB) The Combat Medical Badge was conceived March 1, 1945 by the War Department. The Combat Medical Badge (CMB) could specifically be awarded to Officers and Enlisted personnel of the Medical Department who were assigned to or attached to a medical detachment of the infantry. The CMB was to recognize medical aidmen who shared the same hazards and hardships of ground combat on a daily basis with the infantry soldier.

The CMB was never intended to be awarded to all medical personnel. Due to the uniqueness of ground combat in the infantry it was intended to be awarded only to those Medics who served under direct fire with the infantry. To be awarded the Combat Medical Badge, the infantry unit to which the medical personnel were assigned or attached must have engaged the enemy in active ground combat. Medical personnel must have been personally present and under fire in order to be eligible for this award.

During the Vietnam War, the requirements were so stringent that recommending officials were required to document the place (in six digit co-ordinates), the time, the type of engagement, and also the intensity of fire to which the medical personnel were exposed. The Combat Medical Badge could also be awarded to U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force medical personnel as long as they met all the requirements of Army medical personnel.
3 posted on 02/06/2004 4:10:10 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: All





The Combat Medic Prayer

Oh, Lord I ask for the divine strength to meet the demands of my profession. Help me to be the finest medic, both technically and tactically.

If I am called to the battlefield, give me the courage to conserve our fighting forces by providing medical care to all who are in need.

If I am called to a mission of peace, give me the strength to lead by caring for those who need my assistance.

Finally, Lord, help me to take care of my own spiritual, physical and emotional needs. Teach me to trust in your presence and never-failing love.AMEN
4 posted on 02/06/2004 4:14:17 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Wumpus Hunter; StayAt HomeMother; Ragtime Cowgirl; bulldogs; baltodog; Aeronaut; carton253; ...



FALL IN to the FReeper Foxhole!



Good Friday Morning Everyone

If you would like added to our ping list let us know.

5 posted on 02/06/2004 4:17:04 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it
Hobbs has more to say on the awol story. Bill Hobbs


6 posted on 02/06/2004 4:18:22 AM PST by GailA (Millington Rally for America after action http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/872519/posts)
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To: snippy_about_it
Good morning Snippy.

SAAB Viggen

7 posted on 02/06/2004 4:20:54 AM PST by Aeronaut (In my humble opinion, the new expression for backing down from a fight should be called 'frenching')
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To: snippy_about_it
Good morning, Snippy and everyone at the Foxhole. Good to see the GIF.'s back up again.
8 posted on 02/06/2004 4:35:49 AM PST by E.G.C.
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To: E.G.C.
BTW, Today is Ronald Reagan's birthday. The gipper turns 93. Happy Birthday Gipper!!!!!!
9 posted on 02/06/2004 4:39:20 AM PST by E.G.C.
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To: GailA
Good morning and thanks for the link Gail.
10 posted on 02/06/2004 4:40:18 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Aeronaut
Good morning Aeronaut. This one looks like a rocket!
11 posted on 02/06/2004 4:41:21 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: E.G.C.
Good morning EGC. It certainly is.

Happy Birthday Ronald Reagan


12 posted on 02/06/2004 4:42:44 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it
Set your mind on things above, not on things on the earth. —Colossians 3:2


THINKING IT OVER
What 'hazards' sometimes divert 
your attention from Jesus? 
What positive, God-honoring actions 
can you concentrate on doing instead?

Those who fix their eyes on heaven will not be distracted by the things of earth.

13 posted on 02/06/2004 4:43:44 AM PST by The Mayor (Be steadfast, immovable, . . . knowing that your labor is not in vain in the Lord.)
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To: The Mayor
Good morning Mayor. We're having a little heat wave, it's 43 degrees, yippee!
14 posted on 02/06/2004 4:46:19 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it
It's 34 here and I think what you have is headed our way.

It's starting to rain..
15 posted on 02/06/2004 5:16:29 AM PST by The Mayor (Be steadfast, immovable, . . . knowing that your labor is not in vain in the Lord.)
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To: The Mayor
It should be headed your way. But tomorrow is only to be around 30 so enjoy the mild warm-up while you can!
16 posted on 02/06/2004 5:41:45 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it
A combat medic from the 101st Airborne was presented a Silver Star for heroism in Iraq yesterday.

If you look at his photo in the story, you can see he's already wearing his Combat Medic Badge.

17 posted on 02/06/2004 6:25:49 AM PST by mark502inf
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To: All
Here's a good story.

Medic Took Bullets, Shrapnel To Rescue Wounded In Attack (Awarded Silver Star)

18 posted on 02/06/2004 6:28:08 AM PST by Johnny Gage (God Bless our Firefighters, our Police, our EMS responders, and most of all, our Veterans)
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To: mark502inf
Thank you mark502inf for the link. What a coincidence. These guys are to be admired.
19 posted on 02/06/2004 6:29:05 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Johnny Gage
Thanks Johnny.
20 posted on 02/06/2004 6:29:50 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it
Thank you for the thread on Combat Medics, snippy. I may not post often but I read every thread.
21 posted on 02/06/2004 6:35:41 AM PST by CholeraJoe (Air Force! We're the smart ones, we send the officers out to fight.)
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To: snippy_about_it
Howdy ma'am. Neat thread.
22 posted on 02/06/2004 6:35:56 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Spirit/Opportunity~0.002acres of sovereign US territory~All Your Mars Are Belong To USA)
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To: SuziQ
This might interest you, Suzi. Uncle Henry?
23 posted on 02/06/2004 6:36:59 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Spirit/Opportunity~0.002acres of sovereign US territory~All Your Mars Are Belong To USA)
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To: snippy_about_it
I think this is one of the best Reagan pictures.
24 posted on 02/06/2004 6:38:28 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Spirit/Opportunity~0.002acres of sovereign US territory~All Your Mars Are Belong To USA)
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To: snippy_about_it
Young Private Turner sure makes you proud. So how about a promotion from private! You'd think after earning a Silver Star that the commander could at least get Turner to the august rank of PFC!
25 posted on 02/06/2004 6:38:32 AM PST by mark502inf
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To: mark502inf
*snap*

Beat me by a couple minutes.


26 posted on 02/06/2004 6:40:36 AM PST by Johnny Gage (God Bless our Firefighters, our Police, our EMS responders, and most of all, our Veterans)
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To: Aeronaut; All

Air Power
Saab 37 "Viggen"

In December 1961 the Swedish Government approved development of Aircraft System 37, the Viggen. The basic platform was the AJ 37 attack aircraft, to be followed by S 37 reconnaissance versions and the JA 37 fighter. The new aircraft had a novel and advanced aerodynamic configuration to meet the short take-off/landing and other performance requirements: a fixed foreplane with flaps was mounted ahead of and slightly above the delta main wing. On 8 February 1967 the first prototype of the Saab 37 Viggen family made its maiden flight. In April 1968 the Government authorized Viggen production and the first aircraft was delivered in July 1971. A total of 329 aircraft were eventually built in attack, trainer, two reconnaissance versions and the more powerful fighter variant that included new avionics, new air-to-air missiles and Europe´s first pulse-Doppler radar.

In 1985 Austria became the third export customer, after Denmark and Finland, to buy Saab Draken. This was the fourth time that Austria bought Saab aircraft for their air defense, having previously bought Saab 29, Saab Safir and Saab 105OE. The last of 329 Viggens, a JA 37 fighter version, was delivered from Saab in Linköping to the Swedish Air Force in 1990. Since then, Viggen has undergone several upgrades, the latest being Mod. D for the fighter version including communication and weapon systems similar to those in Gripen.

The aircraft's main wings are low-mounted, delta-shaped, extending from the body midsection to the exhaust. Small, clipped delta wings are forward of the main wings and high-mounted on the body. There is one turbofan engine in the body. There are semicircular air intakes just forward and below the secondary wings. There is a large, single exhaust. The fuselage is short and wide with a pointed, solid nose. There is a bubble canopy and a small belly fin. There are no tail flats. There is a large, unequally tapered fin with a small, clipped tip.

Specifications:
Primary Function: Multi-role fighter
Contractor: Saab
Crew: One
Unit Cost: N/A
Powerplant: One Volvo Flygmotor RM8B turbofan (P&W JT8D-22 w/ Sweedish afterburner and thrust reverser) rated at 16,200 lb st (72.06kN) dry.

Dimensions:
Length: 53 ft 9.75 in (16.40 m)
Wingspan: 34 ft 9.25 in (10.60 m)
Height: 19 ft 4.25 in (5.90 m)
Max Takeoff Weight: 45,194 lb (20500 kg) -- for attack

Performance:
Speed: Mach 2.0 (1,321 mph / 2126 km/h) at 36,000 ft (10975 m)
Ceiling: 18 300 m (60 000 feet)
Combat Range: 800Km

Armaments:
one ventral 30-mm Oerlikon KCA cannon w/ 150 rounds.
Up to 6 Rb 71 Sky Flash and Rb 74 (AIM-9L) AAMs.
Air-to-surface armaments also available.







All photos Copyright of FAS Military Analysis Network
27 posted on 02/06/2004 6:53:41 AM PST by Johnny Gage (God Bless our Firefighters, our Police, our EMS responders, and most of all, our Veterans)
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To: snippy_about_it
On This Day In History


Birthdates which occurred on February 06:
1564 Christopher Marlowe English poet/dramatist (Dr Faustus)
1608 Antonio Vieira Portuguese Jesuit preacher
1665 Anne Stuart Queen of England (1702-14)
1756 Aaron Burr Newark NJ, (D-R), 3rd US Vice-President (1801-05), dueler
1830 Marcellus Monroe Crocker Brigadier General (Union volunteers), died in 1865)
1832 John Brown Gordon Major General (Confederate Army), died in 1904
1833 James Ewell Brown "JEB" Stuart Major General (Commander of Cavalry, Confederate Army)
1834 William Dorsey Pender Major General (Confederate Army), died in 1863
1874 Milton Bennett Medary US, architect (Washington Chapel)
1888 Ljudmil Stojanow Bulgarian poet (Metsh i Slowo, Cholera)
1890 Anton Hermann Fokker aviation pioneer
1893 Sir Muhammad Zafrulla Khan President of UN General Assembly (1962-63)
1895 George Herman (Babe) Ruth Baltimore MD, baseball great (Yankees)
1899 Ramon Novarro [José RG Samaniegos], Durango Mexico, actor (Ben Hur)
1900 Roy Smeck guitarist/banjoist
1902 Louis Nizer lawyer/author (defended blacklisted stars in the '50s, Catspaw)
1908 General Edward Lansdale model for "Quiet American" & "Ugly American"


1911 Ronald Reagan Illinois, actor (Bedtime for Bonzo)/40th President (R) (1981-89)


1912 Eva Braun mistress of Adolf Hitler
1922 Patrick MacNee London England, actor (Jonathan Steed-Avengers)
1931 Rip Torn Texas, actor (Coma, Summer Rental, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof)
1932 François Truffaut Paris France, director (Jules & Jim, Fahrenheit 451)
1933 Walter E Fauntroy (Representative-D-DC, 1971- )
1939 Mike Farrell St Paul MN, actor/idiot (BJ Honeycutt-MASH, Battered)
1940 Tom Brokaw Yankton SD, news anchor (NBC Nightly News 1982- )
1943 Fabian Forte Philadelphia PA, singer (Turn Me Loose, Tiger)
1943 Gayle Hunnicutt Ft Worth TX, actress (Legend of Hell House, Dallas)
1945 Bob Marley Jamaican reggae vocalist (Bob Marley & Wailers-Roots Rock Reggae)
1950 Natalie Cole Los Angeles CA, singer (Unforgettable)
1961 Yuri Ivanovich Onufriyenko Russian major/cosmonaut (Mir, Soyuz TM-23)
1962 Axl Rose [William Bailey] Lafayette IN, rocker (Guns & Roses)


Deaths which occurred on February 06:
743 Hisham ibn 'Abd al-Malik 10th Moslem caliph, dies at about 52
0891 Photius Byzantine theologist/patriarch of Constantinople/saint, dies
1612 Christopher Clavius calendar reformer, dies (birth date unknown)
1685 Charles II King of England/Scotland/Ireland (1660-85), dies at 54
1695 Ahmed II 21st sultan of Turkey (1691-95), dies
1804 Joseph Priestley England/US theologist/philosopher/chemist, dies at 70
1865 John Pegram US Confederate Brigadier-General, dies in battle at 33
1917 Edouard A Drumont French anti-semite journalist, dies at 72
1945 Jan Bos Dutch resistance fighter, executed
1945 Paul Bos Dutch resistance fighter, executed
1952 George VI King of Britain (1936-52), dies at 56 (succeeded by daughter, Elizabeth II)
1965 Jack Wagner actor (Jive Junction), dies at 68
1973 Ira S Bowen US physicist/astronomer (Mt Wilson/Palomar), dies at 74
1976 Vince Guaraldi jazz pianist (Charlie Brown TV specials), dies at 43
1988 Marghanita Laski English author (Victorian chaise-lounge), dies
1989 Barbara Tuchman historian (Guns of August-Pulitzer), dies at 77
1990 Jane Novak silent screen actress (Ghost Town), dies of stroke at 94
1991 Danny Thomas comedian/actor (Jazz Singer), dies of a heart attack at 76
1994 Jack Kirby cartoonist (X-Men, Spiderman, Hulk), dies at 76
1994 Joseph Cotten actor (Citizen Kane), dies at 88
1996 Guy Madison actor (Wild Bill Hickok), dies at 74
1998 Carl Wilson rock vocalist (Beach Boy), dies of lung cancer at 51


Reported: MISSING in ACTION

1967 HALL DONALD J.---STROUD OK
1967 HEISKELL LUCIUS L.---MEMPHIS TN.
1967 KIBBEY RICHARD A.---DELMAR NY.
1967 WOOD PATRICK H.---KANSAS CITY MO.
1968 BURNETT DONALD F.---MONTGOMERY AL.
1968 CHAPA ARMANDO JR.---SAN JOSE CA.
1968 FARRIS WILLIAM F.---WEST SALEM IL.
1968 GALLAGHER DONALD L.---SHEBOYGAN WI.
1968 HUSS ROY A.---EAU CLAIRE WI.
1968 HYLAND CHARLES K.---AUSTRALIA
[11/26/68 RELEASED BY PRG]
1968 JONES THOMAS P.---BUFFALO NY.
1968 MC KAY HOMER E.---SHALLOWATER TX.
1968 NEWMAN JAMES C. JR.---KNOXVILLE TN.
1968 THOMPSON MELVIN C.---COLQUITT GA
1968 TRAVIS LYNN M.---NEWPORT AR.
1969 BRIGGS RONALD D.---PHILDELPHIA PA.
1969 CHRISTIANSEN EUGENE---BARSTOW CA.
1969 O'HARA ROBERT CHARLES---LOST NATION IA.
1969 PADGETT DAVID E.---WASHINGTON IN.
1969 PARSONS DONALD E.---SPRATA IL.
1969 PARKER DAVID W.---STONE MOUNTAIN GA.
1969 STANLEY CHARLES I.---CLEVELAND OH.

POW / MIA Data & Bios supplied by
the P.O.W. NETWORK. Skidmore, MO. USA.


On this day...
0337 St Julius I begins his reign as Catholic Pope
1189 Riots of Lynn in Norfolk spread to Norwich England
1508 Maximilian I crowned Holy Roman Emperor
1577 King Henri de Bourbon of Navarra becomes leader of Huguenots
1626 Huguenot rebels & the French sign Peace of La Rochelle
1693 Royal charter granted College of William & Mary, Williamsburg VA
1716 England & Netherlands renew alliance
1778 France recognizes US, signs treaty of aid in Paris; 1st US treaty
1778 England declares war on France
1788 Massachusetts becomes 6th state to ratify constitution
1815 NJ issues 1st US railroad charter (John Stevens)
1819 Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founds freeport harbor Singapore
1820 86 free black colonists sail from New York NY to Sierra Leone, Africa
1820 US population announced at 9,638,453 (1,771,656 blacks (18.4%))
1832 1st appearance of cholera at Edinburgh, Scotland
1832 US ship destroys Sumatran village in retaliation for piracy
1840 Waitangi Day; treaty signed between Britain & Maoris of New Zealand
1861 English Admiral Robert Ritzroy issues 1st storm warnings for ships
1861 1st meeting of Provisional Congress of Confederate States of America
1862 Victory for General Ulysses S Grant in Tennessee, capturing Fort Henry, and ten days later Fort Donelson; Grant earns the nickname "Unconditional Surrender" Grant
1862 Naval Engagement at Tennessee River-USS Conestago vs CSS Appleton Belle
1865 2nd day of battle at Dabney's Mills (Hatcher's Run)
1867 Peabody Fund forms to promote Black education in South
1869 Harper's Weekly publishes 1st picture of Uncle Sam with chin whiskers
1891 1st great train robbery by Dalton Gang (Southern Pacific #17)
1899 Spanish-American War ends, peace treaty ratified by Senate
1900 Battle at Vaalkrans, South-Africa (Boers vs British army)
1902 Young Women's Hebrew Association organized in New York NY
1904 Russian-Japanese war began
1911 1st old-age home opened in Prescott AZ
1911 Great fire destroys downtown Constantinople/Istanbul Turkey
1918 Britain grants women (30 & over) the vote
1919 1st day of 5-day Seattle general strike
1920 Saarland administrated by League of Nations
1921 "The Kid", starring Charlie Chaplin & Jackie Coogan, released
1922 Cardinal Achille Ratti elected Pope Pius XI
1922 US, UK, France, Italy & Japan sign Washington naval arms limitation
1926 NFL rules college students ineligible until college classes graduates
1933 -90ºF (-68ºC), Oymyakon, USSR (Asian record)
1933 Highest recorded sea wave (not tsunami), 34 meters (112 feet), in Pacific hurricane near Manila
1933 20th Amendment goes into effect; Presidential term begins in Jan not March
1935 Board game "Monopoly" goes on sale for the 1st time
1935 1st election to allow women to vote in Turkey
1941 Battle of Beda Fomm Italian 10th army destroyed
1941 British troops conquer Bengazi, Libya
1943 Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was named commander of Allied expeditionary forces in North Africa. He later became World War II Supreme Allied Commander in Europe.
1943 1st Spitfire in action above Darwin, Australia, Mu Ki-46 shot down
1943 Singer Frank Sinatra debuts on radio's "Your Hit Parade"
1945 8th Air Force bombs Magdeburg/Chemnitz
1945 Russian Red Army crosses the river Oder
1948 1st radio-controlled airplane flown
1951 Radio commentator Paul Harvey arrested for trying to sneak into the Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago IL
1951 US performs nuclear test at Nevada Test Site Argonne Atomic Lab (Illinois), to demonstrate lax in security
1952 England replaces King George VI stamp series with Queen Elizabeth II
1953 US controls on wages & some consumer goods were lifted
1956 University of Alabama refuses admission to Autherine Lucy (because he's black)
1958 Ted Williams signs with Red Sox for $135,000, making him highest paid
1959 Fidel Castro is interviewed by Edward R Murrow
1959 US 1st successful Titan intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM)
1961 "Jail, No Bail" Jail-in movement starts in Rock Hill SC
1964 France & Great-Britain sign accord over building channel tunnel
1965 Righteous Brothers "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" hits #1
1967 Heavyweight Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay) TKOs Ernie Terrell in 15 in Houston for heavyweight boxing title
1968 Former President Dwight Eisenhower shot a hole-in-one
1970 NBA expands to 18 teams with Buffalo, Cleveland, Houston & Portland
1971 1st time a golf ball is hit on the Moon (by Alan Shepard)(FOUR!!)
1974 US House of Representatives begins determining grounds for impeachment of Nixon
1977 Alain Prieur jumps his motorcycle 65 meter over 16 buses, near Paris
1977 (Handsome)Harley Race beats Terry Funk in Toronto, to become NWA wrestling champion
1978 Muriel, wife of late Hubert Humphrey (Senator-D-MN) takes his office
1978 Snowstorm hits New England (54" (137cm))
1979 Supreme court of Lahore affirms death sentence against premier Bhutto
1984 Moslem militiamen take over West Beirut from Lebanese army
1987 No-smoking rules take effect in federal buildings
1989 Lech Walesa begins negotiating with the Polish government
1990 Brett Hull becomes 1st son of NHL 50 goal scorer (Bobby) to score 50
1990 Steve Briers of Wales recited the entire lyrics of Queen's album "A Night At The Opera" in 9 minutes & 58.44 seconds backwards! (someone needs a life)
1996 Heidi Fleiss scheduled to begin her 7 year jail sentence
1997 Diane Blood, 32, in England, won right to use her dead husbands sperm
1998 Mary Kay LeTourneau, 36, former teacher, who violated probation by seeing 14 year old father of her baby, sentenced to 7½ years
1998 Twin trade Chuck Knoblauch to New York Yankees for $3 million & 4 minor leaguers
2001 Ariel Sharon elected prime minister of Israel.


Holidays
Note: Some Holidays are only applicable on a given "day of the week"

Massachusetts : Ratification Day (1788)
New Zealand : Waitangi Day-New Zealand Day (1840)
World : Boy Scouts Day (1910) (Sunday)
World : International Clergy Appreciation Week (Day 6)
US : Muffin Mania Week (Day 6)
US : Ronald Reagan Day
Grapefruit Month


Religious Observances
Christian : Commemoration of St Vedastus
Christian : Feast of St Vaast (St Gaston)
old Roman Catholic : Commemoration of St Titus, bishop of Crete, confessor
Roman Catholic : Commemoration of St Dorothea, virgin/martyr
Anglican, Roman Catholic : Commemoration of St Amandus [Apostle of Belgium] & Vedastus
Roman Catholic : Commemoration of St Philip of Jesus, 1st Christian martyr in Japan
Roman Catholic : Memorial of St Paul Miki & his companions, martyrs


Religious History
679 Death of Amandus, the founder of Belgian monasticism. During his 95 years, he established eight abbeys, five in the Southern Netherlands.
1839 Scottish clergyman Robert Murray McCheyne wrote in a letter: 'Even in the wildest storms the sky is not all dark; and so in the darkest dealings of God with His children, there are always some bright tokens for good.'
1924 Station KFSG (Kall Four Square Gospel) went on the air. One of the earliest radio stations licensed, it broadcast the services of Angelus Temple, the flagship congregation of the International Foursquare Gospel Church, founded by Aimee Semple Mc Pherson in 1923.
1931 Pioneer American linguist and missionary Frank Laubach wrote in a letter: 'There is a deep peace that grows out of illness and loneliness and a sense of failure. God cannot get close when everything is delightful. He seems to need these darker hours, these empty-hearted hours, to mean the most to people.'
1952 American missionary and martyr Jim Elliot wrote in his journal: 'Christianity, disruptive in nature, has nonetheless integrating powers for the individual in the culture, though both he and it may expect revolution.'

Source: William D. Blake. ALMANAC OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH. Minneapolis: Bethany House, 1987.


Thought for the day :
"Ours is a world where people don`t know what they want and are willing to go through hell to get it."


Question of the day...
OK...so if the Jacksonville Jaguars are known as the "Jags" and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers are known as the "Bucs".

What does that make the Tennessee Titans ?


Murphys Law of the day...(Professor Gordon's Rule of Evolving Bryophytic Systems)
While bryophytic plants are typically encountered in substrata of earthy or mineral matter in concreted state, discrete substrata elements occasionally display a roughly spherical configuration which, in presence of suitable gravitational and other effects, lends itself to combined translatory and rotational motion. One notices in such cases an absence of the otherwise typical accretion of bryophyta. We conclude therefore that a rolling stone gathers no moss.


Amazing Fact #2,604...
A duck's quack doesn't echo.
28 posted on 02/06/2004 6:56:00 AM PST by Valin (Politicians are like diapers. They both need changing regularly and for the same reason.)
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To: CholeraJoe
Thank you for the thread on Combat Medics, snippy. I may not post often but I read every thread.

You're welcome. We know you're out there and you're always there when we need you, too. ;-)

29 posted on 02/06/2004 6:57:41 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Johnny Gage
Hey Johnny. You done your research...
30 posted on 02/06/2004 6:58:04 AM PST by Aeronaut (In my humble opinion, the new expression for backing down from a fight should be called 'frenching')
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To: Professional Engineer
Thanks and Good Morning PE. So what's this about Uncle Henry, hmmmm?
31 posted on 02/06/2004 6:58:31 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: mark502inf
Young Private Turner sure makes you proud.He sure does. He just might get promoted. I'll bet it happens soon. :-)
32 posted on 02/06/2004 7:00:09 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Johnny Gage
Cool. Thanks for profiling the plane Aeronaut flew into the Foxhole this morning.
33 posted on 02/06/2004 7:01:28 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it

Good morning everyone in The FOXHOLE!

34 posted on 02/06/2004 7:05:48 AM PST by Soaring Feather (~ I do Poetry and Party among the stars~)
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To: bentfeather
Good morning feather. I like that graphic, may we "borrow" it?
35 posted on 02/06/2004 7:06:34 AM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it
Hi snippy, yes, surely you may use it.
36 posted on 02/06/2004 7:09:08 AM PST by Soaring Feather (~ I do Poetry and Party among the stars~)
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To: snippy_about_it; SuziQ
So what's this about Uncle Henry, hmmmm?

FReeper SuziQ's uncle Henry was a vascular surgeon who served in a MASH unit in Korea. He was apparently the inspiration for the character Henry Blake

37 posted on 02/06/2004 7:29:27 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Spirit/Opportunity~0.002acres of sovereign US territory~All Your Mars Are Belong To USA)
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To: snippy_about_it
Is Sam MIA today?
38 posted on 02/06/2004 7:30:15 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Spirit/Opportunity~0.002acres of sovereign US territory~All Your Mars Are Belong To USA)
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To: Valin; Johnny Gage
1508 Maximilian I crowned Holy Roman Emperor

Maximilian Armor was characterized by it's fluting.


39 posted on 02/06/2004 7:44:57 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Spirit/Opportunity~0.002acres of sovereign US territory~All Your Mars Are Belong To USA)
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To: snippy_about_it
Morning Snippy. Excellent thread today.

Ambrose got it right.



Medic, a watercolor, pencil, and oil pastel, depicts the frenzy of the battlefield under enemy fire.

40 posted on 02/06/2004 7:51:02 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: GailA
Thanks for the link GailA.
41 posted on 02/06/2004 7:52:47 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: Aeronaut
Morning Aeronaut

Now there's a plane I haven't heard of in years.


42 posted on 02/06/2004 7:56:50 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: E.G.C.
Morning E.G.C.


43 posted on 02/06/2004 7:58:48 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: The Mayor
Good Morning Mayor
44 posted on 02/06/2004 7:59:16 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: mark502inf
Thanks for the link mark502inf.

There has to be a special place in heaven for Medics and Corpsmen
45 posted on 02/06/2004 8:01:20 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: Johnny Gage
Morning Johnny.
46 posted on 02/06/2004 8:01:53 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: CholeraJoe
Morning Cholera Joe. Snippy did a great job today.
47 posted on 02/06/2004 8:02:54 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: Professional Engineer
Morning PE.
48 posted on 02/06/2004 8:03:25 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: Johnny Gage
"Real Heroes" don't need to remind everyone that they're a "War Hero".



John F. Kerry, War Zero

49 posted on 02/06/2004 8:07:02 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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To: Johnny Gage
Thanks Johnny. You and Aeronaut coordinating your planes? ;-)


50 posted on 02/06/2004 8:08:56 AM PST by SAMWolf (I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.)
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