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Is the Bookworm an Endangered Species?
Harper's ^ | January 20, 2008 | Scott Horton

Posted on 01/23/2008 7:30:42 PM PST by forkinsocket

In her recent biography of Condoleezza Rice, Elisabeth Bumiller tells us that Condi, a former professor and provost at Stanford University, has a curious relationship to books — curious at least for an academic. As she was growing up, Rice relates, her parents piled books up on her nightstand and the result was a distaste for reading. “She stopped reading for pleasure, and does not to this day,” Bumiller writes.

This was the strangest fact of many curious nuggets that can be gleaned from Bumiller’s work. And it left me wondering about modernity’s relationship with books. Many of the most impressive characters I know from history are book fanatics. I think of Seneca and Montaigne, both of whom developed a decided preference for books over people, seeing in them not a retreat from the world as much as a means of opening the doors to new worlds and a better class of interlocutors. As time passes, I develop more sympathy for their approach.

But the rise of mass literacy and a popular print media clearly constitute one of the markers for the modern age. In fact, for the Enlightenment philosopher Immanuel Kant it was the decisive fact which marked a break with the past and the prospect of the development of a human potential that had long been locked away. “Das lesende Publikum,” “the reading public” was this decisive new audience. And “publicity”—mass education through reading—was in his mind the critical path to the development of a new society. This unfolded in the nineteenth century into a middle class for which voracious reading was seen as a tool for social advancement—the so-called Bildungsbürgertum of Germany, the rise and transformation of universities, the birth of countless newspapers, magazines and publishing houses.

So where do we stand two hundred years after this dawn? Ursula Le Guin charts the territory in an article entitled “Staying Awake” in the current issue of Harper’s.

Some people lament the disappearance of the spotted owl from our forests; others sport bumper stickers boasting that they eat fried spotted owls. It appears that books, too, are a threatened species, and reactions to the news are similarly various. In 2004 a National Endowment for the Arts survey revealed that 43 percent of Americans polled hadn’t read a book all year, and last November, in its report “To Read or Not to Read,” the NEA lamented the decline of reading, warning that non-readers do less well in the job market and are less useful citizens in general. This moved Motoko Rich of the New York Times to write a Sunday feature in which she inquired of various bookish people why anyone should read at all. The Associated Press ran their own poll and announced last August that 27 percent of their respondents had spent the year bookless, a better figure than the NEA’s, but the tone of the AP piece was remarkable for its complacency. Quoting a project manager for a telecommunications company in Dallas who said, “I just get sleepy when I read,” the AP correspondent, Alan Fram, commented, “a habit with which millions of Americans can doubtless identify.”

So Condoleezza Rice, it seems, is in good company. But Condi has it just right when she says that she does not read for pleasure:

For most of human history, most people could not read at all. Literacy was not only a demarcator between the powerful and the powerless; it was power itself. Pleasure was not an issue. The ability to maintain and understand commercial records, the ability to communicate across distance and in code, the ability to keep the word of God to yourself and transmit it only at your own will and in your own time—these are formidable means of control over others and aggrandizement of self. Every literate society began with literacy as a constitutive prerogative of the (male) ruling class.

It’s a simple fact that in many respects, educational standards have fallen in the Western world. What was expected of high school students around the turn of the century is daunting.

I see a high point of reading in the United States from around 1850 to about 1950—call it the century of the book—the high point from which the doomsayers see us declining. As the public school came to be considered fundamental to democracy, and as libraries went public and flourished, reading was assumed to be something we shared in common. Teaching from first grade up centered on “English,” not only because immigrants wanted their children fluent in it but because literature—fiction, scientific works, history, poetry—was a major form of social currency.

To look at schoolbooks from 1890 or 1910 can be scary; the level of literacy and general cultural knowledge expected of a ten-year-old is rather awesome. Such texts, and lists of the novels kids were expected to read in high school up to the 1960s, lead one to believe that Americans really wanted and expected their children not only to be able to read but to do it, and not to fall asleep doing it.

Theater goers in New York who have seen the brilliant new performance of Frank Wedekind’s “Spring Awakening” know this was also the case for Middle Europe, where the spirit of adolescents was often brutally crushed under the weight of rote learning in fields of no obvious practical utility.

But the challenge of this century is a different one. It is a pendulum which has perhaps swung too far in the direction of triviality and popular appeasement. The market drives the media, to some extent, and the keepers of high culture seem to fade into the background. And, as Le Guin argues, technology offers up a great diversity of paths to transmitting information and plot lines. Reading requires an active imagination; it takes an effort.

If people make time to read, it’s because it’s part of their jobs, or other media aren’t readily available, or they aren’t much interested in them—or because they enjoy reading. Lamenting over percentage counts induces a moralizing tone: It is bad that we don’t read; we should read more; we must read more. Concentrating on the drowsy fellow in Dallas, perhaps we forget our own people, the hedonists who read because they want to. Were such people ever in the majority?. . .

Television has steadily lowered its standards of what is entertaining until most programs are either brain-numbing or actively nasty. Hollywood remakes remakes and tries to gross out, with an occasional breakthrough that reminds us what a movie can be when undertaken as art. And the Internet offers everything to everybody: but perhaps because of that all-inclusiveness there is curiously little aesthetic satisfaction to be got from Web-surfing. You can look at pictures or listen to music or read a poem or a book on your computer, but these artifacts are made accessible by the Web, not created by it and not intrinsic to it. Perhaps blogging is an effort to bring creativity to networking, and perhaps blogs will develop aesthetic form, but they certainly haven’t done it yet.

What, blogging has developed no aesthetic form?! Le Guin needs to spend more time surfing the internet. But I’m with her on the rest of it. And indeed, the greatest gift of the internet comes in the fact that masses of accumulated learning can be stored on line and made immediately accessible, with tools to understand the details one doesn’t know. It seems to me that Google Books and comparable resources offered up by dozens of academic libraries around the world may be the most important advance that the internet has offered in the last two or three years. For instance, I recently went searching for one of my favorite Meister Eckehart sermons on the web and found among other sources a fourteenth century manuscript fully imaged and accessible from a cloister library in Switzerland. You could almost feel the crackling, buckling parchment on which it was written. It gave me a bit of a workout reading the Gothic fraktur, but being able to absorb an original illuminated manuscript in the comfort of your own study is quite something. What was the great Library of Alexandria compared to this?

Le Guin also offers us the conventional complaint against the publishing industry and its standards.

To me, then, one of the most despicable things about corporate publishers and chain booksellers is their assumption that books are inherently worthless. If a title that was supposed to sell a lot doesn’t “perform” within a few weeks, it gets its covers torn off—it is trashed. The corporate mentality recognizes no success that is not immediate. This week’s blockbuster must eclipse last week’s, as if there weren’t room for more than one book at a time. Hence the crass stupidity of most publishers (and, again, chain booksellers) in handling backlists. . .

To get big quick money, the publisher must risk a multimillion-dollar advance on a hot author who’s supposed to provide this week’s bestseller. These millions—often a dead loss—come out of funds that used to go to pay normal advances to reliable midlist authors and the royalties on older books that kept selling. Many midlist authors have been dropped, many reliably selling books remaindered, in order to feed Moloch. Is that any way to run a business?

Better of course that they should feed Moloch with midlist authors than with children. But the other point lurking here and made quite brilliantly by Arthur Schopenhauer some 150 years ago goes to the industry’s obsession with always shoveling something brand new under our noses, something with a hint of scandal, but the product of an abysmally poor or thoroughly conventional mind. The past offers better writers, better ideas, more helpful friends. But it does not offer the sort of material that can be sold profitably in airport bookshops and in drugstores. Or will it?

Le Guin in any event comes back to this inevitable point: the distinction between true literature and the trivial, and its relevance to the world of commerce.

So why don’t the corporations drop the literary publishing houses, or at least the literary departments of the publishers they bought, with amused contempt, as unprofitable? Why don’t they let them go back to muddling along making just enough, in a good year, to pay binders and editors, modest advances and crummy royalties, while plowing most profits back into taking chances on new writers? Since kids coming up through the schools are seldom taught to read for pleasure and anyhow are distracted by electrons, the relative number of book-readers is unlikely to see any kind of useful increase and may well shrink further. What’s in this dismal scene for you, Mr. Corporate Executive? Why don’t you just get out of it, dump the ungrateful little pikers, and get on with the real business of business, ruling the world?

Is it because you think if you own publishing you can control what’s printed, what’s written, what’s read? Well, lotsa luck, sir. It’s a common delusion of tyrants. Writers and readers, even as they suffer from it, regard it with amused contempt.

Reading, I firmly believe, is a source of relief from tyrants. Both for individuals and societies.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: book; bookworm; reading
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1 posted on 01/23/2008 7:30:43 PM PST by forkinsocket
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To: forkinsocket
I don't have any idea whether or not this article is true but I do think that Ms. Rice was oversold to us. She's a lovely woman and certainly an educated and accomplished one, but what has she achieved?

Not much, I'd say.

Thank God she didn't do something silly like run for President because I fear many of us would have jumped on board without thinking it through. Sort of like voting for Huckabee or McCain if you get my drift.

2 posted on 01/23/2008 7:35:04 PM PST by BfloGuy (It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we can expect . . .)
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To: forkinsocket

I used to read (books) nonstop.


3 posted on 01/23/2008 7:36:15 PM PST by kinoxi
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To: forkinsocket

I still read a lot for pleasure. Mostly non-fiction.


4 posted on 01/23/2008 7:38:13 PM PST by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: forkinsocket

This smells of more of the “they don’t read” BS they’ve been pumping for 8 years now.

She does not read for PLEASURE. She has a 24 hour job.

I have time to kill waiting in lines, while eating, etc. I am generally reading through 2 or 3 books at any point in time as well as a periodical or two. But I read a lot of articles online too. At a point in time, you have to put the “text” down and relate with people.

You also have to give your eyes a rest.

It is a curious form of attack to take on Condi considering our own displeasure with her bowing to antisemitic Islamic supremacists (making Jews use a separate entrance and then telling the muslims that you understand how they feel???).


5 posted on 01/23/2008 7:40:44 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: weegee
I have time to kill waiting in lines, while eating, etc. I am generally reading through 2 or 3 books at any point in time as well as a periodical or two. But I read a lot of articles online too. At a point in time, you have to put the “text” down and relate with people.

Agreed 100% (my reading habits, in quantity, are similar to yours.) This person is completely out of touch with reality because books are, apparently, the only thing with which she can relate.

6 posted on 01/23/2008 7:42:54 PM PST by ECM (Government is a make-work program for lawyers.)
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To: Army Air Corps

I stopped reading fiction abruptly one day a couple of years ago. I still love reading, but I have to force myself to read any fictional novel. When I do force myself to, because the story sounds very interesting, I never regret it & always enjoy it. But when it comes time to choose more books, I’m back to only wanting to read non-fiction. No idea why.


7 posted on 01/23/2008 7:43:00 PM PST by forkinsocket
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To: forkinsocket


Me? Endangered? Oh noez!
8 posted on 01/23/2008 7:44:13 PM PST by G8 Diplomat (Creatures are divided into 6 kingdoms: Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Monera, Protista, & Saudi Arabia)
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To: forkinsocket

Lots of bookworms in my family.

I, too, have been increasingly disillusioned by Condee Rice, the more I see of her. She certainly has some good qualities, but they seem to appear at rarer and rarer intervals these days.


9 posted on 01/23/2008 7:44:20 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Army Air Corps

The author of this rant seem upset that you, I, and Condi aren’t reading more fiction. And when you step back and realize how much of the “classic literature” of the 20th century pushes social policy, the classics don’t seem so classic.

Not all of the social cricitism comes from the Left, just much of it...

Ray Bradbury has had to tell the Left that they misunderstood his book. The Left also didn’t get Orwell’s 1984 or Animal Farm. They are criticisms of Stalinism and the Western Socialists who make excuses for the abuses. Truth be told they are classic warnings of the Red Menace but they never lumped together with other works as “Red Scare” hooey.


10 posted on 01/23/2008 7:44:47 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: G8 Diplomat

LOL!!!

I could use you to catch some Bass!


11 posted on 01/23/2008 7:45:47 PM PST by dljordan
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To: forkinsocket

I can’t imagine a life without reading or books. I can’t pass a bookstore without going in and my favorite way to spend an afternoon is in Steven’s (Raleigh, NC)used bookstore. I am curious about the books others read as well.
I sometimes use a magnifying glass to get a closer look at the bookcases pictured in magazines.
It bothers me to go in a house where there are no books. The house and its owners seem somehow bereft.


12 posted on 01/23/2008 7:49:42 PM PST by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we write in marble. JHuett)
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To: forkinsocket

^


13 posted on 01/23/2008 7:49:55 PM PST by prognostigaator
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To: ECM

From the article:

“Better of course that they should feed Moloch with midlist authors than with children.”

Molech has feasted on the bodies of 48 million American children since the Supreme Court legalized abortion on demand. No quantity of damned intellectuals could match that grand buffet.


14 posted on 01/23/2008 7:50:49 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: weegee

(making Jews use a separate entrance and then telling the muslims that you understand how they feel???).

What is this? I must have missed something.


15 posted on 01/23/2008 7:52:31 PM PST by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we write in marble. JHuett)
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To: forkinsocket

She watches football to relax. She probably has to read all the time for work.

Any woman who enjoys the NFL is a notch up for me above one who doesn’t.


16 posted on 01/23/2008 7:53:09 PM PST by rlmorel (Liberals: If the Truth would help them, they would use it.)
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To: BfloGuy
I too will agree that I haven't seen solid evidence that Condi is super great. And she does seem to have been taken in by foggy bottom (not that keeping ones independence from foggy bottom as Secretary of State is all that easy.)

Once again, Bush seems to rely a tad too much on his advisors (I guess Nixon had the opposite problem, of too little trust ... hard to get it right.)

17 posted on 01/23/2008 7:53:43 PM PST by ThePythonicCow (The Greens and Reds steal in fear of freedom and capitalism; Fear arising from a lack of Faith.)
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To: BfloGuy

we need to start working on a Freeper for President 2012 immediately, who wants to be on the committee??


18 posted on 01/23/2008 7:56:49 PM PST by GeronL
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To: kalee

I’ve seen several articles on how she sympathized with the muslim leaders she is meeting. She’s talked of racism in Birmingham and segregation.

Meanwhile at the conference I saw a reference in an article (one of the first I saw on the subject) that Jews were required to enter through a separate entrance at the demand of the muslims.

I may be off on the second point in this post (it is as I remember it) but the first should be easier for me to locate some details/quotes).


19 posted on 01/23/2008 7:57:36 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: kalee

I have turned into an audiobook person.

It is unfortnate, because I desperately miss reading. Reading engrosses me like few other things, but I just cannot read anymore.

I used to go on a week vacation and take 10 books with me. Now, my eyes kill me after reading for 15 minutes. I had expensive bifocals made, but I think it was a pricey error. I should have spent money and had some quality reading glasses made. I am so nearsighted store bought ones don’t work.

On the other hand, audiobooks have made my commute to and from work...fun.


20 posted on 01/23/2008 7:57:38 PM PST by rlmorel (Liberals: If the Truth would help them, they would use it.)
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To: Army Air Corps

i used to read fiction but, after high school it just didn’t hold my attention anymore. non-fiction is all i read anymore.


21 posted on 01/23/2008 8:02:29 PM PST by robomatik (......uh since fred and duncan are out, i think i need a new tagline. =()
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To: weegee

If you find the info I would love to see it. I can’t in my wildest imagination think any black American would stand by and watch another group of people be made to enter by a seperate door. I don’t doubt you I am just stunned!


22 posted on 01/23/2008 8:05:27 PM PST by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we write in marble. JHuett)
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To: forkinsocket
OMG, here you are again!

Reading, I firmly believe, is a source of relief from tyrants. Both for individuals and societies.

These sentences pose an interesting thought. I still like to read for fun. I just started De Tocqueville's Democracy in America the other day. It's a pretty new translation, and I think it's going to be very good.

23 posted on 01/23/2008 8:05:31 PM PST by FoxInSocks
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To: rlmorel

If I ever lose my sight I am in trouble, I don’t like audiobooks. I am a visual person and audio books lose me. I can’t seem to pay attention and grasp the material. I need to read it myself.


24 posted on 01/23/2008 8:07:20 PM PST by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we write in marble. JHuett)
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To: kalee; weegee

I heard about Jews having to use the backdoor, too, but I thought it was a wild rumor. That can’t be true, can it? I’d be horrified that Jews would submit themselves to that. I certainly wouldn’t. I won’t even wear Islaamic hijab when in Muslim countries, let alone be pushed to the backdoor. Hope this isn’t true.


25 posted on 01/23/2008 8:09:14 PM PST by forkinsocket
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To: weegee
Here are some references (although they aren't precisely the articles I originally saw these details in): United States: State Sponsor of Judeophobia (Arutz Sheva 12/07/07 Pamela Geller )

Last week, a line was crossed. A terrible line was crossed at Annapolis. With the world looking on, the President of the United States sponsored Judeophobia. Jew-hatred was okay, understandable even.

Under the auspices of a global "peace" conference, the White House sanctioned Jew-hatred. The Jew is contemptible, inferior, ignorant, politically and socially disenfranchised: separate entrance ways, service entrances for the Jews, refusal to touch or shake hands with a Jew, refusal of audience members to wear the translation earphones when Ehud Olmert spoke...

Ms. Rice Visited Israel, Not Birmingham, Alabama (IMRA January 17, 2008 Lenny Ben-David)

Ms. Rice Visited Israel, Not Birmingham, Alabama Two months ago in Annapolis Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice compared the plight of Palestinians to the experience of African-Americans some 40 years ago in the segregated South. "I know what it is like to hear that you cannot go on a road or through a checkpoint because you are Palestinian," she said. "I understand the feeling of humiliation and powerlessness."

26 posted on 01/23/2008 8:10:34 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: kalee

I agree. Reading is much better.


27 posted on 01/23/2008 8:10:38 PM PST by rlmorel (Liberals: If the Truth would help them, they would use it.)
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To: forkinsocket; weegee
I prefer non fiction because real events are often times better than invented ones. I read a lot of 20th century military and diplomatic history as well as aviation and aerospace history.

When I read fiction, it is mostly classics including works from the 20th century that are regarded as classics.

28 posted on 01/23/2008 8:12:45 PM PST by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: kalee

I’ve posted some links in this thread. It was ugly to draw the same comparisons to Israel that Jimmuh Carter also has (he called it “apartheid” whereas his Saudi masters REALLY practice Apartheid supressing all religions other than Islam and have a 21st century policy of REFUSING Jews entry into to country, this may have changed but it was put in place THIS century).


29 posted on 01/23/2008 8:13:27 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: forkinsocket

actually, the bookworm is an endangered species. we are headed to a new dark ages. we have advanced as far as we are going to, and this is as good as it gets.


30 posted on 01/23/2008 8:14:23 PM PST by television is just wrong (deport all illegal aliens NOW. Put all AMERICANS TO WORK FIRST. END Welfare)
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To: FoxInSocks
OMG, here you are again!

I should start a ping list just for screen name twins. :D

Books I just bought yesterday:

Dario Fo's Accidental Death of an Anarchist.

Norman Cohn's Europe's Inner Demons.

& Lila Abu-Lughod's Veiled Sentiments: Honor & Poetry in a Bedouin Society.

31 posted on 01/23/2008 8:14:42 PM PST by forkinsocket
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To: forkinsocket

Sorry, I feel asleep reading this. Let’s see...Oh, yeah. Many of us who love to read haven’t read a book in years because we can read the internet, not as this author suggests, but real books on the internet as if they were from dead trees. For example, I’m into screenplays now and have read one a day for the past month or so. I’d do the same with paper versions, but they’re unwieldy and I’d have to drive to the library. So I contend that there are two different kinds of literate people: those who can read but don’t enjoy it and those who truly enjoy it. The internet has not changed either of them.


32 posted on 01/23/2008 8:17:18 PM PST by Rudder
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To: Army Air Corps
I still read a lot for pleasure. Mostly non-fiction."

Ditto here. I've got bookcases full of 'em. I just hope I live long enough to read them all.

33 posted on 01/23/2008 8:23:06 PM PST by mass55th
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To: weegee
Thanks. UNBELIEVABLE!! I am amazed Olmert agreed. I would have said forget it and your conference and gone home. The recent Annapolis Conference is a case in point. I asked a very knowledgeable friend in Israel if the Hebrew Media actually reported what went on. When I mentioned a few incidents known in America, I was told that, either it was not mentioned in Israel’s Hebrew Media or, if it was, it was positioned in a few lines of commentary and in language stilted to trivialize the event. For example, the Saudi King Faisal stated plainly that he would NOT shake the hand of the Israeli Prime Minister or Foreign Minister. (That was the position of Hafez al Assad (former President of Syria) wherein he too stated that he would rather cut off his hand than shake the hand of Jews.) During the opening ceremonies the Saudi King stated that he would not go through the same main entrance, IF the Jewish delegation also was allowed to enter through that main passage. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice accommodated the Saudis by having the Israelis enter through a service door, otherwise used by servants. To the shame of Olmert, he accepted the Rice-Saudi insult and entered as a servant or known in Arabic as a "Dhimmi" or lowly person. This was NOT reported in the Hebrew Media. In a news editorial in the prestigious Wall St. Journal (1), an editorial was printed entitled "The Saudis New PR Man" by Dan Senor, a well known foreign policy advisor to the Bush Administration. (He is no longer in that position.) We are informed by Senor that Olmert lobbied presidential candidates and members of Congress that their skepticism about the possibility of Annapolis succeeding was misplaced. (He became the "pitchman" for Rice, Bush, the Saudis and thus, the title of "The Saudis’ New PR Man". We are further informed by Senor that the Israeli Press Corps was kicked outside during a press event wherein, under Rice Protocol, the Arab League foreign ministers were to be interviewed by the Press Corps which presumably included all the American and European Media. The Israeli Press Corps were made to stand outside in the rain to cover the story as best they could. Although, no doubt, the Israeli journalist reported this grossly unpardonable insult, the Hebrew Media in Israel chose not to inform the Israeli public.
34 posted on 01/23/2008 8:23:20 PM PST by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we write in marble. JHuett)
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To: ThePythonicCow; anyone

Condi Rice could have been a concert pianist if she so chose, but she decided on a different path. Gifted, would be the word to describe the Sectary of State.


35 posted on 01/23/2008 8:23:37 PM PST by khnyny (Clinton and Co. are the carnies of American politics.)
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To: forkinsocket

see my post 34 forgive the formatting.


36 posted on 01/23/2008 8:24:23 PM PST by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we write in marble. JHuett)
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To: forkinsocket

The high point of literacy in America was reached at the BEGINNING of the age of the Government School. The Government School was introduced to America for the purpose of REDUCING the level of literacy in America. The Government Schools are a resounding success. They are accomplishing what they were designed to do: create an illiterate, ignorant, fornicating Mass American, who would be amenable to being herded into factories and to the battlefield.

My eyes glaze over anytime I hear any politician, no matter how “conservative,” promising to “fix” the Government Schools. They ARE NOT BROKEN. They are functioning PERFECTLY. They are accomplishing PRECISELY what they have been DESIGNED to accomplish.


37 posted on 01/23/2008 8:24:30 PM PST by Arthur McGowan
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To: forkinsocket
What was the great Library of Alexandria compared to this?

What was the Library of Alexandria compared to the Internet? Exclusive. It was also vulnerable to a despotic attack by Islamic tyrants.

With the world of knowledge at your fingertips, people turn to their vices rather than seek to better themselves. Instant gratification. Don't earn the money to buy some leisure; just download that song/new movie. Don't woo a girl, just spam out "hi theres" to young women on a social network and if their rejections seem too much, just discretely get some porn. When that gets old watch some reruns and laugh at some jokes. Who can concentrate on reading Asimov's books on science when you can read his books on ROBOTS instead? Why learn the laws of science when you can learn the laws of ROBOTS?

38 posted on 01/23/2008 8:25:24 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: forkinsocket
Books I just bought yesterday . . .

That's quite an assortment. I'll have to remember to ask you next week how they were.

39 posted on 01/23/2008 8:25:56 PM PST by FoxInSocks
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To: forkinsocket; Cicero

I lost interest in Condi during her speech in 2004(?) at the Repub Convention, in which she described how her grandfather switched religions in order to get a scholarship to college—and that’s why her family have been “devout whatevers ever since.” What kind of cynicism is that?


40 posted on 01/23/2008 8:27:56 PM PST by Arthur McGowan
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To: Arthur McGowan

Do they still devote so much of the school day to showing social engineering films? They used to use 16mm projectors from the AV department.

From the the post war era up through the 1980s (as video came into the classrooms), they were commonplace. And studies have been done on the messages they tried to impart on students (sometimes effectively, sometimes giving the wrong message).


41 posted on 01/23/2008 8:28:08 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: Arthur McGowan

School vouchers. Mike Huckabee opposes school vouchers, btw.

Did you know that the President of the NAACP Julian Bond, who opposes school vouchers, attended private schools his entire academic life?


42 posted on 01/23/2008 8:29:22 PM PST by khnyny (Clinton and Co. are the carnies of American politics.)
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To: forkinsocket

Not a bookworm? Not reading is unfathomable to me.


43 posted on 01/23/2008 8:30:08 PM PST by Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus (Fred Head and proud of it! Fear the Fred!)
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To: forkinsocket
Television killed history. Media only acknowledges reality for which film exists. Last 60 years vice 4000.

One day of human observation is vastly more valuable than one day of electronic noise.

Read.

44 posted on 01/23/2008 8:30:14 PM PST by BGHater ('A Nation's best defense is an educated citizenry'-Thomas Jefferson)
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To: television is just wrong

I read the book and peeked at the ending. It gets better.


45 posted on 01/23/2008 8:30:23 PM PST by weegee (Those who surrender personal liberty to lower global temperatures will receive neither.)
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To: Cicero
"I, too, have been increasingly disillusioned by Condee Rice, the more I see of her. She certainly has some good qualities, but they seem to appear at rarer and rarer intervals these days."

I have to give Condie credit for staying with the Administration for the full two terms. I can't it imagine it's been a picnic for any of them, but she didn't turn tail and run, and has remained loyal to the President all this time. I'm thinking she's tired of the Washington scene, tired of the putz's in the State Department, and is doing only what is necessary just to get by. I felt the same way about my employer and the job in the months before I retired. Why bust your ass when everything you do will more than likely be thrown out when a new Administration comes in. At this point, I'm thinking she's going to keep a low profile until her time is done.

46 posted on 01/23/2008 8:34:39 PM PST by mass55th
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To: forkinsocket

you have to start as a young person reading what you like and not what is forced upon you

I read a lot of crap when I was young...I out grew it.

I have read a lot of very informative and inspirational stuff after I had my fill of pablum...I grew up...


47 posted on 01/23/2008 8:34:57 PM PST by KC Burke (Men of intemperate minds can never be free...their passions forge their fetters.)
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To: forkinsocket

I LOVE to read! If all books were written like this article, I’d never pick up another.


48 posted on 01/23/2008 8:36:50 PM PST by Dianna
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To: Arthur McGowan

She’s Presbyterian.

From her remarks at Southern Baptist Convention.

Now, I am a Presbyterian. (Laughter.) But I want to tell you why I’m a Presbyterian. I trace the roots of my faith back to my granddaddy. Granddaddy Rice was a poor sharecropper’s son in Eutaw, Alabama. That’s E-u-t-a-w, Alabama. (Laughter.) And one day he decided he was going to get book learning, so he asked where a colored man could go to college. And they told him that there was this little school called Stillman College. It was about 60 miles away from where he lived and he could go to Stillman College and get an education. So Granddaddy Rice saved up his tuition, saved up his cotton, and he went off to school and he finished his first year, and they said, “Well, that’s very good. Now how are you going to pay for your second year?” And he said, “Well, I’m fresh out of cotton.” And they said, “Well, you’ll have to leave.”

And he said, “Well, how are those boys going to college?” And they said, “Well, they have what’s called a scholarship. And if you wanted to be a Presbyterian minister, then you could have a scholarship, too.” (Laughter.) Well, my granddaddy said, “You know, that’s exactly what I had in mind.” (Laughter.) And my family has been college educated and Presbyterian ever since. (Laughter and applause.)


49 posted on 01/23/2008 8:43:22 PM PST by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we write in marble. JHuett)
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To: forkinsocket
"Classic. A book which everyone talks about but no one reads."

-Mark Twain

50 posted on 01/23/2008 8:47:15 PM PST by Inyo-Mono (If you don't want people to get your goat, don't tell them where it's tied.)
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