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How Germany got it right on the economy
Washington Post ^ | 11/24/2010 | Harold Meyerson

Posted on 11/24/2010 7:18:50 AM PST by SeekAndFind

It may be turkey week in America, but it's goose month in Germany. In many restaurants, you can get goose in your salad and goose in your soup to go with your goose entrée. Diners fairly honk their way through November.

But then, Germans have something to honk about. Germany's economy is the strongest in the world. Its trade balance - the value of its exports over its imports - is second only to China's, which is all the more remarkable since Germany is home to just 82 million people. Its 7.5 percent unemployment rate - two percentage points below ours - is lower than at any time since right after reunification. Growth is robust, and real wages are rising.

It's quite a turnabout for an economy that American and British bankers and economists derided for years as the sick man of Europe. German banks, they insisted, were too cautious and locally focused, while the German economy needed to slim down its manufacturing sector and beef up finance.

Wisely, the Germans declined the advice. Manufacturing still accounts for nearly a quarter of the German economy; it is just 11 percent of the British and U.S. economies (one reason the United States and Britain are struggling to boost their exports). Nor have German firms been slashing wages and off-shoring - the American way of keeping competitive - to maintain profits.

One key to Germany's miracle is the mittelstand, as the family-owned small and mid-size manufacturing firms that dominate the economy are known. Last week, I visited AWS Achslagerwerk, a factory of one such firm, in the farmlands of Saxony-Anhalt, about two hours west of Berlin. As in many such companies, this factory turns out specialized products: axle-box housings for Chinese and German high-speed trains, machine tools requiring climate-controlled precision measurement.

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtonpost.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: economy; germany
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1 posted on 11/24/2010 7:18:52 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

MORE HERE :

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/german-ifo-gauge-soars-ignores-irish-debt-woes-2010-11-24

German Ifo gauge soars, ignores Irish debt woes

Business sentiment indicates German recovery picking up steam

Renewed sovereign-debt problems in Ireland had little impact on business sentiment in Germany, with the Ifo Institute’s closely-watched business-climate index soaring to the highest levels since the nation was reunified.

The Munich-based Ifo Institute on Wednesday said its November business-climate index rose to 109.3 from a revised 107.7 in October.

The October index was revised from an initial reading of 107.6. Economists had forecast a 107.6 reading for November.

“The upswing in the German economy is gaining more and more strength,” said Ifo Institute President Hans-Werner Sinn.

(CLICK ABOVE LINK FOR THE REST )


2 posted on 11/24/2010 7:29:15 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Of course they did, Germany kicks butt. After they flushed the libtards things turned around.

Of course I’m German by heritage so I’m biased.


3 posted on 11/24/2010 7:29:35 AM PST by Peter from Rutland
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To: Peter from Rutland

Good for them, this is good news.


4 posted on 11/24/2010 7:31:22 AM PST by rovenstinez
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To: SeekAndFind
An article that says manufacturing is important to a strong economy, and that a trade surplus is preferable to a trade deficit? Who is allowing this heresy to be printed in the Washington Post? But the American know-it-all, economic nitwits will not learn anything from this one example.
5 posted on 11/24/2010 7:37:32 AM PST by Will88
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To: SeekAndFind
Wisely, the Germans declined the advice. Manufacturing still accounts for nearly a quarter of the German economy; it is just 11 percent of the British and U.S. economies (one reason the United States and Britain are struggling to boost their exports). Nor have German firms been slashing wages and off-shoring - the American way of keeping competitive - to maintain profits.

Americans and Brits and other developed nations better start reversing the nitwit advice (and profiteering) that led to their current problems and look to Germany's example.

6 posted on 11/24/2010 7:41:41 AM PST by Will88
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To: SeekAndFind

usually these stories head off down the Leftist track on how the Germans have very high rates of unionization and labor activists sitting on corporate boards.


7 posted on 11/24/2010 7:42:24 AM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Peter from Rutland

Hallo,

I just proudly regained my German citizenship this year.
I now hold dual citizenship - USA and Germany.

This way I can jump from the pan into the fire and vice versa - lol. My name is Pete too. My apologies to you, Peter, for being the sole Freeper in Vermont.


8 posted on 11/24/2010 7:44:27 AM PST by A'elian' nation ( America is Exceptional - the only nation of people who escaped from theirs.)
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Well, you start with culture, a work ethic,seriousness, efficiency. Germany does not have several dysfunctional subcultures whose members cost and take from the larger society, in terms of crime, family dissolution, massive educational failure and multigenerational welfare. While Germany does have immigrants, including some dangerous Muslim extremists, it has not opened its borders so that millions of semi or illiterate Third World residents flood the country with their social problems including,in not a few cases, violent criminal behavior. Germany does not have a Mexico or Central America as near neighbors. An incalculable advantage.
9 posted on 11/24/2010 7:48:10 AM PST by Godwin1
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To: Will88

RE: Who is allowing this heresy to be printed in the Washington Post?


Occasionally, the WaPo allows sensible conservatives to submit columns to publish ( I have read people like Milton Friedman, Condoleeza Rice, etc at the WaPo).

They do this in order to appear : “Fair and Balanced” ( with apologies to Fox News ).


10 posted on 11/24/2010 7:49:20 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: A'elian' nation

Welkome! Actually I’m in (M)assachusetts. I regularly fly the German flag much to the shock of some native Germans who have stopped as they drove by and asked me about it.

Grandfather and great Grandfather fought in WW2 and WW1 respectively.


11 posted on 11/24/2010 7:50:48 AM PST by Peter from Rutland
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To: Godwin1

Germany does have a demographic problem like the rest of Europe.

The Germans are not reproducing at the replacement rate needed to sustain their current population level.


12 posted on 11/24/2010 7:51:37 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: Buckeye McFrog

The article does report that fact, and approvingly quotes a labor leader who explains how the unions participate in direction of the firm.

The labor leader says that the unions have a strong stake in vocational education, among other things.

Although we look askance at union power, rightly so considering our experience in the US, UK, France, Spain, Italy and so on and so on, it could be that the social cohesion and overall attitude of the German people are able to make a net positive thing of it.


13 posted on 11/24/2010 7:54:12 AM PST by Erasmus (Personal goal: Have a bigger carbon footprint than Tony Robbins.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Meanwhile in the USA anyone can get a free goose - just go out to your local airport.


14 posted on 11/24/2010 7:54:51 AM PST by RightGeek (FUBO and the donkey you rode in on)
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To: Will88
But the American know-it-all, economic nitwits will not learn anything from this one example.

Hold on, now .... You can't blame those guys for the decisions American corporations made, to send manufacturing elsewhere. Nor would one normally lump the "Free Trade" crowd together with the "economic nitwits."

Americans have given away our manufacturing base without much prompting from the economic nitwits.

There are a lot of reasons for those decisions -- many of which seem to make a great deal of sense so long as you don't look at the big picture.

15 posted on 11/24/2010 7:59:17 AM PST by r9etb
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To: SeekAndFind

Small high-precision machine shop firms dot the Black Forest, just like their cousins nearby in central Switzerland.

Harry Lime: “What did we ever get from the Swiss? The cuckoo clock!”

Well, yeah, Harry. That, and precision machining technology.


16 posted on 11/24/2010 7:59:17 AM PST by Erasmus (Personal goal: Have a bigger carbon footprint than Tony Robbins.)
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To: SeekAndFind
Occasionally, the WaPo allows sensible conservatives to submit columns to publish ( I have read people like Milton Friedman, Condoleeza Rice, etc at the WaPo).

Unfortunately, an article which praises a nation that has kept much of its manufacturing base, and that maintains a trade surplus, cannot be classified as conservative. People advocating those goals are automatically labeled as "protectionists" and "isolationists".

And Milton Friedman is famous for absurd (in the opinion of many) explanations of why trade deficits are just fine. "You have a trade deficit with your grocer".)

What Germany is practicing is a significant degree of economic nationalism, a terrible taboo among the American elite of both parties, and also many "conservatives".

17 posted on 11/24/2010 8:06:51 AM PST by Will88
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To: r9etb
Americans have given away our manufacturing base without much prompting from the economic nitwits.

I consider the economic nitwits to be all those who constantly spew nonsense about free trade (that doesn't exist) and free trade agreements they say will open new markets for US products, but mostly open up more cheap labor for US jobs to move to, while removing tariffs for the export of the products back to the US.

They sung the praises of opening new markets for US products during the NAFTA debate, and that agreement turned a billion dollar trade surplus with Mexico into an $80 billion deficit.

And, also, many of our trade agreements do have a (usually unstated) political goal, for which the economic consequences to the US are glossed over, or outright lied about.

18 posted on 11/24/2010 8:15:43 AM PST by Will88
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To: SeekAndFind

German companies are often slow to respond, usually inflexible once a decision has been made or design agreed but they are excellent engineers and craftsmen and usually make really good stuff that lasts. We buy Rexroth hydraulic components for extreme applications. The Rexroth people find it hard to step far out of their box but supply very competent equipment.

I have a German made John Deere that is nearly 40 years old that has taken all the maintenance abuse Dad could dish out and it still goes on ticking.

Quality is remembered long after price is forgotten isn’t it? Doing what you know and doing it well pays off.


19 posted on 11/24/2010 8:24:30 AM PST by Sequoyah101 (Half of the population is below average)
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To: Erasmus

Let’s not forget, the Swiss not only make watches and precision parts, just a sample of what they make (real products) :

* ASEA BROWN BOVERI (power and automation technology)

* Caran d’Ache, supplier of pencils, pens and other office supplies as well as art supplies

* Ciba Specialty Chemicals

* Ciba-Geigy (materials, chemicals, dyes and drugs of all kinds)

* Flug- und Fahrzeugwerke Altenrhein, plane manufacturer, now Dornier Flugzeugwerke

* SITA — Based in Geneva. a multinational information technology company specialising in providing IT and telecommunication services to the air transport industry.

* Holcim, construction material supplier

* Kühne & Nagel, world’s biggest shipping company

* Lindt & Sprüngli, chocolatier

* Nestle ( if yuo don’t know who they are you ought to get around more often )

* Nobel Biocare (dental implantology and aesthetic dental solutions)

* Sandoz — specialty chemicals (Sandoz merged with Wander AG (known for Ovomaltine and Isostar). Sandoz acquired the companies Delmark, Wasabröd (a Swedish manufacturer of crisp bread), and Gerber Products Company (a baby food company).

* Wenger (bought by Victorinox), manufacturer of the Swiss Army knives

* Novartis (pharmaceuticals and biotech)

High labor specialisation, industry and trade are the keys to Switzerland’s economic livelihood.

Also, Electricity generated in Switzerland is 56% from hydroelectricity and 39% from nuclear power !! On 18 May 2003, two anti-nuclear initiatives were turned down: Moratorium Plus, aimed at forbidding the building of new nuclear power plants (41.6% supported and 58.4% opposed).


20 posted on 11/24/2010 8:25:54 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: r9etb
Hold on, now .... You can't blame those guys for the decisions American corporations made, to send manufacturing elsewhere.

At beginning of the post-WWII trade policies, there was a huge opening of the US market to Japanese products in the '50s and '60s and beyond, with the primary goal of helping to rebuilt Japan into a strong Cold War ally.

That flood of Japanese imports is what really set in motion the response of US corporations. US corporations were not keen on moving operations out of the US in those years, but the flood of cheaper imports caused many corporate decisions that might not have been made otherwise.

The situation with US manufacturing and trade policy has been evolving in a major way since WWII, and I think government policies (often opposed by corporations) have been the biggest catalyst in bringing about our current situation, and then corporations have responded in various self-interested ways over the years.

21 posted on 11/24/2010 8:26:31 AM PST by Will88
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To: SeekAndFind

In the U.S., we label the equivalent of the “mittelstand” (small businesses) the “rich,” since they make more than $250K/year, and therefore soak/destroy and overregulate them to death, since obviously if they make that much money they must be evil, greedy capitalists and therefore deserve what’s coming to them.


22 posted on 11/24/2010 8:30:04 AM PST by MCH
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To: SeekAndFind
Remember this is the liberal media.

I don't have time to find out the Marxist reason they are writing this but I know everything they do is for their religion of Marxism/democrats.

All I know is China manufactures about 1000 times more products in tonnage than the U.S. and Germany combined. READ products sometimes to see what it says on labels :“MADE IN CHINA”

The “value” is just because of China's currency manipulations. Most things are made in China and pretty soon practically nothing will be made in the U.S. or Germany.

23 posted on 11/24/2010 8:33:23 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: SeekAndFind

Trade schools... another reason Germany produces good stuff. Trade schools that produce craftsmen with an engineer’s eye to detail and who can look for and find problems before they become failures.

We, on the other hand, have a bunch of mostly self trained wrench slingers lacking in technical training and filled with a bunch of self-taught half truths.

For example, find me one hydraulic technician that actually knows the principles of operation of a hydrostatic transmission and can trouble shoot and repair one. Good luck in finding anyone who can do more than hunt, peck and replace parts in a random effort.

Texas State Technical Institute in Waco is a collection of ramshackle shacks on a former air base. It does not instill the image of being a paragon of industrial leadership or technical prowess. On the contrary. We should and must do better or we will continue our spiral downward... we may anyway.


24 posted on 11/24/2010 8:34:28 AM PST by Sequoyah101 (Half of the population is below average)
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To: Will88
I consider the economic nitwits to be all those who constantly spew nonsense about free trade (that doesn't exist) and free trade agreements they say will open new markets for US products, but mostly open up more cheap labor for US jobs to move to, while removing tariffs for the export of the products back to the US.

If you include CEOs and boards of directors among the "economic nitwits," then I guess we can agree. And if you fold in a corporate culture that focuses on near-term profits without much regard to long-term consequences, then I agree even more.

But we have to acknoweledge that they didn't just randomly decide to off-shore manufacturing capabilities. In reality, they're responding to real economic pressures, related to the high relative costs of doing manufacturing in the US.

Those high costs have a lot of causes, including taxes, regulations, unions, and the wage/benefit expectations of American employees.

And it's all made worse by the fact that it's impossible in today's political environment to have an extended, rational discussion on any of those things.

25 posted on 11/24/2010 8:41:18 AM PST by r9etb
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To: r9etb; All

Yes,thanks to hundreds of thousands of pages of anti-business and pro union regulations and the EPA, the U.S. manufactures very little.And even that is going away.


26 posted on 11/24/2010 8:45:31 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: Sequoyah101
We, on the other hand, have a bunch of mostly self trained wrench slingers lacking in technical training and filled with a bunch of self-taught half truths.

I think the reason for that, is because our society has decided that everybody ought to go to college, as opposed to encouraging people to learn a trade. We're a "service economy" now .... who would want to learn a dirty old trade?

That sort of thinking is a luxury -- it sprouted up at the peak of American power and wealth, and the idea has increasingly taken hold as our manufacturing base has diminished.

Short of a crash -- which I think is coming -- I don't think there's any way we'll return to a cultural mindset that actually values tradecraft.

27 posted on 11/24/2010 8:50:48 AM PST by r9etb
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To: SeekAndFind

The U.S. Taxpayer paid tens of billions of dollars to bail out Deutchebank’s sub-prime mortgage investments. Without that, the German Economy would have crashed.

A TON of AIG Bailout money went to them.
The US taxpayer must be proud.....


28 posted on 11/24/2010 8:54:47 AM PST by tcrlaf (Obama White House=Tammany Hall on the National Mall)
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To: SeekAndFind

Harold Meyerson is a f’ing moron.


29 posted on 11/24/2010 8:58:03 AM PST by JerseyHighlander (p.s. The word 'bloggers' is not in the freerepublic spellcheck dictionary?!)
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To: Democrat_media
the EPA

Perhaps you're just too young to remember how filthy the air and rivers were, back in the days before the EPA.

For all the EPA's over-reach today, one need only look at what China's polluting industries are doing to the land and people, to understand that environmental protection isn't all bad.

30 posted on 11/24/2010 8:59:48 AM PST by r9etb
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To: r9etb
Those high costs have a lot of causes, including taxes, regulations, unions, and the wage/benefit expectations of American employees.

There is some truth to all of that, but I always think how one of the first industries to be decimated was textiles and the associated sewing plants. Those jobs were mostly non-union and paid around $8.00 per hour and less when they really began to disappear in the 1980s, or before. When jobs can be moved to $.50 per hour labor as was the case a few years back, still to $1.00 per hour labor, it doesn't have a lot to do with efficiency or anything else. It has to do with reducing the US standard of living because the jobs are only partially being replaced, as our real unemployment rate and the explosion of temp and part-time work shows.

And since China India have combined populations of 2.3 billion, and Indonesia and other nations easily kick that to 3 billion, then there is virtually unlimited cheap labor, both unskilled and skilled, available to export and outsource to.

It's just a question of how much Americans will allow their standard of living to be reduced. There is no strategy to combat the available cheap labor because it isn't possible to backfill with newly created jobs all the jobs that are being exported, because we need jobs for every educational and skill level. And we always will need large numbers of jobs at every skill level.

Germany has followed a sane policy. The US has not, but it will take more years and more deterioration before the nitwits and peddlers of one-sided trade as free trade will admit the to the disasters they have brought.

31 posted on 11/24/2010 9:01:00 AM PST by Will88
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To: SeekAndFind

Wow...creating manufacturing jobs...not slashing wages....banks being responsible...6 weeks of vacation per year....Germany’s economy is growing.

I bet Germans see less of “Made in China” on products sold there

The Liberal Free Trade Globalists...who continue to push bank bailouts, Free Trade with Communist China, North American Union....and other failed economic programs...might just arse-plode. Germany is doing everything that the Liberal Free Trade Globalists recommend not doing...and its working for Germany


32 posted on 11/24/2010 9:04:00 AM PST by UCFRoadWarrior (Isolationism and Protectionism sure beat Globalism and Communism)
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To: Will88

An article that says manufacturing is important to a strong economy, and that a trade surplus is preferable to a trade deficit? Who is allowing this heresy to be printed in the Washington Post? But the American know-it-all, economic nitwits will not learn anything from this one example.


George Soros is on the phone right now....chewing out his buddies at the WaPo for printing such “rubbish” /sarc

The Liberal Free Trade Globalists are going to arse-plode. I wonder how the supporters of Free Trade with Communist China gonna explain this one


33 posted on 11/24/2010 9:06:50 AM PST by UCFRoadWarrior (Isolationism and Protectionism sure beat Globalism and Communism)
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To: SeekAndFind

Prior comment was a bit short on details.

Germany became an exporter of non-durables and the creditor to the PIIGS and southern and peripheral Europe as a whole.
Germany will never be repaid for the loans taken out to pay for consumer and governmental purchases of German goods in the last decade, and for the portions the Germans do get repaid on it will be in devalued Euro currency.

Germany destroyed the EU free trade zone through these policies and while not their fault they outcompeted other EUropean manufacturers, they would have been just as bankrupt as GReece if it weren’t for mark to fantasy accounting practices for German banks.

In Germany, banks can hold “secret state reserves” that can not be audited, and can be marked at any amount required to maintain the banks solvency, and the German state, German Federal, and EU politicians and regulators are forbidden by law from even knowing the amount put aside in this fund, because the German government considers it a military top secret.

While the immediate man on the street situation in Germany is indeed better than most of Europe and the US, the country in total has much less capital savings and credit than it should because the central bankers and politicians nuked their common currency accounts.

The effects of this won’t be felt until the Euro collapses when Spain collapses in the next year or three.


34 posted on 11/24/2010 9:07:57 AM PST by JerseyHighlander (p.s. The word 'bloggers' is not in the freerepublic spellcheck dictionary?!)
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To: Will88
It's just a question of how much Americans will allow their standard of living to be reduced. There is no strategy to combat the available cheap labor because it isn't possible to backfill with newly created jobs all the jobs that are being exported, because we need jobs for every educational and skill level. And we always will need large numbers of jobs at every skill level.

Well..... ok. But you've introduced a lot of rather difficult considerations here, not least of which is a significant measure of government control over business and industry.

And that, in a political environment that is characterized by factions whose very viability depends on avoiding rational discussion, let alone compromise.

35 posted on 11/24/2010 9:13:11 AM PST by r9etb
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To: SeekAndFind

“Over the past decade, banking largely became a self-fulfilling activity,” says Patrick Steinpass, chief economist for the national organization of savings banks. “But our banks are restricted to doing business in their regions; they have to concentrate on the real economy.”

My heavens, what a novel concept. Banks actually involved in lending into the real economy in their locality as opposed to securitizing and packaging home loans and other debt to unsuspecting investors.

But being an investment banker is so much more fun and sexy than local lending especially when you own the politicians.


36 posted on 11/24/2010 9:14:44 AM PST by bereanway (I'd rather have 40 Marco Rubios than 60 Arlen Specters)
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To: Will88
The problem is too many laws and regulations democrats have imposed on businesses.

I'm not saying I'm for “free trade”. But if the U.S. wouldn't import then there would be hardly any products in the U.S. because the EPA has crippled U.S. manufacturing and is about to basically ban all new coal power plants (C02 global warming regulations).

Just take one example, energy production. The democrats have stopped nuclear power plant building,refinery building, oil shale,oil drilling in the U.S. and off U.S. coasts.

This makes electricity which is needed to manufacture products 10 times to 100 times more expensive than it needs to be.

There are also 100,000’s of thousands of more pages of anti-business and pro union laws and regulations that make most manufactoring unfeasible.

What needs to be done first is repeal all laws to 1890 when the government was limited.

37 posted on 11/24/2010 9:15:08 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: r9etb; All
“Well..... ok. But you've introduced a lot of rather difficult considerations here, not least of which is a significant measure of government control over business and industry.”

That is why the liberal media wrote this article: to get people to say “Why we have to do something” which means more government control when what is needed is less.

38 posted on 11/24/2010 9:18:06 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: Will88

Germany has followed a sane policy. The US has not, but it will take more years and more deterioration before the nitwits and peddlers of one-sided trade as free trade will admit the to the disasters they have brought.


Great postings Will....I am never to explain it so eloquently.


39 posted on 11/24/2010 9:20:27 AM PST by UCFRoadWarrior (Isolationism and Protectionism sure beat Globalism and Communism)
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To: r9etb
Well..... ok. But you've introduced a lot of rather difficult considerations here, not least of which is a significant measure of government control over business and industry.

And government just keeps putting off the "rather difficult considerations", but they will have to be dealt with sooner or later. And a strong case can be made that business and industry control over government has become one of our greatest problems in the past two or three decades.>

But the US cannot go on and on serving as the host to a growing contingent of parasite economies. And that is just what we have been doing with decades of one-sided trade policies that have given away the US market while receiving not much in return other than access to cheap labor and lax regulation. Some day, some of the parasites will be stronger than the old host, and who knows what will happen to the host.

40 posted on 11/24/2010 9:21:33 AM PST by Will88
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To: UCFRoadWarrior; All
And you all think the EPA and democrats will allow any company to feasibly manufacture anything in the U.S.?

Think again. The 100,000 pages of government anti-business and pro-union regulations are not enough for the socialists, the democrats.

The EPA is about to TOTALLY ban all coal power plant construction, and and any new manufacturing construction:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2605230/posts

If Democrats take a drubbing in November, the Obama Administration is likely to turn to regulation to achieve its “transformational” agenda. Which is all the more reason to cheer on Texas as it pushes back against the EPA’s illegal attempt to rewrite the nation's clean air laws.

To wit, the Lone Star State is resisting the Environmental Protection Agency's decision to regulate carbon under the clean air laws of the 1970s. These regulations will be damaging enough on their own. But the EPA and chief Lisa Jackson are also threatening to punish Texas and other green dissenters with a de facto moratorium on any major energy or construction projects. Just what the economy needs.

41 posted on 11/24/2010 9:28:02 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: r9etb

I am afraid you are correct. Somehow “doing” things and building things has become second rate. I see kids going to college who shouldn’t and getting degrees that don’t qualify them for much if anything. Poor things don’t even understand why their “skills” are so useless.

The last guy I can remember who was a true journeyman was a millwright working for the old Allis Chalmers turbine equipment company.

The latino sweeping chips and feeding parts into the 5 axis cnc machine hasn’t got a clue what he is actually doing.


42 posted on 11/24/2010 9:28:43 AM PST by Sequoyah101 (Half of the population is below average)
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To: Democrat_media
because the EPA has crippled U.S. manufacturing and is about to basically ban all new coal power plants (C02 global warming regulations).

The EPA has gone to excess in many areas, but we lost the electronics manufacturing industry and much of the textile and apparel industries in the '50s and '60s before the EPA came into existence during the Nixon administration. Why did we lose industries and manufacturing jobs before the EPA even existed.

This export of manufacturing jobs started long before there were any EPA regulations to speak of.

43 posted on 11/24/2010 9:29:58 AM PST by Will88
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To: UCFRoadWarrior; Will88; All
The problem is too much government. The EPA has crippled U.S. manufacturing. The EPA is about to totally destroy what's left of manufacturing in the U.S.A and the economy.What would your proposals and or import restrictions do to stop that? Nothing. And you all think the EPA and democrats will allow any company to feasibly manufacture anything in the U.S.?

Think again. The 100,000 pages of government anti-business and pro-union regulations are not enough for the socialists, the democrats.

The EPA is about to TOTALLY ban all coal power plant construction, and and any new manufacturing construction:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2605230/posts

If Democrats take a drubbing in November, the Obama Administration is likely to turn to regulation to achieve its “transformational” agenda. Which is all the more reason to cheer on Texas as it pushes back against the EPA’s illegal attempt to rewrite the nation's clean air laws.

To wit, the Lone Star State is resisting the Environmental Protection Agency's decision to regulate carbon under the clean air laws of the 1970s. These regulations will be damaging enough on their own. But the EPA and chief Lisa Jackson are also threatening to punish Texas and other green dissenters with a de facto moratorium on any major energy or construction projects. Just what the economy needs.

44 posted on 11/24/2010 9:33:31 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: Will88; All

No, you are wrong. Democrats and progressives have been writing anti-business laws since at least 1890.

Repeal all laws to 1890. No more problems.


45 posted on 11/24/2010 9:36:04 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: r9etb; All
So you are for the EPA.

Did you read the Article that I posted?

The EPA is socialism, tyranny, statism.Socialism never works.
People know how incompetent the TSA is because that is out in the open but people don't know what the EPA is doing. The EPA is about to in the new Year to basically shut down all new coal power plant construction and new manufacturing plants in the U.S.A. But you trust the EPA to keep your environment safe when government doesn't work? Amazing the trust that people have in the EPA(government) .

In a conservative forum, amazing.


46 posted on 11/24/2010 9:42:47 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: Democrat_media
No, you are wrong.

Specifically what did I say that I am wrong about? And the EPA was brought into existence in 1970 by Republican Nixon.

Repeal all laws to 1890. No more problems.

I think you've let your hyperbole get the best of you.

47 posted on 11/24/2010 9:48:07 AM PST by Will88
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To: Democrat_media
So you are for the EPA.

Sigh....

Not going to waste any of my time or effort arguing with a loud-mouthed idiot like you.

48 posted on 11/24/2010 9:51:27 AM PST by r9etb
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To: Will88
Democrats and progressives have been writing anti- private business laws since at least 1890. That means that it is not just the EPA.It is all these laws together that have crippled manufacturing in the U.S..The EPA was created by a democrat Congress.

FYI Nixon is one man, and last time I heard presidents can't write laws.

I see many of you repeat the liberal mainstream media media brainwashing

The EPA is just about to ,using all those previous laws, about to completely destroy the U.S. economy.

So you think what the EPA is about to do is not a threat to manufacturing and the economy. 99% of people don't even know this shadow government is about to do this.

49 posted on 11/24/2010 9:55:19 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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To: r9etb; All

Your name calling doesn’t affect me.

Guess the truth hurts you, that you trust government.

No wonder the U.S. is in trouble. The liberal mainstream media has brainwashed a lot of puppets.


50 posted on 11/24/2010 9:57:19 AM PST by Democrat_media (Why is no government creating a product we can hold in our hands like a cell phone..?)
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