Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Could You Modify It ‘To Stop Students From Becoming This Advanced?’
cato institute ^ | 7-25-11 | Andrew J. Coulson

Posted on 07/28/2011 11:39:35 AM PDT by netmilsmom

The free Web tutoring service “Khan Academy” has gotten much well-deserved attention, including a feature story in the current issue of Wired. That story includes a quote that literally took my breath away:

~~~"Even if Khan is truly liberating students to advance at their own pace, it’s not clear that the schools will be able to cope. The very concept of grade levels implies groups of students moving along together at an even pace. So what happens when, using Khan Academy, you wind up with a kid in fifth grade who has mastered high school trigonometry and physics—but is still functioning like a regular 10-year-old when it comes to writing, history, and social studies? Khan’s programmer, Ben Kamens, has heard from teachers who’ve seen Khan Academy presentations and loved the idea but wondered whether they could modify it “to stop students from becoming this advanced.”"~~

This attitude is a natural outgrowth of our decision to operate education as a monopoly. In a competitive marketplace, educators have incentives to serve each individual child to the best of their ability, because each child can easily be enrolled elsewhere if they fail to do so. That is why the for-profit Asian tutoring industry groups students by performance, not by age. There are “grades,” but they do not depend on when a student was born, only on what she knows and is able to do.

But why should a monopolist bother doing that? It’s easier just to feed children through the system on a uniform conveyor belt based on when they were born.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: homeschooling; khanacademy
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051 next last
My husband sent me this. My 11-year-old is almost through Algebra 1 and my 13-year-old is 22 lessons away from Trig. I wonder what they would do with them in school?
1 posted on 07/28/2011 11:39:39 AM PDT by netmilsmom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom
I always preferred self paced classes myself. It allowed me to outrun the slackers. It does intimidate the teachers. Especially the marginal ones who are barely qualified to take attendance and step through the "approved" textbook. Screw that insanity. Cattle car education holds back the best and brightest to the pace of the slowest dullard in the room. Sometimes that is the teacher.
2 posted on 07/28/2011 11:46:45 AM PDT by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

Perhaps some of the many teachers of mathematics who are clueless about the subject matter they are supposed to be presenting will use the Kahn tutorials to come up to speed themselves?

Recommended reading:
Underground History of American Education
http://www.johntaylorgatto.com/underground/toc1.htm


3 posted on 07/28/2011 11:49:11 AM PDT by Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

“I wonder what they would do with them in school? “

Bore them to the point they would rather do drugs than learn.


4 posted on 07/28/2011 11:50:47 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom
I wonder what they would do with them in school?

Punish them.......seriously, they would punish them.

Teachers do not like it when they have certain students who are way ahead of the class, look at the resentment so many asian kids get for trying to get ahead.

5 posted on 07/28/2011 11:54:06 AM PDT by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Myrddin

We homeschool. When people would ask what grade my “3rd-grade” son was in, I would reply 3rd, 4th and 8th. He had the opportunity to study each subject at the level appropriate for him.


6 posted on 07/28/2011 11:55:23 AM PDT by fightinJAG (Please stop posting "helpful hints" in parentheses the title box. Thank you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom
This is a non-problem, other than public school teachers being unable to grasp how to educate kids that tend to move along at different levels in different subjects.

Back in the 1960s, I attended a small church school that solved this problem by going "ungraded". The different levels of elementary school subjects were not 1st through 6th grade, but identified just by the teacher's name (so as not to hurt the kids' widdle feelings, I guess). The kids moved from class to class as though they were in high school -- and their classes were tailored to their abilities in different subjects.

So - let's use me for an example - In third period I went to Mrs. Corbett for English because I was already reading on a high school level, but I went to Cdr. Galloway in second period for math because that wasn't my strong suit! Other classes I was somewhere in the middle.

I had no problem transferring to a more conventional junior high school at the end of elementary school. They did want to test me, but that would be true of homeschoolers coming out of elementary school as well.

7 posted on 07/28/2011 11:55:35 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

See if anyone is re-running old episodes of “Watch Mr. Wizard”.

http://www.mrwizardstudios.com/watchmrwizardtvshow.htm

Take your kids to a Maker Faire and get them interested in robotics, amateur rockets, rapid prototyping. In other words, CREATING THINGS!

http://makerfaire.com/

http://www.harris-educational.com/reinventing-science/index.html

http://www.youtube.com/user/UniversalHovercraft#p/u/1/ZnHdTh1eouk “Hoverkids”


8 posted on 07/28/2011 11:57:10 AM PDT by BwanaNdege (For those who have fought for it, Life bears a savor the protected will never know.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BwanaNdege

http://hoverkid.hovercraft.com/

Easy to build models for science, industrial arts, physics & math students. Our projects have been successful for thousands of young adults interested in building technical projects with inexpensive materials and minimum tools.

Grade school, middle school, high school and universities can all apply these projects into current curriculum to help increase student interest.

Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets.


9 posted on 07/28/2011 11:59:17 AM PDT by BwanaNdege (For those who have fought for it, Life bears a savor the protected will never know.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

Being the parent of a couple of those kids who knew math almost with out being taught, who are now successful and well-adjusted adults (who vote right!), please let me suggest that you just allow them to be ordinary kids.

They only get one chance to do that, and their social and spiritual development is every bit as important as their academic ability. It all comes together eventually to form a well-rounded adult.

“What would they do with them in school?” you ask.

They would put them in advanced classes in the subjects in which they excel and let them succeed academically. Our kids earned more than a year of college credit through AP work in public high school, but still lived as normal teenagers under our guidance.

Their AP teachers were excellent.

Worked for us, splendidly.

God bless as you rear those kids.


10 posted on 07/28/2011 11:59:58 AM PDT by Jedidah (I'll vote for an earthworm before I'll vote for Obama. So wiggle on in, Rick Perry.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

I had taught math to my oldest son. He ended up coasting through math in school for several years, basically learning nothing new, until they caught up with him. If they ever did.


11 posted on 07/28/2011 12:00:37 PM PDT by Elderberry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

I LURVE khan academy. At age 50 I breezed through the parts of Calculus and Physics that kicked my behind in college.

It’s a great resource and screw the education NAZIs who think it’s a problem.


12 posted on 07/28/2011 12:01:55 PM PDT by PhilosopherStone1000
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

I teach in a home school enrichment program where my high school students regularly get their AA’s from the local community college the same week they get their high school diplomas. Home schoolers are consistently off grade level.


13 posted on 07/28/2011 12:03:57 PM PDT by LiteKeeper ("Who is John Galt?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

Mindless blighted Educrats are the enemies of education.

With the power of the NEA and AFT they have sucked the public dry while maintaining vast numbers of students in their cesspools of non-achievement.

Will Khan’s approach shatter the rigid age-cohort approach of current Educrats?

Sure, so what, learn and adjust folks, as all real educators would be eager to do!!!


14 posted on 07/28/2011 12:05:12 PM PDT by Enchante (Are there any honest politicians in Washington, DC??)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AngieGal

ping


15 posted on 07/28/2011 12:05:17 PM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: reed13; reed13k

bfl


16 posted on 07/28/2011 12:08:41 PM PDT by reed13
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

“but is still functioning like a regular 10-year-old when it comes to writing, history, and social studies?”

It’s not really the writing and history that concerns them; they are thrown in for affect.

Their real concern is that the child not miss the “social studies” - political indoctrination, that every state education curriculum is filled with.


17 posted on 07/28/2011 12:09:49 PM PDT by Wuli
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sonny M
You're so right. My middle son convinced my wife and I to let him go to a "magnet school" for marine biology. It was sponsored by Scripps. To participate, he waited for a bus at 5:30 AM daily and took a ride into an elementary school in barrio Logan. He returned at 5:30 PM. After a couple weeks, we suspected something was wrong. The "marine biology" part was a mere ONE HOUR on ALTERNATE weeks. A whole 2 hours each month. The remainder of the time, he was in a classroom with substandard teaching. The school's primary mission was to feed the students 2 meals a day and provide daycare service for parents. My son was so far ahead of the other students that they would beat the crap out of him on the playground for doing better than the remainder of the class. Being top fly on the manure pile is no fun.

My son asked to be transferred back to our neighborhood school. It took 3 weeks to catch up on work that his classmates were doing in the neighborhood school that was not being done in the "barrio" "magnet" school. He not only caught up, but kept accelerating his efforts. I checked his English compositions after the "teacher" corrected them. Total crap...on the part of the teacher. I finished the job and made him rewrite the papers. In the end, he was tutoring the AP classes in high school in evening sessions. He often stepped in for the assigned teacher because he knew the material better than the teacher. His exam scores were 5 on all tests. Final GPA was 4.33.

Back to the original issue. Doing significantly better than your peers may result in punishment by the teacher and your peers. Expect it. Don't let it impede your desire to excel. The world is full of Luddites.

18 posted on 07/28/2011 12:10:16 PM PDT by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Wuli

19 posted on 07/28/2011 12:10:34 PM PDT by null and void (Day 918. When your only tools are a Hammer & Sickle, everything looks like a Capitalist...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom
My grad degree was in a form of math and I have been brushing up by taking Khan Academy tests and watching his videos. He is the best teacher I have ever had.

What Khan has done is deliver a mathematics toolkit that anyone, at any level, can use to quickly and easily access whatever math skillset, program, or formulae is needed to solve any problem or meet any work challenge. And he offers this toolkit in brief youtube videos.

His basic idea is that in conventional school systems create problems when students move to higher and higher grades with only a 70 or 80 grade. When schools permit this they are passing students with proficiency in only 70% or 80% of the material presented (and they are failing to become proficient in 20% to 30% of the material).

In Khans view, this leaves students with a swiss cheese like understanding of math...and this eventually leads to failure.

He has changed the paradigm. He makes sure that students master EVERY area of math. And he demonstrates that it is so easy, anyone can do it (with a little persistence).

IMHO Sal Khan has sparked a revolution that will be impossible to stop.

Sorry for any errors...I am a newby.

Khan Academy

20 posted on 07/28/2011 12:12:20 PM PDT by RoosterRedux
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BwanaNdege

We have tickets for Saturday! We LOVE the Maker Faire! Last year my younger daughter would have spent the entire time in the Maker Tent soldering if she hadn’t been so excited to see the Iron Mongers pour into their molds. (we did miss the Diet Coke and Mentos though)

I have to remember to bring more cash this year.....


21 posted on 07/28/2011 12:12:48 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: All
So what happens when, using Khan Academy, you wind up with a kid in fifth grade who has mastered high school trigonometry and physics

They could teach that kid college calculus and physics.

Duh!

22 posted on 07/28/2011 12:13:31 PM PDT by Aroostook25
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: fightinJAG
That's the way to get it done. Move as fast as you can achieve 100% mastery of topic. It's important to make sure you mastered the topic as a poor foundation will impede progress later. Each person has a different aptitude for specific topics. The cattle car approach is a disservice.
23 posted on 07/28/2011 12:15:21 PM PDT by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

Two comments

1) I used Khan academy for my 6th grader who was taking an entrance exam for an accelerated program. The educrats in our district told us we should not “study for” the test, but we had heard they used algebra on the test. We went through the basic Khan Academy algebra course - and she did very well on the entrance exam.

2) I used to think home-schooling would be very time consuming - but I realized that when you don’t have the “convoy system” of public schools, a parent (with help from tutors if necessary) can cover subjects like Algebra, Geometry, etc... in 1/4 or less the time it takes a public school class. They waste A LOT of time in our district.


24 posted on 07/28/2011 12:15:45 PM PDT by PGR88 (I'm so open-minded my brains fell out)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: null and void
I hear Khan Academy is really strong on Shakespeare and revenge, but a bit weak in three dimensional thinking.

Pictured below: A Khan Academy instructor and students in an interactive classroom.


25 posted on 07/28/2011 12:16:01 PM PDT by buccaneer81 (ECOMCON)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Jedidah

>>please let me suggest that you just allow them to be ordinary kids.<<

We are far advanced because we school through summers. It takes about an hour to complete Saxon. They get up, we go for a walk, they eat breakfast, do math then splash in the pool. Actually, my kids are extra-ordinary, but I don’t force it. They are what they are and we are having a blast!


26 posted on 07/28/2011 12:16:13 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: PGR88

>>They waste A LOT of time in our district.<<

It’s not just your district.


27 posted on 07/28/2011 12:21:20 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Jedidah
I teach at a public high school. That is wonderful that your children were permitted to take advanced classes. Our “gifted and talented coordinator” is a crooked bi+ch who has been threatened with law suits numerous times. “Earning” a spot in the coveted classes comes down to who you are and not your academic abilities. She schedules the AP exams so that it is very difficult for regular education students to take them, therefore they do not have the opportunity to get into the classes. I no longer teach her “scholars” students because I uncovered a pretty intricate cheating ring. Thirty-two of the 35 students in my Scholars’ American Literature and Advanced Composition I class purchased their research papers online and handed them in as their own work. I wish that I could tell you that my story is unique; however, it is not and my children will be homeschooled. We had two broken jaws this past school year. Both incidences were covered up by the school until students posted the vids on Youtube. I literally had no clue that two students, in two different fights, suffered from broken bones until News 9 reported on the Youtube videos. When my comrades ask how my kids will learn socialization skills I tell them this: Every month my husband will take them to the bathroom, beat the crap out of them, and then try to sell them drugs. That usually shuts them up.
28 posted on 07/28/2011 12:22:20 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: driftdiver

“Bore them to the point they would rather do drugs than learn.”

^^ This. I was the kid who had completed calculus by the 5th grade, but was still stuck in the public schools going through the motions. By high school, I was so bored I just started skipping classes and smoking weed.


29 posted on 07/28/2011 12:29:21 PM PDT by Boogieman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: All

b


30 posted on 07/28/2011 12:31:34 PM PDT by Maverick68
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: goodwithagun

>>Every month my husband will take them to the bathroom, beat the crap out of them, and then try to sell them drugs<<

LOL!!! Good one!


31 posted on 07/28/2011 12:38:28 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Boogieman

I had to post just to make sure I hadn’t changed my handle to “Boogieman.” Seems that my short-term memory took a bit of a hit in high school...


32 posted on 07/28/2011 12:40:57 PM PDT by philled (Lay on, Macduff! And damned be him that first cries “Hold, enough!”)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom
I wonder what they would do with them in school?

As long as they didn't have attitudes or disrupt the class due to their boredom, they'd do quite well in my class, and I'd encourage them onward.

They'd need three years of math credits in high school (in NY), so they'd have to take some college classes, but thankfully, we do have teachers that can teach this should the need arise.

33 posted on 07/28/2011 12:42:00 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a liberal when I married her.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

Kids should be able to move along at their own pace, an idea I like. If a 13 year old winds up graduating, so what?


34 posted on 07/28/2011 12:44:15 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

Feel free to use it at any time. Some people still try to use the “socialization” issue even though that was debunked decades ago. I’ve recently heard that we’re (as in homeschoolers) now being attacked for not teaching our children enough diversity and teaching them too much about Christianity. Interestingly it is my ghetto thugs who have no grasp of diversity and my homeschool students who can accurately break down and explain the concepts of major religions. Gasp!


35 posted on 07/28/2011 12:44:56 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

My 12 year old is not being home schooled and loves this program

It also has a ‘coach’ feature so i can monitor her progress

It does not give answers- only suggestionds- the student has to learn to figure out how to find the answer on their own.

I like it a lot


36 posted on 07/28/2011 12:54:53 PM PDT by Mr. K (CAPSLOCK! -Unleash the fury! [Palin/Bachman 2012- unbeatable ticket])
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sonny M

Teachers do not like it when they have certain students who are way ahead of the class,....

****
If I can make that “Many teachers”, I will agree with you. It’s sad but true. (Retired teacher here.)


37 posted on 07/28/2011 12:56:58 PM PDT by Bigg Red (Palin in 2012)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Tanniker Smith

>>They’d need three years of math credits in high school (in NY), so they’d have to take some college classes, but thankfully, we do have teachers that can teach this should the need arise.<<

I think they’ll just follow the path of the other homeschoolers in our group and go on to Community College so they can have their AA at 18. But thanks for the offer.


38 posted on 07/28/2011 1:00:29 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom
Question...

Hows the economics and finance sections ?

Its the typical traditional keynesian crap or is more along the classical line ?

Anyone here see the Khan academy version of the bailouts and the financial and housing crisis ?

39 posted on 07/28/2011 1:05:27 PM PDT by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

>>>what happens when, using Khan Academy, you wind up with a kid in fifth grade who has mastered high school trigonometry and physics

Isn’t it the purpose of teachers’ “grading parties” to prevent this tragic advancement of human achievement? /s/

Khan academy rocks! So too, MIT’s OCW.


40 posted on 07/28/2011 1:06:06 PM PDT by Hop A Long Cassidy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sonny M

For economics, just have them read Sowell’s “Basic Economics”. That’s all they’ll ever need.


41 posted on 07/28/2011 1:18:32 PM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working for)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

They would get them to tutor other students.


42 posted on 07/28/2011 1:36:59 PM PDT by goldi (')
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sonny M

I heard the economic is not good.


43 posted on 07/28/2011 1:58:29 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Sonny M

BTW, we use these

http://www.amazon.com/Bluestocking-Guide-Economics-Whatever-Happened/dp/0942617363


44 posted on 07/28/2011 2:13:57 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

guess they never heard of advanced placement...

I was doing college math in high school 40 years ago.

and, of course, this is similar to the home school idea.

Here in the Philippines, the “Kumon” Japanese tutoring method which uses workbooks is used by many middle class parents to tutor their kids outside of the school system.


45 posted on 07/28/2011 2:21:29 PM PDT by LadyDoc (liberals only love politically correct poor people)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: driftdiver
Bore them to the point they would rather do drugs than learn.

That would make them "normal"

Perhaps label them ADD or some other acronym so that they could be singled out and punished for their "advanced" condition.

.

"The nail that stands out gets pounded down." - Japanese proverb.

46 posted on 07/28/2011 2:27:01 PM PDT by Only1choice____Freedom (FDR had the New Deal. President 0bama has the Raw Deal.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom

I was speaking hypothetically. I wouldn’t want you to send your kids all the way over here to my school.


47 posted on 07/28/2011 2:53:12 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a liberal when I married her.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: netmilsmom
My grandson (and granddaughter) attend a Montessori school in town. Great school. Starts with 2 classrooms of kindergarten, 2 classrooms of grades 1-2-3, two classrooms of 4-5-6, and two of jr high. In other words, K-8. The kids have their weekly portfolios containing their assignments for the week. A lot of flexibility and independent work built into the system, along with a strong emphasis on self discipline. Teachers can address individual students at the appropriate level. Kids love the school.
48 posted on 07/28/2011 5:08:08 PM PDT by ArmyTeach (Our liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain ... Iowa 61)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ArmyTeach

Re the Montessori school: Do they get the same sort of political indoctrination there that kids often get in the public schools? We’re in Northern California (a hotbed of liberalism, needless to say) and the public schools here seem to regard it as their duty to make sure all students get their monthly dose of “activism.” We will be homeschooling our kids for a year or two, but I’ve heard good things about Montessori. Do you have any info or opinions about Montessori’s political leanings, or lack thereof? Thanks!


49 posted on 07/29/2011 1:53:57 AM PDT by Hetty_Fauxvert ("And I'm actually happy to be, for us to be the moat with alligators party." -- Mark Steyn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: ArmyTeach
The thing about Khan Academy is that he (Sal Kahn) has attacked the very foundation of math instruction (it worked poorly BTW).

He has approached the problem by destroying the old ineffective way of teaching math and by building a new foundation. Not just any foundation...but a foundation that must be mastered (100%) before moving on.

And his approach is informal and friendly. And if a student is confused...he sends them to a lesson that they might have missed.

Regarding mathematics, Sal believes (as I do) that anyone can master math. Math is innate...it is in our genes.

I am a math major (econometric modeling) at the grad level and I have filled in many of my weaknesses in my foundational understanding of math using Khan Academy. I thought I knew math because I was good at it...but I found (thx to Sal Khan) that there were many areas in which I was weak.

Like Sal Khan, I believe that every student can master math (each in his/her own way). He is at the edge of a new revolution. Check out his site (khanacademy.org) and pull from it all the things that increase your life and mind.

50 posted on 07/29/2011 4:03:30 AM PDT by RoosterRedux
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson