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Being 30 and Living With Your Parents Isnít Lame ó Itís Awesome
Time Moneyland ^ | May 31,2012 | BRAD TUTTLE

Posted on 05/31/2012 6:41:01 AM PDT by Hojczyk

Just how much of a bummer is it to be well past the age of adulthood and still living under your parent’s roof? As this living arrangement grows increasingly common, the perception is that it’s not so bad after all. In fact, living with mom and dad can be pretty sweet. According to a new survey, young adults who live with their parents are nearly as likely to say they are satisfied with their housing situation as those who live on their own.

The Great Recession has brought with it a reevaluation of the American Dream, and even whether a college degree is worth the money. Now, the idea of living at home with your parents isn’t associated with failure or a lack of achievement. More likely, young adults living with their parents are thought of as victims of unfortunate circumstances, with plenty of good company.

They may also be considered to be pretty smart customers: At the very least, they weren’t foolish enough to buy a home that they couldn’t afford—and that promptly declined in value by 50%. That’s what so many adults, young and old alike, did five or so years back. To homeowners who are deeply underwater or facing foreclosure, living debt-free in your parents’ home must sound like a nice possibility.

(Excerpt) Read more at moneyland.time.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; News/Current Events
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1 posted on 05/31/2012 6:41:07 AM PDT by Hojczyk
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To: Hojczyk
It's Funemployment!

Everything is peachy in Obamaland.

2 posted on 05/31/2012 6:42:51 AM PDT by Martin Tell (ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it)
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To: Hojczyk
According to a new survey, young adults who live with their parents are nearly as likely to say they are satisfied with their housing situation as those who live on their own.

Wonder if they surveyed the parents, who I imagine are considerably less satisfied.

3 posted on 05/31/2012 6:43:57 AM PDT by Maceman
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To: Hojczyk
Whee! Let's all be moochers! Mooching is fun and easy!

I'm just waiting to see what happens to Generation Fail when mom and dad can no longer support them. I guess they will just turn to Big Daddy Govenment and the Democrat dream of "every man a dependent" will finally be realized.

4 posted on 05/31/2012 6:46:35 AM PDT by jboot (Emperor: "How will this end?" Kosh: "In fire.")
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To: Hojczyk

Whistling past the graveyard as the society/culture continues its unabated descent into a 3rd world cesspool of shared misery


5 posted on 05/31/2012 6:47:14 AM PDT by bill1952 (Choice is an illusion created between those with power - and those without)
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To: Hojczyk

How else are they going to get to go to all those rallies and protest the evil capitalist system. /sarcasm


6 posted on 05/31/2012 6:50:14 AM PDT by justice14 ("stand up defend or lay down and die")
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To: Hojczyk

How else are they going to get to go to all those rallies and protest the evil capitalist system. /sarcasm


7 posted on 05/31/2012 6:50:31 AM PDT by justice14 ("stand up defend or lay down and die")
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To: Hojczyk

To tell you the truth, I’ve got mixed feelings on it. With the way the economy is going, my family is starting to consider what to do with my grandmother’s house when she passes.

Talk seems to be leaning in the direction of moving my uncle and my cousin and wife into the house. That’s 5 people in that big ole 5 bedroom house and 4 of them are couples which will leave 2 free bedrooms.


8 posted on 05/31/2012 6:52:14 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Hojczyk

I lived in the same house with 3 generations when in my 20s. Its not ideal, but ya do what ya gotta do. 3 generations or more under one roof is standard procedure in almost all places in the world except america, and was standard procedure here in america up until the around 1960.


9 posted on 05/31/2012 6:53:50 AM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: cripplecreek

sounds like a plan to me, as long as there’s no hard feelings between them.


10 posted on 05/31/2012 6:55:21 AM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: Maceman

I can say one thing if it turned out my children had to move back home.

I rasied and trained them well they are both living away from with good jobs

I would never have to cut the grass, weed the garden, cut and split fire wood and any other chores I could think of.

May be there is a reason they are not living at home.


11 posted on 05/31/2012 6:58:22 AM PDT by riverrunner
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To: Hojczyk

We just keep lowering the bar, we make the tests easier, we make the demands on our children lower, and then wonder why other countries are picking up our manufacturing base, why we are importing H-1B Visa Engineers and Software programmers.

Then, we wonder why business’s here are failing.

It’s going to get much worse, before it gets better.


12 posted on 05/31/2012 6:58:33 AM PDT by Hodar (Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.- A. Schopenhauer)
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To: mamelukesabre

I’m sure its never easy but lord knows how many generations have done it. It wasn’t so long ago that most families lived that way.


13 posted on 05/31/2012 6:59:12 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: cripplecreek

I don’t think that is a bad idea at all, Cripplecreek, as long as the adults set out rules of sorts. For example, how will the bills be divided, who cooks/cleans/does yard work etc... In these economic times, families sometimes need to help each other to keep their head above water. IMHO.


14 posted on 05/31/2012 7:01:24 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: Hojczyk

It’s very common in many ethnicities or cultures. I think if both sides are happy, it can be beautiful and keep them close. All those empty rooms, a responsible child can keep the house safe while you travel, the child can be saving up for a better house when he marries.

It depends on the people. My brother stayed there til almost 30 when he married, and then he bought a nice home. He left to attend college and law school and lived at home as he started his career.

I wish my elderly parents WOULD live with us. I treasur thm and I like having different generations and ages around. But they refuse.

It depends on the individuals. If its mostly a responsible adult, mutually satisfying thing, it can be a “family compound” and provide times for true family closeness. If it’s a pothead on the couch with chips all around him, that is different. He needs a kick out of the nest.


15 posted on 05/31/2012 7:02:40 AM PDT by Yaelle
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To: cripplecreek; Impy

Do yourself and your immediate family a favor and IF you go down that path (having relatives move into the house), get everything squared away legally before your grandmother passes.

When everyone owns something, no one owns anything.

You’d be surprised how “relatives” act when their “free” gig is up. I lived through one of these “family house” situations via my Mother and it was a nightmare to get resolved. And I did get it resolved (using both legal and Don Corleone methods), although it took years off my life in the process.


16 posted on 05/31/2012 7:03:06 AM PDT by GOPsterinMA (We may die, but DISCO LIVES FOREVER!!!)
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To: Hojczyk

Not so awesome for Mom and Dad.


17 posted on 05/31/2012 7:04:13 AM PDT by Bubba_Leroy (The Obamanation Continues)
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To: Hojczyk
Despite quoting one "she", I'm betting that the "young adults" and "graduates" are overwhelmingly male.

A "young adult" I know told me that the majority of his mid-to-late-20s male friends still live at home and the majority of the corresponding females he went to school with have their shit together.

18 posted on 05/31/2012 7:04:31 AM PDT by synbad600
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To: Hojczyk

No surprise here. Time Magazine doing what it can to make unemployment and living with your parents a fun thing to do during the Obama regime.


19 posted on 05/31/2012 7:05:49 AM PDT by Presbyterian Reporter
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To: GOPsterinMA

Not all families are litigious.


20 posted on 05/31/2012 7:07:26 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Hojczyk
My reading of 19th century/early 20th century American literature shows that most children lived at home until they married. And sometimes after marriage they returned to their parents. It was called the extended family. "Spinster” women always lived at home. Bachelor sons often lived at home. They worked and contributed to the household. At one time, families were very tight. It's only the modern era where that has become an anomaly.
21 posted on 05/31/2012 7:07:30 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: Maceman

Ya, how happy are parents about their adult children still living with them?

I think a big issue would be, are these young people being responsible in their lives? Are they working? Are they paying rent? Are they doing household chores?

I had a bad personal experience in this area. My son was unemployed, and didn’t seem to be working too hard in seeking work, from what I could tell. We had some discussions about that.

But the last straw from me was one morning, I heard strange noises from his room. I couldn’t imagine what was going on in there. It turns out he had brought a girl into his room!!

He and I had some sharp discussions, in which I told him, I was not going to subsidize his engaging in immoral behavior with girls under my roof.

In the end, he moved out, got a job, and has had that job for a few years now. And, he ended up marrying that girl. In his case, moving out and being compelled to work, and being compelled to pay rent so he could entertain whoever he wanted where he lived, pushed him to make positive effort to being a responsible young adult.


22 posted on 05/31/2012 7:09:18 AM PDT by Dilbert San Diego
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To: Hojczyk

I’ve told my kids that they are welcome to come back and live with us, but that it’s not a party house. To live with us, they must be productive (working, looking for work, or waiting for a job to start); they must be supportive (help with regular chores, with home repairs, and with yard work, plus pay 25% of their income in rent to us); and they must be respectful (as polite as was expected when they were kids, plus continuing to follow our rules for what happens under our roof). Under those conditions, they are welcome when they are in need or just to save for a down payment.


23 posted on 05/31/2012 7:10:34 AM PDT by Pollster1 (A boy becomes a man when a man is needed - John Steinbeck)
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To: miss marmelstein

We have a three generation home, and it’s great! Everyone contributes what they are able in time, talent and earnings.

That said, my teenagers will be expected to leave when they go to college. It is SO important to be able to make something of your life on your own in your 20’s. Its a step in a person’s development that is necessary.


24 posted on 05/31/2012 7:11:55 AM PDT by freemama
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To: Hojczyk

What a great way to prolong adolescence.
(Been there did that ‘til 25. Push ‘em out sooner.)


25 posted on 05/31/2012 7:14:13 AM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com)
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To: Hojczyk

Society has shifted back - we are all newly arrived immigrants to these expensive shores now. Young adults used to live with their parents - to build up savings to buy a house - wait until they got married and start out with money in the bank, etc.

The American dream is still there, like immigrant families of old, it will take decades to achieve independence in this strange new world.


26 posted on 05/31/2012 7:14:27 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Check my profile page for the FReeper Online Cookbook 2011)
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To: synbad600

Modern women don’t want to live with their parents because they are still treated like children at home. Sons who live at home don’t have to put up with the nagging and the (!!) setting of curfews that some parents impose of their educated, adult, working daughters.


27 posted on 05/31/2012 7:17:54 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: miss marmelstein

My great grandmother and her first husband lived in the house she was born in until both her parents passed. By that time she had 3 kids. When her first husband ran off during the depression she got remarried and sold the house and moved to this part of the state where my great grandfather already owned a house.


28 posted on 05/31/2012 7:18:49 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Maceman
Wonder if they surveyed the parents, who I imagine are considerably less satisfied.

Thats probably a safe bet. I have an aunt and uncle who had just retired very comfortably with two good pensions, when their oldest daughter got divorced and moved back in with her two kids (and remains unemployed after two years). Then their middle daughter lost her $60,000 a year job and is currently living on unemployment, with mom and dad making the better part of her mortgage payment for her so she doesn't lose her house. Now the youngest daughter and her husband couldn't find any work after college and have moved back in as well. So my aunt and uncle who had saved up and planned to spend their golden years traveling are now barely scrapping by with two kids (and two grandkids) under their roof and paying the mortgage of the third. They have even started thinking about going back to work part time to supplement their pensions.

29 posted on 05/31/2012 7:21:03 AM PDT by apillar
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To: Dilbert San Diego

The persistent occupant may be responsible and contributing, but not making personal progress. Other than saving money, there’s not much room for progress.

One exception I’d make: using the opportunity to buy/build real estate. Save enough money for cash payment for cheap/odd land upon which an inexpensive home may be built (search “tiny houses”).

So long as active forward progress is occurring, fine. Too easy to just tread water. Too easy for Miss/Mr. Right to be unimpressed and move on.


30 posted on 05/31/2012 7:22:58 AM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com)
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To: Hojczyk

I think it can be mutually helpful. My ne’er-do-well brother-in-law now lives with my mother-in-law. He is a college graduate who was out of work for a year and is now underemployed as a produce clerk in a supermarket. But he is a great “house-husband” for my MIL. He has fixed up a lot of things around the house, is always respectful, does most of the cooking, and adores his mom’s really spoiled cockatiel. I thought he was going to be just a mooch, but he is good company for Mom, and now we don’t have to worry that no one will be there if she falls or gets ill.

Is my BIL as productive as my husband? No. Did he successfully get married and have kids and build a life for himself? No, and that’s not great for him. In many ways, his is a case of arrested development. But as to whether the two generations can live happily together as adults? These two people do.


31 posted on 05/31/2012 7:23:55 AM PDT by married21 (As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.)
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To: freemama

I lived at home during my college years - commuting into New York City. I didn’t leave home until I got my first decent job - I was about 22. Had to go through years of miserable roommates and bad apartments but it made me grow up...and grow up conservative.


32 posted on 05/31/2012 7:25:08 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: married21

Your story is so interesting! A brother-in-law who isn’t perfect but has found a place in the world for himself.

I have a friend who is a landscape painter and makes a living doing handywork for all the elderly widows in his town. They love him and he’s very honest and helpful. He would have loved to have been a famous artist but it just didn’t happen.


33 posted on 05/31/2012 7:29:00 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: Hojczyk

Pathetic. That’s what it is. Pathetic. If my kid wanted to live with me at the age of 30 I’d have kicked his ass out and disowned him!


34 posted on 05/31/2012 7:29:01 AM PDT by pgkdan (ANYBODY BUT OBAMA!)
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To: cripplecreek

That’s true.

Neither was my Mother’s family. However, when situations deteriorate to the point where steps (legal and otherwise) have to be taken, you see how fast “families” turn into packs of animals.

Just talking from experience; do what you want.


35 posted on 05/31/2012 7:31:47 AM PDT by GOPsterinMA (We may die, but DISCO LIVES FOREVER!!!)
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To: Hojczyk

In this economy people will likely have to double up. Some of the parents can’t make it, or the kids can’t make it- or both so in that case it makes sense. If done right it works for everyone. This is different than grown children that live off the parents because they are not responsible, don’t want to grow up- that is just wrong.

Some people are doubling up with friends instead of family. My oldest daughter and a friend of hers rented a really nice house and it is cheaper for them than it was each having their own apartment.


36 posted on 05/31/2012 7:32:04 AM PDT by Tammy8 (~Secure the border and deport all illegals- do it now! ~ Support our Troops!~)
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To: miss marmelstein

Watching the Hatfields and McCoys over the last few days and was struck by how similar some things were to the way I grew up. My extended family made up a pretty fair percentage of my hometown. I lived less than two blocks from my grand mother and great grandmother and had all kinds of aunts uncles and cousins around all the time.


37 posted on 05/31/2012 7:35:34 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: cripplecreek

We’ve got a monster of an eldercare cost crisis looming and moving back to extended families is probably a great way to lower costs and increase sense of purpose while decreasing loneliness for people in their latter years.


38 posted on 05/31/2012 7:36:00 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: cripplecreek

I wonder if her first husband went out to get the proverbial “bottle of milk” or “pack of cigarettes.” My family suffered pretty badly during the depression - and they all shacked up in one house in Queens.


39 posted on 05/31/2012 7:36:23 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: miss marmelstein

The first husband tried to put my great grandmother and kids on a train to Chicago. She told him that he could come home with her or get on the train himself but she was going home. He got on the train and she never saw him again.

Funny thing was, they did find him back in the 80s, living less than 50 miles away in Traverse city.


40 posted on 05/31/2012 7:40:56 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: miss marmelstein

That is true.....and parents simply worry more about physical safety of girls.....which is normal

I had one adult girl at home....all i asked was where she was....even if at BFs

I left for work and college at 17....never lived at home for more than a week or two again

I wanted freedom baby


41 posted on 05/31/2012 7:41:06 AM PDT by wardaddy (the GOP are cowards)
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To: Hojczyk

My middle son got a job on the west side of Houston in May 2011 after graduating from Texas A&M in December 2010. He had an apartment in College Station, with a lease that expired in April 2011. My wife and I live in the NASA area of Houston (at that time I was working for a JSC contractor).

He moved back in with us to build up a stake for a house. It meant a 50 minute commute (one-way), but it allowed him to bank most of his salary. The original plan was for him to stay with us for a year.

Due to a lot of paid overtime, he was able to get a down payment put together by October. After a couple of months of house-hunting, he decided to rent for a year or two instead. In February he moved into a rental house 10 minutes from where he works.

For my wife and I having him live at home was a fine arrangement. He did his own laundry, and cleaned up after himself. In September I got a job fairly close to his, and we would commute together occasionally.

Still, he wanted to be on his own. Can’t blame him. It was a long drive, and when you are searching for a spouse, who wants to be in the ‘rents house? So now he has own place.

He had us out there on Memorial Day. Fixed dinner for us. Showed us his pad. Kinda cool. *That’s* when you know you have succeeded as a parent.

(And we now have a hurricane getaway that isn’t 200 miles away.)


42 posted on 05/31/2012 7:41:06 AM PDT by No Truce With Kings (Ten years on FreeRepublic and counting.)
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To: miss marmelstein

That is true.....and parents simply worry more about physical safety of girls.....which is normal

I had one adult girl at home....all i asked was where she was....even if at BFs

I left for work and college at 17....never lived at home for more than a week or two again

I wanted freedom baby


43 posted on 05/31/2012 7:41:16 AM PDT by wardaddy (the GOP are cowards)
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To: Hojczyk
Now, the idea of living at home with your parents isn’t associated with failure or a lack of achievement.

It means I live under their rules, their way, on their terms. I don't like that very much. No thanks. I'll pass. My parents and I get along great, and I'd like to keep it that way.

Besides. "Uhhh, I live with my parents" isn't very impressive to women.

44 posted on 05/31/2012 7:41:38 AM PDT by Darren McCarty (The Republican Party is bigger than the presidency.)
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To: Hojczyk
My cousin moved back home, but that was to take over the farm.

Still, I was raised that you were expected to make your own way. No mooching. My sisters had a different message, but we all went our own way.

This can work, if everyone has clear boundaries. In my experience, that isn't the case.

45 posted on 05/31/2012 7:42:03 AM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: Dilbert San Diego

If I tried that one under ma and pa’s roof, I’d be a dead man. Mom would kill me, and then she’s start crying and put what’s left of me through the guilt trip for years. Then the old man would kill me for doing that to Mom.


46 posted on 05/31/2012 7:52:53 AM PDT by Darren McCarty (The Republican Party is bigger than the presidency.)
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To: Hojczyk
It's really cool for "kids" 25 years and up to sponge off of their parents!

Who wrote this story? Beavis or Butthead?

47 posted on 05/31/2012 7:53:55 AM PDT by Minutemen ("It's a Religion of Peace")
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To: Hojczyk

In Italy, “37 percent of 30-year-old men live with their parents, and have never lived anywhere else”
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/04/books/review/the-rise-of-multigenerational-and-one-person-households.html?pagewanted=all

Becoming more like Italy isn’t the kind of change I’m hoping for.


48 posted on 05/31/2012 7:55:41 AM PDT by DrC
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To: miss marmelstein
". . . still treated like children . . ."

Ain't that the truth! I'm pushing 50 and I sfeel like my mom talks to me like a child. I've had to be mean to my family (so they think) just to get the point across that I'm an adult and I'll do as I want, not as they want.

49 posted on 05/31/2012 7:56:47 AM PDT by synbad600
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To: miss marmelstein
Modern women don’t want to live with their parents because they are still treated like children at home.

Our daughter couldn't wait to get out of the house and be on her own. She had to move back in after she quit her job in LA, but that was just for a few months.

50 posted on 05/31/2012 7:59:37 AM PDT by Arrowhead1952 (It's time to take out the trash in DC.)
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