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College grads learning good jobs hard to find now (employers note "skill gap")
San Antonio Express News ^ | July 1, 2012 | Tracy Idell Hamilton and Beth Brown

Posted on 07/01/2012 3:24:51 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife

Andi Meuth earned a history degree from Texas A&M in May and has applied for 150 jobs, so far with no luck.

Jon Ancira graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology last year, but can't find work that uses his degree. After six months of searching, the 26-year-old did finally land a job — at a bank.

Alex Ricard, 21, is grateful to be using his electronic media degree from Texas State at a social media startup company, but it's an unpaid internship.

He says he's sent out three to five resumes a week for the past two months, with almost no response from prospective employers. When he does hear back, he says, it's most often that he doesn't have enough experience.

While the particulars for each graduate are different, the overarching narrative has become familiar.

Up to half of all recent college grads are jobless or underemployed, doing low-wage work outside their chosen fields, according to a widely reported analysis this spring by the Associated Press.

These young women and men still have high expectations — as do their parents — that a college degree will pay off, despite rising tuition and the resulting debt.

But increasingly, say economists and workforce experts, there is a mismatch in today's job market between graduates' skills and those needed in the fastest-growing career fields.

The recession changed the economy permanently, economists say. In this largely jobless recovery, millions of mid- and entry-level positions are gone, the work now automated.

Many of those with college degrees who do find jobs can expect lower salaries and reduced earning potential over their working lives. Rising debt — the average graduate carries about $25,000 in loans — can push the often-necessary advanced degree out of reach.

Locally, the unemployment rate among 20- to 24-year-olds has been about twice as high as the overall rate.

Psych degree overload

Ricard still holds out hope that his degree will eventually lead to a job, given the increased importance of social media and digital technology, but he has his limits: August.

“If I haven't found something by then,” he said, “even though I'd like to think my days of fast-food jobs are behind me, it becomes less about the job I want and more about the job I need at that point.”

Not all graduates face such dire straits. Those with in-demand degrees in areas such as engineering, information technology and nursing enjoy much brighter job prospects.

Kevin Davis, who earned an electrical engineering degree from the University of Texas at Austin, had three job offers before he graduated in May. He took a job with Toshiba in Houston.

John Hollman will graduate from Austin Community College in December with a two-year associate degree in nursing. The San Antonio native already has two job offers, one from his current employer of nine years, Texas Oncology.

But employers and workforce agencies say the labor market is suffering from a jobs-skills mismatch.

Psychology, for example, is the third-most-popular four-year degree in Texas and one of the fastest growing, according to Workforce Solutions Alamo, a public agency that works to bring people and jobs together.

Problem is, there's almost no demand at that level, said Eva Esquivel, communications manager with the agency.

More than 5,000 people graduated from Texas colleges and universities with bachelor's degrees in psychology in 2010, she said, to compete for four job openings in the field, with an annual salary of $22,000.

“That's not even enough to pay student loans back,” Esquivel said. Most psychology jobs require a higher-level degree — and there still aren't many positions available.

Ancira, who saw some of his psychology research published while studying at Northwest Vista, one of the Alamo Colleges, said he found fewer research opportunities after transferring to UT.

Disenchanted, he looked into changing majors or getting an advanced degree, but the burden of $36,000 in student loans put him off.

Meuth, who lives in San Antonio, said she knew the job market for history majors without a master's degree or teaching certification was limited but decided to go for a major she was passionate about, even in a slumping economy. She wants to work in a museum eventually, which requires a master's, but is putting it off for now to avoid taking out any loans.

Conversely, Texas colleges graduated far fewer engineers than psychology majors in 2010 — just 271 petroleum engineers, according to Workforce Solutions Alamo, and demand far outstrips supply, especially as the Eagle Ford Shale continues to boom.

Starting pay for petroleum engineers averages $85,000, Esquivel said. For the 405 chemical engineers who graduated in 2010, it's about $60,000.

Skills in short supply

Chris Nielsen, president and CEO of Toyota Motor Manufacturing in San Antonio, said the company has struggled to fill engineering positions and points to the healthy starting salary as proof of the competitive nature of the field.

But perhaps more crucially, Nielsen said that in the six years the company has been building trucks in San Antonio, it's never been able to fill all its trade positions, or what it calls “skilled job” positions.

Those include maintaining assembly-line robots, which Nielson said requires training in programming, hydraulics and pneumatics.

These are good, career-track positions, he said, many that pay in the $60,000 range.

Toyota is hardly alone.

Manufacturers surveyed in the latest “Skills Gap” report from the Manufacturing Institute, an affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers, reported that roughly 5 percent of current jobs go unfilled because of a lack of qualified candidates. That's as many as 600,000 unfilled jobs — machinists, operators, craft workers, distributors, technicians and more — that manufacturers say hamper their ability to expand operations, drive innovation and improve productivity.

Those surveyed said the national education curriculum is not producing workers with the basic skills they need, and the trend is not likely to improve in the near term.

Tom Pauken, appointed to the Texas Workforce Commission by Gov. Rick Perry in 2008, has become a passionate advocate for greater vocational and technical training.

He laments what he calls a “one size fits all” approach to higher education, which assumes that everyone needs a four-year degree.

Those who do are often saddled with enormous debt and still can't find good jobs, he said. “Meanwhile, there is a shortfall of qualified applicants for those with skills training as welders, electricians, pipe fitters and machinists.”

Entry-level salaries for those jobs in the San Antonio area begin in the low- to-mid-$20,000 range, according to Workforce Solutions Alamo, and rise to the upper $40,000s at the expert level.

In San Antonio, Alamo Colleges runs Alamo Academies, which aims to train high school juniors and seniors for skilled employment in fast-growing local industries, including aerospace, information technology and security, manufacturing and the health professions.

The academies, which are a partnership among the community college district, local industry and workforce agencies, also provide college credits, and expose students to occupations that require a college education. Students stay in their high schools, take about half their classes at the academy and participate in a paid internship in their chosen field.

After high school, graduates earn an average starting pay of more than $30,000 and will have earned a couple dozen college credits.

“I tell students they need to do career planning even before education planning,” said Esquivel, who travels a 12-county region talking to high school students about where job growth will occur in the coming years. “I wish more students would take advantage” of the information her agency has to offer.

Luisa Ramirez, the on-campus recruiting coordinator at the University of Texas at San Antonio, said she's seen an increase in freshmen who come to the career center seeking advice, rather than waiting until they're seniors.

“They've seen their parents go through the recession,” she said, “So they're more aware.”

Ancira said many recent graduates might be in for a rude awakening.

“You go to school thinking you're going to graduate and there's going to be a job in an office waiting for you,” he said, “but a few years into it, you realize that's not really going to happen.”


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government
KEYWORDS: economy; education; educon; educonomy; highereducation; jobs; marketability; univdegrees
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
"Locally, the unemployment rate among 20- to 24-year-olds has been about twice as high as the overall rate"

Obama voters. No they can't :)


151 posted on 07/01/2012 12:00:24 PM PDT by I see my hands (It's time to.. KICK OUT THE JAMS, MOTHER FREEPERS!)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Like the heat and being outdoors? They are running ads for shade tobacco workers in Connecticut. At least it is work. A green job. I believe you can stay on site in barracks.


152 posted on 07/01/2012 12:11:24 PM PDT by Daffynition (Our forefathers would be shooting by now.)
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To: Eye of Unk
Thats my business plan, an at home tunup, service and firearm cleaning package availabe for a monthly charge.

That's a great idea.

153 posted on 07/01/2012 12:28:57 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: EQAndyBuzz

Don’t be so smug. We’ll see if your kid makes it in a few years. You already know from the article that psych undergrad degree will be useless, no matter the business plan and the vast majority of business plans fail even when developed by skilled and qualified people. With state licensing requirements and ObamaCare regulations, you’re still encouraging this path? Pity.


154 posted on 07/01/2012 12:32:48 PM PDT by newzjunkey
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To: eyedigress

Good suggestion, thanks! Our county Aquatics and Fitness Center offers SCUBA classes.

Lifeguard son just came in from work. It’s 104 outside. I need to get up to his room and make sure he comes down to get more water, instead of passing out in bed from dehydration.


155 posted on 07/01/2012 12:36:42 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat and bring me safe to His heavenly kingdom.")
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To: Beagle8U
I'll bet psychobabble inc is open too.

psycho-babelfish: English-Psychologist & Psychologist-English Translation Services.

156 posted on 07/01/2012 12:39:27 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: Future Snake Eater
Because someone, somewhere will want to see your respective GPAs.

GPAs aren't the be all end-all of everything; I held a good GPA in excess of 3.5 for a long while, but graduated with something like a 2.6, 2.3, it doesn't matter. Why? Well it took me nearly a decade to get the degree, at the end you could say I had the worst case of seniorits ever. Certainly taking classes where we 'learned' the same thing over and over didn't help keep motivation up.

I know I had to take Statistics several times before getting it; and even then I know I only tentatively grasped the surface of it.

What my transcripts should show is that I work towards the goal w/o giving up; but they won't see that, they'll see a 2.X GPA.

157 posted on 07/01/2012 1:02:17 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: OneWingedShark

I wanted to keep it just low key, my worst nightmare would be that a Federal task force would do the same in order to gain ownership information. So it may sound like a good idea but in light of the political situation it could also be very perilous, but then the best things in life are dangerous.


158 posted on 07/01/2012 1:03:30 PM PDT by Eye of Unk (Is your state Obamacare free yet?)
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To: Eye of Unk
I wanted to keep it just low key, my worst nightmare would be that a Federal task force would do the same in order to gain ownership information. So it may sound like a good idea but in light of the political situation it could also be very perilous, but then the best things in life are dangerous.

Aye; there is that. I'm thinking about running for pres (2016), and let me say: adhering to the oath of office would instantly put me in peril and danger.

{Oh but what Chaos I could wreak upon the domestic enemies of the United States simply by enforcing the laws!}
Imagine using the "president can order indefinite detention" clause being used against the USSC until the USSC ruled it unconstitutional; or asking the counties/cities to use Eminent Domain on all physical properties using "projections" of increased tax revenue until they decided to overturn Kelo.

159 posted on 07/01/2012 1:10:36 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: OneWingedShark

Physical sciences. Software is called software for a very important reason my FRiend. Get a second major in electrical or mechanical.


160 posted on 07/01/2012 1:22:54 PM PDT by mazda77 (and I am a Native Texan)
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To: Ann Archy
History was one of the old "liberal arts" (in the good sense) that grew out of the medieval Trivium and Quadrivium. They are opposed to the "mechanical" or "practical arts" - those courses of study that require learning a body of information (like engineering and so forth).

The purpose is not to learn history, just as Izaak Walton's real purpose in fishing was not to catch fish.

History (properly taught) teaches you how to read and digest large amounts of written material, how to write, and how to think analytically. Almost any workplace can use somebody with those talents.

In many places, a history degree is nothing but a "social studies" degree -- b.s. with a politically correct coating. THAT sort of degree is as useless as one in sociology.

161 posted on 07/01/2012 1:32:08 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGS Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment))
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To: JCBreckenridge; Ann Archy

:-D Took the words right out of my mouth . . . .


162 posted on 07/01/2012 1:38:34 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGS Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment))
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
A DEGREE does NOT bestow SKILLS upon you.

SKILLS are gained through EXPERIENCE

You do NOT need a DEGREE to get EXPERIENCE.

163 posted on 07/01/2012 1:42:29 PM PDT by VideoDoctor
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To: mazda77
Physical sciences. Software is called software for a very important reason my FRiend. Get a second major in electrical or mechanical.

Wait, what? Is math a soft science? -- It's actually called software because it's the changeable/malleable algorithms implemented on the machine, rather than being hard-wired into it.

But I'll consider it. I do not want to return to school; I put myself through it by doing the National Guard and I don't want to do that again (far too much politics).

164 posted on 07/01/2012 1:44:33 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: 9YearLurker

It’s called liberty. Look it up.

It’s easily a living wage for me here in Texas and I am doing what I enjoy and am building up experience to move up the ladder.

It’s a free country isn’t it?


165 posted on 07/01/2012 1:46:14 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: miss marmelstein

I understood that from your previous post and I didn’t mean to imply otherwise. We’re in complete agreement all around.


166 posted on 07/01/2012 1:47:19 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: DH

“I am the founder and owner of an industrial electronic manufacturing and product design business.”

Would be nice to have a name so I can be sure never to patronize you. :)


167 posted on 07/01/2012 1:51:30 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: 9YearLurker

It does tend to, but you’re talking mainly about rice bowl issues. They don’t want to starve to death or lose their independence.

It’s up to us to show them the way out. That way has to be politically viable. Liberals have forced their views on us and the way out isn’t to force our views on the country. Educate them and reason with them, that’s the best way. I think the suggestions that allow young people to get out of SS or those under a certain age are good. We must definitely change medicare.

The GOP and conservatives specifically have got to be nimble and goal oriented. It may take us a dozen steps to undo all the government jumble that’s messed up our country, but we cannot shoot ourselves every time we don’t get 100%.

I’ll take the incremental, but politically possible path every time. A little fiscal conservatism and a little social conservatism a little at a time and all in the correct direction.


168 posted on 07/01/2012 1:53:35 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: 1010RD

Oh, sorry. I misunderstood!


169 posted on 07/01/2012 1:55:29 PM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: DH

“What’s yours?”

I’m a teacher. I also subcontract data entry work for firms on an as needed basis. I own my own tutoring business. I might not be a millionaire but I’m doing alright. Don’t owe a dime, and run things on cash on hand only.

Wasn’t even touched by the Obama recession when plenty of other folks closed, and the credit crunch was the same. Too many other businesses were running off borrowed credit. Still are in fact.


170 posted on 07/01/2012 1:56:24 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: 1010RD

Unfortunately our ‘team’ (the GOPe) seems to merely want to slow the rate of increase in big government dependence, not turn it around.

We definitely have our work cut out for us...


171 posted on 07/01/2012 2:30:59 PM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: C19fan

“Also, with the cost of tuition skyrocketing is it worth going six figures into debt for a BA degree.’

I personally believe a BA has value but not six figures. Six figures today represents the cost of a private school education. There are other alternatives. If I were 18 today, was funding my education, and wanted a degree I’d probably go to the local community college for a 2 year associate degree while working as many hours as I could. I’d then go to a state university for my last two years. Of course I’d also pursue every scholarship program I could identify. Another option would be ROTC.

When my daughter applied to college in the early 2000’s the cost of 4 years at a state school was about $50,000 including room and board. Private school was 2-3 times that depending on the “prestige” of the school. Thanks to her good grades and extracurricular activities in high school she actually ended up with a nice scholarship package from an “up and coming” private school with her net cost at $10,000 per year. She worked all four years while she was in school so with our assistance, her income, and her savings she exited college debt free. She then went to graduate school (state university). She paid for grad school by working and taking out loans. Now she is working two jobs and will have her graduate education paid off less than 3 years after graduating.

Quite frankly I have no sympathy for the Harvard, Duke, Stanford, Vanderbilt, or Columbia graduate with a fresh liberal arts BA and $200,000 in debt. Those students and their parents have exercised poor judgment. I’ve seen first hand it is possible to go to college and not be in debt for life upon graduation. The kids who work their way through a state school, or less prestigious private school, appreciate the value of their education and are much more prepared to compete in the world than the students taking on six figure debt and using their extra time in college to play or participate in Occupy Wall Street.

Look at our president for example. He was given private school undergraduate and graduate school educations at very expensive private institutions. He shows no indication he appreciates those educations or anything else about this country.


172 posted on 07/01/2012 2:40:58 PM PDT by Soul of the South
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To: Texas Fossil

I’d be happy with a Court made up of nine Catholics in the mold of Justice Thomas all the live long day!

The next President will likely get to appoint 3 Justices - Ginsburg, Breyer? or even Scalia or Kennedy. Which of them retires will depend on who wins, but Ginsburg is old. The other 3 could hold on, but if Romney takes a second term he’ll get all three for a total of four nominations.

It would be smart for conservatives to start looking for 3 Thomases who can survive the confirmation process. Liberals will fight like mad, but if you can appoint the right Justices, the Court will then be solidly conservative for more than a generation.


173 posted on 07/01/2012 2:46:04 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: Eye of Unk

“Gusmithing has been my hobby for years, and it may very well become my primary source of income soon.”

Great idea and good luck. Given the way the country is headed you have a skill that will have value no matter how bad things become. A local community college near me is teaching blacksmithing. I’m thinking about taking it up as a hobby. Again, it is a skill that could be valuable if our civilization collapses and we go to a much more primitive economy.


174 posted on 07/01/2012 2:47:34 PM PDT by Soul of the South
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To: 9YearLurker

We truly do. Keep in mind that we couldn’t even cut the sugar tariff which benefits the few at the expense of the many.

It will take a multiprong attack. We need to win the Presidency, despite Romney’s less than conservative record. That won we need to take the Congress, but with enough conservatives to make a difference. We then need to get 2 Supreme Court Justices to retire with at least one of them a liberal. That gives us the Court (depending on whether or not we get a stealth liberal - think Souter)

That still isn’t quite enough because the GOPe will simply ally with Dems to move their agenda forward. We’ll need to outmaneuver them over and over again. Pick just one goal - Strengthening the 10th Amendment is a good one (we just won the Commerce Clause Debate) and use every policy tool - Executive, Legislative and Judicial - to win.

Think 2nd Amendment and look for issues that capture the mushy middle. School vouchers would also work wonders.

Gee, we really do have our work cut out for us.


175 posted on 07/01/2012 2:53:30 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: 1010RD

I don’t know, Roberts seems awfully young to retire. ;-)


176 posted on 07/01/2012 3:51:48 PM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: JCBreckenridge

You are a teacher huh? I am not surprised.

You could not utilize any of of services or product because they are for products for people who work with their hands and pay taxes so teachers can unionize and only work 9 months out of year.

Basically, they are for people who actually produce a tangible product or service themselves.

So much with your threat to ruin my business by not buying anything.


177 posted on 07/01/2012 4:03:58 PM PDT by DH (Once the tainted finger of government touches anything the rot begins)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

What, Fraternity XBox high scorer and youPorn producer aren’t skills in demand? Imagine that.

These demoralized Gen-XYZ frat punks, and the progressive 60’s reject dirt bags who created them, are in for a rude awakening when they discover the system has tired of their gaming.

GAME OVER.


178 posted on 07/01/2012 5:12:28 PM PDT by OldEarlGray (The POTUS is FUBAR until the White Hut is sanitized with American Tea)
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To: Tax-chick

Ha Ha! I was bailing hay at his age with 102 ambient temps in Tennessee. The barn was pure hell. Tell him we at FR respect his work ethic and attitude. It makes the man!

(We sincerely appreciate you getting it done as well)


179 posted on 07/01/2012 5:21:58 PM PDT by eyedigress ((zOld storm chaser from the west)/?)
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To: Ann Archy

Once again, Start making collages & university issue the loan to pay for their degree program and tie repayment to the students income over the next 10-20 years and you will see university start offering education for worthwhile fields in which there is demand.

Right now the university system is build upon a foundation of reputation bordering on outright fraud. They don’t care how successive the vast majority of their students & degrees are because they get paid upfront by the ignorant student.

Wether the student can get a job from their degree pay back their loans(now issued by uncle Sam) is largely irrelevant to the university. All the university has to do is convince the child & their parents that they can & must if that at all. With Federal taxpayer dollars on the line nether is necessarily too inclined to be worried about payback.


180 posted on 07/01/2012 5:30:01 PM PDT by Monorprise
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To: newzjunkey

I am encouraging her to find her way. She is a smart kid, has good family values and is enterprising, as is my son.

I don’t think that is being smug. I think it is showing confidence and having faith in my child’s future. Trust me, when she said she wanted to be a Paleontologist, we stepped in and had a talk.


181 posted on 07/01/2012 5:37:24 PM PDT by EQAndyBuzz (ABO 2012)
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To: pepsionice

Medical degrees?

Not anymore. Why become a corperate state slave?


182 posted on 07/01/2012 6:03:34 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: 1010RD
Have no argument with Justice Thomas. He is rock solid.

I don't think that Catholics are a homogeneous group. They vary from the rock solid, like Thomas, to the FAR LEFT (as in Liberation Theologists).

Unfortunately most of them vote Dem and are very suspicious of “capitalists”. A very good family friend recently asked me if I supported the capitalists, when I told him I attended the Texas GOP Convention. That one really set me back, they are good people, but that is the mindset.

183 posted on 07/01/2012 6:05:30 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: DH

Yes, among other things.

“You could not utilize any of of services or product because they are for products for people who work with their hands and pay taxes so teachers can unionize and only work 9 months out of year.”

Hmm, I see. It’s not as if I don’t work for people who work with their hands and pay taxes either. Folks who have a vested interest in making sure their child gets an education.

We aren’t all public school teachers - as anyone who had a clue in this thread could see it, - I’m private. Prefer it that way as I can run my own curriculum without the cruft that’s accumulated in the public schools.

Nobody’s trying to ruin your business, you’re doing a fine job of that yourself. So, want some more rope there?

This little tirade has me wondering, exactly how many subsidies do you receive to do your work from the various levels of government. That would be an interesting question, no?


184 posted on 07/01/2012 6:06:40 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: Mygirlsmom

With interest rates on mortgages being so low, and home prices depressed, I have a feeling they will be looking for either another duplex or perhaps a single family home for themselves....both are 22 and they are actually in much better shape than MGD and me.
___________________

Smart kids, I have tried to teach mine the same. For some it sticks, for others, no.


185 posted on 07/01/2012 6:12:09 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: eyedigress

Thanks! Lifeguarding isn’t strenuous work, but it is out in the hot sun all day. I loved it, at his age, when I discovered I could work in an air-conditioned office, typing all day ;-). Unfortunately, typist jobs seem not to exist any more.


186 posted on 07/01/2012 6:13:52 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat and bring me safe to His heavenly kingdom.")
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To: JCBreckenridge

This little tirade has me wondering, exactly how many subsidies do you receive to do your work from the various levels of government. That would be an interesting question, no?


We have never done any sales or work for the government on any level...from local to federal. Pretty well answers your question?

We are a truly American business doing business with Americans, not politicians and special interests.


187 posted on 07/01/2012 6:20:52 PM PDT by DH (Once the tainted finger of government touches anything the rot begins)
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To: DH

“We have never done any sales or work for the government on any level...from local to federal. Pretty well answers your question?”

That’s not what I asked. What subsidies does your business receive?


188 posted on 07/01/2012 6:25:37 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: Texas Fossil

Agreed. I am in Cook County IL and Catholics here are pro-family, etc., but have a mis-developed sense of social justice. It leads them to vote Democratic and cause a lot of harm to those they would help.

One problem is that you can be “Catholic” in a social sense while totally ignoring any Catholic Doctrine. That happens to a lot of religions, too. My hope is that as government unions die you’ll see better thinking. A lot of the Catholic vote is driven by the pocketbook issues of government employment.


189 posted on 07/01/2012 6:33:11 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: rabidralph

>>History, psychology and electronic media?

Have they applied at the Glavnoye Razvedyvatelnoye Upravleniye yet?


190 posted on 07/01/2012 6:33:26 PM PDT by OldEarlGray (The POTUS is FUBAR until the White Hut is sanitized with American Tea)
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To: Ann Archy
History degree???? What the HELL would they be good for in the workplace?? NOTHING but be Mr. KnowitAll.

As you may have guessed by now, this one is a nominee for ignorant quote of the day :)

A good education with a major in history is a solid start to a career in business as a manager or entrepreneur. The history major may end up with a group of his pre-professional peers (engineers, IS, accountants) working for him. Pre-professional is the easier path to a guaranteed job right out of college, but longer term the history major (or other quality liberal arts grad) can be highly successful.

It's sad to think that conservatives would fail to see value in a classic liberal education.

191 posted on 07/01/2012 6:57:28 PM PDT by Skulllspitter
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To: Skulllspitter
but longer term the history major (or other quality liberal arts grad) can be highly successful.

It's sad to think that conservatives would fail to see value in a classic liberal education.

Please provide a list of undergraduate majors that are "quality liberal arts."

Thank you.

192 posted on 07/01/2012 7:00:44 PM PDT by thecodont
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

History? You want history? Your hands are History babe!

193 posted on 07/01/2012 7:12:03 PM PDT by MaxMax
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I guess if they cannot at some point afford toilet paper due to lack of income then the degree may come in handy....


194 posted on 07/01/2012 7:12:03 PM PDT by Lexinom
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To: Skulllspitter

I kind of agree with you, except that no one outside of a few small colleges offers a ‘quality liberal arts’ education. It is possible to find self-educated folks though.

Almost all LA grads these days are simply brainwashed leftists or worn-out cynics, not to mention barely literate by any historical standard.

The fact that such grads become managers just means that American business as a whole is non-competitive.


195 posted on 07/01/2012 7:15:45 PM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: VideoDoctor

Umm I wouldn’t hire her based on her NAIL POLISH!! Flourescent PINK that needs a FILL on an interview? Forget it!


196 posted on 07/01/2012 7:16:18 PM PDT by AbolishCSEU (Percentage of Income in CS is inversely proportionate to Mother's parenting of children)
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To: unixfox
I can get all the history I need by using Google. I don’t need a degree for it.

And you can accomplish all the math you need using a calculator. You don't need to actually know how to add.

Sadly, the education establishment has been a big proponent of the above two beliefs.

197 posted on 07/01/2012 7:19:02 PM PDT by Skulllspitter
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To: AbolishCSEU

I noticed that too. And “in need of a fill” indicates it was probably done at a nail salon. I work full time and I can’t afford to have my nails done.


198 posted on 07/01/2012 7:35:17 PM PDT by Mygirlsmom (Are you breathing????? There's a tax for that.)
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To: thecodont
Please provide a list of undergraduate majors that are "quality liberal arts."

It's not the major, it's the quality of education. One could get a liberal arts education and major in biology or psychology or economics or computer science or philosophy or Russian or music theory.

Of course a liberal arts major will study a wide array of fields and should graduate as a sort of Renaissance Man (you know, people who got classic liberal educations!) who has the ability and flexibility to succeed in law, business, finance, politics - wherever interest takes him and opportunity presents. That's the ideal, anyway. Whether that describes the typical psych major at Texas A&M I doubt; the average graduate of a good liberal arts school like the University of Dallas is probably much closer to the mark.

199 posted on 07/01/2012 7:44:47 PM PDT by Skulllspitter
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To: jjotto
The fact that such grads become managers just means that American business as a whole is non-competitive.

The riff raff can become managers. The exceptional become executives / owners.

200 posted on 07/01/2012 7:47:13 PM PDT by Skulllspitter
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