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'Dark Knight Rises' Review: Nolan Slaps Obama With a Masterpiece
Big Hollywood ^ | July 21, 2012 | John Nolte

Posted on 07/21/2012 6:39:37 PM PDT by Bratch

From a purely cinematic standpoint, director/co-writer Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight Rises" is a genuine masterpiece. Actually, it's a triumph.

Surpassing the extraordinary hype and expectations surrounding the conclusion to his epic trilogy seemed impossible, and yet somehow Nolan achieved just that. The fact that I'm even debating whether or not "Rises" surpasses its perfect predecessor speaks volumes. Without giving anything away -- without telling you if it's tragic or happy or bitter or sweet -- let me just say that the final few minutes of "Rises" represent one of the most intensely satisfying movie moments of my life.

And beyond filmmaking skills that will surely place him among the all-time greats, what kind of crystal ball does Nolan have access to that gives him the prescient power to begin a project years ago that upon delivery would be as timely and relevant as the latest refresh of the Drudge Report? "Rises" is about many things, but it is mostly about a rousing defense of an America under siege by a demagogue disguising his nihilistic rage and thirst for revenge and power as a noble quest for equality.

Sound familiar?

(Excerpt) Read more at breitbart.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: batman; darkknight; hollywood; moviereview; nolan; ows; superheroes
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To: Bratch

Actually I think the movie stinks. Any ending that does not have Batman watching over Gotham City, Wayne Manor with Bruce Wayne as it’s chief resident, and Wayne Enterprises as a huge conglomerate is not worth the price of admission.


51 posted on 07/21/2012 8:00:07 PM PDT by ducttape45
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To: BushCountry

Just a hint, the movie was about Batman. Batman was rich, he was the hero that was risking it all to help people, he gave his money to support an orphanage. He is the rich businessman helping people that you’re looking for.

I don’t know why you think the movie needed another person to play the role of hero, when the whole point was that Batman is the embodiment of all those heroic things you said the film needed. Unless you simply hate Batman as a character as insist on the movie having anybody but him as the hero, in which case I guess I understand why you hate the movie.


52 posted on 07/21/2012 8:02:08 PM PDT by Truthsearcher
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To: Yardstick

Well, you have a big, powerful Panem government that totally controls all the people, even forcing kids to kill each other, but some of the people still have a spark of resistance. They wander beyond the wire (i.e., the Berlin Wall), they kill and eat their own food (NRA types), and in the end, Katniss and Peeta would rather eat deadly berries than play “the man’s” game. Katniss sacrifices herself for her little sister; she befriends others, contrary to the intent of the games; and in the end she once again gives a symbol of resistance. Maybe because I had just read the book my mind filled in a few blanks, but I think it’s anti-leftie. The authoress is a USAF brat and a Catholic.


53 posted on 07/21/2012 8:03:42 PM PDT by LS ("Castles Made of Sand, Fall in the Sea . . . Eventually (Hendrix))
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To: eclecticEel

Well, all leftist revolutions will have those similar characteristics, be they French or Russian, but the point remains that Bane’s revolution is portrayed as very much a leftist revolution.


54 posted on 07/21/2012 8:05:19 PM PDT by Truthsearcher
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To: Bratch

Batman of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s was never dark. Kids of that era (including me) would never buy comic books like that. The dark era of Batman came much later to reflect the degeneration of modern society into a cesspool of hate and violence.


55 posted on 07/21/2012 8:11:24 PM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: bray

thanks...I value your opinion.

and any friend of Breitbart is a friend of mine.

If I can handle the gore I may go see it.


56 posted on 07/21/2012 8:17:09 PM PDT by Recovering Ex-hippie
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To: Bratch

What ever happened to Robin?


57 posted on 07/21/2012 8:34:02 PM PDT by Lucas McCain
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To: fortheDeclaration
I never saw the comic book hero as 'dark'.

Depending on your age and your degree of interest, it's likely you never read any of the comics I refer to as "dark". And there was little heroic about them, either, although I wouldn't discard that term. And, quite frankly, I think it is possible to understand and use the term "dark" without being a "liberal" and moreover, the term "dark" as I used it predates the present use of the word liberal by centuries.

58 posted on 07/21/2012 8:36:03 PM PDT by John Valentine (Deep in the Heart of Texas)
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To: BushCountry
The movie could have been so much better if Nolan had faith in humanity. Where citizens fought back, where some of the rich offered food and belongings in support of the poor, where people helped people out of the kindness of their hearts, where honest businessman contributed in this time of need. Where people stood up and died for the cause of right. Nolan has no faith in America or the American people, his portrayal is the opposite of what America is.

Now I know you have no clue what you are seeing. Did you see the Dark Knight Returns? Where the Joker had wired several barges to explode, unless the passengers on the barges chose to kill the those on the other boat? And both groups, the citizens and the criminals, choose to risk death rather than take the lives of others. The whole point of that movie was faith in the basic decency of people! That's how the Joker was defeated.

Same director. Same theme.

59 posted on 07/21/2012 8:41:28 PM PDT by Charles H. (The_r0nin) (Hwaet! Lar bith maest hord, sothlice!)
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To: John Valentine
The real Batman has never been "fun".

Sorry to burst the ol' bubble, but there never was a *real* Batman. Just a fictional character meant to entertain.

We're assigning way too much importance to the characters of childhood's "graphic novels" (well, except for Doc Savage, of course!)

60 posted on 07/21/2012 8:45:44 PM PDT by The Duke
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To: BushCountry

I have not been a big fan of these Batman movies but did you get the point they they were the bad guys in the movie? How can it be a recruitment for the Occupy crowd when they were portrayed as evil and the end result of their ideology which sounded so good in words but in action was on the lines of the French Revolution? Not to mention they were just the tools being used for another person’s agenda.


61 posted on 07/21/2012 9:08:58 PM PDT by Lady Heron
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To: yldstrk

The original 1930-1940s batman was dark - at one point he packed heat for an issue or two. It wasn’t until the 50s that he got campy which is what the tv show was based on. Starting in the late 60s/early 70s and increasingly through the 80s and 90s he returned to his “dark knight” / avenger roots through a number of writers/artists including Neal Adams, Frank Miller, and Jeph Loeb. It’s a much more human character than the campy fair by far.


62 posted on 07/21/2012 9:10:19 PM PDT by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: Kirkwood
Batman of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s was never dark. Kids of that era (including me) would never buy comic books like that. The dark era of Batman came much later to reflect the degeneration of modern society into a cesspool of hate and violence.

I preferred Batman over Superman--I thought he was more of a he-man. Unlike Superman, Batman had no love life and never showed emotion.

Batman may have lacked Superman's super powers, but the Man of Steel owed his life to him. In 1958, I was at a barber shop where I saw a comic book featuring a story in which Superman was in mortal peril--bad guys in a space ship had sprayed him with a green goo that was fatal to him, but to no one else. Unfortunately, I didn't have time to finish the story. About half a century later, I found out how Superman got out of that scrape--Batman came to the rescue!

However, I quickly lost interest in Batman after he swapped his big and powerful Batmobile for a wimpy compact. A few years later, I was told by a comic book fan that Batman went liberal--he was fighting "social injustice' in lieu of crime. I never found out if that was true, but given the media's bias, I wouldn't be surprised if it was.

63 posted on 07/21/2012 9:10:23 PM PDT by Fiji Hill (Deo Vindice!)
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To: John Valentine

here here!


64 posted on 07/21/2012 9:12:18 PM PDT by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: Truthsearcher

Exactly. Revolution from the left ends in mass murder and chaos. Self destructive.

People seemed to have missed the point. Even the Catwoman character becomes disgusted with the revolution.

Seems very in line with Tea Party. Government bailouts for Wall Street and average people pay for it. That’s not capitalism.


65 posted on 07/21/2012 9:14:08 PM PDT by TigerClaws
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To: Bratch
Since when has 'heroic' become 'dark'?

Ever see John Wayne in "The Searchers"?

66 posted on 07/21/2012 9:19:28 PM PDT by tophat9000 (American is Barack Oaken)
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To: Revolting cat!

“Infantilization of culture.”

Produced by the Culture of Narcissism.


67 posted on 07/21/2012 9:22:10 PM PDT by Domestic Church (AMDG ...)
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To: TigerClaws
Exactly. Revolution from the left ends in mass murder and chaos. Self destructive.

It what every "Final Solution" grows from

68 posted on 07/21/2012 9:26:05 PM PDT by tophat9000 (American is Barack Oaken)
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To: Domestic Church

I give up. Rashomon was a masterpiece. Bergman and Truffaut made masterpieces, as did Howard Hawks, Billy Wilder. Here we have childish comic book melodramas with actors dressed in homosexuality suggesting costumes, no better than professional wrestling matches, and certainly not as humourous, hailed as masterpieces.


69 posted on 07/21/2012 9:28:42 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong!)
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To: Bratch

I don’t know about masterpiece. I liked it, but it was too busy. Batman’s emotional journey had too many steps. Really the movie should have gone with an Empire Strikes Back-esque ending when Bane won. Then Batman comes back in the fourth movie. Retired and depressed, to back in the game, to defeated, to renewed, to {spoiler} is just too many beats for one character in one movie. None of the phases had time to breath and be invested in by the audience. It’s good but much like Spiderman 3 was trying too hard to put too many bows on, this kept it from the greatness of its predecessors.


70 posted on 07/21/2012 9:32:44 PM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: BushCountry

You do realize that was the bad guy that labeled all the rich people evil and FORCED the masses to “revolt” under threat of blowing them up. Usually positions the bad guys take are the opposite of the message of the story.


71 posted on 07/21/2012 9:38:14 PM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: fortheDeclaration

1986, the year Frank Miller’s Dark Knight Returns (with Batman) and Alan Moore’s Watchmen started. And Frank was really bringing back the truly original Batman, in the early days of the comics he regularly broke spines and even shot bad guys, he was a mean nasty person.


72 posted on 07/21/2012 9:41:42 PM PDT by discostu (Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends.)
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To: Revolting cat!

Yup....I agree. We are amusing ourselves to death in this culture. We have millions of middle aged “men” in this country dressed like children....wearing team colors & baseball caps. They read comic books & worship cartoons. And, they think movies like this are conservative. Masterpieces even. Several of these grown idiots that work with us take personal days off if their team is playing a big game. Look at American civic culture from the 1950s, and look at it today.....


73 posted on 07/21/2012 9:44:26 PM PDT by LongWayHome
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To: Revolting cat!

It isn’t THAT bad...there is something epic about this trilogy even if it is spawned by comics of the 30s - there wasn’t “dumbing down” yet so even the comics back then had more actual gravitas and vision than much of the current literary fiction. I just read the O.Henry/Pen award short stories for last year and they for the most part were crap. I think I found only 1 that seemed decent. O.Henry (William Porter) must be rolling in his grave from all the pc garbage being awarded in his honor.


74 posted on 07/21/2012 10:03:15 PM PDT by Domestic Church (AMDG ...)
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To: Bratch

[Spied this tidbit on the net. Any reaction?]

We Are In Obama’s Dark Night !

Are you aware that Barack Hussein Obama can be found in the Bible?
Proverbs 19:10 (NIV): “It is not fitting for a fool to live in luxury - how much worse for a slave to rule over princes!”
Also Proverbs 30:22 (NIV) which says that the earth cannot bear up under “a servant who becomes king.”
And Ecclesiastes 5:2-3 (KJV) advises: “let thy words be few...a fool’s voice is known by multitude of words.”
Although Obama is not descended from slaves, he may feel that he’s destined to become a black-slavery avenger.
Or maybe an enslaver of all free citizens!
For some stunning info on Obama and his fellow subversives, Google “Imam Bloomberg’s Sharia Mosque,” “Michelle Obama’s Allah-day,” “Obama Supports Public Depravity,” “David Letterman’s Hate Etc.,” “Un-Americans Fight Franklin Graham” and also “Sandra Bernhard, Larry David, Kathy Griffin, Bill Maher, Joan Rivers, Sarah Silverman.” Also Google “Islam will purify Jews and Christians” and “Prof. F. N. Lee’s ISLAM IN THE BIBLE [PDF].”
PS - Since Christians are commanded to ask God to send severe judgment on persons who commit and support the worst forms of evil (see I Cor. 5 and note “taken away”), Christians everywhere should constantly pray that the Lord will soon “take away” or at least overthrow all US leaders who continue to sear their conscience and arrogantly trample the God-given rights of the majority including the rights of the unborn. Do we need a second American Revolution?
PPS - For a rare look at the 182-year-old endtime belief which has long neutralized millions of American patriots by promising them an “imminent rapture” off earth - which has diverted them away from being prepared to stand against all enemies, domestic as well as foreign - Google “Pretrib Rapture Dishonesty,” “Pretrib Rapture Diehards,” “Edward Irving is Unnerving,” “Pretrib Rapture Secrets,” “Christ’s Return is NOT Imminent,” “Roots of Warlike Christian Zionism” and “Pretrib Rapture Politics” - all by the author of the bestselling nonfiction book “The Rapture Plot” (the most accurate and highly endorsed documentation on the pretrib rapture’s long-covered-up-but-now-revealed beginnings in Britain in 1830 - see Armageddon Books).


75 posted on 07/21/2012 10:07:29 PM PDT by Lounor
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To: Domestic Church

I can only recommend the truly incredible and virtually unknown John Burnside, plus Charlotte Rogan’s The Lifeboat, D.J. Taylor, Michael Cox, Dan Vyleta, all of them current literary fiction, and none related to the likes of Tom Wolfe’s contemptible literary Three Stooges, and other New Yorker favorites. I’m quite literally buried in books of excellent current literary fiction waiting to be read and there are more on the way from Amazon. It ain’t so bad. Oh, the latest Julian Barnes is perty good as well. Started reading Luke Williams.


76 posted on 07/21/2012 10:14:21 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong!)
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To: katana; Bender2
the word "camp" would be replaced with its more modern euphemism "gay"

"Camp" as used to describe the TV Batman series does not mean gay. It means exaggerated and self parodying.

The movie Blazing Saddles is an example of "High Camp" humor, while the "French Mistake" scene was both camp in the gay sense in its content and high camp in its presentation.

Bendy, you were in the business. Back me up on this.

77 posted on 07/21/2012 10:16:40 PM PDT by Jeff Chandler (I miss Harriet Miers.)
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To: Revolting cat!

“I give up. Rashomon was a masterpiece. “

When someone tries to establish their cine-aesthete bonafides by playing the hoary old “Rashomon was a masterpiece” card, well... HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

I bet you haven’t even seen it. When you pin ‘em down and ASK, most of the people who beat the Rashomon drum haven’t. It’s unwatchable. Interesting idea. Terrible movie. The End.


78 posted on 07/21/2012 10:29:13 PM PDT by Blue Ink
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To: Blue Ink

I bet you haven’t read anything besides children’s comics. Back atcha! Two can play the game.


79 posted on 07/21/2012 10:31:48 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong!)
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To: Revolting cat!

I would rather read “Archie & Jughead” Digest than sit through “Rashomon” again.

And if you had actually seen it, so would you.


80 posted on 07/21/2012 10:35:45 PM PDT by Blue Ink
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To: Blue Ink

You don’t give up, do you? One idiotic accusation after another! Just like in the infantile comic books you “read”.


81 posted on 07/21/2012 10:39:09 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong!)
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To: Jeff Chandler
Re: "Camp" as used to describe the TV Batman series does not mean gay. It means exaggerated and self parodying.

I can say without doubt, "Camp" does not mean gay. As to the 1960s "Batman" TV series, Adam West was not gay.

He and I drank a lot together back in those days... and he never hit on me.

And he never hit on me either... that hot summer we had in Spain!

Adam West was a man's man... but that fella that played Robin? He gave me the eye a lot--

82 posted on 07/21/2012 10:56:22 PM PDT by Bender2 ("I've got a twisted sense of humor, and everything amuses me." RAH Beyond this Horizon)
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To: Revolting cat!

I respect that, unlike all the junior development executives at the networks and studios, you don’t assert that you’ve seen actually seen “Rashomon,” despite your having called it a “masterpiece,” so I’m going to let you off the hook.


83 posted on 07/21/2012 11:03:20 PM PDT by Blue Ink
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To: BushCountry
Christopher Nolan on The Dark Knight Rises' Literary Inspiration

The Dickensian Aspects of The Dark Knight Rises

84 posted on 07/21/2012 11:29:05 PM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: The Duke
Sorry to burst the ol' bubble, but there never was a *real* Batman. Just a fictional character meant to entertain.

Good grief! I feel like you're just aching to tell me is that Abraham Lincoln wasn't really a vampire hunter...

85 posted on 07/22/2012 12:14:03 AM PDT by John Valentine (Deep in the Heart of Texas)
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To: BushCountry
I do not think you saw the movie at all, and if you did, you must have either slept through most of it, or have very poor cognitive skills.

The city’s rich were as much as a villain a Bain.

This movie NEVER depicted such a thing aside from a few people portrayed as crony Capitalists for the purpose of furthering the storyline. In fact, in the beginning of the film, the city's rich are enjoying 8 years of a relatively peaceful city that was coming out of DECADES of corruption (think Cook County Chicago).

Every rich person an oppressor of the masses.

There is not one scene in the movie that depicts or even suggest that. The lines that the rich are the 'people's' oppressors are spoken by Bane and his freed inmate mercenaries.

The government an oppressive regime.

Bane's 'Revolutionary' Government - YES. Because it was. Gotham's government before Bane arrives is not depicted as an oppressive regime. It's depicted as a government at peacetime.

Not one hero in the ordinary masses

One rookie cop and Jim Gordon were not heroes? Anyone standing up against the initial takeover by Bane was shot by rooftop snipers. The rest of the city was warned that any attempts to play 'hero' or to escape would result in the nuclear device being set off and everyone in the city being vaporized

instead they enjoy the rape and pillaging of the rich. Destroying their property that they didn’t earn.

Not one suggestion or hint of rape is even implied in this movie, and much of the violence on ordinary citizens by Bane's mercenaries left up to your own assumptions.

Actually, Bane tells the "ordinary citizens" of Gotham to go back to their homes, and that they should join his revolution and 'take control' from the rich who HE SAID oppressed them.

The 'ordinary' friend of Selina Kyle that makes a statement that everything the rich have is now theirs, was a thief in the beginning of the film and already had the mindset that she could help herself to whatever she wanted.

The movie could have been so much better if Nolan had faith in humanity.

Obviously you did not see The Dark Knight either. The entire point of the ending of that movie was Batman placing his faith in the humanity of Gotham's citizens, INCLUDING a barge full of convicts that were given an opportunity to blow up a barge full of 'ordinary citizens' by the Joker.

Where citizens fought back, where some of the rich offered food and belongings in support of the poor, where people helped people out of the kindness of their hearts, where honest businessman contributed in this time of need. Where people stood up and died for the cause of right. Nolan has no faith in America or the American people, his portrayal is the opposite of what America is.

You did not see the movie the Dark Knight Rises. Not possible with a statement like that.

Bruce Wayne and his acts for the city and the poor are EXACTLY what you say Nolan did not portray. In fact in Batman Begins it was the rich of the city after Thomas and Martha Wayne's murder that were galvanized into action and saving the city. Wayne even built a free public transportation monorail for the city with his own money.

Whatever your animus is for this movie - slandering it and depicting it as something it doesn't depict - is pretty pathetic.

86 posted on 07/22/2012 1:09:20 AM PDT by INVAR ("Fart for liberty, fart for freedom and fart proudly!" - Benjamin Franklin)
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To: yldstrk

Was told by someone in Hollywood, that these recent dark Batman movies are more true to the original comic book series. Not the original TV series. When I asked why could not they make it similar to the original TV series, they laughed and said that was impossible.


87 posted on 07/22/2012 1:17:39 AM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: atc23

ew never noticed


88 posted on 07/22/2012 1:24:00 AM PDT by yldstrk ( My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: John Valentine
I am talking about the comics from the 60's.

I know that later comics became more 'dark'.

I never said the term 'dark' was in itself a liberal one, it is a liberal one in relationship to a hero.

Darkness is about evil, light is about good.

The implication in making the hero 'dark' is to associate him with evil, a 'dark side'.

89 posted on 07/22/2012 2:06:48 AM PDT by fortheDeclaration (Pr 14:34 Righteousness exalteth a nation:but sin is a reproach to any people)
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To: John Valentine
Good grief! I feel like you're just aching to tell me is that Abraham Lincoln wasn't really a vampire hunter...

I just read your profile and now realize I've bitten off more than I can chew. Laying down the sarcasm here and stepping back very slowly... :)

While I do think we take our pure entertainment way too seriously in this country, I also still have every comic book I ever bought as a kid meticulously stored away in little plastic bags!

90 posted on 07/22/2012 4:01:34 AM PDT by The Duke
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To: fortheDeclaration
The implication in making the hero 'dark' is to associate him with evil, a 'dark side'.

Here again, I don't think I was painting Batman himself as "dark," although others have, i.e. "Dark Knight", but rather I was referring to the mood of the Batman/Gotham world. That's why I referred to the comics, and not Batman per se when I used that term.

91 posted on 07/22/2012 4:18:49 AM PDT by John Valentine (Deep in the Heart of Texas)
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To: John Valentine
Ok, then we are discussing two different things.

You are talking about the background he is operating in.

I was discussing his character.

92 posted on 07/22/2012 4:34:31 AM PDT by fortheDeclaration (Pr 14:34 Righteousness exalteth a nation:but sin is a reproach to any people)
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To: Bratch

Well at least it wasn’t as bad as the liberal message in Avatar, and Marion Cotillard is pretty hot.


93 posted on 07/22/2012 7:38:38 AM PDT by AmericanSamurai
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To: Bender2

Ha !


94 posted on 07/22/2012 10:19:19 AM PDT by Para-Ord.45
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To: LS
What makes it a leftie movie is they take pains to portray Panem's government as a right wing government -- a mixture of artistocratic, fascist, and decadent capitalist. Like they have the hostess lady done up as a kind of powdered Marie Antoinette just so you get the point early on. When the troops hose down the race rioters in the middle of the movie, they are wearing snappy white uniforms with jack boots. And of course the goverment exploits the lower classes (represented by Appalachian coal miner types, the ultimate symbol of the virtuous exploited poor, who in real life were assisted by Roosevelt and the TVA but here are left abandoned to their poverty) for profit and entertainment. The movie does have an "individual versus The System" theme, but it's the leftist version of that theme because the ruling class is right wing (or a leftist caricature of right wing). That said, there's enough ambiguity that you can probably read into it whatever ideological perspective you want to some extent. But to me the most natural one is a 99% versus the 1% kind of thing.
95 posted on 07/22/2012 11:44:05 AM PDT by Yardstick
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To: Yardstick

Didn’t see that at all. The Marie Antoinette? Totally a leftist babe. And if you read the books, ALL the districts are treated like dirt: it’s EXTREMELY states rights vs. federal government sort of thing.


96 posted on 07/22/2012 3:38:26 PM PDT by LS ("Castles Made of Sand, Fall in the Sea . . . Eventually (Hendrix))
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To: Bratch

Just got back from this. While I might not go as far as Nolte in calling it a masterpiece, it was one of the few newer movies where the violence, mayhem, and explosions all had a point and none were gratuitous. Hathaway was likeable after a while, and the CLEAR villain of the movie was Occupy Wall Street, whose greedy criminals seek to steal from and execute the rich (in mock tribunals) at every opportunity.


97 posted on 07/22/2012 3:40:42 PM PDT by LS ("Castles Made of Sand, Fall in the Sea . . . Eventually (Hendrix))
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To: LS

Marie Antoinette a leftist babe? She’s the ultimate symbol of aristocracy, the 1 percent. She was put to death by the leftist Jacobins. In the movie there is no states right theme, or it’s extremely weak, because all we really see is one district — the dirt poor coal miners. Maybe there’s a disconnect between the book and the movie.


98 posted on 07/22/2012 3:49:21 PM PDT by Yardstick
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To: Yardstick

I don’t see the disconnect, and the so-called peacekeepers were pure UN. No, I took this as a total conservative book, written by the Catholic daughter of an Air Force officer. If you read the series, especially the first two come off as extremely anti-left. Heck, just read some of the comments on Wiki and you’ll see the lefties are desperate to make the story about “high school insecurity.”


99 posted on 07/22/2012 3:59:32 PM PDT by LS ("Castles Made of Sand, Fall in the Sea . . . Eventually (Hendrix))
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To: LS

The peacekeepers were anything but UN. There were employed by Panem, and they were doing the very non-Kofi Anon approved deed of hosing down the race rioters in the predominately black district. The lady who wrote the book may have been an Air Force brat Catholic, but she said she got the inspiration one night when she saw a new report of troops in Iraq followed by game show. Hence the analogy of rightwing patriotism and sending troops to Iraq with gameshow exploitation. The leftist American Library Association heartily endorsed her books. I doubt that was because they wanted the young skulls full of mush exposed to a states rights theme. Instead I think it’s because they saw the fairly overt theme of resistance to class exploitation.


100 posted on 07/22/2012 4:11:56 PM PDT by Yardstick
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