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Schumer: U.S. needs to block 3D plastic guns like ‘The Liberator’ from Defense Distributed
New York Daily News ^ | May 6, 2013 | Edgar Sandoval

Posted on 05/06/2013 7:24:42 AM PDT by Seizethecarp

A Texas company is set to release blueprints for making a plastic gun with a 3-D printer — a development Sen. Chuck Schumer called “stomach-churning” Sunday.

Defense Distributed, a collective of gun access advocates headed by self-described “free-market anarchist” Cody Wilson, has announced it made such an untraceable gun with the new plastic-making technology. The nonprofit Texas group intends to post blueprints for “The Liberator” (pictured) online this week.

The Liberator may look like a toy, but “this gun can fire regular bullets,” Schumer said, calling for legislation outlawing the technology’s weapons potential.

“Security checkpoints, background checks and gun regulations will do little good if criminals can print their own plastic firearms at home and bring those firearms through metal detectors with no one the wiser,” Israel said in a statement.

To Schumer, the ramifications of make-your-own untraceable and undetectable weapons are “stomach-churning.”

“Now anyone, a terrorist, someone who is mentally ill, a spousal abuser, a felon, can essentially open a gun factory in their garage,” Schumer said. “It must be stopped.”

(Excerpt) Read more at nydailynews.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: 2ndamendment; 3dprintergun; banglist; chuckschumer; defensedistributed; democrathistrionics; democrats; democratshistrionics; guncontrol; liberator; schmuckschemer; schumer; secondamendment; theliberator; youwillnotdisarmus
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1 posted on 05/06/2013 7:24:42 AM PDT by Seizethecarp
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To: Seizethecarp
“Security checkpoints, background checks and gun regulations will do little good if criminals can print their own plastic firearms at home....

Well, we'll make it illegal to do so....that'll stop them!......

2 posted on 05/06/2013 7:27:10 AM PDT by Red Badger (Want to be surprised? Google your own name......Want to have fun? Google your friend's names........)
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To: Seizethecarp
“Now anyone, a terrorist, someone who is mentally ill, a spousal abuser, a felon, can essentially open a gun factory in their garage,” Schumer said. “It must be stopped.”

Not just anyone. It has to be someone with enough cash to buy a 3D printer and the program to print the “The Liberator”.

3 posted on 05/06/2013 7:29:34 AM PDT by Pontiac (The welfare state must fail because it is contrary to human nature and diminishes the human spirit.)
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To: Seizethecarp

Der Reichsfuhrer Schumer needs to lighten up.


4 posted on 05/06/2013 7:30:20 AM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (America is the root cause of violent crime in Mexico. - Barack Hussein Obama Jr.)
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To: Seizethecarp

“Now anyone, a terrorist, someone who is mentally ill, a spousal abuser, a felon, can essentially open a gun factory in their garage,” Schumer said.

Duuuuhhhhhh, I guess anyone who can buy a pressure cooker can also start a bomb factory in their own garage too chucky boy...

Heck anyone with enough skill to use a 3d printer can ALSO build their own gun using off the shelf parts ANYWAYS!!!

A shopping trip to home despot can get you plenty of parts to build one...


5 posted on 05/06/2013 7:31:57 AM PDT by GraceG
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To: Pontiac

Not just anyone. It has to be someone with enough cash to buy a 3D printer and the program to print the “The Liberator”.

Someone with enough cash to buy a 3-D printer can also buy a gun onthe regular market or the black market anyways...


6 posted on 05/06/2013 7:32:47 AM PDT by GraceG
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To: GraceG

The funny thing is the pressuer cooker bomb does not have to be a pressure cooker.
Any pan with a lid the can be screwed down with a Dewalt drill and screws can be made into a bomb! Any old paint pot like we used to use can be made into a bomb!
You can make a bomb with out explosives that can rip your heart out!
The fact is the item is not the perprtrator of terror, the human deploying the item is, be it gun, knife, bomb, or a peice of glass! All can kill but not with out the perp .


7 posted on 05/06/2013 7:39:06 AM PDT by Conserev1 ("Still Clinging to my Bible and my Weapon")
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To: Red Badger
Well, we'll make it illegal to do so....that'll stop them!......

Don't laugh. Libs actually believe this. They would do better to study the meaning of Pandora's Box and stop passing meaningless laws. There are game changing events. They happen. Get used to it Chuckie.

8 posted on 05/06/2013 7:39:34 AM PDT by InterceptPoint (If I had a tag line this is where you would find it)
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To: Red Badger

These old, life-long politicians all have 3 things in common:

1. They see something they don’t understand, they try to ban/regulate it.
2. They do not comprehend the radical changes in our society that the internet has created. Namely free transfer of information; data.
3. The pace of technology will now outpace their ability to ban it.

Once it’s digital, it’s out there, and you can’t stop that.

Once they figure this out they will move to really clamp down on the internet. They will say it is “dangerous.”

The power is shifting towards the people and they will not stand for that.


9 posted on 05/06/2013 7:45:14 AM PDT by Noamie
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To: Seizethecarp

When I look at this I think of how mush faster the Soviet Union could have fallen with a device like this, or how dangerous it is to be a tyrant now.


10 posted on 05/06/2013 7:47:59 AM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: Seizethecarp

Any plastic part of that gun except the spring can be made from a piece of hard, dense Oak wood.


11 posted on 05/06/2013 7:51:00 AM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: Red Badger

Just like the Pharisees, the libs believe more and more laws will make society righteous.


12 posted on 05/06/2013 7:54:12 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: Seizethecarp; All

http://tribune.com.pk/story/458310/the-legendary-gunsmiths-of-darra-adam-khel/


13 posted on 05/06/2013 7:59:46 AM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: Seizethecarp

Little Chuckie Schumer is an amazingly lucky public official; he’s never had to contend with a shortage of things about which to wee himself.


14 posted on 05/06/2013 8:06:47 AM PDT by Jack Hammer (American)
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To: Seizethecarp
Had to check if this was from the Onion. What a fool. Undetectable firearms are already illegal, so what does he propose to do? Make them double-secret SUPER DUPER illegal?

I think what he really objects to but knows he'd get little public support for legislating against, is the distribution of power that requires that government edicts about gun manufacture be willingly obeyed. That's a good check on tyranny; when compliance by definition must be voluntary it prevents them from being able to pass laws more restrictive than the public at large feels are justified. They can't be unilaterally dictatorial tyrants. As a tyrant, this is a stomach-churning prospect for him.

15 posted on 05/06/2013 8:08:43 AM PDT by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: Seizethecarp
Guns can be made from practically any tube of sufficient thickness. All you need is something to burn inside a tube with a projectile in front of it. Will Chuckie Schmuckie attempt to ban creativity?

Paper Mache prison gun made from newspaper, spit and rubberband:

Shotgun made from bedframe and matchheads.

Homemade belt-fed machine gun. Shoots 420 RPM

16 posted on 05/06/2013 8:09:00 AM PDT by varyouga
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To: Red Badger
Remember that Original Star Trek episode where Harry Mudd was on some planet with a population of androids who would do his every bidding?

He made an android of his wife Stella, and got great satisfaction ordering her (it) to "Shut up" when she (it) started nagging.

Well I hope someday someone makes a 3-D printer that can replicate Schumer. I'd buy a couple of 'em.

I'd pay good money commanding Schumer (it) to Shut up!"

17 posted on 05/06/2013 8:09:15 AM PDT by eCSMaster ("God bless Planned Parenthood"- B.H.Obama, 2013)
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To: Seizethecarp

Dear Schmuk, you keep your whiney bans, I’ll keep my rights, liberty, & freedom!


18 posted on 05/06/2013 8:11:03 AM PDT by vpintheak (Occupy your Mind!)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

Actually, I think they have a plastic spring but a metal firing pin made from a nail.


19 posted on 05/06/2013 8:12:16 AM PDT by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: eCSMaster

Harcourt Fenton Mudd would caution you that what is created for one use can be turned to an unintended use. I shudder to think what hell Schumer could accomplish if there were more than one of him sauntering around. No TV crew would be safe, no microphone could be protected sufficiently to prevent him smarming US. The devil must tremble at the prospect of McCain, Obama, Harkin, and Schumer in his future. The reality of Boxer and Pelosi joining the devilment must quaver the old imp.


20 posted on 05/06/2013 8:14:27 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: varyouga

You should send these pics to Chuckie Schmuckie and really give his nightmares. It would be great if he were to make statements about it.


21 posted on 05/06/2013 8:14:46 AM PDT by Rusty0604
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To: Noamie

Isaac Asimov wrote a sci-fi short story called “The Dead Past” waaay back in the 50’s that dealt with a “Time Viewer” he called a ‘Chronoscope’. The situation closely resembles this one with 3D printing of firearms.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dead_Past


22 posted on 05/06/2013 8:15:56 AM PDT by Red Badger (Want to be surprised? Google your own name......Want to have fun? Google your friend's names........)
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To: Conserev1

Easier still is good oldfashioned threaded galvanized steel pipe. Large diameter plastic pipe coated with shrapnel also would work nicely and make a good boom.


23 posted on 05/06/2013 8:22:57 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 .....History is a process, not an event)
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To: Still Thinking

When I was a kid I messed around with Live Oak scraps, nails and rubber bands. I didn’t make anything pretty but I made stuff that would shoot. I also know that regular 3/4” water pipe will hold a 4 dram equivalent black powder load just fine.


24 posted on 05/06/2013 8:34:43 AM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: Pontiac

Schumer is an idiot. If you have the money to purchase a 3d printer AND the rest of the parts, you will simply buy a gun on the black market.


25 posted on 05/06/2013 8:47:59 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
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To: Seizethecarp; All
I posted the picture of this gun several days ago.

Last night I was trolling around the net and found the auction description to go with the picture.

Hans Jacob Honaker was my great great great great grandfather. He made this gun in a mountain hollow, just like most of the rifles used in The Revolution were made.

They cannot disarm us if we refuse to be disarmed!

Where it says "swapped" it should say swamped. A swamped barrel is filed so it is bigger on the ends than in the middle. It improves balance and adds strength at the breech.

Photo & Video Sharing by SmugMug http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?ItemId=107047 .55 cal. smoothbore, 45" swapped octagonal brass barrel, steel tang. Iron rear sight, brass front blade sight. Engraved flat-style lockplate, with flat cock, faceted-style pan, frizzen spring with finial. 2.25" wide brass buttplate, brass sideplate, brass two-piece patchbox, brass triggerguard, brass ramrod thimbles and nosecap. Maple stock with raised carving behind the cheek piece, behind the tang, and a border around the lock ending in the rear with a tear drop. Carved border on the bottom of stock running from buttplate to triggerguard on both sides. Carved border outlining the butt plate. Nice border carved on both sides of the comb of stock. Nice carved molding running from the rear ramrod molding running down past the front thimble. This rifle is one of the most important American long rifles known. Its prominent feature is the American-made long tapered and flared brass barrel. It is dated 1771 near the breech on the bottom of the barrel and has Do (short for "Anno Domini" 1771 engraved inside the box lid. It is the earliest known dated American long rifle with a hinged box, and is the second oldest dated American long rifle. The earliest dated long rifle is signed by John Schrite of Reading, Pennsylvania; it has a Germanic style sliding wood box cover. A dated 1771 Pennsylvania side-opening detached box (probably excavated) is in a private collection. While much has been written regarding the hinged box (called "patch box" after 1790) being developed by 1750, the 1771 brass barrel rifle is the earliest survivor. In addition to its date and extraordinary brass barrel, the architecture of the stock is the strongest Germanic example known to have been made in America. The massive long cheek rest is strongly molded on its edge with a convex section followed by concave molding. The back of the cheek rest ends with a graceful covered step down that terminates with a convex molding running perpendicular to the cheek piece molding. From this molding another curved step blends smoothly into the buttstock. At the wrist, the cheek rest terminates with a flowing serpentine step in concert with the serpentine relief line that forms the transition of the comb and wrist. The only other example of this complex architecture is a somewhat later (ca 1775) iron barrel rifle from the same shop. (See Shumway, Rifled of Colonial America Vol. II, 1980: fig 145, pp.610 and 616.) The cheek-rest of this brass barrel is convex and the overall nature of the buttstock has the bulbous qualities of the baroque style of the late 17th century. Hans Jacob Honaker, like the vast majority of immigrant gunsmiths, came from a provincial area where the style tended to be old fashioned. The relief carving behind the cheek piece is a simple baroque scroll interrupted by the first cheek rest step. This interruption of the carved design leaves the voluted scroll to be connected by the eye of the viewer. The ending of the scroll has a small rosette with clusters of simple leaves. The high-relief buttstock molding is incised with a front-to-back serpentine line with sprigs ending in circular grains. This "vine and berry" design also runs backward along the top edge of the edge of the cheek rest, travels gracefully down the stepped edge of the cheek rest, and ends in the corner of the brass butt-piece. This termination has two leaves pointing inward with a berry in the center. The relief molding of the breech stock terminates at the rear of the trigger guard return. At the end of the step a narrow relief molding continues past the triggerguard finial termination with a chip border and small leaves. The breech pin tang carving is also closely related with a three-leaf termination. The wrist carving terminates with a cluster of three leaves when it meets the incise-carved border that surrounds the brass box arched finial. A chip border follows the brass butt-piece along its back and front to the butt-piece top extension. The chipped borders are connected by an incised line that parallels the top extension on both sides of the butt-piece. These combined borders completely surround the butt-piece. All of the carving is beautifully integrated with the complexly shaped stock. The stock architecture suggest that Hans Jacob Honaker was trained in gun stocking in Switzerland. The carved decorations are more aligned with American backcountry long rifle art -- baroque design combined with folk art qualities. This combination of architecture and carved decoration like this brass hinged box and brass barrel makes an outstanding American frontier statement from 1771. Like many early American rifle guns, the brass barrel was bored smooth in its latest stage of active use. Fortunately, in this conversion to shot gun the remnants of the hind sight survived, revealing that it was originally a folding leaf long-range type. This leaf sight is matched by only one other 18th Century American example. A rifle of ca 1775 from Shenandoah County, Virginia, has an intact leaf sight and it also shares some carved and architectural features with the brass barrel rifle. The exceptionally large and boldly sculptured triggerguard is unique to the Hans Jacob Honaker Shop, which was the first to develop a strong regional type that extended throughout southwest Virginia and Tennessee in the late 18th and early 19th century. The guard stud was fitted with a sling swivel, and the middle barrel loop is thicker than the others to retain the forward sling swivel. The front of the guard bow has a deep wear groove from the swivel hitting, showing the rifle was carried hundreds of miles without a sling attached. The imported Germanic lock has remained in its original flint lock form, although the cock was replaced (ca 1789, English origin) during its active use. Since the rifle was used in the late 18th century with this cock, it has been retained as an important part of the rifle's history. The overall age of this brass barrel rifle is evident in the shrinkage of the curly maple breech stock. The butt-piece now extends well beyond the toe and shrinkage stress cracks penetrate the relief carving behind the cheek rest. The witness of the mismatch of the relief buttstock molding is obvious on the lower edge of the toe of the brass butt-piece. On the box side the shrinkage has eliminated part of the incise-carved molding next to the door on the toe side. The deep black patina highlighted by wear is another important record of the rifle's age. This rifle is a singular bench mark of backcountry production, reflecting the dynamic cultural amalgam of the American frontier. ATTRIBUTION: The attribution of the brass barrel rifle to Hans Jacob Honaker is based on artistic and structural details found on rifles made by his sons and grandsons. They have a common architecture of the breech stock that has a prominent "step toe" or "step wrist." The step ends at the rear extension of the guard; the profile of the toe is straight from there to the butt-piece. The comb profile of these stocks typically is a moderate "Roman nose" profile, although occasionally makers used an almost straight line. A very unusual structural feature that occurs constantly throughout the group is the breech pin tang held with a wood screw rather than a draw screw that enters the trigger plate. The two earliest rifles in the group, (i.e., this brass rifle of 1771 and the iron barrel example, ca 1775) both have their first barrel retaining pins placed in front of the end of the fore stock, offset in the fore end adjacent to rear thimble. Other Shenandoah rifles of the early period also have this unusual placement. This forward placement of the first barrel retaining pin is not a feature found on Pennsylvania long rifles. In the Valley of Virginia, including in the products of the early gunsmiths of the Honaker family, the long pin placement does not extend into the post-Revolutionary Federal period. The placement is moved back closer to the breech between the locks and the tail piece (called "rear ramrod thimble" in modern times.) While the brass barrel rifle has a single trigger, it is important that Hans Jacob Honaker's sons and grandchildren made set triggers of a distinct type associated with Germanic wheel-lock guns. They have springs held by a single screw that is mounted in the front of the trigger plate. All three Honaker family rifles offered here have set triggers of this structure that is exclusively a Honaker or a Honaker-associated feature. At this writing no other makers in American backcountry are known to have used this type. PROVENANCE: Jerry Woodward, a western Pennsylvania longrifle collector, found this rifle in a Florida flea market in the spring of 1969. It had a large sale tag marked "Spanish Gun," but Jerry, an experienced collector, immediately recognized its early style and American origins. Shortly after the discovery Woodward sold it to Dallas C. Ewing of Pennsylvania. Ewing sold it to Wester A. White of Freeville, New York, a well recognized collector and researcher of early rifles and guns. Within a few months of its discovery White traded it to Joe Kindig, Jr. of York, Pennsylvania, for an important Indian trade gun by Bumford of, London (now in the collections of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation). Kindig, the author of "Thoughts on the Kentucky Rifle in its Golden Age" (1960) was the preeminent dealer in American and European arms, and one of the country's most distinguished dealers of American furniture and Pennsylvania folk art. Within a few weeks Kindig employed Wallace Gusler, master gunsmith at Colonial Williamsburg, to restore the brass barrel and lost fore stock. [See report and Kindig letters]. On its arrival in Williamsburg, Gusler called two gun shop colleagues to see this exceptional find. Gusler and Gary Brumfield examined the interior of the box under a household lamp. Rod Moore, sitting on the sofa next to the light observed, "Looks like some writing on the inside of the door." Closer examination and removal of dirt and grease revealed the engraved inscription Do 1771. Later examination uncovered a scratched 1771 near the breech on the bottom of the barrel.

26 posted on 05/06/2013 8:48:21 AM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: Seizethecarp

What a fool. Only the lower receiver would be made of plastic. The remainder of the rifle, the upper receiver, bolt, the barrel, and all the internals to the lower are still steel and easily detectable.


27 posted on 05/06/2013 8:50:08 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

12 gauge and .22 are the size they are for a good reason.
They fit standard water pipe inside diameters.


28 posted on 05/06/2013 8:51:38 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: varyouga
. Will Chuckie Schmuckie attempt to ban creativity?

That has ALWAYS been a goal of leftists!

29 posted on 05/06/2013 8:57:05 AM PDT by pgkdan (Some taglines never go away....)
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To: eCSMaster

Yeah, but that Star Trek episode didn’t end well for Harry Mudd.

Was it Captain Kirk or someone else who made scores of duplicates of Harry’s wife Stella near the end of the episode, and the androids all ganged up on Harry and nagged him in unison as he cowered in fear.


30 posted on 05/06/2013 8:58:05 AM PDT by july4thfreedomfoundation (November 4, 2008 and November 6, 2012.....Two days that will live in infamy!)
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To: Jack Hammer
Little Chuckie Schumer is an amazingly lucky public official; he’s never had to contend with a shortage of things about which to wee himself.

Yep, that's true. The man does seem to have his bowels in a continual uproar.

31 posted on 05/06/2013 9:01:26 AM PDT by OldPossum
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

“Hans Jacob Honaker was my great great great great grandfather. He made this gun in a mountain hollow, just like most of the rifles used in The Revolution were made.”

What a great ancestor to be proud of! However he was a Swiss-trained professional gunsmith with a brass foundry accessible from the ‘mountain hollow’ so not exactly your typical colonist start-from-scratch gunsmith.

Too bad the rifle was converted to be a smooth-bore shotgun...not that anyone will be firing it.


32 posted on 05/06/2013 9:18:59 AM PDT by Seizethecarp ((Defend aircraft from "runway kill zone" mini-drone helicopter swarm attacks: www.runwaykillzone.com)
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To: Red Badger

Never heard of a zip gun have they? You can make a gatling gun out of a round block of hardwood using 22 or 22 magnum cartridges. Just drill the right size holes for the barrels. Of course it will catch fire eventually.


33 posted on 05/06/2013 9:46:58 AM PDT by macglencoe
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To: Seizethecarp
People served apprenticeships beginning when they were just kids.

If I had to set up a brass foundry big enough for that barrel It wouldn't take much, although cannons and large bells are a different breed of cat. I have a sister who actually built one for the sculptures she does, using propane.

A friend of mine was collecting filings from all the local key cutting machines and making some impressive stuff on a charcoal forge.

Lots of things aren't as high tech as people think, imagination and determination go a long way, and a good file will make a lot of dust before it wears out..

34 posted on 05/06/2013 9:57:55 AM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
The gun in the article is made entirely from ABS plastic. He added a steel insert to comply with the plastic firearm laws.

The barrel appears very thick to handle the pressure but I'm sure it wears slightly after every shot. I'm very curious how many rounds it can fire before breaking.

This is the first model and anyone if free to try it and contribute. The design WILL improve quickly so I'm sure Chuckie and his ilk are filling their pants right now.

35 posted on 05/06/2013 10:36:47 AM PDT by varyouga
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To: varyouga

Still, a criminal will resort to it only if there isn’t an easier to get firearm available. I wonder what the bolt is made of.


36 posted on 05/06/2013 10:44:28 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
The firing pin is the only metal piece required and it is made from a standard wood nail.

Homemade firearms are quite easy to make. The only reason we don't see more of them is because people still have access to factory firearms. If the government somehow shuts that down, countless people will simply start making guns at home and selling them.

Gun laws are useless for criminals who are willing to kill. All gun restrictions can do is force law-abiding citizens to disarm themselves.

37 posted on 05/06/2013 11:02:46 AM PDT by varyouga
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To: Seizethecarp; AFPhys; AD from SpringBay; ADemocratNoMore; aimhigh; AnalogReigns; archy; ...
3-D Printer Ping!

See also duplicate thread here

38 posted on 05/06/2013 11:19:17 AM PDT by null and void (CA State Moto: "We have no idea right now where they were going or where they were coming from")
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To: varyouga
The firing pin is the only metal piece required and it is made from a standard wood nail.

Sounds like a good way to get seriously hurt. There is no way that a plastic bolt on a plastic receiver would be anywhere near strong enough to safely fire anything more powerful than a .22 lr.

39 posted on 05/06/2013 11:38:43 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
This is a simple handgun with a very thick plastic barrel. If thick enough, it can work and have a considerable safety factor. The only issue I see is that the bullet will scratch the barrel each time and make it loose. Eventually the pressure behind the bullet will get too low. The barrels are small, cheap and interchangeable so replacing it is not an issue.

If they can get a plastic barrel to fire a few dozen shots, I foresee a semi-auto model in the near future. Basically a single-use semi-auto pistol that you can throw away.

They tested it successfully with .380 several times. After first testing it from behind glass, the site's founder was confident enough to shoot it with his bare hands.

40 posted on 05/06/2013 12:20:15 PM PDT by varyouga
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To: varyouga

Brownells makes barrel liners.


41 posted on 05/06/2013 12:38:53 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
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To: Pontiac
So according to Schumer, a criminal would rather spend:

$800 for the 3d printer
$800 for a decent computer
Download, install and learn a free CAD software,
Download, install and learn a slicer program
Run a few test prints and adjust their printer
Then print off a single shot .380 pistol

VS

Going to the local criminal gun dealer and paying say $500 for a 15 plus shot 9 mm Glock that was stolen from someones house

Sure, makes sense to me.

42 posted on 05/06/2013 1:05:44 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: Seizethecarp
“Security checkpoints, background checks and gun regulations will do little good if criminals can print their own plastic firearms at home and bring those firearms through metal detectors with no one the wiser,”

Apparently with plastic cartridges as well.

43 posted on 05/06/2013 1:27:10 PM PDT by Doomonyou (Let them eat Lead.)
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To: taxcontrol; Blood of Tyrants
Then print off a single shot .380 pistol VS Going to the local criminal gun dealer and paying say $500 for a 15 plus shot 9 mm Glock that was stolen from someones house

It only makes sense if you have the printer for an other purposes and you want to knock off a few thousand of these guns.

44 posted on 05/06/2013 1:44:01 PM PDT by Pontiac (The welfare state must fail because it is contrary to human nature and diminishes the human spirit.)
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To: Seizethecarp
plastic firearms

That was the same wailful cry when the first thermoplastic glocks came out. They'd be invisibile to airport x-ray machines............LOL!

As a side note, a few years ago when I lost my job, I applied for employment with the TSA. I went thru a battery of tests, one of which was to view photos of typical luggage x-rays and try to identify specific test mandated items.

Outlines of literally everything you store in your carry on luggage is revealed in those x-rays, not just metal objects........

45 posted on 05/06/2013 2:10:01 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (This space for rent)
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To: Seizethecarp
The Liberator may look like a toy, but “this gun can fire regular bullets,” Schumer said, calling for legislation outlawing the technology’s weapons potential

Too late! The Liberator cost less than $2.00 to build using the stamped-metal technology of the early 1940s [Guide Lamp division of General Motors of Anderson, Indiana was the prime contractor] and with today's plastics technology....


46 posted on 05/06/2013 2:17:12 PM PDT by archy
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To: Seizethecarp

Remember, communist countries are fond of banning printers, copiers, faxes, etc.


47 posted on 05/06/2013 4:41:15 PM PDT by ctdonath2 (Making good people helpless doesn't make bad people harmless.)
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To: eCSMaster

But what if some jerk with a starship came by and reprogrammed them?


48 posted on 05/07/2013 5:46:55 AM PDT by TalonDJ
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To: eCSMaster

What happens when what happened to Mudd in that episode happens to you?


49 posted on 05/07/2013 8:16:13 AM PDT by Lx (Do you like it, do you like it. Scott? I call it Mr. and Mrs. Tennerman chili.)
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To: GraceG
Heck anyone with enough skill to use a 3d printer can ALSO build their own gun using off the shelf parts ANYWAYS!!!

Not even necessary: USFA Zip .22:


50 posted on 05/07/2013 9:38:10 AM PDT by archy
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