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America-hating: a badge of identity (Rushdie)
National Post ^ | 2/8/02 | Salman Rushdie

Posted on 02/08/2002 8:23:08 AM PST by denydenydeny

LONDON - They told us it would be a long, ugly struggle, and so it is.

America's war against terror has entered its second phase, a phase characterized by the storm over the status and human rights of the prisoners held at Camp X-Ray, and by the frustrating failure of the United States to find Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar.

Additionally, if America now attacks other countries suspected of harbouring terrorists, it will almost certainly do so alone.

In spite of the military successes, America finds itself facing a broader ideological adversary that may turn out to be as hard to defeat as militant Islam: anti-Americanism, which is presently becoming more evident everywhere.

The good news is that these post-Taliban days are bad times for Islamist fanatics. Dead or alive, Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar look like yesterday's men, unholy warriors who forced martyrdom on others while running for the hills themselves.

Also, if the persistent rumours are to be believed, the fall of the terrorist axis in Afghanistan may well have prevented an Islamist coup against President Pervez Musharraf in Pakistan, led by the more Taliban-like elements in the armed forces and intelligence services -- people like the terrifying General Hamid Gul.

And President Musharraf, no angel himself, has been pushed into arresting the leaders of the Kashmiri terrorist groups he used to encourage.

Around the world, the lessons of the American action in Afghanistan are being learned. Jihad is no longer quite as cool an idea as it was last fall.

States under suspicion of giving succor to terrorism have suddenly been trying to make nice, even going so far as to round up a few bad guys. Iran has accepted the legitimacy of the new Afghan government.

Even Britain, a state which has been more tolerant of Islamist fanaticism than most, is beginning to distinguish between resisting "Islamophobia" and providing a safe haven for some of the worst people in the world.

America did, in Afghanistan, what had to be done, and did it well. The bad news, however, is that these successes have not won new friends for the United States outside Afghanistan.

In fact, the effectiveness of the American campaign may have made some parts of the world hate America more than they did before.

Critics of the Afghan campaign in the West are enraged because they have been shown to be wrong at every step. No, American forces weren't humiliated the way the Russians had been; and yes, the air strikes did work; and no, the Northern Alliance didn't massacre people in Kabul; and yes, the Taliban did crumble away like the hated tyrants they were, even in their southern strongholds; and no, it wasn't that difficult to get the militants out of their cave fortresses; and yes, the various factions succeeded in putting together a new government that seems to have broad support among the people.

Meanwhile, those elements in the Arab and Muslim world who blame America for their own feelings of political impotence are feeling more impotent than ever.

As always, anti-American radicalism feeds off widespread anger over the plight of the Palestinians, and it remains true that nothing would undermine the fanatics' propaganda more completely than an acceptable settlement in the Middle East.

However, even if that settlement were arrived at tomorrow, anti-Americanism would probably not abate. It has become too useful a smokescreen for Muslim nations' many defects -- their corruption, their incompetence, their oppression of their citizens, their economic, scientific and cultural stagnation.

America-hating has become a badge of identity, making possible a chest-beating, flag-burning rhetoric of word and deed that makes men feel good. It contains a strong streak of hypocrisy, hating most what it desires most, and elements of self-loathing. ("We hate America because it has made of itself what we cannot make of ourselves.")

What America is accused of -- closed-mindedness, stereotyping, ignorance -- is also what its accusers would see if they looked into a mirror.

These days, there seem to be as many of these accusers outside the Muslim world as inside it. Anybody who has visited Britain and Europe, or followed the public conversation there during the past five months, will have been struck, even shocked, by the depth of anti-American feeling among large segments of the population.

Western anti-Americanism is an altogether more petulant phenomenon than its Islamic counterpart, and far more personalized. Muslim countries don't like America's power, its "arrogance," its success; but in the non-American West, the main objection seems to be to American people.

Night after night, I have found myself listening to Londoners' diatribes against the sheer weirdness of the American citizenry. The attacks on America are routinely discounted. ("Americans only care about their own dead.") American patriotism, obesity, emotionality, self-centredness: these are the crucial issues.

It would be easy for America, in the present climate of hostility, to fail to respond to constructive criticism, or worse: to start acting like the overwhelming superpower it is, making decisions and throwing its weight around without regard for the concerns of what it perceives as an already hostile world.

The treatment of the Camp X-Ray detainees is a worrying sign. The reported desire of Colin Powell, the U.S. Secretary of State, to grant these persons prisoner of war status was a statesmanlike response to global pressure -- but Powell has apparently failed to persuade President Bush and Donald Rumsfeld, U.S. Secretary of Defence.

The Bush administration has come a long way from its treaty-smashing beginnings. It should not abandon consensus-building now.

Great power and great wealth are perhaps never popular, yet, more than ever, we need the United States to exercise its power and economic might responsibly.

This is not the time to ignore the rest of the world and decide to go it alone. To do so would be to risk losing after you've won.

Salman Rushdie is the author of Fury: A Novel and the forthcoming essay collection Step Across This Line.


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS: clashofcivilizatio
America-hating has become a badge of identity, making possible a chest-beating, flag-burning rhetoric of word and deed that makes men feel good. It contains a strong streak of hypocrisy, hating most what it desires most, and elements of self-loathing.

I interpret this as belated self-criticism, since Rushdie has done his share of America-hating in his day.

1 posted on 02/08/2002 8:23:08 AM PST by denydenydeny
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To: denydenydeny
Never expect a thank you, just do the job.
2 posted on 02/08/2002 8:28:19 AM PST by Zeroisanumber
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To: denydenydeny
In spite of the military successes, America finds itself facing a broader ideological adversary that may turn out to be as hard to defeat as militant Islam: anti-Americanism, which is presently becoming more evident everywhere.

I for one am glad for this. Glad that it's becoming self-evident, that is. We always knew it was out there and now even the most obtuse person alive will see it for what it is. Let them hate us...muslem and Europeans, and then let us react accordingly the next time Europeans start to destroy their bloodsoaked continent in another outbreak of fratricidal mania, or the next time an earthquake or some other natural disaster befalls them. Let the EU solve all of Europe's problems. It's about time.

3 posted on 02/08/2002 8:33:07 AM PST by pgkdan
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To: denydenydeny
“We hate America because it has made of itself what we cannot make of ourselves."

Exactly. The backwards muslim middle east is confronted with their own ineptitude each time they come in contact with the U.S. Since these savages have no ability to evolve up to Western standards, you can rest assured that this hatred will continue forever.

Owl_Eagle

”Guns Before Butter.”

4 posted on 02/08/2002 8:35:20 AM PST by South Hawthorne
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To: denydenydeny
Anyone who hates America had the right never to come here or if they live here they have the right to leave before a Patriot kills them.
5 posted on 02/08/2002 8:40:50 AM PST by B4Ranch
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To: Zeroisanumber
"Never expect a thank you, just do the job."

"Never apologize. Never explain. Get it done and let them howl."
A British Imperialist

6 posted on 02/08/2002 8:42:12 AM PST by BlueLancer
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To: pgkdan
”Let them hate us...muslem and Europeans” pgkdan

“We hate America because it has made of itself what we cannot make of ourselves." Rushdie

"It cannot be that you decide on your own, and we trot along after you," Gert Weisskirchen, German parliamentarian.

Simply put the Europeans are jealous of the U.S. just as the muslims are. They can’t stand it that we’ve accomplished so much and compared to the U.S. really are second rate countires.

Hey Gert, get trottin’!

.

Owl_Eagle

”Guns Before Butter.”

7 posted on 02/08/2002 8:46:25 AM PST by South Hawthorne
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To: *Clash of Civilizatio
Indexing.
8 posted on 02/08/2002 8:49:35 AM PST by denydenydeny
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To: denydenydeny
I interpret this as belated self-criticism, since Rushdie has done his share of America-hating in his day.

Aye. Nice article, but Rushdie is a jerk.

9 posted on 02/08/2002 9:22:56 AM PST by lepton
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To: BlueLancer
"Never apologize. Never explain. Get it done and let them howl."

Exactly. I think Henry Ford once said something similar: "Don't complain; don't explain."

Why do the British care how fat Americans are, anyway?

10 posted on 02/08/2002 11:15:37 AM PST by ikanakattara
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To: Owl_Eagle
"Simply put the Europeans are jealous of the U.S. just as the muslims are.

Your comment makes me wonder if you're aware that Rushdie, although a British citizen, is actually an Indian-born Moslem who lives under a threat for his life. An Iranian Ayatholla issued a Fatwa (decree) that he be killed for his criticism of Islam in his book "The Satanic Verses".

Rushdie's comments strike differently depending upon who you think is talking.

11 posted on 02/08/2002 12:36:23 PM PST by mikeIII
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To: mikeIII
Oh, I knew. I’m kind of surprised he’s lived this long.

Salaman Rushdie= Someone in a Rush to Die..

Owl_Eagle

”Guns Before Butter.”

12 posted on 02/08/2002 12:53:15 PM PST by South Hawthorne
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To: Owl_Eagle
Salaman Rushdie= Someone in a Rush to Die..

I hadn't heard that one!

13 posted on 02/08/2002 1:37:58 PM PST by mikeIII
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