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Honor Among Soldiers
email | unknown | Joe Galloway

Posted on 03/30/2002 4:29:16 AM PST by where's_the_Outrage?

If you have fed from a steady diet of Hollywood movies about Vietnam you probably believe that everyone who wore a uniform in America's long, sad involvement in war in Vietnam is some sort of a clone of Lt. William Calley---that all three million of them were drug-crazed killers and rapists who rampaged across the pastoral landscape. Those movies got it wrong, until now. There is one more Hollywood film now playing called "We Were Soldiers" and it gets it right. Ask any Vietnam veteran who has gone to see the movie. In fact, ask any American who has gone to see it.

It is based on a book I wrote with my lifelong friend Lt. Gen. (ret) Hal Moore; a book written precisely because we believed that a false impression of those soldiers had taken root in the country which sent them to war and, in the end, turned its back on both the war and the warriors. I did four tours in Vietnam as a war correspondent for United Press International---1965-66, 1971, 1973 and 1975. In the first three of those tours at war I spent most of my time in the field with the troops and I came to know and respect them and even love them, though most folks might find the words "war" and "love" in the same sentence unsettling if not odd. In fact, I am far more comfortable in the company of those once-young soldiers today than with any other group except my own family. They are my comrades-in-arms, the best friends of my life and if ever I were to shout "help!" they would stampede to my aid in a heartbeat. They come from all walks of life; they are black, white, Hispanic, native American, Asian; they are fiercely loyal, dead honest, entirely generous of their time and money. They are my brothers and they did none of the things Oliver Stone or Francis Ford Coppola would have you believe all of them did.

On the worst day of my life, in the middle of the worst battle of the Vietnam War, in a place called Landing Zone X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley of Vietnam, I was walking around snapping some photographs when I caught a movement out of the corner of my eye. It was a tall, lanky GI who jumped out of a mortar pit and ran, zig-zagging under fire, toward me. He dove under the little bush I was crouched behind. "Joe! Joe Galloway! Don't you know me, man? "It's Vince Cantu from Refugio, Texas!" Vince Cantu and I had graduated together from Refugio High School, Class of 59, 55 boys and girls. We embraced warmly. Then he shouted over the din of gunfire: "Joe, you got to get down and stay down. It's dangerous out here. Men are dying all around." Vince told me that he had only ten days left on his tour of duty as a draftee soldier in the 1st Battalion 7th U.S. Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). "If I live through this I will be home in Refugio for Christmas." I asked Vince to please visit my mom and dad, but not tell them too much about where we had met and under what circumstances. I still have an old photograph from that Christmas visit---Vince wearing one of those black satin Vietnam jackets, with his daughter on his knee, sitting with my mom and dad in their living room. Vince Cantu and I are still best friends.

When I walked out and got on a Huey helicopter leaving Landing Zone X-Ray I left knowing that 80 young Americans had laid down their lives so that I and others might survive. Another 124 had been terribly wounded and were on their way to hospitals in Japan or the United States. I left with both a sense of my place, among them, and an obligation to tell their stories to any who would listen. I knew that I had been among men of honor and decency and courage, and anyone who believes otherwise needs to look in his own heart and weigh himself.

Hal Moore and I began our research for the book-to-be, We Were Soldiers Once and Young, in 1982. It was a ten-year journey to find and ultimately to bring back together as many of those who fought in LZ Xray and LZ Albany, a separate battle one day after ours only three miles away in which another 155 young Americans died and another 130 were wounded. We had good addresses for perhaps no more than a dozen veterans, but we mailed out a questionnaire to them to begin the process. Late one night a week later my phone rang at home in Los Angeles. On the other end was Sgt. George Nye, retired and living very quietly by choice in his home state of Maine. George began talking and it was almost stream of consciousness. He had held it inside him for so long and now someone wanted to know about it. He described taking his small team of engineer demolitions men into X-Ray to blow down some trees and clear a safer landing zone for the helicopters. Then he was talking about PFC Jimmy D. Nakayama, one of those engineer soldiers, and how a misplaced napalm strike engulfed Nakayama in the roaring flames. How he ran out into the fire and screamed at another man to grab Jimmy's feet and help carry him to the aid station. My blood ran cold and the hair stood up on the back of my neck. I had been that man on the other end of Nakayama. I had grabbed his ankles and felt the boots crumble, the skin peel, and those slick bones in my hands. Again I heard Nakayama's screams. By then we were both weeping. I knew Nakayama had died a day or two later in an Army hospital. Nye told me that Jimmy's wife had given birth to a baby girl the day he died--- and that when Nye returned to base camp at An Khe he found a letter on his desk. He had encouraged Nakayama to apply for a slot at Officer Candidate School. The letter approved that application and contained orders for Nakayama to return immediately to Ft. Benning, Ga., to enter that course.

George Nye is gone now. But I want you to know what he did with the last months of his life. He lived in Bangor, Maine, The year was 1991 and in the fall plane after plane loaded with American soldiers headed home from the Persian Gulf War stopped there to refuel. It was their first sight of home. George and some other local volunteers organized a welcome at that desolate airport. They provided coffee, snacks and the warm "Welcome home, soldier" that no one ever offered George and the millions of other Vietnam veterans. George had gone out to the airport to decorate a Christmas tree for those soldiers on the day he died. When we think of ourselves we think Shakespeare, Henry IV, Act IV, Scene 3: "We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he today that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother."

Honor and decency and uncommon courage were common among these soldiers and all the soldiers who served in Vietnam. I think of how they were, on patrol, moving through jungle or rice paddies. Nervous, on edge, trying to watch right, left, ahead, behind, all at once. A friend once described it as something like looking at a tree full of owls. They were alert for sign, sound or smell of the enemy. But they also watched each other closely. At the first sign of the oppressive heat and exhaustion getting to someone the two or three guys around would relieve him of some or all of the heavy burden that the Infantryman bears: 60 or 70 pounds of stuff. Rifle and magazines. A claymore mine or two. A couple of radio batteries. Cans of C-Rations. Spare socks. Maybe a book. All that rides in the soldier's pack. They would make it easier for him to keep going. They took care of each other, because in this situation each other was all they had.

When I would pitch up to spend a day or two or three with such an outfit I was, at first, an object of some curiosity. Sooner or later a break would be called and everyone would flop down in the shade, drink some water, break out a C-Ration or a cigarette. The GI next to me would ask: What you doing out here? I would explain that I was a reporter. "You mean you are a civilian? You don't HAVE to be here?" Yes. "Man, they must pay you loads of money to do this." And I would explain that, no, unfortunately I worked for UPI, the cheapest news agency in the world. "Then you are just plain crazy, man." Once I was pigeonholed, all was all right. The grunts understood "crazy" like no one else I ever met. The welcome was warm, friendly and open. I was probably the only civilian they would ever see in the field; I was a sign that someone, anyone, outside the Big Green Machine cared how they lived and how they died. It didn't take very long before I truly did come to care.

They were, in my view, the best of their entire generation. When their number came up in the draft they didn't run and hide in Canada. They didn't turn up for their physical wearing pantyhose or full of this chemical or that drug which they hoped would fail them. Like their fathers before them they raised their right hand and took the oath to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. It is not their fault that the war they were sent to fight was not one that the political leadership in Washington had any intention of winning. It is not their fault that 58,200 of them died, their lives squandered because Lyndon Johnson and, later, Richard Nixon could not figure out some decent way to cut our losses and leave the Vietnamese to sort the matter out among themselves.

As I have grown older, and so have they, and first the book and now the movie have come to pass I am often asked: Doesn't this close the loop for you? Doesn't this mean you can rest easier? The answer is no, I can't. To my dying day I WILL remember and honor those who died, some in my arms. I WILL remember and honor those who lived and came home carrying memories and scars that only their brothers can share and understand. They were the best you had, America, and you turned your back on them.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: joegalloway; moore; weweresoldiers
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Here's an email going around the Gulf. If the media whores were more like him, I might actually have some use for them.

And one thing I see in the soldiers, sailors, airman, and marines here, they look out for their buddy, and will/have die for them.

With soldiers like these, watch out terrorists. We're here,

1 posted on 03/30/2002 4:29:16 AM PST by where's_the_Outrage?
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
I did not get a chance to be in the military back when I was 18. It was 1968 and Vietnam was raging. But I wanted to. There were physical reasons behind this. I supported the soldiers but had some problems with who was running the war. Back then at 18, even I saw the problem with Lyndon Johnson and Robert McNamara. I predicted even then with what was going on we would be long if ever getting out of there. I have been pro military most of my life. Some thought I was anti American because I did not support what they were doing. I have always supported the soldier just like Col Hackworth does. David Hackworth has a lot of military biggies against him. Why? Because some of these people are career military people that do not support the soldiers but are worried only about their status. Myself, I support the soldier and was incredibly moved by that film "We are Soldiers." Every American should see it. I sat there during the credits at the end still stunned by the realistic portrayal it gave. I knew guys over there and yes it is better than any film. I am sure the Academy Award people will ignore it as Best Picture like they ignored "Saving Private Ryan," and instead voted that insipid "Shakespeare in Love" movie. But who cares? This last Academy Award show showed exactly what the political left are. Many tuned it out because of their p.c. agenda. Anyway, the movie is one of the best you will ever see. Can you imagine if the p.c. people would get ahold of this film like they have done with E.T.? anyway, this is all I had to say. Brad in Houston
2 posted on 03/30/2002 4:42:43 AM PST by bradactor
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
One of the very, very, very few journalists from Vietnam who got it right. And the movie is great! I've been waiting 33 years, since I finished my tour in 'Nam in 1969, for a decent movie about those of us who fought there. It was worth the wait. God Bless all our troops this Easter weekend.
3 posted on 03/30/2002 4:45:08 AM PST by Viet Vet in Augusta GA
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
I have been in service since late 1991 and as person in the service right now, I just want to say we could not be the best fighting force in the history of the world without the courage and sacrifice of the men and women who came before us. Your example has inspired me since childhood, and if I have my way it will inspire my children's children. Thank you Vietnam Veterens. Thank you Korean War Veterens. Thank you veterns of World War Two and those in the tiny unmentioned brushfires in between. You are my heros in a world conspicuously absent of them. God Bless you all.
4 posted on 03/30/2002 4:45:49 AM PST by McCloud-Strife
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To: bradactor
I've read the book, but haven't been able to see the movie yet. So I really can't comment on the movie. It did play here last night, and one swabbie that read the book said he was disappointed. Not sure why, but will reserve judgement until I see it.
5 posted on 03/30/2002 4:48:01 AM PST by where's_the_Outrage?
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
It is really good to see that someone finally got it right. I saw the movie and it is one of the best. I was in the military during the Vietnam fiasco, but never did have the privelege of making it to that part of the world and ended up in the European theatre for the cold war. This did not prevent me from getting harrassed as a baby killer, when in the states, by the long haired hippy freaks.
6 posted on 03/30/2002 4:52:43 AM PST by Piquaboy
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
THANK YOU
US ARMY
1964-1968
7 posted on 03/30/2002 5:00:07 AM PST by DeaconRed
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To: Viet Vet in Augusta GA
God bless all you guys who tried to do a job which the politicians hung you out to dry on . . . and the leftwing loonies fought against you. The closest I ever got was as a college freshman in ROTC, final year of the war. The worst I had to put up with was the ridicule of fellow students on the days I wore the uniform to class-- and my summer job of trying to get recruits for the program among incoming high school graduates who refused to even agree to meet and talk about it.
8 posted on 03/30/2002 5:15:36 AM PST by Rubber Ducky
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To: where's_the_Outrage?;Snow Bunny;VOA;RonDog;generalissimoduane;JoeSixPack;onyx;Ragtime Cowgirl...
NEVER FORGET

For more on .."WE WERE SOLDIERS"../ Battle of IA DRANG-1965 see:

1) ..'Ronnie Guyer Photo Collection'.. IA DRANG-1965 Photos on our 7th Cavalry website.. www.LzXray.com ...thru the Home Page's ..'Ia Drang - Interest'.. Section.

2) ..'ALOHA RONNIE'.. Bookmarked F/R .."WE WERE SOLDIERS"../ IA DRANG-1965 / RICK RESCORLA ..Articles by accessing the ..'ALOHA RONNIE'.. on this Post.

3) ..'ALOHA RONNIE'.. Forum Threads/Posts on.. www.WeWereSoldiersFILM.com .. ('The Movie' -&- 'General Discussion' Sections)

GARRY OWEN, Sir

Signed:

ALOHA RONNIE Guyer / Vet-Battle of IA DRANG-1965/ Landing Zone Falcon / Lt. Col. HAL G. MOORE's Radioman/Driver/Orderly till IA DRANG-1965 / IA DRANG S-1 Personnel Clerk - MOORE wrote his personal Letters of Condolances to the families of our fallen, I typed them up, ie. to Mrs. JACK GEOGHEGAN (Actress Keri Russell)

NEVER FORGET

9 posted on 03/30/2002 5:23:10 AM PST by ALOHA RONNIE
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
I was just beginning helicopter pilot training at Ft. Wolters, TX when this battle was raging. Ended up in the same AO (Pleiku) a little over a year later with the 4th ID as a slick driver. The 1st Cav, by that time, had moved most of their operations to the east of An Khe. By the time the NVA had gotten my cherry in the western end of the Ia Drang in Feb/Mar 67, any institutional knowledge of the 65 battle had vanished for the average soldier (me).

I saw the movie the day it opened. Liked it. However, just as anyone is critical of things they know about, I am critical of how helicopter operations were portrayed in "Soldiers." First of all, Hueys didn't sneak up on anyone. Second, gunships didn't hover around a hot landing zone firing their weaponry. They made gun runs with one aircraft covering the other on the break. However, they had to put a 3-day battle into a 2-hour movie and all are forgiven. Joe Galloway and LTG Hal Moore are still two of my heroes.

10 posted on 03/30/2002 5:28:14 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
...Please go to.. www.WeWereSoldiersFILM.com .. 'Latest News' ..and scroll down to my own .."WE WERE SOLDIERS".. Movie Review that I wrote after seeing it in a Special Screening for us IA DRANG-1965 Vets at Ft. Benning on Feb 13th titled:

..'I LOVED THIS MOVIE'..

11 posted on 03/30/2002 5:28:53 AM PST by ALOHA RONNIE
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To: ALOHA RONNIE
Hello, AR. I was going to ping you after I finished my thoughts. Glad to see you're here.
12 posted on 03/30/2002 5:30:44 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: ALOHA RONNIE
Thank you Bump.
13 posted on 03/30/2002 5:33:53 AM PST by Ditto
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
Although I never got closer than about 500 miles to Vietnam, my life was profoundly affected by that war. I joined the Navy because of the draft in late 1967 and spent three years in the Phillipines watching people go TDY to thailand and Vietnam.

I will never forget the professionalism and the honor exhibited by most of the people I knew during that time. I also remember the sickness I would feel when reading about the so-called Paris peace talks, knowing all along that we were being played by the communists and the press for fools. For me, the really ugly part of the Veitnam war was played by the unprincipled apologists for marxism who as much as spat in the face of the honorable people from our armed services.

Mr. Gorbachev's recent description of the Soviet Union as all propoganda and no substance made me cheer. It is too bad that our former president who "loathed the military" and had visited Moscow in the late 60's, had the power to appoint people to run our military. In my mind there is a direct connection between his willful hatred of the military and what is protrayed in "Black Hawk Down"..... Honorable men being betrayed by weanies who trust themselves too much.

14 posted on 03/30/2002 5:37:39 AM PST by Tom Bombadil
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To: Tom Bombadil;Tennessee_Bob;VOA;RonDog;Judicial Watch;Carl/Newsmax;Snow Bunny;Alamo Girl
...The Enemy Within CLINTONS =

...No Tanks to protect our Troops in Somolia...

...No Intelligence Op's in Afgh starting in 1993..

...No Hiring of Spies to stop Sept 11th since 1995..

...No RICK RESCORLA who died inside Tower 2 on Sept 11th after saving 1,000's of lives, like he did in the World Trade Center Bombing-1993 -&- the Battle of IA DRANG-1965 ("WE WERE SOLDIERS")*

...Don't you DARE let them get away with THIS ONE...!!!*

Signed:..ALOHA RONNIE/Vet-Battle of IA DRANG-1965 www.LzXray.com

15 posted on 03/30/2002 6:06:06 AM PST by ALOHA RONNIE
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To: McCloud-Strife
Thank you Vietnam Veterens. Thank you Korean War Veterens. Thank you veterns of World War Two

my Dad made all three of these, and that's why I'm serving. And it's the sevicemen now that have to carry the ball, so do us proud.

16 posted on 03/30/2002 6:23:09 AM PST by where's_the_Outrage?
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To: Voter#537
Thank You for your service,

And you're welcome:

US Army 1977-1982
USAR 1982-2001
US Army 2001 - Now.

Proud to serve, and Proud of our military.

17 posted on 03/30/2002 6:27:02 AM PST by where's_the_Outrage?
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
And it's the sevicemen now that have to carry the ball, so do us proud

We civilians are very proud of you. Thanks.

18 posted on 03/30/2002 6:38:18 AM PST by RightWingMama
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To: leadpenny
I was just beginning helicopter pilot

The most profound passage in the book for me was where one of the Helo pilots said:

"The unit was not going to fail its mission cause of support he didn't provide."

I've made that my philosopy. And hope a REMF like me can help.

19 posted on 03/30/2002 6:38:34 AM PST by where's_the_Outrage?
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To: Viet Vet in Augusta GA; where's_the_Outrage?; McCloud-Strife; Piquaboy; Voter #537; Aloha Ronnie...
And to all GIs past and present:

From the bottom of my heart, thank you for your service to our country.
Thank you for your noble pursuit of honor and righteousness.
Civilization, now and always, survives because of the bravery of men like you.

20 posted on 03/30/2002 6:38:52 AM PST by Bigg Red
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To: leadpenny
NEVER FORGET

...It was the constant Artillery -WALL OF FIRE- encircling Landing Zone X-Ray fired from our Landing Zone Falcon that protected our SkyTroopers during the massive NVA Assaults on them ..especially during the last NVA Assault ..coupled with Huey and Tactical AirStrikes throughout that helped Save the Day (days) for us.

...Greg Kinnear's Helicopter Commander BRUCE CRANDALL kept flying in under heavy NVA fire to keep our 7th Cavalry SkyTroopers resupplied with crucial Ammo/Water/Food and taking out our wounded and dead when Medi-Vac Hueys wouldn't come near. CRANDALL's Wingman BILL "Too Tall" FREEMAN received his Congressional Medal of Honor from President BUSH last year.

...BRUCE CRANDALL's own MOH Papers have been "Misplaced" since between Washington State's former Senator (R) who lost in Year 2000 and new Sen. CANTWELL (D) and we are pushing folks to find them.

...Another Helicopter Commander PAUL P. WINKEL,Jr deserves his own Congressional Medal of Honor as well ...since our guys survived the initial Day/Night of Battle against impossible odds because of constant re-supply by air under heavy enemy fire just yards away.

NEVER FORGET

21 posted on 03/30/2002 6:39:22 AM PST by ALOHA RONNIE
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
After you see the movie, be sure to come to DC on Memorial Day Weekend and see the hundreds of thousands of supporters who show up every year to keep the spirit of our heroes alive!
22 posted on 03/30/2002 6:40:34 AM PST by squeegee boy
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To: where's_the_Outrage?;Snow Bunny
Snow Bunny! Please bring the "brothers" to this thread. PLEASE!

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he today that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother."

I had to quit here and attempt to regain some compusure. My eyes are still having a hard time adjusting to the page for the tears just won't quit.

where's_the_Outrage? do you have a link or at least the name and address of the person who wrote this?

Anyone? I really would like to contact this writer.

23 posted on 03/30/2002 6:43:52 AM PST by ImpBill
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To: ImpBill
Ok, it's Joe Galloway. Does anyone have a way to reach him?
24 posted on 03/30/2002 6:46:23 AM PST by ImpBill
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To: ImpBill
...Send all inquiries to:

JOSEPH P. GALLOWAY

C/O Secretary of State COLIN POWELL

as he is now the Secretary's Speech Writer/Advisor

25 posted on 03/30/2002 6:49:57 AM PST by ALOHA RONNIE
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
Bttt.

5.56mm

26 posted on 03/30/2002 6:57:59 AM PST by M Kehoe
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To: Rubber Ducky
Thanks for your post.

"God bless all you guys who tried to do a job which the politicians hung you out to dry ... "

Don't forget that before "politicians" hang anyone "out to dry" they have to first be elected by the "people" of this Republic, and by nature of that election represent the "will" of those same people.

I am not pointing a finger at anyone here, but for too long America has been willing to lay blame at the feet of the "soldiers", the "politicians", the "news media", etc.

America as comprised of a free people "hung us out to dry" and that my friend seems to get lost time and time again.

Nothing can be done today to undo what was done, but as Sgt. George Nye died doing, we can do plenty today to make sure the "young centurians" of today never get "hung out to dry".

27 posted on 03/30/2002 6:59:52 AM PST by ImpBill
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To: ALOHA RONNIE
Still serving his country, we see. Pretty good job all around if you ask me.
28 posted on 03/30/2002 7:03:48 AM PST by squeegee boy
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To: Tom Bombadil
For me, the really ugly part of the Veitnam war was played by the unprincipled apologists for marxism who as much as spat in the face of the honorable people from our armed services.

I've been out of Nam for 33 years now and probably my most vivid memories are of the humiliation I received when I got back to the states and found that I was considered a "baby killer". Even more gut wrenching is that in the early 90's when my son was in college I realized that the the universities had been taken over by the Marxists. I think they were teaching him that I was a baby killer. My son is probably incapable of understanding the real story of Vietnam from an objective point of view. Most teaching of our kids about Vietnam is from the radical left's point of view.

29 posted on 03/30/2002 7:12:12 AM PST by BeAllYouCanBe
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To: ImpBill
As Aloha Ronnie said, Joe Galloway has been doing some work for Colin Powell. Below is an example of his speechwriting.

Joe Galloway was the guest speaker at the 2000 Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Association (VHPA) dinner in Washington, DC. The day before that dinner, there were 2-3000 members and guests gathered in the vicinity of the Wall as a planned flyover of about a half dozen Vietnam-vintage choppers made their way from east to west in formation at about 800 feet above the ground. As the noise subsided, Joe Galloway made a few remarks for all in the area of The Wall to hear.

The following is taken from a VHPA newsletter published later in the summer:

Remarks prepared for delivery Sunday July 2, 2000, at VHPA Memorial at The Wall:

______________________________________________________

Is there anyone here today who does not thrill to the sound of those Huey blades?? That familiar whop-whop-whop is the soundtrack of our war...the lullaby of our younger days. To someone who spent his time in Nam with the grunts I have got to tell you that that noise was always a great comfort. It meant someone was coming to help...someone was coming to get our wounded...someone was coming to bring us water and ammo...someone was coming to take our dead brothers home...someone was coming to give us a ride out of hell. Even today when I hear it I stop...catch my breath...and think back to those days.

I love you guys as only an Infantryman can love you. No matter how bad things were...if we called you came. Down through the green tracers and other visible signs of a real bad day off to a bad start. I would like to quote to you from a letter Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman wrote his friend Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at the end of the Civil War: "I knew wherever I was that you thought of me, and if I got in a tight place you would come---if alive." That was always in our minds and that is how we thought of you. To us you seemed beyond brave and fearless...that you would come to us in the middle of battle in those flimsy thin-skinned crates...and in the storm of fire you would sit up there behind that plexiglass seeming so patient and so calm and so vulnerable...waiting for the off-loading and the on-loading. We thought you were God's own lunatics... and we loved you. Still do.

We are gathered here this morning to appreciate the lives and honor the memory of 2,209 helicopter pilots and 2.704 helicopter crewmen who were killed while doing their duty in the Republic of Vietnam between May 30, 1961, and May 15, 1975. Theirs are some of the names among the 58,220 on this precious Wall. So many good men...so many good friends.

Before I come here I always remind myself of what another good friend, Captain B.T. Collins..who is now gone..liked to say at gatherings like this:

No whining and no crying! We are the fortunate ones! We survived...when so many better men gave up their precious lives for us. We owe them a sacred debt...to live each day to its fullest...trying to make this world a better place for our having lived and their having died.

So we come here today to remember them...and to celebrate their lives and their deeds. I like to come here at dawn...or around midnight...when things are so quiet you can hear their voices. What they are saying...when you listen hard enough...is this: We are at peace; so should you be...so should you be.

I would like to close by reading you from something written by a World War I poet named Lawrence Binyon:

They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old,
Age shall not weary them...nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun, and in the morning,
We will remember them!

God Bless all our absent friends...and God bless you.

______________________________________________________

I treasure that speech and will pass it on to my grandchildren.

BTW, I saw Joe on C-SPAN earlier in the week with a group of war correspondents. Jamie McIntyre of CNN, etc. It is very obvious that whether Joe Galloway is writing, giving a speech or speaking extemporaneously - people listen.

30 posted on 03/30/2002 7:17:03 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: BeAllYouCanBe
Welcome home and welcome to FR.
31 posted on 03/30/2002 7:19:46 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: ALOHA RONNIE; All
Thanks to all for your service, bravery, and honor. I saw the movie and agree; it is a very moving film, and gives honor to those who lived it. Having been a military brat, the home scenes of the wives and children rang true. It brought back a lot of memories.

Hopefully we can begin to regain what was lost at that time in our country's history, and begin to honor again what is noble, true, and good.

32 posted on 03/30/2002 7:24:29 AM PST by happygrl
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To: where's_the_Outrage?
Gen. Moore, Galloway, and ALOHA RONNIE bump
33 posted on 03/30/2002 7:28:34 AM PST by VOA
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To: leadpenny
Thank you. I have been living in the boonies for perhaps too long now. I never knew, nor cared to find out, that people like Joe Galloway existed. I have been way too long wrapped up in and nuturing my own sick bitterness. Perhaps it is time to effect a change!
34 posted on 03/30/2002 7:34:22 AM PST by ImpBill
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To: leadpenny
We are gathered here this morning to appreciate the lives and honor the memory of 2,209 helicopter pilots and 2,704 helicopter crewmen who were killed

I was a crew chief on a UH-1B and so I also was moved by the speech so thanks for posting it. I've lived most of the last 33 years not mentioning my service. I was there in a war no one cared about and I still feel bad because let's face it nobody really understands.(Mostly, in the beginning in the 70's we Vets were expected to become crazed-killers like Hollywood portrayed us in hundreds of TV programs -- I always thought my family thought I would some day crack.) Latter, I think people just wanted to forget and put closure on the wounds so apathy set in.

35 posted on 03/30/2002 7:35:08 AM PST by BeAllYouCanBe
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To: happygrl
...CRONKITE was telling the same lies on TV about what we were doing in Vietnam that our Communist Enemy was telling the People we were defending.

...CLINTON & CLINTON = LIAR CRONKITE...

...The Enemy is now Within...

...and always has been.

36 posted on 03/30/2002 7:54:51 AM PST by ALOHA RONNIE
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To: happygrl
Hopefully we can begin to regain what was lost at that time in our country's history, and begin to honor again what is noble, true, and good.

To show that hollywood is not quite done bashing Viet Vets I point as an example the Agency episode this week.

The plot was that the head of the CIA was going to be accused of a massacre in Vietnam in 69 by one of his fellow platoon members. This would be a major media fiasco and make the CIA look bad. This kind of plot line used to happen all the time but it is still open season on Vets.

What is noble and true -- yes, that would be wonderful!!

37 posted on 03/30/2002 7:56:58 AM PST by BeAllYouCanBe
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To: ImpBill;BeAllYouCanBe
I've always talked about my experiences in Nam (67 and 69/70). Especially about the people I knew and how the war effected me, warts and all. I refused to put it away, mainly because I wanted to keep alive the memory of those who were lost. The good to come out of Nam is that our generation has not let the politicians get us into another one - yet. As long as I have a breath, I'm going to help keep 'em honest.
38 posted on 03/30/2002 7:59:04 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: leadpenny
I've always talked about my experiences in Nam (67 and 69/70).

Strange that many times that I've wanted to communicate the "truth" about Nam I've been shut down and labeled as a goof-ball. When you tell a story very different then what people hear in the media they just don't believe you.

Case in point we were both in Army Avaiation and drug use was extremely rare and we were all volunteers had a higher sense of duty then the average GI. When I tell people that morale was high and we were good and dedicated soldiers -- I just lose a lot of people.

Perhaps people don't know what a crew chief was you as a pilot may get more respect. In the last 33 years I've only known 2-3 people who have the slightest idea of what I did and they think I'm bull**iting. But, I was a soldier once and I'm sorry no one listens -- so I don't say much.

39 posted on 03/30/2002 8:35:38 AM PST by BeAllYouCanBe
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To: BeAllYouCanBe
But, I was a soldier once and I'm sorry no one listens -- so I don't say much

A buddy retired a few years ago, one of his remarks was "All my true Friends were soldiers, that's why I hung around as long as I did."

This guy was a gunship pilot in Nam, I didn't tire of his stories. So:

TELL A SOLDIER, we'll listen.

And trust me, we're relearning lessons again. So tell a Soldier, hopefully he won't have to relearn your lessons.

40 posted on 03/30/2002 8:53:47 AM PST by where's_the_Outrage?
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To: BeAllYouCanBe
If you can find it in this new system, I sent you a FReep mail.
41 posted on 03/30/2002 9:35:10 AM PST by leadpenny
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Comment #42 Removed by Moderator

To: ALOHA RONNIE;where's_the_Outrage?
Thank you with all my heart Ronnie.

where's_the_Outrage? thank you for the thread !!!!

43 posted on 03/30/2002 2:07:45 PM PST by Snow Bunny
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To: ImpBill ;where's_the_Outrage?;SAMWolf;4TheFlag;68-69TonkinGulfYatchClub;SLB;HiJInx;
BUMP my brothers!
44 posted on 03/30/2002 2:17:02 PM PST by Snow Bunny
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To: ImpBill ;where's_the_Outrage?;NAM Vet;Theirjustdue;timydnuc;782 gear;
BUMP
45 posted on 03/30/2002 2:24:02 PM PST by Snow Bunny
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To: leadpenny
I have had the same goal as you, but I never, I mean NEVER speak of my experiences in country.

I have tried upon occasion to speak with my dear bride of 34 years about my bitterness since returning "home", but she thinks I am a bit "off balance" ... LOL ... so I don't discuss them much with her either. As in most other things in our relationship, she is more than likely correct about my being "off balanced".

Anyway, nice to exchange with you and thanks for the further example of Joe Galloway's magnificent ability to put raw emotion into words.

I am looking forward to seeing the flick when it gets on the tube. I really do live about 45 miles from the nearest town with "one" theater. /;-)

46 posted on 03/30/2002 2:41:01 PM PST by ImpBill
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To: BeAllYouCanBe
I learned a lot from a blue-suited spook who worked Buffalo Hunter and other missions over the Gulf of Tonkin...
Don't stop talking. It's good for you to get it out, and eventually you're going to find someone who really wants to hear what you have to say.
As a suggestion, start here. We're listening. And we Care.
If you can't find a thread where you want to start, then come over to the USO Canteen FReeper Style. Just do a search on "USO+Canteen", or link in from the FR Home Page. There are a lot of wonderful folks there who are ready and willing to accept what you have to say!


47 posted on 03/30/2002 3:09:07 PM PST by HiJinx
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To: where's_the_Outrage?,Snow Bunny,All
"As I have grown older, and so have they, and first the book and now the movie have come to pass I am often asked: Doesn't this close the loop for you? Doesn't this mean you can rest easier? The answer is no, I can't. To my dying day I WILL remember and honor those who died, some in my arms. I WILL remember and honor those who lived and came home carrying memories and scars that only their brothers can share and understand. They were the best you had, America, and you turned your back on them."

Tribute To Vietnam Era Veterans....Welcome Home by Snow Bunny
48 posted on 03/30/2002 4:17:16 PM PST by 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub
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To: McCloud-Strife,Alamo-Girl
Form your FReeper Profile Page
"Currently proud to serve my country as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom: Philippines "

Thank You for your service to our country!

If no one has said it, allow me:
Welcome to Free Republic!

Click Here to find Free Republic
NEWCOMERS: Welcome Center and Information Desk Latest Thread
Stop in to meet our hostess Alamo-Girl.
She has a great collection of Free Republic useful links.

49 posted on 03/30/2002 4:22:14 PM PST by 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub
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To: BeAllYouCanBe
"I've been out of Nam for 33 years now"

Welcome Home Brother
50 posted on 03/30/2002 4:24:42 PM PST by 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub
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