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The UN is on the verge of destroying itself
The Ottawa Citizen ^ | October 30, 2002 | David Warren

Posted on 10/31/2002 3:39:20 PM PST by Ragtime Cowgirl

The UN is on the verge of destroying itself
If it does not enforce its resolutions on Iraq, the UN will meet the same fate as the League of Nations

Wednesday, October 30, 2002

Ali Haider, The Associated Press
Iraqi soldiers carry the coffins of Iraqi soldiers killed during the war with Iran during a ceremony held at the border yesterday. The ceremony was held to exchange the remains of Iraqi and Iranian soldiers killed during the 1980-88 war. An estimated one million Iraqis and Iranians were killed in the war.

The United States is about to force a vote in the UN Security Council on its Iraq resolution. It is by no means clear that this resolution will pass.

Negotiations over it among the five veto powers on the council have now gone on an unconscionable length of time: an attempt to square a circle that has not succeeded. While the details are murky, it appears the Russians, through a combination of hard experience in a Moscow theatre, and secret U.S. recognition of several Russian interests in Iraq, have been persuaded not to employ their veto. The Chinese were expected from the beginning to stand aside. It appears now to be down to the U.S. vs. France -- an unhappy spat over very large stakes between two allied democracies, but there you have it.

The issue comes down to just two words. The American resolution finds Saddam Hussein's regime to be in "material breach" of previous UN resolutions, which demanded the opening of the whole territory of Iraq to unimpeded weapons inspections. Mr. Saddam agreed to these, in order to preserve his regime, after the Gulf War in 1991. They were resolutions under Chapter VII of the UN Charter -- in other words, fully binding.

As opposed, for instance, to the myriad anti-Israel resolutions brought by Arab states under Chapter VI -- which provides for mere talk, or in the words of the charter, "negotiation, enquiry, mediation, conciliation, arbitration and judicial settlement."

These two words -- "material breach" -- are as fully loaded as any in diplomacy and international law. If the Security Council acknowledges Mr. Saddam is in "material breach" of Chapter VII resolutions -- which he obviously is -- then the U.S. may cite the authority of the UN to enforce Iraqi compliance, by all means necessary. If, alternatively, the words were removed from the resolution -- at French and perhaps still Russian insistence -- then the U.S. has no pretext, at least under the UN charter.

The French describe the two words as "hidden trigger language." This is false: it is open trigger language and if it is removed, there is no point to the resolution. If, for sake of argument, Mr. Bush were to agree to remove those two words, in order to "get a deal" with the French, I for one would lose confidence in him, along with most of his allies, and I can count on Mr. Bush at least to know this.

It would anyway be necessary to rewrite history to achieve the latter end -- to take the sting out of the tail, as it were. And what the alternative French resolution, now presented to the Security Council, proposes to do is, implicitly, to rewrite this history. (The U.S. resolution, having been first presented, must be voted on first.)

Iraq would be effectively forgiven for all past violations, and presented with a fresh opportunity to meet much diminished standards for inspections. A reporting provision would be set up, to prevent member states from taking any action against Mr. Saddam unless and until the molasses of the UN bureaucracy has had its chance to work.

The effect would be to turn Chapter VII violations into Chapter VI violations -- to let Mr. Saddam off any plausible threat of consequences for his intransigence, either forever or until he has deployed nuclear weapons, whichever comes first.

- - -

I am besieged by readers asking me the question, "When, oh when, are the Americans going into Iraq?" Let me just give the answer once and to all.

Mr. Bush's style -- the reflection of the man himself -- is to be fairly louche on deadlines. Nor does he give ultimatums, if there is any alternative. That would be shouting, and neither he, nor anyone in his administration, shouts.

As I have written before, the constraints that are observed are the real time constraints, not the artificial ones; every possible alternative is kept open to the last minute. To do otherwise is to be trapped in your own verbiage, and I would say that even Mr. Bush's essays in unsyntactical English help to keep his options open.

Like President Reagan before him, he keeps his eye on the main issues, and delegates minor dependant ones. Like Mr. Reagan's secretary of state, George Schultz, he is looking ahead about five years, and to what may be practically achievable on such a reasonably ambitious time scale. Cheney, Rumsfeld and Rice are also five-year people: a much longer period and you are no longer engaging with reality, a much shorter and you are being controlled by events.

Few of their critics see beyond the moment, which is all very well if you have no responsibilities.

In this case, the short-term goal is to change the regime and nature of Iraq, which must be done before this winter is out. If necessary, direct military action could be delayed until about February, or could come as soon as next week; the U.S. has been in a position to strike at short notice since early August. Early December would be the best balance of weather conditions, and civil and military preparedness. The "war" itself will be fast and furious, it will not require months, though as in Afghanistan, the mopping up may go on longer. But this mopping up will be done from inside, not outside, Baghdad.

Three more things to bear constantly in mind: 1. the longer-term intention, 2. the politics in the interim and 3. the need to exploit opportunities as they arise.

First, beyond Iraq, there is Iran, and Syria; Saudi Arabia and the funding of international networks of terror and Islamist proselytizing; the problem of Israel and its neighbours; problems presented by lesser rogue Arab states; the North Korean threat; China's threat to Taiwan; and last, but not least, the erection of a new system of international order to replace the one that has fallen apart. Dealing with Saddam Hussein is urgent, but it is also part of these other dealings, and the change of regime in Iraq must serve other purposes down the road, not get in their way.

Second, "there is a tide in the affairs of men," and Mr. Bush cannot afford to disregard either national or world public opinion -- which does not mean he need be guided by it. He must at all times carry a sufficient number of allies with him, domestically and internationally, to carry on his campaign. If he neglects this political and diplomatic base, both he and the campaign are over.

For it's not enough just to fight the right enemy, you also have to defeat him. Unfortunately, in the last couple of weeks, by actively campaigning in the mid-term elections to press the advantage of Republican Congressional candidates, Mr. Bush temporarily abandoned his "presidential" posture at a critical moment in the Iraq standoff, lost precious steam, and may be about to receive a political beating for it on the home front. That, for sure, was a Bush mistake, though one from which he can recover.

Third, the need to exploit opportunity. There are many ways to get to the same destination. Several months ago, it appeared that removing the Saddam regime would require physical force, whereas the ayatollah regime in neighbouring Iran was coming down of its own exhausted weight under the pressure provided by the Iranian population. It now appears the Iraqi regime may itself be crumbling, under the pressure of U.S. and British threats.

There have been unprecedented demonstrations against Mr. Saddam in Baghdad itself, and suddenly Iraqi citizens are even approaching foreign news reporters to explain what's going on. The U.S. mission in Iraq may have to be re-oriented at very short notice, as it would be if Mr. Saddam were assassinated. The U.S. would still have to go in to sort out the mess, but more immediately and less aggressively. It must be prepared at all times for other, less predictable, breaking developments.

Similarly, recent Islamist terror hits on Bali and Moscow have opened the field to much higher levels of co-operation between Russia, Indonesia, and the U.S. (Australia, too; but the Australians were already as fully "onside" with the Americans as were the British). The sad reality is that the U.S.-led coalition must wait for countries one after another to have their own "9/11 experiences," before they will remove obstacles to the hot pursuit of Islamists across international frontiers.

The coalition must meanwhile sneak around these remaining obstacles -- the countries still living in the fairy tale of the old world order -- in glass slippers.

- - -

Now, how is the first part of this article connected to the second part? What is the "real deadline" on Iraq, or to wind forward to the better question, Why Iraq first, when there are so many other "lions in the road?" (North Korea, for instance, which yesterday declared to Japan that it had no intention of abandoning its own nuclear weapons program.)

The answer is because in addition to its threat to deploy genocidal weapons, and its role in sponsoring, sheltering and fomenting terrorism both against Israel and farther afield, the Iraqi regime presents a special case. It is already in defiance of Chapter VII resolutions, and so it uniquely presents an opportunity for remedy through the auspices of the UN. If the UN is going to have any role at all in the rest of the "war against terror," it must prove its resolve and ability to act in this case.

If, alternatively, the UN fails to vindicate its own resolutions on Iraq, the whole organization is as dead as the League of

Nations before it. In that case, President Bush will not have destroyed it, it will have destroyed itself, and the U.S. and its allies can get on with the business of walking over it.

Read previous columns by David Warren at www.canada.com/ottawa



TOPICS: Canada; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Germany; Government; Israel; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; Russia; United Kingdom
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1 posted on 10/31/2002 3:39:20 PM PST by Ragtime Cowgirl
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
Good riddance. Now, what ever will we do with the
$ 800,000,000 a year the US gives it...?
2 posted on 10/31/2002 3:47:32 PM PST by pabianice
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
Don't worry all the PC educated youth and media of the world will rise up to save the UN.
3 posted on 10/31/2002 3:51:24 PM PST by crypt2k
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To: pabianice
Good riddance. Now, what ever will we do with the
$ 800,000,000 a year the US gives it...?

Do the words 'concurrent receipt' ring a bell?

4 posted on 10/31/2002 3:51:58 PM PST by gcruse
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
GLORY, GLORY HALLELUJAH
5 posted on 10/31/2002 3:53:34 PM PST by demkicker
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
The sooner the better. The UN was worthless 57 years ago, and it is still worthless today.
6 posted on 10/31/2002 3:54:48 PM PST by GOP_1900AD
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
If only this were indeed true. I should live long enough to see that day...
7 posted on 10/31/2002 3:56:22 PM PST by MarineDad
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Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: pabianice
**Good riddance. Now, what ever will we do with the
$ 800,000,000 a year the US gives it...?**

The UN has a rather lovely piece of land in NY, too. Whatever can we put there when they are forced to give it BACK to the U.S.? What to do? What to do?
9 posted on 10/31/2002 4:00:11 PM PST by kitkat
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl; All
One can hope...

My 2¢'s about the un?

American Policy Center on-line Declaration of Independence from the U.N.

As I recall, the un has one or more "contingency sites" located in other nations... let's banish them there--

Moreover:

 
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/679476/posts
U.N. Finally Forced to Probe Its Pedophilia Scandal
Newsmax.com ^ | Tuesday, May 7, 2002
"Imagine the screaming headlines and worldwide outrage if the Catholic Church or any other church allowed sexual abuse of children on such a massive scale. Could the media establishment's pro-U.N., anti-religious bias have anything to do with the stunning discrepancy? "

Child sex book given out at U.N. summit


massive sexual abuse of children in Africa,


10 posted on 10/31/2002 4:00:59 PM PST by backhoe
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IN 5 DAYS, THEY'LL BE VOTING DEMOCRAT

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TODAY TO HELP TAKE BACK THE SENATE?

TakeBackCongress.org

A resource for conservatives who want a Republican majority in the Senate

11 posted on 10/31/2002 4:14:51 PM PST by ffrancone
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To: kitkat
The UN has a rather lovely piece of land in NY, too. Whatever can we put there when they are forced to give it BACK to the U.S.? What to do? What to do?

Soccer Fields. Build a soccer program so we'll be able to kick the world's @$$ in everything.

12 posted on 10/31/2002 4:35:29 PM PST by Oschisms
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
One could only hope
13 posted on 10/31/2002 4:42:30 PM PST by Texas_Jarhead
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
Death to the UN!
14 posted on 10/31/2002 4:52:57 PM PST by Henrietta
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl

15 posted on 10/31/2002 4:57:30 PM PST by Dan Day
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To: backhoe
A happy headline is welcome these days. (^:

Like President Reagan before him, he keeps his eye on the main issues, and delegates minor dependant ones. Like Mr. Reagan's secretary of state, George Schultz, he is looking ahead about five years, and to what may be practically achievable on such a reasonably ambitious time scale. Cheney, Rumsfeld and Rice are also five-year people: a much longer period and you are no longer engaging with reality, a much shorter and you are being controlled by events.

Few of their critics see beyond the moment, which is all very well if you have no responsibilities.

Just say "NO!" to Freepers who put their pride before the country and stay home or vote third party this election day.

16 posted on 10/31/2002 5:55:06 PM PST by Ragtime Cowgirl
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
the Security of America is up to the U.N ?
17 posted on 10/31/2002 6:39:03 PM PST by USA21
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
iF PEOPLE want the TRUTH look up, the Treaties Compliance Agency that make sure that America Compliance to all Treaties U.N CONTROL AMERICA
18 posted on 10/31/2002 6:54:26 PM PST by USA21
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
a package of 34 treaties, all of which were ratified by a show of hands -- no recorded vote.
19 posted on 10/31/2002 7:10:19 PM PST by USA21
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To: USA21
You must be reading a different article. No one's claiming that US security is dependent upon the UN....just the opposite. The author is stating that the UN's survival is dependent on the US.

No, I don't want us in the UN.
No, I don't think we can act alone in today's world.
Reality bites.

20 posted on 10/31/2002 7:37:47 PM PST by Ragtime Cowgirl
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To: Ragtime Cowgirl
Army gives Fort Baker to National Park Service(FOUNDATIONS AT THE PRESIDIO,UNITED NATIONS) SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS ^ | Oct. 31, 2002 | By Marilee Enge

Posted on 10/31/2002 7:58 PM PST by USA21

Army gives Fort Baker to National Park Service

With San Francisco's skyline shimmering across a perfect blue bay, the Army formally handed Fort Baker over to the National Park Service on Wednesday in the last swords-to-plowshares land transfer in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

The 91-acre waterfront site near Sausalito joins the Presidio, Fort Mason, Alcatraz and five other military posts that once guarded the Bay from enemy attack and are now regarded collectively as an urban parkland jewel that sets a national standard for military conversions.

"This is truly one of the prettiest places in the Army," said Army Col. Richard Conte. "Fort Baker will be a remarkable national park, with its rich history and natural setting."

Founded just after the Civil War, the post was once intended as part of a "triangle" harbor defense, along with the Presidio and Alcatraz. But it never launched an attack and was better known for the stately red-roofed mansions that housed Army brass in a village-like setting between oak-studded hills and the Bay. As recently as last year, it was home to an Army training regiment.

Fort Baker's 47 historic buildings, most dating from the turn of the century, are slated to become a retreat and conference center, similar to Asilomar in Monterey.

The nonprofit Fort Baker Institute will conduct public programs relating to conservation, recreation and resource protection, in keeping with the Park Service's mission. And park officials plan to restore a small beach along Horseshoe Cove, improve hiking trails and add picnic areas.

The event also marked the 30th anniversary of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, established by Congress in 1972 to protect the dwindling wildlands around the Bay and bring national parks to a city population. It is the largest national park in an urban setting, with 75,500 acres stretching from Tomales Bay south to the Phleger Estate in Woodside.

Two of the most pivotal figures in its creation, parks advocate Amy Meyer and former Sierra Club president Dr. Edgar Wayburn, received a standing ovation Wednesday when park Superintendent Brian O'Neill introduced them as the "mother and father" of the recreation area. The two collaborated with the late Rep. Phil Burton to make the park a reality.

"It, in effect, brings parks to the people," said Wayburn, 96. "It's something we had never done before."

As an honor guard retired the Army flag Wednesday morning, the Air Force Band of the Golden West played "America the Beautiful," appropriate on a day when sunshine sparkled on the Bay and dignitaries welcomed the newest addition to a park system established to protect America's wild and beautiful places.

"It's so extraordinary," said Doug McConnell, who was chosen as master of ceremonies because his TV show "Bay Area Backroads" frequently celebrates the lands in the recreation area. "It's easy to take it for granted."

21 posted on 10/31/2002 8:01:39 PM PST by USA21
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To: belmont_mark
I hope they can find office space in one of the desolate, third world countries they claim to be helping. The incentive? ACRES of that free parking they love so much!
22 posted on 10/31/2002 8:28:30 PM PST by dogbowl
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Comment #23 Removed by Moderator

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