Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

CHOSIN RESERVOIR - Saga of Epic Heroism
VFW Magazine ^ | Unknown | B. Gordon Wheeler

Posted on 11/29/2002 5:36:59 AM PST by SAMWolf

Between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15, 1950, the 1st Marine and 7th Infantry divisions took on 100,000 Chinese (25,000 of whom died) during a 70-mile fighting withdrawal in bitterly cold North Korea.

Thanksgiving Day, 1950, began relatively well for Marine Cpl. Harley Trueblood. Cooks were dishing out roast turkey with all the trimmings—the first food except cold C rations that he and the other leathernecks in Co. B, 1st Tank Bn. of Col. Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller’s 1st Marine Division had eaten since they had stormed Blue Beach at Inchon two months earlier.

The enemy was on the run. Trueblood and the other Marines who had been advancing steadily along a narrow, twisting mountain road onto the 4,000-foot-high Chosin Reservoir were too savvy to buy Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s declaration that U.S. troops would be heading home by Christmas.

But it did seem that American fighting men once again had demonstrated what firepower, rugged training, combat experience and incomparable courage could accomplish.

Everything quickly proved too good to be true. Bitter winds sweeping down from Siberia dropped temperatures so far below zero that steaming slices of turkey froze between mess kit and mouth. "What you had was kind of a turkey popsicle," Trueblood recalls.

Hours later, the 20-year-old Marine found himself crouched in an icy ditch outside the town of Yudam-ni, fighting for his life. Waves of Communist Chinese Forces (CCF)—divisions that Eighth Army intelligence officers, under the command of Maj. Gen. Charles Willoughby, had insisted were not there or were present in numbers so small as to be inconsequential—had struck the most decisive blow of the Korean War.

Forward March

To achieve his goal of ending the war quickly, MacArthur ordered an offensive as daring and unorthodox as his bold amphibious landing at Inchon. "Two major field forces, the Eighth Army and the X Corps, with the 1st Marine Division as one of its major components, would drive north on opposite sides of the Korean peninsula," said Lt. Gen. Alpha L. Bowser, division operations officer.

"The North Korean army would be pushed across the Yalu River. Korea would be unified under a non-Communist government in Seoul. Then everybody except a few military advisors for South Korea’s new army could go home."

At first, the offensive went like clockwork. "Some U.S. Army battalions [elements of the 7th Infantry Divison’s 32nd Regiment] and South Korea’s 7th Inf. Regt. [its recon platoon] actually reached the ice-rimmed Yalu," said Bowser, who was then a colonel.

But farther south, below the Chosin Reservoir, Bowser and other U.S. officers, including Brig. Gen. Bankson Holcomb, 1st Marine Division intelligence officer, were worried about the dangers of staging a major offensive through forbidding terrain during the coldest winter of the decade.

Bowser, who had fought at Bougainville and in a dozen other WWII battles, and had perfected plans for the tricky Inchon landing, was skeptical of MacArthur’s winter offensive. "We should have let the enemy impale himself on our lines all winter, instead of moving forward," Bowser believes. So he deliberately slowed the division’s advance toward Chosin.

"I decided my tactic would be to build up supply points and drag my feet long enough to get them set up along the main supply route," Bowser relates. "I think Smith [the division commander, Maj. Gen. Oliver P. Smith] was aware of what I was doing, and he let me get away with it up to a point.

"But then X Corps called me and said, ‘We’ve seen you move a division across Korea on 15 minutes’ notice.’ I got the message and started moving north."

Disaster in Waiting

"In the first big attack, the enemy came at us in a huge mass at night," said Frank Kerr, 2nd Bn., 5th Regt., 1st Marine Div., combat photographer.

Initially, there seemed no way for U.S. forces to avoid being overrun. "Our machine gunners took such a fearful toll that enemy bodies had to be pushed out of the way, during lulls in the fighting, to open up fields of fire," Trueblood recalls. "Then another wave would come, charging over bodies already freezing."

Despite the subzero temperatures, the barrels of automatic weapons glowed red hot from constant use. There was no front or rear—and no safe haven—because the enemy had penetrated almost every American position.

Army units faced an equally grim situation. "I figured out later we had 32 GIs trying to hold a ridge against two whole enemy regiments," said Edward Reeves, a member of the ill-fated 31st Inf. Regt., 7th Inf. Div. "The first troops that hit us were wearing white camouflage uniforms, and so were we. They were carrying Thompson submachine guns and M-1 rifles they had captured from the Nationalists [Chinese]. You couldn’t rely on the sound of the weapons to tell where the enemy was at night."

Fighting All The Way

For the soldiers battling their way back down the roads beside the reservoir, the battered town of Hagaru was like a citadel. There was even an airstrip where pilots risked constant enemy fire to bring in ammo and take out the wounded.

Some 5,381 of the most critically wounded were flown out. The remainder came out strapped to M-26 tanks, truck fenders, piled onto sleds or carried by GIs in only slightly better shape.

"At Chosin, we didn’t consider ourselves wounded until we could no longer fire a rifle," said Pfc. Jack Erickson, a Marine reservist called up and assigned to C Co., 2nd Bn., 5th Marines—just in time for the battle. "I got hit on the second night. At first I was taken down to a MASH unit, but the enemy was really hitting all around so they loaded us on a truck like cordwood. The road was like an ice cube, and the truck tipped over. Some of us took off on foot and made it to Hagaru."

But Hagaru was only the first stop in a running battle that made a formula for survival out of Gen. Smith’s assertion: "We are simply attacking in another direction" (hyped to "Retreat, hell" by correspondents).

"I’ll never forget when we were encircled and Ned Almond (X Corps commander) flew in to discuss how we could get out," said Holcomb.

"He told Smith, ‘I suggest that you destroy all your artillery, burn your supplies and let every man go out on foot by himself. I have no doubt that a lot will get through to the south.’ There was a stunned silence.

"Then Smith said very quietly but firmly, ‘General, I don’t accept that suggestion at all. The 1st Marine Division is going to fight its way out, we’re going to take all our equipment and wounded and as many dead as we can. If we can’t get out that way, this division will never fight as a unit again.’ Almond just said, ‘All right, general,’ then left and we never saw him again."

It took 22 hours of fierce fighting—and 600 more American casualties—to get from Hagaru to the next way point, Koto-ri. "Enemy units fought savagely," Erickson recalls, "mounting attacks from ridges towering above the road, setting ambushes and executing the wounded when hospital trucks could be isolated from the rest of the column."

Below Koto-ri, the biggest challenge was a 1,500-foot-deep chasm where the enemy had dynamited the lone bridge. "Crossing the chasm became a classic of engineering improvisation under fire," Trueblood said.

Eight 2-ton Treadway bridge sections, secured to the biggest parachutes that could be found, were dropped from C-119 Flying Boxcars flying at only 800 feet. "Marine patrols recovered six of the sections, but still came up short by seven feet," the leatherneck recalled.

The solution of engineers with the 1st Amphibious Tractor Bn. was grisly. They built a timber frame at one end of the bridge and filled it to road level.

"There wasn’t enough loose rock for the bulldozers to scrape up, but there were enough dead enemy soldiers frozen hard as rocks stacked up alongside the road, so they bulldozed them in and covered them up with dirt and we started to move," said the tank crewman, who by then was among the walking-but-still-fighting wounded.

‘I’d do it over again’

On Dec. 9, on a bitterly cold ridge just north of Chinhung-ni, the 12,000-strong 1st Marine Division did come out intact. It had battled its way 35 blood-stained miles from its point of farthest advance, above Yudam-ni, south to Chinhung-ni, where it linked up with a relief force moving north.

Was "Retreat, hell!" truly hype?

"Based on the fundamental measure of war as an extension of political struggle, Chosin was a defeat," said former Ohio senator John Glenn, who as a Marine combat pilot in Korea shot down three MiG’s near the war’s end.

"But for the courageous men of Chosin, and in the proud history of the U.S. Marine Corps, it is remembered, rightfully so, as a victory—a saga of heroism and suffering written by an extraordinarily tenacious, superbly disciplined combat division."

Chosin vets echo those sentiments. Says Trueblood: "South Korea wouldn’t have lived in freedom for 50 years if we hadn’t gone there." Reeves, a quadruple amputee from his wounds sustained at Chosin, believes every battle in Korea was a significant victory.

"When I was over there for the Olympics [1988] and saw how far they had come, and had people come out onto the street to thank an American vet in a wheelchair, it was worth it," he says. "If I had to do it all over again, yes, I would."



TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: chosin; chosinreservoir; koreanwar; marines
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-60 next last
BATTLE CASUALTIES

7th Infantry Division

Killed in Action 2,657

Wounded in Action 354

1st Marine Division

Killed in Action 718

Missing in Action 192

Wounded in Action 3,508

Note: The Marines also suffered 7,313 losses to frostbite and indigestion ailments.

Battlefield Valor

Thirteen Americans earned the Medal of Honor in and around Chosin (Toktong Pass, Koto-Ri, Yudam-ni, Hagaru-ri):

Marine Capt. William E. Barber

Marine Pfc. William B. Baugh*

Marine Pvt. Hector A. Cafferata, Jr.

Marine Lt. Col. Raymond G. Davis

Army Lt. Col. Don C. Faith, Jr.*

Navy Lt. Thomas J. Hudner

Marine Sgt. James E. Johnson*

Marine Staff Sgt. Robert S. Kennemore

Marine 1st Lt. Frank N. Mitchell*

Marine Maj. Reginald R. Myers

Army Lt. Col. John U.D. Page*

Marine Capt. Carl L. Sitter

Marine Staff Sgt. William G. Windrich*

* Posthumous

1 posted on 11/29/2002 5:36:59 AM PST by SAMWolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: souris; SpookBrat; Victoria Delsoul; MistyCA; AntiJen; SassyMom; bluesagewoman; GatorGirl; radu; ...
My Thnaks to SpookBrat for the research and idea for this thread.
2 posted on 11/29/2002 5:37:57 AM PST by SAMWolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf; SpookBrat
Great idea, SpookBrat!! I hope the both of you had a wonderful Thanksgiving!! I'm over here freezing, but hey..that's life, huh? LOL!! Hope you both have a great day!
3 posted on 11/29/2002 5:50:52 AM PST by MoJo2001
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
My DI way back in the early 60's told us aobut Korea, good read, thanks.
4 posted on 11/29/2002 5:55:27 AM PST by 2timothy3.16
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
You flatter me. LOL You did all the work. I just thought it was an important story worth remembering and learning about.
5 posted on 11/29/2002 5:57:43 AM PST by SpookBrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: MoJo2001
It's FREEZING here too, but I hate to complain. It's Florida for God sake...I can't believe how cold it is.
6 posted on 11/29/2002 5:58:33 AM PST by SpookBrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: MoJo2001
I hope you enjoyed your Thansgiving MoJo.
7 posted on 11/29/2002 5:58:54 AM PST by SAMWolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: SpookBrat
No I'm not, you gave me enough material to work with.
8 posted on 11/29/2002 5:59:32 AM PST by SAMWolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: SpookBrat
Freezing weather..GO AWAY! COME BACK SOME OTHER DAY! (Not sure when I'd want ya to come back, but stay away..LOL)!! Florida is cold? Well, it's time for me to move to Tahiti. I know it's not cold there!! LOL!
9 posted on 11/29/2002 6:00:00 AM PST by MoJo2001
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
I sure did! I ate a lot! I watched the most boring football game known to man. I helped my neighbor's relatives read the road sign that seemed a bit confusing like: NO PARKING ON THIS SIDE OF THE STREET! Not sure what was so stressful. Perhaps, it was the "NO" at the beginning! LOL!
10 posted on 11/29/2002 6:01:12 AM PST by MoJo2001
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

Comment #11 Removed by Moderator

To: SAMWolf
Timely post.....an often overlooked conflict, Korea.....1st of our "Police" actions and 1st of our defeats.....but not for lack of courage.
12 posted on 11/29/2002 6:07:24 AM PST by pgobrien
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
I once knew a man who had faced the advancing Chinese Red Army in Korea. He claimed that during one battle which lasted from shortly after sundown to about sunrise he "melted out" two barrels on his .50 cal mg, and was well on the way to doing the same to the third when the sun came up and the battle stopped. Later, when I watched him on the mg range and he excised the target lines from his target at 500 yards, I figured he just might have been telling the truth. That .50 was like an extended pointing finger to him. Never saw anything like it, before or since.
13 posted on 11/29/2002 6:11:34 AM PST by logos
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
Never forget. I tell the students in my classrooms about the Chosin Reservoir Battle every year (and I don't teach History). Incredible bravery...
14 posted on 11/29/2002 6:16:39 AM PST by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
Thanks so much for posting this. One of the things that I'm thankful for this
Thanksgiving is the bravery of the common American. It is our greatest strength, both then and now.
15 posted on 11/29/2002 6:20:37 AM PST by FLAUSA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: pgobrien
"Timely post.....an often overlooked conflict, Korea.....1st of our "Police" actions and 1st of our defeats.....but not for lack of courage.

Bump! Thank you.

16 posted on 11/29/2002 6:22:04 AM PST by SpookBrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: xzins
*Ping*
17 posted on 11/29/2002 6:22:51 AM PST by SpookBrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf; SpookBrat
Thanks !


18 posted on 11/29/2002 6:30:38 AM PST by MeekOneGOP
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
"But for the courageous men of Chosin, and in the proud history of the U.S. Marine Corps, it is remembered, rightfully so, as a victory—a saga of heroism and suffering written by an extraordinarily tenacious, superbly disciplined combat division."

Chosin vets echo those sentiments. Says Trueblood: "South Korea wouldn’t have lived in freedom for 50 years if we hadn’t gone there." Reeves, a quadruple amputee from his wounds sustained at Chosin, believes every battle in Korea was a significant victory. "When I was over there for the Olympics [1988] and saw how far they had come, and had people come out onto the street to thank an American vet in a wheelchair, it was worth it," he says. "If I had to do it all over again, yes, I would."

Hopefully all Americans will remember these men...and what they did there... And not let the VA be defunded or medical care for combat vets be cut or allowed to wither away to substandard levels...By any President regardless of his political party affiliations.

19 posted on 11/29/2002 6:41:15 AM PST by joesnuffy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
The frozen chosen of the Chosin. I remember reading about Capt. William Barber... company commander I believe.

Held a hilltop for a extended period of time so that the Marines could continue their fighting retreat.

Task-force Drysdale comes to mind... cut to shreds.

MacArthur made only 2 major blunders in his career. His lack of education about airpower in 1941 and his underestimation of the Chinee in Korea.

The Marines did not panic and stayed a cohesive, fighting force. God bless them!

20 posted on 11/29/2002 6:49:15 AM PST by johnny7
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: logos; Joe Brower
Ping to #13!
That's some shootin'.
21 posted on 11/29/2002 6:51:41 AM PST by HiJinx
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: MeneMeneTekelUpharsin
Thank God for teachers like you.

If any of the higher ups give you any trouble, you can always drag out the almost hackneyed quote:

"Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it"....Santyana;

then you can add:
"...those who do learn will find new ways to screw up."

It's an incredible saga, especially the Koto-Ri story. I just read the part about the bridge replacement to my son. It was special to me, as I was in the engeneers. I served in Viet-Nam, and ours was a cake walk compared to what these guys went through. God bless them and you.

(BTW, you are added to my list of things to be thankful for during Thanksgiving.)
22 posted on 11/29/2002 6:55:40 AM PST by VMI70
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: pgobrien
.....an often overlooked conflict, Korea.....1st of our "Police" actions and 1st of our defeats.....but not for lack of courage.

So you define Korea, the place where 54,246 American service men and women lost their lives as a "conflict?" Further, you suggest it was the "1st of our defeats."

I'd really like to know how you consider Korea a "defeat" and also what subsequent defeats you're referring to.

Semper Fi
23 posted on 11/29/2002 6:57:01 AM PST by oh8eleven
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
God bless America and the brave warriors who have kept her free. I've heard stories from Korean Vets, some who have passed on. Most of the stories are awesome tales of courage. I also found out how fierce the Turks were in battle from the Vets.
24 posted on 11/29/2002 7:01:42 AM PST by AndrewC
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
bump
25 posted on 11/29/2002 7:03:49 AM PST by Soaring Feather
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf

26 posted on 11/29/2002 7:16:12 AM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
To all veterans, from all wars and the periods of peace between:

THANK YOU. I CAN NEVER ADEQUATELY EXPRESS THE GRATEFULNESS I FEEL FOR THOSE THAT HAVE RISKED THEIR LIVES, FREEDOM AND HAPPINESS FOR THE IDEALS THAT ALLOW ALL THE REST OF US TO FLOURISH IN THIS FABULOUS COUNTRY. GIANTS WALK AMONG US.
27 posted on 11/29/2002 7:16:42 AM PST by WorkingClassFilth
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
My uncle, Marine pfc Carl C. Edwards, Jr., fought at the Chosin with the 1st Marine Division, sustained frostbite on both feet which still disables him today. He has been unable to obtain much assistance from the Veterans Administration. Meanwhile, the son of a friend of my mother's was briefly in the army in the Gulf War theatre; he came home complaining of unspecified ailments (possible 'Gulf War syndrome'); this guy is a druggie, thief and child abuser. He recieved a 100% disability. A grateful nation gives it's thanks
28 posted on 11/29/2002 7:17:26 AM PST by notdownwidems
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
My father in law was in the Army in Korea. Some of the time he was a truck driver, some of the time he was a Ma Deuce crewman. He lost all his high-frequency hearing from that experience.

He tells a story of how he and some other soldiers were on a winter night patrol (rotated footsoldier duty among the gun crews) with an M2 carbine (.30 carbine, select-fire). It was very cold, and foggy. When they finished their evening walk, my father in law said "Let's see what these carbines will do." He took aim at a tree and pulled the trigger. "POW" was the result... a single cartridge fired.

In the cold fog, ice had formed on the weapon's action, preventing it from cycling. All the other M2s were likewise. If they had run across the enemy, they would have been done for.

He kept close attention to the condition of his weapon after that.

29 posted on 11/29/2002 7:46:52 AM PST by Oberon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
Senator Dianne Feinstein should be forced to read this, once each month, to all the Senators.
30 posted on 11/29/2002 7:53:33 AM PST by gatex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: pgobrien
Timely post.....an often overlooked conflict, Korea.....1st of our "Police" actions and 1st of our defeats.....but not for lack of courage.

Seems you need a history lesson.

31 posted on 11/29/2002 8:00:43 AM PST by AmusedBystander
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
Great ThanksgivingDay Bump.
32 posted on 11/29/2002 8:07:16 AM PST by txzman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: oh8eleven
It was neither a victory nor a defeat. The "conflict", which was never called a war, ended by a truce and both sides stood down. That truce has endured for almost 50 years now. Actually 49 and a half years. I served in combat in both the Korean conflict and Viet Nam. To me Korea was much harsher due to the freezing weather.
33 posted on 11/29/2002 8:15:01 AM PST by rstevens
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: AmusedBystander
Timely post.....an often overlooked conflict..........but not for lack of courage.

I bumped this person's post because of the first and last part of his/her post. It's an overlooked war and these men showed great courage and valor.

34 posted on 11/29/2002 8:16:36 AM PST by SpookBrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf; Sparta
Initially, there seemed no way for U.S. forces to avoid being overrun. "Our machine gunners took such a fearful toll that enemy bodies had to be pushed out of the way, during lulls in the fighting, to open up fields of fire," Trueblood recalls.

Bump

35 posted on 11/29/2002 8:20:17 AM PST by facedown
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
Thank you Sam.
36 posted on 11/29/2002 8:27:25 AM PST by Ragin1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
Excellent post again, SAMWolf. Bookmarked and I'm activating the ping list.
37 posted on 11/29/2002 8:27:31 AM PST by Sparta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf; SpookBrat
Wow you guys.....great thread...great idea, Spooky!
38 posted on 11/29/2002 8:33:37 AM PST by MistyCA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: sphinx; Toirdhealbheach Beucail; curmudgeonII; roderick; Notforprophet; river rat; csvset; ...
Western Civlization Military History ping!!!

Battle of Chosin (Korean War)

If you want on or off, let me know.
39 posted on 11/29/2002 8:45:32 AM PST by Sparta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
See Marine Frankie Gross' Korean War Ballads....
CLICK-HERE!!!!!
40 posted on 11/29/2002 10:00:53 AM PST by gunnyg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gunnyg
Thanks for the Link.
41 posted on 11/29/2002 10:05:30 AM PST by SAMWolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
Lotsa great Pics--1st Marine Division at Chosin!
CLICK-HERE!!!!!
42 posted on 11/29/2002 10:18:15 AM PST by gunnyg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
One More
CLICK-HERE!!!!!
43 posted on 11/29/2002 10:21:14 AM PST by gunnyg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gunnyg
Thnaks. Some great pics there.
44 posted on 11/29/2002 10:23:40 AM PST by SAMWolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
" The North Korean army would be pushed across the Yalu River. Korea would be unified under a non-Communist government in Seoul. Then everybody except a few military advisors for South Korea’s new army could go home." At first, the offensive went like clockwork."

There's a significant omission in this story. That is that the 10 Chinese Red divs. weren't supposed to be there according to some folks in DC. Officially what X corps and the 8th Army were facing was the NKPA, reports of the Red Chinese presence were dismissed as nonsence.

It was Smith and Puller in X corps that prepared for attack in all directions of movement, when on the move, that allowed the forces to defeat the enemy's plans. They didn't underestimate the enemy, that was the communists, and not limited to the NKPA.

"The first troops that hit us were wearing white camouflage uniforms..."

LOL. They were bedsheets and their insulation from the cold was heroin.

45 posted on 11/29/2002 11:14:29 AM PST by spunkets
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SpookBrat
Hey, Spook, thanks for the ping.

I think I have a Chosin veteran in my church. He has 3 purple hearts from that war, believe it or not.

He testified at church the other night....He said, "The 3rd time I said, 'Lord, I can't take any more.'" He then went on to declare that the Lord spoke to him and said, "This'll be the last time."

He's a treasure in the church.

Z
46 posted on 11/29/2002 12:51:45 PM PST by xzins
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Sparta
thanks Sparta
47 posted on 11/29/2002 1:03:52 PM PST by Semaphore Heathcliffe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Sparta
Thanks for the bump and the pings, Sparta.
48 posted on 11/29/2002 7:06:14 PM PST by SAMWolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
Your welcome and thank you for posting this display of heroism. I just hope it's still there if we ever run into a similar situation again.
49 posted on 11/29/2002 7:09:57 PM PST by Sparta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: Sparta
The American soldier always seems to come through, even if the American politician doesn't.
50 posted on 11/29/2002 7:11:41 PM PST by SAMWolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-60 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson