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Was Martin Luther King a Communist?
sierratimes.com ^ | 01.20.02 | By Chuck Morse

Posted on 01/20/2003 8:04:08 AM PST by paltz

This writer does not question that the late, great Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was deservedly one of the most monumental and pivotal figures of the 20th century. King's inspirational leadership, oratory, and profession of non-violence may have very well saved this nation from a race war. I am grateful that the Rev. Dr. King emerged as the most visible and influential leader of the civil rights movement as opposed to an advocate of violence such as Malcolm X or a radical communist.

No, the Rev. Dr. King was not a communist, however, he did business with communists and was influenced by them. While this is a delicate subject to broach, especially given the martyrdom and lionization of Dr. King to virtual sainthood status, the subject must nevertheless be broached for a better understanding of some of the darker forces that infiltrated and sabotaged an organically pro American, conservative, and Christian civil rights movement.

Martin Luther King surrounded himself with communists from the beginning of his career. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed in 1957 and led by Dr. King, also had as its vice president Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth who was at the same time president of the Southern Conference Education Fund, an identified communist front according to the Legislative Committee on un-American Activities, Louisiana (Report April 13, 1964 pp. 31-38). The field director of SCEF was Carl Braden, a known communist agitator who also sponsored the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, which counted as a member Lee Harvey Oswald, the communist assassin of President Kennedy. Dr. King maintained correspondence with Carl Braden. Also on the board of SCLC was Bayard Rustin, a known communist.

In 1957, Dr. King addressed the Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tenn. which was originally called Commonwealth College until it was sited by the House Committee on un-American Activities as being a communist front (April 27, 1949). The committee found that Commonwealth, later the Highlander Folk School, was using religion as a way to infiltrate the African-American community by, among other techniques, comparing the texts of the New Testament to those of Karl Marx. Dr. King knew many of the known communists associated with the Highlander school.

In 1960, Dr. King hired Hunter Pitts O'Dell, a communist official to work at SCLC. According to the St. Louis Globe Democrat (Oct. 26, 1962) "A Communist has infiltrated the top administrative post in the Rev. Martin Luther King's SCLC. He is Jack H. O'Dell, acting executive director of conference activities in the southeastern states including Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana." Dr. King fired O'Dell when this information emerged but rehired him as head of the SCLC New York office.

Dr. King was praised by communists and promoted by fellow travelers. Communist official Benjamin J. Davis, in the Worker (Nov. 10, 1963) describes Dr. King as "a brilliant and practical leader who articulates the philosophy of the Negro people, for direct non-violent mass action." The Worker article goes on to describe Dr. King as "The foremost advocate of the solution of social problems through nonviolent methods of mass action."

In his own words, Martin Luther King expresses a communist outlook in his book "Stride Toward Freedom" He states that "in spite of the shortcomings of his analysis, Marx had raised some basic questions. I was deeply concerned from my early teen days about the gulf between superfluous wealth and abject poverty, and my reading of Marx made me even more conscious of this gulf. Although modern American capitalism has greatly reduced the gap through social reforms, there was still need for a better distribution of wealth. Moreover, Marx had revealed the danger of the profit motive as the sole basis of an economic system…"

It's strikes me as sad that Dr. King, the most influential leader of the civil rights movement wasn't an advocate of the capitalism that was already leading to such great economic strides amongst African-Americans in his day. By advocating a "better distribution of wealth" he meant state control over the economy. He sneered at "the profit motive" without explaining why African-Americans shouldn't seek to profit to the best of their ability. These ideas would later on open the floodgates to radical African-American leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, H. Rap Brown, the Black Panthers, and the burning and looting of African-American neighborhoods, the institutionalizing of welfare programs, the perpetuation of poverty, the destruction of the African-American family, drugs, violence, racism, and crime.

In "Stride Toward Freedom" Dr. King states that "In short, I read Marx as I read all of the influential historical thinkers – from a dialectical point of view, combining a partial yea and a partial no…My readings of Marx convinced me that truth is found neither in Marxism nor in traditional capitalism. Each represents a partial truth. Historically capitalism failed to see truth in collective enterprise and Marxism failed to see the truth in individual enterprise…The Kingdom of G-d is neither the thesis of individual enterprise nor the antithesis of collective enterprise, but a synthesis which reconciles the truths of both."

By stating that he views things "from a dialectical point of view" Dr. King is thinking like communists such as Marx, Lenin, or Stalin. The dialectic always and can only lead to authoritarianism. Man cannot, for example, be half free and half slave, either he is free or he is a slave. Dr. King's imperious stand toward his own people would stand in contrast to an advocacy of genuine freedom, the development of self-rule, self-sufficiency, private ownership, and the accumulation of capital resulting from achievement. Dr. King was not advocating the American system of free market capitalism. Instead, he stood for a system that has stunted the growth of African-Americans as well as the rest of us.

Much remains to be said regarding the communist infiltration of the civil rights movement as a whole. The communists sought to use African-Americans as cannon fodder in their revolution by stoking hatred and racial division. Much blood and suffering is on the hands of these communist agitators. The story of how the left-wing predominantly white establishment promoted communists in the African-American community as a means of continuing an informal system of oppression also cries out to be told.


Chuck Morse is the author of "Why I'm a Right-Wing Extremist" and, coming soon, "The Difference between Us and Them".


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 01/20/2003 8:04:08 AM PST by paltz
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To: paltz
Nice post. King's interests and the communists' interest were conveniently aligned. King was not averse to using that to advance his cause. People don't want to hear this message, despite its historical truth.
2 posted on 01/20/2003 8:12:44 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: paltz
Shhhhhhhhhhhhh... It's against the law to speak the truth
3 posted on 01/20/2003 8:15:14 AM PST by Lexington Green
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
Nice post? The author uses extremely dubious sources, including guilt by association and the "findings" of the rabidly pro-segreationist Louisiana Un-American Committees, to smear some great civil rights leaders like Fred Shuttlesworth and King with the commie tag. BTW, the stuff on Highlander is ancient and disproven. It was not a "Communist" organization.

Now....it is true that King, much to his discredit, had at least one close Communist advisor named Levin...but the rest of this article is a grand smear job. One wishes people like Morse would do original research on King using primary sources rather than trotting out the discredited musings of old-time segregationists who, of course, wanted to smear King at all costs.

4 posted on 01/20/2003 8:22:37 AM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
Reagan was well aware of King's Communist background, when the President named a national holiday after him, but at that point..(I think '81 or '82) King had been lifted up with the civil rights martyrs and anything negative was on the backburner.
5 posted on 01/20/2003 8:24:21 AM PST by paltz
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To: paltz
"Much remains to be said regarding the communist infiltration of the civil rights movement as a whole. The communists sought to use African-Americans as cannon fodder in their revolution by stoking hatred and racial division."

Yes, it has been known for years that Dr. King was uncomfortably close to the Communist enemies of all Americans. And the civil rights movement opened the gate to very bad forces who over the last forty years conducted an attack on America from within.

Civil rights, however, are something which are consistent with a conservative view of the Constituion (As opposed to the Eleanor Roosevelt's "Human Rights") Civil rights are and were something every American should expect to have guaranteed by the Bill of Rights, yet the marches, sit-ins and disruptions of the 1960s were necessary in order to secure those rights for many Americans.

To paraphrase FReeper rdb3, why was is it that a Dr. King was even necessary at that point in our history? In a perverse and unfortunate way the democrat segregationists like Byrd, Wallace et al. were one cause of the introduction of hard left politics into American life.

6 posted on 01/20/2003 8:29:11 AM PST by BenLurkin (Socialism is immoral.)
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To: Austin Willard Wright
This is general knowledge in the poltical realm. Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton did not just get their socialist views overnight. They were cultivated in the same environment that was furtheer developed during the late 60's. It's only called a "smear job" because of king's current martyrdom. However, it is fair to criticize martyrs...wouldn't you say?
7 posted on 01/20/2003 8:29:38 AM PST by paltz
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To: Austin Willard Wright
Do a Google Search on Martin Luther King and Communist and see what you find. the associations are much deeper then you indicate. BTW, Harry Belafonte, Castro and commie lover then and now, was King's bag man, collecting money in NY and bringing it down to King. The associations are there and they are real.


On Labor Day, 1957, a special meeting was attended by Martin Luther King and four others at a strange institution called the Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee. The Highlander Folk School was a Communist front, having been founded by Myles Horton (Communist Party organizer for Tennessee) and Don West (Communist Party organizer for North Carolina). The leaders of this meeting with King were the aforementioned Horton and West, along with Abner Berry and James Dumbrowski, all open and acknowledged members of the Communist Party, USA. The agenda of the meeting was a plan to tour the Southern states to initiate demonstrations and riots.

From 1955 to 1960, Martin Luther King's associate, advisor, and personal secretary was one Bayard Rustin. In 1936 Rustin joined the Young Communist League at New York City College. Convicted of draft-dodging, he went to prison for two years in 1944. On January 23, 1953 the "Los Angeles Times" reported his conviction and sentencing to jail for 60 days for lewd vagrancy and homosexual perversion. Rustin attended the 16th Convention of the Communist Party, USA in February, 1957. One month later, he and King founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, or SCLC for short. The president of the SCLC was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The vice-president of the SCLC was the Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, who was also the president of an identified Communist front known as the Southern Conference Educational Fund, an organization whose field director, a Mr. Carl Braden, was simultaneously a national sponsor of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, of which you may have heard. The program director of the SCLC was the Reverend Andrew Young, in more recent years Jimmy Carter's ambassador to the UN and mayor of Atlanta. Young, by the way, was trained at the Highlander Folk School, previously mentioned.

Soon after returning from a trip to Moscow in 1958, Rustin organized the first of King's famous marches on Washington. The official organ of the Communist Party, "The Worker,- - openly declared the march to be a Communist project. Although he left King's employ as secretary in 1961, Rustin was called upon by King to be second in command of the much larger march on Washington which took place on August 28, 1963.

Bayard Rustin's replacement in 1961 as secretary and advisor to King was Jack O'Dell, also known as Hunter Pitts O'Dell. According to official records, in 1962 Jack O'Dell was a member of the National Committee of the Communist Party, USA. He had been listed as a Communist Party member as early as 1956. O'Dell was also given the job of acting executive director for SCLC activities for the entire Southeast, according to the St. Louis "Globe-Democrat - -of October 26, 1962. At that time, there were still some patriots in the press corps, and word of O'Dell's party membership became known.

What did King do? Shortly after the negative news reports, King fired O'Dell with much fanfare. And he then, without the fanfare, "immediately hired him again- - as director of the New York office of the SCLC, as confirmed by the "Richmond News-Leader - -of September 27, 1963. In 1963 a Black man from Monroe, North Carolina named Robert Williams made a trip to Peking, China. Exactly 20 days before King's 1963 march on Washington, Williams successfully urged Mao Tse-Tung to speak out on behalf of King's movement. Mr. Williams was also around this time maintaining his primary residence in Cuba, from which he made regular broadcasts to the southern US, three times a week, from high-power AM transmitters in Havana under the title "Radio Free Dixie." In these broadcasts, he urged violent attacks by Blacks against White Americans.

During this period, Williams wrote a book entitled "Negroes With Guns." The writer of the foreword for this book? None other than Martin Luther King, Jr. It is also interesting to note that the editors and publishers of this book were to a man all supporters of the infamous Fair Play for Cuba Committee.

According to King's biographer and sympathizer David J. Garrow, "King privately described himself as a Marxist." In his 1981 book, "The FBI and Martin Luther King, Jr.", Garrow quotes King as saying in SCLC staff meetings, "...we have moved into a new era, which must be an era of revolution.... The whole structure of American life must be changed.... We are engaged in the class struggle."

Jewish Communist Stanley Levison can best be described as King's behind-the-scenes "handler." Levison, who had for years been in charge of the secret funnelling of Soviet funds to the Communist Party, USA, was King's mentor and was actually the brains behind many of King's more successful ploys. It was Levison who edited King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom." It was Levison who arranged for a publisher. Levison even prepared King's income tax returns! It was Levison who really controlled the fund-raising and agitation activities of the SCLC. Levison wrote many of King's speeches. King described Levison as one of his "closest friends."

8 posted on 01/20/2003 8:30:45 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: paltz
If the question asked if he was a useful and or willing tool, the answer would be a resounding yes.
9 posted on 01/20/2003 8:31:40 AM PST by cynicom
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To: paltz
http://foia.fbi.gov/mlkjrrep/mlkjrrep1.pdf

A summary of MLK's FBI file.

The Freedom of Information Act is a beautiful thing. I'm amazed it ever passed, and I'm even more amazed it hasn't been repealed. Just goes to show that I guess every once in awhile, government does something right. But it's not often.
10 posted on 01/20/2003 8:38:45 AM PST by Viva Le Dissention
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To: Austin Willard Wright
The author uses extremely dubious sources, including guilt by association

No, what the author demonstrates about King is guilt OF association. Knowlingly associating and cooperating with sworn enemies of you country, for that is what communists are, is a most unpatriotic and dishonorable act, and there can be no doubt that King was guilty of it.

Guilt by association is something else. Go take a logic class to find out what it means.

11 posted on 01/20/2003 8:39:11 AM PST by traditionalist
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To: BenLurkin
"Constituion" should be "Constitution".

(Must get second cup of coffee . . .)

12 posted on 01/20/2003 8:40:32 AM PST by BenLurkin (Socialism is immoral.)
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To: traditionalist
Guilt OF instead of BY association. I love it! You are of course 100% correct, and have nailed the argument. Nice post.
13 posted on 01/20/2003 8:50:45 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: Viva Le Dissention
Saved a local copy for later viewing. Thanks for the link!
14 posted on 01/20/2003 8:52:26 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: paltz
If it looks like a duck...walks like a duck...& quacks like a duck...its probably a duck

Woo Hoo Woo Hoo Woo Hoo


15 posted on 01/20/2003 8:52:55 AM PST by joesnuffy
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
Google search? Of course, King has been smeared with the commie charge since the 1950s. Segregationists made extensive use of the Highlander photo though King never denied going to the school. Rosie Parks had also attended Highlander. I wonder why the King bashers here never bash Rosa Parks? Double standard?

As to the "Highlander is a Communist training school" the FBI was not, I repeat not, able to find any evidence to back up that claim. See footnote 37 in the following article by David Horowitz who also rejects this smear:

http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/american_quarterly/48.1horowitz.html

Now....did King have his vices. I am the first to admit that he went off the deep end when he embraced the leftist, pro-welfare Poor Peoples Movement. The early King (who voted for Ike) was a hard-hitting fighter for liberty, critic of Communism, and critic of relativism. I will post my King quote from 1957 which all those who favor the cardboard cutout theory of King chose to ignore.

The segreationists who defended *official* segregation in Montgomery and tried to smear him as a commie, however, are never criticized by the King bashers.

16 posted on 01/20/2003 8:54:16 AM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
"Fair Play for Cuba Committee"

Of Lee Harvey Oswald fame?
17 posted on 01/20/2003 8:54:44 AM PST by joesnuffy
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To: BenLurkin
The communists sought to use African-Americans as cannon fodder in their revolution by stoking hatred and racial division."

The Muslims seem to have a penchant for that tactic as well....and they have plenty of exuberant/motivated volunteers

18 posted on 01/20/2003 8:56:40 AM PST by joesnuffy
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To: traditionalist; 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
No, what the author demonstrates about King is guilt OF association.

Perfect 2 Kool, and thanks for the data! These little truths drive the King defenders nuts.

King may not have been a card-carrying member of the communist party, but there seems little doubt he was a strong communist "sympathizer."

19 posted on 01/20/2003 8:56:46 AM PST by Cuttnhorse
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To: joesnuffy
History does have a way of the darndest thinks popping up in the darndest places, doesn't it? I know of only one "Fair Play for Cuba Committee". Seems rather unlikely that there would be two. I did spot that as well.
20 posted on 01/20/2003 8:58:19 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: Cuttnhorse
Some of us don't live in a world where we feel compelled to classify Martin Luther King is a saint or Satan-reborn. I myself favor a middle ground.
21 posted on 01/20/2003 8:59:39 AM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: Cuttnhorse
In fairness, the credit goes to traditionalist for the observation, I was merely parroting it!
22 posted on 01/20/2003 8:59:50 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: Austin Willard Wright
"Some of us don't live in a world..."

What color is the sky in your world?


23 posted on 01/20/2003 9:00:36 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
Sometimes it is blue and sometimes it is gray. How about you?
24 posted on 01/20/2003 9:06:15 AM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: paltz
OK, let's suppose that EVERY member of the civil rights movement, without exception, was a card-carrying and publicly declared communist. What would this tell us except that communists can sometimes do righteous things?
25 posted on 01/20/2003 9:30:32 AM PST by Grut
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To: Austin Willard Wright
Some of us don't live in a world where we feel compelled to classify Martin Luther King is a saint or Satan-reborn. I myself favor a middle ground.

It isn't a question whether King was a saint or Satan, but that he had very real and obvious ties to a movement dedicated then and now to the overthrow of the government of the United States of America.

While many people seem to think this is ok and should be dismissed with a wink, (the "I myself favor a middle ground" types) I feel it is an important part of his legacy and should be known by his supporters as well as his detractors. He was a communist supporter and useful to the communist movement.

26 posted on 01/20/2003 10:30:52 AM PST by Cuttnhorse
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To: mhking
A submission for you rping list.
27 posted on 01/20/2003 12:03:26 PM PST by BenLurkin (Socialism is immoral.)
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To: Cuttnhorse
You simply have not proven the smear that he was a "communist supporter." This is a serious charge! As I pointed out in an earlier post of the article by Horowitz, the FBI dismissed the claim that Highlander was a "Communist training school" in any shape or form.

I have posted King's anti-Marxist comments in Stride for Freedom 1001 imes. Would you like me to do it again? The King bashers seem to never read it. Perhaps you haven't had a chance to see them yet.

28 posted on 01/20/2003 12:59:36 PM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: Austin Willard Wright
Please do post the link to King's anti-Communist quotes.

Of course, even if King had openly supported Stalin, it wouldn't have taken anything away from the justice of his fight for equality before the law for blacks.

All the civil rights martyrs belonged to the left, except perhaps James Meredith.

29 posted on 01/20/2003 1:11:12 PM PST by secretagent
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To: secretagent
I just posted it on another thread addressed to you.
30 posted on 01/20/2003 1:22:58 PM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
King was not averse to using that to advance his cause.

How did association with communists advance King's cause?

31 posted on 01/20/2003 4:16:23 PM PST by beavus (Et tu, Buttheadius? Heh-heh heh heh.)
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To: Austin Willard Wright
I just posted it on another thread addressed to you.

Indeed you did - oops!

32 posted on 01/21/2003 1:23:27 PM PST by secretagent
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To: Austin Willard Wright; paltz; 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten; traditionalist; Cuttnhorse; secretagent
As to the "Highlander is a Communist training school" the FBI was not, I repeat not, able to find any evidence to back up that claim. See footnote 37 in the following article by David Horowitz who also rejects this smear:

http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/american_quarterly/48.1horowitz.html

You're a little bit loose with the rhetoric.

First, this is an article by "Daniel" Horowitz, not David.

About this Horowitz: Daniel Horowitz is a professor of American studies and history at Smith College. His most recent book is Vance Packard and American Social Criticism (1994).

[I'm suspicious already.]

Second, what Horowitz wrote is much more revealing than what's in footnote 37:

In the fall of her junior year, Friedan took an economics course taught by Dorothy W. Douglas, Theories and Movements for Social Reconstruction. Douglas was well known at the time for her radicalism. 35 In what she wrote for Douglas, and with youthful enthusiasm characteristic of many members of her generation, Friedan sympathetically responded to the Marxist critique of capitalism as a cultural, economic, and political force. 36

Friedan also gained an education as a radical in the summer of 1941 when, following Douglas's suggestion, she participated in a writers' workshop at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee, an institution active in helping the CIO organize in the South. The school offered a series of summer institutes for fledgling journalists which, for 1939 and 1940 (but not 1941), the communist-led League of American Writers helped sponsor. For three years beginning in the fall of 1939, opponents of Highlander had sustained a vicious redbaiting attack, but a FBI investigator found no evidence of subversive activity. 37 In good Popular Front language, Friedan praised Highlander as a truly American institution that was attempting to help America to fulfill its democratic ideals. She explored the contradictions of her social position as a Jewish girl from a well-to-do family who had grown up in a class-divided Peoria, gave evidence of her hostility to the way her parents fought over issues of debt and extravagance, and described the baneful influence of the mass media on American life. Though she also acknowledged that her Smith education did "not lead to much action," she portrayed herself as someone whose radical consciousness relied on the American labor movement as the bulwark against fascism. 38 [Emphasis added]

Now let's see if there are any "Red flags" in these excerpts:

Dorothy W. Douglas?

35. In 1955 Douglas took the Fifth Amendment before HUAC as she was redbaited, accused of having been a member of a communist teachers union in the late 1930s.

Betty Friedan?

Friedan sympathetically responded to the Marxist critique of capitalism as a cultural, economic, and political force.

Friedan educated as a radical?

Friedan also gained an education as a radical in the summer of 1941 when, following Douglas's suggestion, she participated in a writers' workshop at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee, an institution active in helping the CIO organize in the South. The school offered a series of summer institutes for fledgling journalists which, for 1939 and 1940 (but not 1941), the communist-led League of American Writers helped sponsor.

Popular Front?

In good Popular Front language, Friedan praised Highlander as a truly American institution that was attempting to help America to fulfill its democratic ideals.

And what might that Popular Front be?

POPULAR FRONT: Stalinist idea developed in the 1930/40's. After the idea of the "Third Period" (a period of capitalist crisis in which every non-Stalin leftist was labeled a "social fascist") proved an utter failure, Stalin's Comintern created the Popular Front.

http://www.red-encyclopedia.org/vocab.html

Redbaiting?

Whenever I hear a college professor, especially from an institution like Smith College, go into a snit using this term I know a Communist, or a nest of the same, has just been exposed.

Class-divided Peoria?

Yeah right.

The term "FBI" appears in only one place in the footnotes of this article (not #37) and in that instance has nothing to do with the FBI declaring the Highlander Folk School free of Communist control. There is no identification of "a FBI investigator" as Horowitz wrote.

Please try to get your stuff together before posting again -- or take it over to DU where it belongs.

America's Fifth Column ... watch Steve Emerson/PBS documentary JIHAD! In America
New Link: Download 8 Mb zip file here (60 minute video)

Who is Steve Emerson?

33 posted on 01/25/2003 8:13:55 AM PST by JCG
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To: paltz
I have just been reading a recent biography of Charlie Chaplin, and the author went to the trouble of inquiring whether there is any evidence in Soviet archives of Chaplin's having been a secret member of the Communist Party (as he was accused of being during the Cold War.) Apparently, there is no such evidence.

I wonder if anybody has ever done the same with respect to Martin Luther King. I suspect not, because any author or researcher who did make such an inquiry would be risking his career.

34 posted on 01/25/2003 8:26:53 AM PST by aristeides
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To: JCG
Thanks for the correction on Horowitz. I am glad to finally meet someone who never makes mistakes!

Why are you bothering to use Friedan as an example? She was a commie scumbag and I have no intention of defending her. I guess you are throwing as much you can in my direction and seeing what sticks, is that it?

Highlander was a leftwing, often naive, organization and, in the early, years proably had communist who were involved on some levels (so did the AFL and CIO and numberless other organizations and agencies).

Jumping from this, do the laughable claim that it was "Communist training school" does not wash. I would be interested in your thoughts of the references in footnote 37. Did you read them, if so, what are your *specific* objections to the information contained in these references. That was, after all, the whole point of my message to you.

BTW, did you even read the King quote. What is your opinion on that? Just a commie trick? If so, he makes a better case against communism than most freepers! That sly dog eh?

35 posted on 01/25/2003 10:05:53 AM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: aristeides
Risking his career? Perhaps but please note that King bashing is a favorite pastime on the web. Just do a google search. Perhaps the King bashers had been unable to find evidence of secret party membership, because no such evidence exists.
36 posted on 01/25/2003 10:09:13 AM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: paltz
Question:"Was Martin Luther King a Communist?"

Answer: That is irrelevant. He was a symptom of an illness that had infected the people.

37 posted on 01/25/2003 10:14:25 AM PST by AEMILIUS PAULUS (Further, the statement assumed)
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To: Austin Willard Wright
Thanks for the correction on Horowitz. I am glad to finally meet someone who never makes mistakes!

The misidentification of Horowitz was the least of your "mistakes." Accepting what this leftist schmuck writes as truth is beyond mistake -- it's blindingly stupid. As I mentioned, he offers no proof of his claim that "a FBI investigator" cleared the Highlander School of Communist control -- yet you accept it.

Why are you bothering to use Friedan as an example?

Obviously I used what was written about her because you referred me to the fawning propaganda piece in the first place.

Highlander was a leftwing, often naive, organization and, in the early, years proably had communist who were involved on some levels (so did the AFL and CIO and numberless other organizations and agencies).

The fact that writing courses were taught there by "communist-led" organizations is enough for me, or didn't you read that in your own proffered article?

I would be interested in your thoughts of the references in footnote 37.

Footnote 37 has this to say:

37. John M. Glen, Highlander: No Ordinary School, 1932-1962 (Lexington, Ky., 1988), 47-69. I am grateful to Professor Glen for a letter in which he clarified the timing of the League's sponsorship. Meltzer, Friedan, 20 says that Friedan's economics professor pointed her to Highlander but identifies that professor as a male; since the only economics course Friedan took was from Douglas, I am assuming that it was she who urged her student to attend the workshop. Meltzer thinks that is a reasonable assumption: Milton Meltzer, phone conversation with Daniel Horowitz, 24 Sept. 1995.

So Glen gives Friedan an out -- the League wasn't there in 1941 when Friedan was. (The Reds had only been there the two previous years.) And Meltzer clarifies what gender Friedan's professor was. So?

America's Fifth Column ... watch Steve Emerson/PBS documentary JIHAD! In America
New Link: Download 8 Mb zip file here (60 minute video)

Who is Steve Emerson?

38 posted on 01/25/2003 10:54:56 AM PST by JCG
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To: JCG
Horowitz a leftist? Is there anyone who is not part of the grand communist conspiracy, other than you, of course?

As to fn 37, let me try again and frame the question another way. Have you read the Glen book and, if so, what is your response to his evidence that Highlander was not a Communist training school? Again, this is my point in bring up fn 37.

39 posted on 01/25/2003 11:44:15 AM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: JCG
Thanks JCG for your excellent research and post. The data you present only punctuates what has been said in the past about King...he may not have been a card-carrying communist, an organization dedicated to the overthrow of the government of the USA, but he certainly was sympathetic to their cause and it appears would not turn down any assistance from them.
40 posted on 01/25/2003 12:13:43 PM PST by Cuttnhorse
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To: Austin Willard Wright
Perhaps the King bashers had been unable to find evidence of secret party membership, because no such evidence exists.

Odd, then, that King's defenders don't say they have tried to find it, and it doesn't exist.

Mind you, I'm not saying it does exist. I suspect it does not. But I also suspect nobody has tried to find it, so that they can make the same denial that the Chaplin biographer makes, for the reason I surmised earlier: even asking the question can be a career-ender.

41 posted on 01/25/2003 12:49:26 PM PST by aristeides
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To: aristeides
Chaplin may, or may not, have been a party member but he the nearest closest thing: an outright apologist for Stalin.

King, by contrast, often criticized Communism *as a philosophy and as applied." Chaplin never did. In fact, King powerful anti-Communist quotation which I posted many, many, times here is a more effective indictment of the philosophical basis of Communism than any penned by most freepers.

Unfortunately, every time I post this quote (taken from original sources not secondary hatchet jobs), it is greeted with total silence by the King bashers. They don't even want to consider that they have misjudged the man.

As I have said many times, King had his flaws and politically went off the deep end in the late 1960s. The claim that he was a communist, however, is pure fantasy.

42 posted on 01/25/2003 1:22:44 PM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: Austin Willard Wright
Horowitz a leftist? Is there anyone who is not part of the grand communist conspiracy, other than you, of course?

A leftist is not necessarily a communist. Sometimes it's difficult to tell however. Who would want to bet Pete Seeger isn't one?

As to fn 37, let me try again and frame the question another way. Have you read the Glen book and, if so, what is your response to his evidence that Highlander was not a Communist training school?

I don't normally run to Barnes & Noble to purchase a $25 book just to argue with someone who has an "obscure-professor" fetish. The Web is a better resource. For example, consider the testimony of a real leftist which I found at trumanlibrary.com. Here's what one-time US congressman (1949-1983) and a founder of the Americans for Democratic Action (ADA), Richard W. Bolling, had to say:

Well, for some reason, I've forgotten why, I guess the year between my graduation in '37 and the beginning of my masters, which was in English literature--I got my bachelor's in French literature and my masters in English--I went to a Quaker school, a Quaker camp, at a place called the Highlander Folk School. The Highlander Folk School was famous in those days for being dominated by the Stalinists. But there were also people like the Friends; the camp was a Friends camp at this school. I got exposed to all of that. I had a couple of people that are relatively well-known in Washington, one that was there, and we each remember the other as relatively sympathetic to their anti-Stalinist view. They were the ones that were most interested in the anti-Stalinist view. The guy I'm talking about is Adam Yarmalinsky, an intellectual with considerable potency.

JOHNSON: This Quaker school would be inherently anti-Stalinist, would it not, since they do not believe in dictatorship?

BOLLING: They didn't believe in it, but they were at the same school.

JOHNSON: They were at the same school--or on the same grounds?

BOLLING: No, they were there as guests of and paying their way at Highlander. In those days there was a large amount of infiltration into liberal groups that didn't know they were infiltrated.

[Emphasis added] http://www.trumanlibrary.org/oralhist/bolling.htm

Funny how terms like "dominated by the Stalinists" and "infiltration into liberal groups" and "communist-led" makes one wonder if there might just be just the slightest outside chance that the Highlander School was a "Communist training school" -- even, maybe, part of the "grand communist conspiracy?"

And, remember, I didn't say it. Two leftists did.

America's Fifth Column ... watch Steve Emerson/PBS documentary JIHAD! In America
New Link: Download 8 Mb zip file here (60 minute video)

Who is Steve Emerson?

43 posted on 01/25/2003 4:18:26 PM PST by JCG
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Bump.
44 posted on 01/19/2004 12:12:15 PM PST by sweetliberty (Even the smallest person can change the course of the future. - (LOTR))
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To: Grut
"What would this tell us except that communists can sometimes do righteous things?"

Perhaps...

But supporting civil rights in America - wasn't a demonstration of their righteousness or "humanity", it was a wedge issue they attempted to hammer into a schism in America....

"Civil Rights" and HUMAN RIGHTS were unknown in much of the good ole "Soviet Union" of the big guy -- Joseph Stalin....

One can apply lipstick on a pig -- but on Communist pigs - it doesn't make them anything but a silly looking pig.

Even a broken clock - is correct twice a day...
The Communists couldn't even come close to matching that standard.

Semper Fi

45 posted on 02/16/2006 8:00:43 AM PST by river rat (You may turn the other cheek, but I prefer to look into my enemy's vacant dead eyes.)
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To: river rat

I've known a few communists and they were very nice people, if a bit fixed in their opinions. It isn't necessarily true that communists leap out of bed every morning with a cry of "Evil, I take thee for my good!" although I'm inclined to agree with you that Party support of the civil rights movement was cynical.

The main thing is that MLK had plenty of reasons to act as he did without our imputing dark motives to him. What the communists did they did for their own reasons.

Incidentally, in the military a stopped clock is right only once a day. ;^)


46 posted on 02/16/2006 10:27:24 AM PST by Grut
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