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Final Radio Transmission From Space Shuttle
Drudge | 2-1-03 | Joe Hadenuf

Posted on 02/01/2003 11:52:21 AM PST by Joe Hadenuf

Final radio transmission between Columbia and Mission Control:

Mission Control: 'Columbia, Houston we see your tire pressure messages and we did not copy your last.'

Columbia: 'Roger, uh, ...' (transmission breaks off after the crew member starts to stay a word beginning with the sound 'buh.')

Burn through??


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: columbiadata; columbiatragedy; feb12003; nasa; spaceshuttle; sts107
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1 posted on 02/01/2003 11:52:21 AM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: Joe Hadenuf
No offence meant, but this is morbid.
2 posted on 02/01/2003 11:54:27 AM PST by EggsAckley
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To: EggsAckley
I don't understand your statement?
3 posted on 02/01/2003 11:55:01 AM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: Joe Hadenuf
I'm thinking (I'm certainly no expect although I witnessed the event here in N. Texas) that probably the sensors in the tires may have been the first detection method that something was wrong in the belly... pure speculation on my part of course...
4 posted on 02/01/2003 11:55:48 AM PST by TexasGunLover
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To: Joe Hadenuf
I heard that tape Joe.....I couldn't make out anything after Roger,uh.....sounds of static and breakup after that..
5 posted on 02/01/2003 11:56:18 AM PST by Dog
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To: Joe Hadenuf
Can't really explain it. Maybe it's the fact that everyone will be trying to "fill in the blanks" and speculate on what was said. Just being overly sensitive, I guess.
6 posted on 02/01/2003 11:56:55 AM PST by EggsAckley
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To: Dog
Yep... as bad as I dislike MSNBC, they do have a link to the audio clip on their main news page right now if anyone wants to go listen to it...
7 posted on 02/01/2003 11:57:09 AM PST by TexasGunLover
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To: TexasGunLover
That's probably pretty good speculation.......
8 posted on 02/01/2003 11:58:21 AM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: Joe Hadenuf
"...and we did not copy your last.

The reference to the "last" transmission leads to a desire to hear the last minute or so of communication not simply where it breaks apart...

Can you go further back for us?

9 posted on 02/01/2003 11:59:15 AM PST by ez2muz
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To: Joe Hadenuf
Tire pressure?

What?

10 posted on 02/01/2003 11:59:21 AM PST by maquiladora
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To: Joe Hadenuf
The tire pressure sensors on the shuttle consist of several strain gages on the tire rims. The shuttle computers convert "strain" to "pressure" via some algorithm.

The wires from the strain gages go up to the struts through a breakaway cable.

The last thing that is done before closing the wheel-well doors in the VAB is to take resistance readings of the strain gages and make sure they are correct. (There is no way to get a readout in the cockpit because there is no power on shuttle at the time.)

11 posted on 02/01/2003 11:59:55 AM PST by snopercod
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To: Joe Hadenuf
Like hitting a bridge abutment. At that speed, even the light air would act like a solid. It was over quick.
12 posted on 02/01/2003 12:00:08 PM PST by RightWhale
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To: RightWhale
NASA "technical" press conference coming up now.
13 posted on 02/01/2003 12:01:25 PM PST by snopercod
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To: RightWhale
Oh I agree, like one poster stated, it would be like getting hit by an invisible wrecking ball........
14 posted on 02/01/2003 12:01:43 PM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: snopercod
Oops! Make that one hour from now. 3PM CST
15 posted on 02/01/2003 12:02:12 PM PST by snopercod
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To: snopercod
FOX??
16 posted on 02/01/2003 12:02:13 PM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: snopercod
tire pressure sensors

Are you sure the tires are filled with air? I would think they'd be solid or semi-solid, else the compartments would have to stay highly pressurized during the flight. In the vaccum of space, air filled tires could blow apart.

17 posted on 02/01/2003 12:03:45 PM PST by Reeses
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To: Joe Hadenuf
Bump
18 posted on 02/01/2003 12:03:48 PM PST by Fiddlstix (Tag Line Service Center: Get your Tag Lines Here! Wholesale! (Cheaper by the Dozen!) Inquire Within)
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To: snopercod
CNN and FOX still both state NASA breifing coming any moment.
19 posted on 02/01/2003 12:04:13 PM PST by Hillarys Gate Cult ("Read Hillary's hips. I never had sex with that woman.")
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To: snopercod
Make that one hour from now. 3PM CST

Radio news just said it is now.

20 posted on 02/01/2003 12:04:45 PM PST by RightWhale
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To: EggsAckley
That's not morbid. But watching the body-sniffing dogs circle that smoking hole on TV is.
21 posted on 02/01/2003 12:05:28 PM PST by snopercod
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To: snopercod
So how was ground control picking up the pressure sensor?
22 posted on 02/01/2003 12:05:39 PM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: Reeses
That's kind of what it sounds like - the spacecraft rapidly depressurized beginning in the wheel bays. (This is my own decidedly non-technical speculation.)
23 posted on 02/01/2003 12:05:40 PM PST by Chi-townChief
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To: Joe Hadenuf
In honor of the space shuttle Columbia astronauts, would someone please post the official NASA picture of them, on this and every thread about this tragedy? Their faces deserve to be remembered. Thanks...
24 posted on 02/01/2003 12:06:38 PM PST by FBD (May God be with the families of "Columbia")
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To: snopercod
I'm wondering what you mean by "no power on shuttle at that time". Years ago when I flew the shuttle simulators during Space Camp (actually Space Academy as I was in middle school) in Huntsville, I don't remember the shuttle loosing power during landing... perhaps I misunderstood your post...
25 posted on 02/01/2003 12:06:42 PM PST by TexasGunLover
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To: Hillarys Gate Cult
That's because none of them recognize Central Time! They think everything is on Eastern or Pacific!
26 posted on 02/01/2003 12:07:33 PM PST by PhiKapMom (Bush/Cheney 2004)
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To: Reeses
Are you sure the tires are filled with air?

They are filled with nitrogen, not air. 235# as I recall. An additional 14.7# from being in space doesn't matter.

27 posted on 02/01/2003 12:07:38 PM PST by snopercod
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To: RightWhale
NASA TV reads 3:15 EST.
28 posted on 02/01/2003 12:08:23 PM PST by Las Vegas Dave
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To: TexasGunLover
I meant that the shuttle lost power when it broke up and physically ripped the wires leading to the crew module.
29 posted on 02/01/2003 12:09:08 PM PST by snopercod
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To: Joe Hadenuf
Could they have meant "tile" pressure(the insulating tiles on the outside) instead of "tire" pressure?
30 posted on 02/01/2003 12:09:12 PM PST by exit82
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To: snopercod
Ah... that makes total sense... sorry for the misunderstanding...
31 posted on 02/01/2003 12:09:37 PM PST by TexasGunLover
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To: Formerly Brainwashed Democrat


Flowers sit next to what appears
to be debris from Space Shuttle Columbia in
Nacogdoches, Texas, on Saturday
32 posted on 02/01/2003 12:10:22 PM PST by TomGuy
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To: PhiKapMom
Don't you know the world revolves around eastern time......:-)

I spent a week in Western Tenn..... one time.....could never get use to central time...:-)

33 posted on 02/01/2003 12:10:42 PM PST by Dog
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To: exit82
I would doubt that. From what I understand, the word "tire" was fairly clear audio........
34 posted on 02/01/2003 12:10:45 PM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: maquiladora
Tire pressure?

Just as in commercial aircraft, the wheels are folded up inside the Shuttle wings when the gear is retracted. They are inflated with nitrogen. The first sign of a burn-through on the underside of a wing in that vicinity could show up as a spike in tire pressure. This is pure speculation, of course, one of many that pople will be making in the months to come.

35 posted on 02/01/2003 12:10:46 PM PST by BlazingArizona
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To: Joe Hadenuf
The recording of this is so chilling.
36 posted on 02/01/2003 12:10:54 PM PST by ladyinred
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To: snopercod
Thanks, I was a little confused too......
37 posted on 02/01/2003 12:11:21 PM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: Reeses
Are you sure the tires are filled with air? I would think they'd be solid or semi-solid, else the compartments would have to stay highly pressurized during the flight. In the vaccum of space, air filled tires could blow apart.

Not really. The air pressure at sea level is a bit less than 15 psi. If you took a normal 30 psi inflated car tire into space, it would have the equivalent filling of about 45 psi.

38 posted on 02/01/2003 12:12:00 PM PST by eabinga
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To: BlazingArizona
Maybe speculation, but it would seem to make sense.
39 posted on 02/01/2003 12:12:30 PM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: Formerly Brainwashed Democrat
Profiles of Shuttle Columbia's Crew
Sat February 1, 2003 02:46 PM ET
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Here are brief profiles of the crew of Space Shuttle Columbia.
Shuttle Commander Rick Douglas Husband, a U.S. Air Force colonel and former test pilot, was on his second shuttle mission, having flown previously in 1999 aboard shuttle Discovery.

Born July 12, 1957, in Amarillo, Texas, and married with two children, Husband joined the astronaut program in 1994 and worked as chief of safety for NASA's Astronaut Office.

His previous shuttle voyage was a 10-day mission that docked with the International Space Station and delivered supplies in preparation for the arrival of the first crew to live aboard the orbiting outpost.

He piloted that flight, logging 235 hours, 13 minutes in space.

---

Shuttle Pilot William C. McCool, a U.S. Navy commander, was on his first shuttle voyage aboard Columbia, but had wide experience as a military aircraft pilot with more than 2,800 hours of flight experience in 24 aircraft.

A test pilot at the Strike Aircraft Test Directorate at Patuxent River, Maryland, McCool managed projects ranging from airframe fatigue life studies to avionics upgrades. He acted as test pilot of the EA-6B Prowler, a radar-jamming warplane.

His primary efforts, however, were dedicated to dedicated to flight test of the Advanced Capability (ADVCAP) EA-6B.

Married, McCool was born Sept. 23, 1961, in San Diego, California.

---

Shuttle Payload Commander Michael Anderson, a U.S. Air Force lieutenant colonel, was responsible for science hardware aboard Columbia.

Anderson joined the astronaut corps in 1994 and previously flew aboard shuttle Endeavour in 1998, the eighth docking mission between a space shuttle and the Soviet-made Mir spacecraft. Anderson logged over 211 hours in space on that voyage.

Born in Plattsburgh, New York, on Dec. 25, 1959, Anderson counted Spokane, Washington, as his hometown. He was married.

---

Ilan Ramon, an Israeli Air Force colonel, was the first Israeli to go into space. At 48, he was a veteran of Israel's Yom Kippur War and the son of a Holocaust survivor from the Auschwitz concentration camp. In memory of family members who died under Nazi rule during the World War II, Ramon took with him a pencil drawing by a Czech Jewish boy.

Ramon logged more than 3,000 flight hours on the Israeli A-4, Mirage III-C, and F-4, and more than 1,000 flight hours on the F-16.

Selected by NASA as a payload specialist in 1997, Ramon began training in July 1998. Born June 20, 1954, in Tel Aviv, Israel, Ramon was married with four children.

---

Laurel Blair Clark, a U.S. Navy commander and a physician, was on her first NASA shuttle voyage.

An avid scuba diver, Clark did active duty training with the Diving Medicine Department at the Naval Experimental Diving Unit during medical school. During a later assignment in Scotland, she dove with U.S. Navy divers and Naval Special Warfare Unit Two Seals and performed numerous medical evacuations from U.S. submarines. She was designated a Naval Submarine Medical Office and Diving Medical Officer. and a Naval Flight Surgeon.

Selected for the astronaut corps in 1996, Clark was married with one child. She was born in Iowa but called Racine, Wisconsin, her hometown. Her birth date was not immediately available.

---

David Brown, a U.S. Navy captain and surgeon, was a gymnast who performed as an acrobat, unicyclist and stilt walker while attending college.

Brown joined the Navy after his medical internship, and after completing flight surgeon training in 1984, became director of medical services at the Navy Branch Hospital in Adak, Alaska.

Brown logged more than 2,700 flight hours with 1,700 in high performance military aircraft. The Columbia mission was his first space flight. He joined the astronaut program in 1996.

Born April 16, 1956, in Arlington, Virginia, Brown was unmarried.

---

Kalpana Chawla, an aerospace engineer and commercial pilot, was on her second space shuttle flight, having been a mission specialist in 1996, logging more than 376 hours in space.

Born in Karnal, India, she studied in the United States, and received her doctorate from the University of Colorado.

She started working for NASA in 1988, studying powered-lift computational fluid dynamics. Her research concentrated on simulation of complex air flows encountered around aircraft.

Chawla joined the astronaut program in 1994.
40 posted on 02/01/2003 12:13:03 PM PST by anniegetyourgun
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To: TomGuy
I hope whoever put the flowers there checked first to see if there was any hydrazine present!!!!
41 posted on 02/01/2003 12:13:14 PM PST by Las Vegas Dave
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To: Joe Hadenuf
Via the Orbiter S-Band link to TDRSS. All data stopped as soon as "communication was lost" as the orbiter broke up.

I was on console for the Challenger launch and when it broke up, the green little arrow on my screen turned red and pointed down, meaning data was no longer valid. Our screens simply froze while displaying the last valid data.

Houston certainly has a similar system.

BTW, the KSC launch team is on station in the firing room for landing, in case they are needed. My heart goes out to all those good people.

42 posted on 02/01/2003 12:13:52 PM PST by snopercod
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To: anniegetyourgun

Cape Canaveral, FL

43 posted on 02/01/2003 12:14:19 PM PST by anniegetyourgun
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To: anniegetyourgun

All seven astronauts aboard the space shuttle Columbia were killed after it broke up just 16 minutes from its scheduled landing at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on February 1, 2003, the U.S. space agency NASA said. "The loss of this valiant crew is something we will never be able to get over," NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe said at a news briefing. A December 20, 2002 file photo shows (L-R) Mission Commander Rick Husband, Pilot William McCool, Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon (the first Israeli astronaut), Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist David Brown, Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist Laurel Clark and Kalpana Chawla. Photo by Joe Skipper/Reuters


44 posted on 02/01/2003 12:15:32 PM PST by anniegetyourgun
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To: BlazingArizona
That would be my speculation, too. This recording doesn't sound particularly consistent with the aerodynamic break-up scenario, IMO. Not on the face of it, anyway.
45 posted on 02/01/2003 12:15:32 PM PST by The Great Satan (Revenge, Terror and Extortion: A Guide for the Perplexed)
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To: snopercod
What about telemetry, would they not have almost real time "black box", info if will?
46 posted on 02/01/2003 12:17:18 PM PST by Joe Hadenuf
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To: Las Vegas Dave
I doubt that the pic is of the Columbia's tire. However, I wouldn't be surprised to see flowers next to every piece of highway litter in Texas now. ;)
47 posted on 02/01/2003 12:17:25 PM PST by Normal4me
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To: anniegetyourgun


The STS-107 crew (from the left): David Brown; Commander Rick Husband;
Laurel Clark; Kalpana Chawla; Michael Anderson; William McCool and Ilan Ramon
48 posted on 02/01/2003 12:17:36 PM PST by TomGuy
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Could the area have overheated causing a tire to blow? Wouldn't temp sensors have recored a rise in temp, though, before a tire could get overheated enough to blow?
49 posted on 02/01/2003 12:20:11 PM PST by mewzilla
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To: anniegetyourgun

50 posted on 02/01/2003 12:20:41 PM PST by anniegetyourgun
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