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Debris Photos (GRAPHIC)
Yahoo News photos ^ | 2/2/03 | freepers

Posted on 02/02/2003 7:34:59 AM PST by Mark Felton

Edited on 02/02/2003 12:51:23 PM PST by Admin Moderator. [history]

[Your attention please. This thread has generated a ton of abuse reports. Some have been from long established freepers. Others have been from relative newbies. Some have been complaining about the thread. Others have been complaining about the complainers.

Throw on top of it the fact that some of the newbies who showed up on this thread happen to be returning bannees, who before being banned were friendly with some of the very people they are bickering with here, and something is striking us as just not right.

If you are interested in the debris photos, this is the thread for it. If not, don't join in this thread. It is not disrespectful to those who died to post pictures of the debris in our opinion. What they show and where they landed may help piece together what killed these brave people.

If you feel that is the wrong decision, we apologize and mean no harm. But please, no more arguing about it on the thread, and no more abuse reports on the matter.

Thanks, AM.]

Fires, believed started by debris from the downed space shuttle Columbia, burn in an area near Dallas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Seven astronauts perished when the shuttle broke to pieces as it re-entered the atmosphere at the end of a 16-day mission. (AP Photo/Joe Cavaretta)
Sun Feb 2, 1:14 AM ET

Fires, believed started by debris from the downed space shuttle Columbia, burn in an area near Dallas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Seven astronauts perished when the shuttle broke to pieces as it re-entered the atmosphere at the end of a 16-day mission. (AP Photo/Joe Cavaretta)



A video image of a helmet that dropped into a yard in Norwood Community, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia is seen Feb. 1, 2002. Many parts of the shuttle, along with human remains, were found in the area. NASA officials later removed the helmet. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)
Sat Feb 1, 9:31 PM ET

A video image of a helmet that dropped into a yard in Norwood Community, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia is seen Feb. 1, 2002. Many parts of the shuttle, along with human remains, were found in the area. NASA (news - web sites) officials later removed the helmet. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)



A small brush fire started by a falling piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Athens, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during re-entry over Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Fla., Feb. 1, 2003. Authorities have not speculated on the cause of the crash. (Jeff Mitchell/Reuters)
Sat Feb 1,10:35 PM ET

A small brush fire started by a falling piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Athens, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during re-entry over Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Fla., Feb. 1, 2003. Authorities have not speculated on the cause of the crash. (Jeff Mitchell/Reuters)


A piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia is photographed near Lufkin, Texas, Feb. 1, 2003. NASA lost contact with the shuttle at around 9 a.m., about 16 minutes before its scheduled landing at Kennedy Space Center. (Reuters)
Sat Feb 1, 9:31 PM ET

A piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia is photographed near Lufkin, Texas, Feb. 1, 2003. NASA (news - web sites) lost contact with the shuttle at around 9 a.m., about 16 minutes before its scheduled landing at Kennedy Space Center (news - web sites). (Reuters)


Goldie Hamilton looks at a piece of debris that dropped into her yard in Alto, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia February 1, 2003. Many parts of the shuttle along with human remains were found in the area. Hamilton lives in the house in the background. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:15 PM ET

Goldie Hamilton looks at a piece of debris that dropped into her yard in Alto, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia February 1, 2003. Many parts of the shuttle along with human remains were found in the area. Hamilton lives in the house in the background. REUTERS/Rick Wilking


A piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia dropped into this yard in Alto, Texas, February 1, 2003. Debris from space shuttle Columbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:18 PM ET

A piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia dropped into this yard in Alto, Texas, February 1, 2003. Debris from space shuttle Columbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking



Stan Melasky, left, and his brother Steve Melasky look over a piece of debris, believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia, that fell on their farm near Douglass, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)
Sat Feb 1, 7:43 PM ET

Stan Melasky, left, and his brother Steve Melasky look over a piece of debris, believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia, that fell on their farm near Douglass, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)


An Anderson County sheriff's deputy walks past a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Palestine, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during reentry over East Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Florida, February 1, 2003. Shaken NASA officials vowed to find out what caused the space shuttle Columbia to break up, saying they would look closely at the impact of a piece of foam insulation that struck the orbiter's left wing at takeoff. REUTERS/Jeff Mitchell
Sat Feb 1, 8:52 PM ET

An Anderson County sheriff's deputy walks past a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Palestine, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during reentry over East Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Florida, February 1, 2003. Shaken NASA (news - web sites) officials vowed to find out what caused the space shuttle Columbia to break up, saying they would look closely at the impact of a piece of foam insulation that struck the orbiter's left wing at takeoff. REUTERS/Jeff Mitchell


A piece of space shuttle debris sits on the ground outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Sat Feb 1, 7:25 PM ET

A piece of space shuttle debris sits on the ground outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)


Searchers mark a small piece of debris while looking for remnants of the space shuttle outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Sat Feb 1, 7:29 PM ET

Searchers mark a small piece of debris while looking for remnants of the space shuttle outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)


Resident Bugs Arriola looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2003 in Nacogdoches, Texas. People have been told not to touch any of the debris as there could be toxic chemicals on the material. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)
Sun Feb 2,10:11 AM ET

Resident Bugs Arriola looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2003 in Nacogdoches, Texas. People have been told not to touch any of the debris as there could be toxic chemicals on the material. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)


Vollunteer firefigher John Berry looks out at small piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia in a rural area north of Palestine, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. The shuttle broke apart in flames over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Sat Feb 1, 7:41 PM ET

Vollunteer firefigher John Berry looks out at small piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia in a rural area north of Palestine, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. The shuttle broke apart in flames over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/LM Otero)


A couple looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia that dropped onto the highway in Alto, Texas February 1, 2003. Debris fromColumbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:23 PM ET

A couple looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia that dropped onto the highway in Alto, Texas February 1, 2003. Debris fromColumbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking


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Post your debris field related photos here.
1 posted on 02/02/2003 7:34:59 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: Mark Felton
REMNANTS FOUND: Another possible artifact from the shuttle landed in the Arriola-Cooke Cemetery off Texas Highway 7 in Nacogdoches County. (Staff Photo By D.J. Peters)

2 posted on 02/02/2003 7:38:01 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: Mark Felton
Space Shuttle Columbia Disaster Archive
3 posted on 02/02/2003 7:38:12 AM PST by petuniasevan (RIP Columbia crew - you were the "Right Stuff")
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To: Mark Felton
bttt
4 posted on 02/02/2003 7:41:06 AM PST by EggsAckley (Time flies like an arrow.......but fruit flies like bananas)
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Comment #5 Removed by Moderator

To: DesideriusErasmus; Admin Moderator
I live in Clear Lake and we work for NASA. We have friends who are astronauts! One of them is due to go up on the next flight.

Do not DARE to lecture me about this you sanctimonious numbskull.

We want answers. We want truth. We want closure. Do NOT look at this thread if you have problems.
6 posted on 02/02/2003 7:47:03 AM PST by Mark Felton
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Comment #7 Removed by Moderator

To: DesideriusErasmus
How is posting these here any more inappropriate than the news organizations publishing them in the first place? This is just consolidating these items for people who want to see what's happening.
8 posted on 02/02/2003 7:48:47 AM PST by John Jorsett
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To: Mark Felton
Thank you for this thread, even as hard as it is to look at. I am in the process of trying to collect and save these photo's for a possible online memorial.(or something)

The helmet is heart wrenching, but says so much about this tragedy and the sacrifice these astronauts made.

9 posted on 02/02/2003 7:50:13 AM PST by KineticKitty
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To: John Jorsett; Admin Moderator
Admin: Please restore this to the Breaking News where I originally posted it and where it belongs. FR is concerned with truth, knowledge and understanding.

This thread is useless if it does not exist in the Breaking News or Front Page.

Since you removed it, must I assume you are not interested?
10 posted on 02/02/2003 7:53:17 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: DesideriusErasmus
Unfortunately, all of this must be cataloged, docuemented, archived, etc. so that a tragedy of this nature won't happen again.

5.56mm

11 posted on 02/02/2003 7:53:40 AM PST by M Kehoe
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To: Mark Felton

A piece of the space shuttle Columbia lies on the side of Hwy 21 near Nacogdoches, Texas, February 1, 2003. Debris from space shuttle Columbia rained down onto fields and highways in Texas on Saturday, with witnesses coming across smoldering metal wreckage, including what appeared to be a door from the orbiter, local officials and eyewitnesses said. REUTERS/Richard Carson

12 posted on 02/02/2003 7:54:13 AM PST by John Jorsett
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To: Mark Felton
I have no problem with this thread. I don't want to see remains, God knows, but the debris is significant. I am actually most caught up by the very American pictures. These are normal folks, farmers, families, all taking time out of their day to watch over and ponder these pieces of debris on their roads. Various members of a community sem to be gathering around the roped off areas and talking.In a way its very moving....
13 posted on 02/02/2003 7:54:30 AM PST by Will_Zurmacht
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To: KineticKitty
The photos may help bring closure.
14 posted on 02/02/2003 7:56:07 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: Mark Felton
Thanks for this thread, some of these WILL be hard to view
but we must see them to KNOW.

9-11 look, see, and remember.
15 posted on 02/02/2003 7:56:26 AM PST by tet68
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To: Mark Felton
Thank you for this. Considering this occurred 40 miles up at 12500 mph and 3000F, it is amazing to see what did survive the rest of the trip down.
16 posted on 02/02/2003 7:57:08 AM PST by nhoward14
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To: DesideriusErasmus
Please, I find this ugly. Why do this to ther people who are involved & the thousands in so many areas who have family & friends from NASA?

Take it easy. The 7 people lost yesterday were killed because they sought to learn. Their jobs, the jobs they choose, were to find the truth in their own dangerous work. Without striving to find the truth of things man would not be man.

The same thing applies to anyone wanting to discover the truth about what happened yesterday. Part of that is gathering evidence and looking at it. It's also the nature of man to be curious. Something you proved by coming here to this thread. And if you are reading this you came back again when you should have just stayed away if you have a problem with the content.

So use the off switch is you need to. That's is what it is for.

17 posted on 02/02/2003 7:57:27 AM PST by isthisnickcool
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To: Mark Felton
I support your thread. I want to feel closer to those who were braver than I could ever be. I'll look at debris photos and cry for the families, friends, and everyone involved. I don't find it gruesome or tasteless. I also looked at photos of the WTC. How else can we remember? How else can we cope? Why else would people...strangers...be putting flowers and flags at a piece of metal other than to say, "I care...and I will honor you".
18 posted on 02/02/2003 7:57:52 AM PST by ZinGirl
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To: DesideriusErasmus
If the pictures bother you ,don't look. This is a historic event, like the WTC, a tragedy to be sure, but interesting & something to remember. I doubt very much if the families of the astronauts are on FR looking at this. I would tell them the same thing, don't look.
19 posted on 02/02/2003 7:58:30 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Mark Felton

20 posted on 02/02/2003 7:59:29 AM PST by Momaw Nadon
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To: Mark Felton


Flowers sit next to what appears
to be debris from Space Shuttle Columbia in
Nacogdoches, Texas, on Saturday
21 posted on 02/02/2003 8:00:39 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: Will_Zurmacht
Well said. I think you are right. The photos with the people are the best.

Nor do I wish to see remains either, that is for the family if they choose only. When my brother was killed in a US Navy helicopter accident I choose not to see the photos of the remains, but I was deeply interested in the wreckage, the causes and gaining an understanding. I wanted to remember him
in life.
22 posted on 02/02/2003 8:03:38 AM PST by Mark Felton
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Comment #23 Removed by Moderator

To: Mark Felton
BTTT
24 posted on 02/02/2003 8:04:07 AM PST by dtel (Texas Longhorn cattle for sale at all times. We don't rent pigs)
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To: DesideriusErasmus
>>...Please, I find this ugly...<<

Sorry, but FR doesn't revolve around you.

25 posted on 02/02/2003 8:06:57 AM PST by FReepaholic
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To: DesideriusErasmus
Puh-LEEEEEZE untie your shoes.

They are obviously waaaaaay too tight.

26 posted on 02/02/2003 8:07:16 AM PST by Brandybux
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To: Mark Felton

27 posted on 02/02/2003 8:08:13 AM PST by mikenola
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To: DesideriusErasmus
I strive to be pertinant & succinct

Please work a little harder on the first one.

28 posted on 02/02/2003 8:09:36 AM PST by Helen
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To: Mark Felton
I don't have any problem with the thread but I don't think it meets the criteria for "breaking news." Those who find these pictures morbid are free to tune it out.
29 posted on 02/02/2003 8:12:04 AM PST by SamAdams76 ('Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens')
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To: Mark Felton
Moffett Volunteer Fire Department Assistant Fire Chief Eddie Sweet holds yellow emergency tape around a charred piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia, Saturday, February 1, 2003, in Etoile, Texas.
30 posted on 02/02/2003 8:12:49 AM PST by mikenola
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To: DesideriusErasmus
"The TV is awash with slobering, gap-toothed baffoons who can barely string words togethor-all grinning about the carnage & excitement. "

"GRINNING"? Who is "grinning"?

Let your contempt for Americans you have never met be known to all.

31 posted on 02/02/2003 8:13:36 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: mikenola
Wilbern Powell approaches a piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia that fell in his Bronson, Texas backyard.
32 posted on 02/02/2003 8:14:11 AM PST by mikenola
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To: DesideriusErasmus
Apparently Mark has not cornered the market on ugly responses.

"slobering, gap-toothed baffoons who can barely string words togethor" [sic]

Supposedly these are your fellow Texans you are talking about. Are you a native or a carpetbagger?
33 posted on 02/02/2003 8:14:53 AM PST by nhoward14
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To: mikenola
Margie Powell, left, and her husband, Wilburn, stand near a sole of a shoe, believed to be debris from the space shuttle Columbia in their yard in Bronson, Texas.
34 posted on 02/02/2003 8:15:56 AM PST by mikenola
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To: Mark Felton
Something I haven't seen posted or mentioned in the media: We are going to find out that a heckofa lot of airliner parts fall off in routine flights. Folks will be finding these and attributing them to the shuttle.
35 posted on 02/02/2003 8:17:05 AM PST by js1138
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To: DesideriusErasmus
You've been here since January 12th, 2003.....have you not yet learned how to use your mouse? Do NOT click on any THREAD where there might be information or pictures YOU do NOT want to SEE.
36 posted on 02/02/2003 8:17:33 AM PST by goodnesswins (Thank the Military for your freedom and security....and thank a Rich person for jobs.)
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To: mikenola
Jimmy Brown kneels next to debris, believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia, which fell in his yard in Bronson, Texas, Saturday. Brown said he after heard a loud roar and felt his house shake, he looked outside to find this large piece of smoldering debris in the yard.
37 posted on 02/02/2003 8:18:23 AM PST by mikenola
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To: nhoward14
Alright,kids.... STOP THIS BICKERING RIGHT NOW, OR I'M TURNING THE CAR AROUND AND WE'RE HEADING STRAIGHT BACK TO ARKANSAS!!!!

By the way, has anybody considered what a miracle it is that with all this falling debris, not a single person on the ground was killed or injured. Small mercies in an otherwise tragic event.
38 posted on 02/02/2003 8:19:45 AM PST by Camerican
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To: Mark Felton
Good thread about a truly sad event.

FR does on occasion attract the tabuloid type who act like numbskulls. Once in a while a slobbering, gap-toothed bauffoon who can barely string words togethoer shows up.
39 posted on 02/02/2003 8:22:10 AM PST by djf
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To: js1138
Exactly what justification do you have for claiming "a heckofa lot of airliner parts fall off in routine flights"?
I will spare you my opinion as an engineer about this statement if you can answer this question.
40 posted on 02/02/2003 8:22:20 AM PST by nhoward14
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To: Mark Felton
Just an insignificant observation....if you look at the first photo, in the upper right corner, is a lake that really resembles a dove carrying an 'olive branch'. Weird?
41 posted on 02/02/2003 8:23:05 AM PST by mommadooo3
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To: Will_Zurmacht
These are normal folks, farmers, families, all taking time out of their day to watch over and ponder these pieces of debris on their roads

That's what struck me too Will, it's almost as though they are guarding these pieces with pride and honor. They understand that it's not merely a piece of history, it's an important piece of the future as well.

42 posted on 02/02/2003 8:23:24 AM PST by McGavin999
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To: mikenola

43 posted on 02/02/2003 8:24:32 AM PST by mikenola
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To: Camerican
But Mooooooooooooooooooooooom... she started it!

And.. yes, the miracle has been considered.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/834027/
post 8
44 posted on 02/02/2003 8:24:52 AM PST by nhoward14
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To: mommadooo3
I see the dove. beautiful.
45 posted on 02/02/2003 8:24:56 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: mikenola
An unidentified FBI Evidence Response Team member examines a bagged piece of debris Saturday at the Hemphill Police Department. Two women who were fishing on Toledo Bend Lake saw the debris drop in front of them. (Star-Telegram / Paul Moseley)
46 posted on 02/02/2003 8:27:01 AM PST by mikenola
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To: mikenola
A federal investigator, at right, examines a piece from space shuttle Columbia on Texas 96, just north of Bronson in Galveston County. (Star-Telegram / Paul Moseley)
47 posted on 02/02/2003 8:30:03 AM PST by mikenola
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To: DesideriusErasmus
If you don't like it, you don't have to look... or are you one who prefers that if YOU dont like it NO ONE can see it? Do you burn books???
48 posted on 02/02/2003 8:32:10 AM PST by Chad Fairbanks (We've got Armadillos in our trousers. It's really quite frightening.)
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To: Chad Fairbanks
Slow Motion Close-Up Video of Debris hitting left wing during launch
49 posted on 02/02/2003 8:36:36 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: DesideriusErasmus
I find comfort in seeing the attention and respect each piece of Columbia is receiving. There is a almost reverence in how this clean up is being conducted. This is a national tragedy, and we need to grieve together.

If you want to complain about something related to this tragedy, it should be about the hideous "Democrat Underground" remarks that the Admin Moderator allowed to be posted yesterday during the first moments of this tragedy. As a result, many of us found out about the deaths of these fine Americans in the most hurtful way possible.

50 posted on 02/02/2003 8:37:13 AM PST by Ronaldus Magnus
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