Keyword: helixmakemineadouble

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  • First Anatolian farmers were local hunter-gatherers that adopted agriculture

    03/21/2019 12:29:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Tuesday, March 19, 2019 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Farming was developed approximately 11,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent, a region that includes present-day Iraq, Syria, Israel, Lebanon, Egypt and Jordan as well as the fringes of southern Anatolia and western Iran. By about 8,300 BCE it had spread to central Anatolia, in present-day Turkey. These early Anatolian farmers subsequently migrated throughout Europe, bringing this new subsistence strategy and their genes. Today, the single largest component of the ancestry of modern-day Europeans comes from these Anatolian farmers. It has long been debated, however, whether farming was brought to Anatolia similarly by a group of migrating farmers from the...
  • Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds

    03/17/2019 11:36:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 14, 2019 | University of Zurich
    Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as "f" in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers at the University of Zurich has shown. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history. Human speech is incredibly diverse, ranging from ubiquitous sounds like "m" and "a" to the rare click consonants in some languages of Southern Africa. This range of sounds is generally thought to have been established with the emergence of the Homo sapiens around 300,000 years ago. A study...
  • The genetics of regeneration: Study uncovers genes that control process of whole-body regeneration

    03/15/2019 6:16:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 59 replies
    news.harvard.edu/gazette ^ | March 14, 2019 | By Peter Reuell Harvard Staff Writer
    When it comes to regeneration, some animals are capable of amazing feats. If you cut off a salamander’s leg, it will grow back. When threatened, some geckos drop their tails to distract their predator, only to regrow them later. Other animals take the process even further. Planarian worms, jellyfish, and sea anemones can actually regenerate their bodies after being cut in half. Led by Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Mansi Srivastava, a team of researchers is shedding new light on how animals pull off the feat, along the way uncovering a number of DNA switches that appear to...
  • Ancient DNA research shines spotlight on Iberia

    03/15/2019 2:20:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 14, 2019 | University of Huddersfield
    The largest-ever study of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) suggests that the Iberian male lineages were almost completely replaced between 4,500 and 4,000 years ago by newcomers originating on the Russian steppe... Most striking was an influx of new people during the later Copper Age, otherwise known as the Beaker period because of the ubiquitous presence in burials of large drinking vessels, from about 4,500 years ago. By the Early Bronze Age, 500 years later, these newcomers represented about 40% of Iberia's genetic pool - but virtually 100% of their male lineages... This is an extraordinary...
  • Scientists are one step closer to reviving woolly mammoths

    03/12/2019 3:16:19 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 28 replies
    NY Post ^ | March 12, 2019 | By Natalie O'Neill
    Japanese scientists have awakened the cells of an extinct woolly mammoth in an experiment that could one day bring the prehistoric beasts back to life. Researchers from Kindai University in Osaka extracted bone marrow and muscle tissue from a long-frozen beast and injected it into the ovaries of a mouse, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Scientific Reports. The experiment revived the 28,000-year-old creature’s cells, triggering “signs of biological activity,” according to the researchers. “[It’s] a significant step towards bringing mammoths back from the dead,” Kei Miyamoto, one of the study’s authors, told the Nikkei Asian Review.
  • Woolly mammoth cells brought back to life in shocking scientific achievement

    03/12/2019 2:02:38 PM PDT · by ETL · 51 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Mar 12, 2019 | Chris Ciaccia | Fox News
    Cells from a woolly mammoth that died 28,000 years ago have begun to show "signs of biological [activity]" after they were implanted in mouse cells. However, researchers caution that it's unlikely the extinct creatures will walk the Earth again anytime soon. The research, published in Scientific Reports, details how a well-preserved woolly mammoth, found in 2011 in the Siberian permafrost, has begun to show some activity. "Until now many studies have focused on analyzing fossil DNA and not whether they still function," Miyamoto added. The study's abstract reveals "[i]n the reconstructed oocytes, the mammoth nuclei showed the spindle assembly, histone...
  • Secrets of early life revealed from less than half a teaspoon of blood

    03/12/2019 3:25:09 PM PDT · by ETL · 5 replies
    MedicalExpress.com ^ | Mar 12, 2019 | London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    A global team of scientists have mapped the developmental pathway of a newborn's life for the first time. The research, published in Nature Communications, could transform our understanding of health and disease in babies. Co-led by the MRC Unit The Gambia at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, the new study included lifting the lid on what genes are turned on, what proteins are being made and what metabolites are changing in the first seven days of human life.Newborn babies are the most vulnerable population when it comes to infectious disease. Establishing key pathways in early development could...
  • Ancient Egyptian mummy genomes suggest an increase of Sub-Saharan African ancestry in post-Roman...

    03/10/2019 4:37:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Nature ^ | 30 May 2017 | Verena J. Schuenemann, Alexander Peltzer, et al
    Until now the study of Egypt’s population history has been largely based on literary and archaeological sources and inferences drawn from genetic diversity in present-day Egyptians. Both approaches have made crucial contributions to the debate but are not without limitations. On the one hand, the interpretation of literary and archaeological sources is often complicated by selective representation and preservation and the fact that markers of foreign identity, such as, for example, Greek or Latin names and ethnics, quickly became ‘status symbols’ and were adopted by natives and foreigners alike. On the other hand, results obtained by modern genetic studies are...
  • A black woman who lived in Britannia in Roman times "a lady of ivory bracelet"

    03/04/2019 3:36:25 PM PST · by robowombat · 29 replies
    Gigazine ^ | 14:30 Mar 02, 2010
    Mar 02, 2010 14:30:03 A black woman who lived in Britannia in Roman times "a lady of ivory bracelet" (This article was originally posted in Japanese on 14:30 Mar 02, 2010) Roman EmpireSpeaking of ancient Roman civilizationLatinAnd CaesarGaara's war historyRecord remains inGaulians·GermanicAlthough it tends to embrace the image of a society centered on white people, such as white, the vast empire with the whole region of the Mediterranean coast as a version,Aeeguptus(Now Egypt) toMauretania(Now Morocco) to include the northern African region, there are also many African populations, and it seems that there were many people who moved out of Africa...
  • Four New DNA Letters Double Life’s Alphabet

    02/27/2019 5:29:17 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 58 replies
    Scientific American ^ | February 22, 2019 | Matthew Warren, Nature magazine
    The DNA of life on Earth naturally stores its information in just four key chemicals—guanine, cytosine, adenine and thymine, commonly referred to as G, C, A and T, respectively. Now scientists have doubled this number of life’s building blocks, creating for the first time a synthetic, eight-letter genetic language that seems to store and transcribe information just like natural DNA. In a study published on 22 February in Science, a consortium of researchers led by Steven Benner, founder of the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution in Alachua, Florida, suggests that an expanded genetic alphabet could, in theory, also support life....
  • Scientists stunned by discovery of 'semi-identical' twins

    02/28/2019 4:04:42 PM PST · by EveningStar · 50 replies
    The Guardian ^ | February 27, 2019 | Nicola Davis
    Boy and girl, now four, are only the second case of ‘sesquizygotic’ twins recorded A pair of twins have stunned researchers after it emerged that they are neither identical nor fraternal – but something in between. The team say the boy and girl, now four years old, are the second case of semi-identical twins ever recorded, and the first to be spotted while the mother was pregnant. The situation was a surprise to the researchers. An ultrasound of the 28-year old mother at six weeks suggested the twins were identical – with signs including a shared placenta. But it soon...
  • First ancient DNA from mainland Finland reveals origins of Siberian ancestry in region

    03/02/2019 1:21:42 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, November 27, 2018 | Max Planck Institute
    Researchers from the Max-Planck-Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Helsinki have analyzed the first ancient DNA from mainland Finland. As described in Nature Communications, ancient DNA was extracted from bones and teeth from a 3,500 year-old burial on the Kola Peninsula, Russia, and a 1,500 year-old water burial in Finland. The results reveal the possible path along which ancient people from Siberia spread to Finland and Northwestern Russia. Researchers found the earliest evidence of Siberian ancestry in Fennoscandia in a population inhabiting the Kola Peninsula, in Northwestern Russia, dating to around 4,000 years ago. This...
  • Researchers Seek DNA Link to Lost Colony

    06/11/2007 2:04:04 PM PDT · by varina davis · 65 replies · 2,203+ views
    WRAL & AP ^ | June 11, 2007
    <p>ROANOKE ISLAND, N.C. - Researchers believe they may be able to use DNA to uncover the fate of the Lost Colony, which vanished shortly after more than 100 people settled on Roanoke Island in 1587.</p> <p>Using genealogy, deeds and historical narratives, researchers have compiled 168 surnames that could be connected to settlers in what is considered the first attempt by the English to colonize the New World. The team will try to trace the roots of individuals related to the colonists, to the area's 16th century American Indians or to both.</p>
  • DNA from a newly unearthed Alaska graveyard offers fresh knowledge about ancient Arctic populations

    02/23/2019 12:47:09 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Arctic Today ^ | January 21, 2019 | Dermot Cole
    An ancient site on the shores of the Beaufort Sea... known as Nuvuk, which means tip or point, was an ideal spot for hunting and whaling and researchers believe it was occupied continuously for a millennium until the end of the 19th Century... About 20 years ago the deteriorating bluffs north of Utqiagvik began exposing a forgotten Nuvuk graveyard that had been used for hundreds of years, triggering a process to relocate dozens of graves to a protected site inland... So far, 85 graves have been unearthed from the site, making it the largest Thule cemetery ever excavated in North...
  • The Crucifixion of James Watson (Co-Discoverer of the double-helix structure of DNA)

    01/18/2019 7:27:06 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 72 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 01/18/2019 | Andrew Benjamin
    CNN reports: "James Watson, who discovered the double-helix structure of DNA alongside Francis Crick in the 1950s based on the work of British chemist Rosalind Franklin, said in a PBS film that genes cause a difference in intelligence between white and black people in IQ tests. "The 90-year-old's comments were labeled 'reprehensible' by the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) on New York's Long Island, where Watson had been the director from 1968 to 1993. The laboratory said it 'unequivocally rejects the unsubstantiated and reckless personal opinions Dr. James D. Watson expressed,' noting the statements were 'reprehensible [and] unsupported by science[.]'"...
  • DNA testing needed to identify mystery animal that attacked and killed NC teacher

    02/18/2019 11:52:41 AM PST · by DUMBGRUNT · 60 replies
    herald-mail media ^ | 18 Feb 2018 | MARK PRICE
    A 77-year-old North Carolina teacher has died of injuries suffered in a mysterious animal attack Friday in the small Beaufort County town of Pantego... Beaufort County is home to bears, alligators and coyotes, but “preliminary DNA testing facilitated by NC Wildlife Biologist has eliminated any wild animals indigenous to the area,”
  • Ancient African exodus mostly involved men, geneticists find

    12/22/2008 5:14:35 PM PST · by CE2949BB · 26 replies · 733+ views
    Science Codex ^ | December 21, 2008
    BOSTON, Mass. (Dec. 21, 2008) — Modern humans left Africa over 60,000 years ago in a migration that many believe was responsible for nearly all of the human population that exist outside Africa today.
  • We should gene-sequence cave paintings to find out more about who made them

    02/16/2019 5:29:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Technology Review ^ | February 14, 2019 | Emerging Technology from the arXiv
    ...the origin of these artworks is shrouded in mystery. Nobody is quite sure what the artists used for paint or binder, how the pigmentation has been preserved for so long, and -- most controversial of all -- exactly when the images were made... Today we get a unique insight into this question thanks to the work of Clodoaldo Roldán at the University of Valencia in Spain and colleagues... One way to date ancient artifacts is with carbon dating. But this works only with pigments that have a biological origin, and with the exception of black, most of them do not....
  • Extinct human species lived together in Siberian cave, new research shows

    02/16/2019 12:59:45 PM PST · by ETL · 20 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Feb 15, 2019 | Walt Bonner | Fox News
    Bones recently found in a Siberian cave have given researchers a new glimpse into the timeline of an extinct human species. The species – known as Denisovans – at one time lived alongside Neanderthals in the same cave, the evidence showed. The only fossil evidence of the Denisovans was uncovered in Denisova Cave in the Russian Altai Mountains back in 1980, and amount to three teeth and bone fragments. “Denisovans are a sister group to Neanderthals – that is, they are closer in terms of shared ancestry to Neanderthals than they are to modern humans,” study leader and geochronologist Dr. Richard...
  • The Caucasus: Complex interplay of genes and cultures

    02/11/2019 8:14:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, February 4, 2019 | editors
    An international research team, coordinated by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Eurasia Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) in Berlin, is the first to carry out systematic genetic investigations in the Caucasus region... based on analyses of genome-wide data from 45 individuals in the steppe and mountainous areas of the North Caucasus. The skeletal remains, which are between 6,500 and 3,500 years old, show that the groups living throughout the Caucasus region were genetically similar, despite the harsh mountain terrain, but that there was a sharp genetic boundary to the adjacent...