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Keyword: navigation

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  • Earth’s magnetic pole is on the move, fast. And we don’t know why

    01/12/2019 9:17:53 AM PST · by shove_it · 66 replies
    News Corp Australia Network ^ | 12 Jan 2019 | Jamie Seidel
    Earth’s magnetic field is what allows us to exist. It deflects harmful radiation. It keeps our water and atmosphere in place. But now it’s acting up — and nobody knows why. Planet Earth is alive. Deep beneath its skin, its life blood — rivers of molten iron — pulse around its core. And this mobile iron is what generates the magnetic field that causes auroras — and keeps us alive. But, according to the science journal Nature, something strange is going on deep down below. It’s causing the magnetic North Pole to ‘skitter’ away from Canada, towards Siberia. “The magnetic...
  • Shifting North Magnetic Pole Forces Unprecedented Navigation Fix

    01/11/2019 9:23:46 PM PST · by artichokegrower · 99 replies
    gCaptain ^ | January 11, 2019 | Alister Doyle
    Rapid shifts in the Earth’s north magnetic pole are forcing researchers to make an unprecedented early update to a model that helps navigation by ships, planes and submarines in the Arctic, scientists said.
  • Earth’s magnetic field is acting up and geologists don’t know why

    01/10/2019 7:52:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 126 replies
    Nature ^ | 09 January 2019 | Alexandra Witze
    The magnetic pole is moving so quickly that it has forced the world’s geomagnetism experts into a rare move. On 15 January, they are set to update the World Magnetic Model, which describes the planet’s magnetic field and underlies all modern navigation, from the systems that steer ships at sea to Google Maps on smartphones. The most recent version of the model came out in 2015 and was supposed to last until 2020 — but the magnetic field is changing so rapidly that researchers have to fix the model now. The problem lies partly with the moving pole and partly...
  • Jean-Jacques Savin: Frenchman sets off to cross Atlantic in a barrel

    01/01/2019 12:56:58 PM PST · by Theoria · 46 replies
    BBC ^ | 27 Dec 2018 | BBC
    A Frenchman has set off to cross the Atlantic Ocean in a barrel-shaped orange capsule, using ocean currents alone to propel him. Jean-Jacques Savin, 71, left El Hierro in Spain's Canary Islands and hopes to reach the Caribbean in as little as three months. His reinforced capsule contains a sleeping bunk, kitchen and storage. He will drop markers along the way to help oceanographers study Atlantic currents. Updates on the journey are being posted on a Facebook page and the latest message said the barrel was "behaving well". In a telephone interview with AFP news agency, he said: "The weather...
  • The Search for MH370 Revealed Secrets of the Deep Ocean

    03/12/2017 9:24:01 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 23 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 10 Mar, 2017 | SARAH ZHANG
    A remote part of the Indian Ocean has become, by chance, one of the best-mapped parts of the underwater world. The ocean is vast, deep, and unexplored. When Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared three years ago this week, the search brought the ocean’s vastness into sharp relief. This is how deep and dark it is three miles down. This is how unlikely you are to spot a downed airliner in 120,000 square nautical miles of open ocean. This is how much we know about the ocean floor—less than we know about the surface of Mars. As the search dragged on...
  • Ocean Search for Malaysian Airliner Finds 2nd Shipwreck [MH370]

    01/14/2016 4:13:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Voice of America ^ | January 13, 2016 | Associated Press
    story from AP, so, not risking an excerpt.
  • 4th century BC Mazotos shipwreck yields Chian amphorae and rich finds about shipbuilding history

    12/28/2018 2:47:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | December 12, 2018 | unattributed
    A total of seventy (70) partly or fully preserved Chian amphorae were recovered, which raised the number of amphorae stowed under the foredeck of the ship’s hold to ninety nine (99). Most of these amphorae were most probably carrying wine but at least one was full of olive pits, possibly for consumption by the crew. Also, two fishing weights were found, which offer us a glimpse of the life onboard the merchantmen of the period. Underneath the cargo, the wooden hull was poorly preserved, most probably (as a result of the wrecking episode and (the subsequent natural site formation processes...
  • Ancient grape seeds may link Sri Lankan trading port to Roman world

    12/26/2018 12:28:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Science Mag ^ | December 12, 2018 | Lizzie Wade
    1500 years ago, Mantai was a bustling port where merchants traded their era’s most valuable commodities. Now, a study of ancient plant remains reveals traders from all corners of the world—including the Roman Empire—may have visited or even lived there... During that time, it would have been a nexus for the spice trade, which ferried Indonesian cloves and Indian peppercorns to Middle Eastern and Roman kitchens...“Because [spices] are so valuable, people in the past really made sure they didn’t lose them or burn them,” Kingwell-Banham says. “These things were worth more than gold.” The clove, in particular, must have made...
  • Data Links Early Settlers To African Diaspora (Taiwan)

    08/30/2004 11:38:24 AM PDT · by blam · 8 replies · 660+ views
    Taipei Times ^ | 8-29-2004 | Wang Hsiao-wen
    Data links early settlers to African diaspora DIFFERENT STORIES: While genetic research puts this land on a main route of early humans' dispersion, anthropologists tie early settlements to the Pearl River Delta By Wang Hsiao-wen STAFF REPORTER Sunday, Aug 29, 2004,Page 2 Long before Portuguese sailors put "Formosa" on the world map, and long before Chinese people crossed the dark current to set up home here, this land was inhabited by Austronesian Aborigines for thousands of years. Multigenetic analysis reveals that Austronesian tribes arrived as early as 14,000 years ago. According to Marie Lin (ŞL¶ý˛ú), who conducted the research as...
  • Polynesian mtDNA in extinct Amerindians from Brazil

    04/04/2013 11:01:14 AM PDT · by Theoria · 16 replies
    Dienekes' Anthropology blog ^ | 03 April 2013 | Dienekes' Anthropology blog
    From the paper: In 1808 the Portuguese Crown declared “Just War” (Bellumiustum) against all Indian tribes that did not accept European laws (23). The fierce Botocudo were targeted in such wars and, in consequence, became virtually extinct by the end of the 19th century (24). Their importance for the history of the peopling of the Americas was revealed by studies reporting that the Botocudo had cranial features that consistently were described as intermediate between the polar Paleoamerican and Mongoloid morphologies (25, 26). Multivariate analyses of the cranial measures of different Amerindian and Paleoamerican groups from Brazil indeed concluded that the...
  • The Earliest Group Of Modern Humans To Branch Off Survived Until Just 2,300 Years Ago

    10/03/2014 8:26:08 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 10/03/2014 | STEPHEN LUNTZ, IFL SCIENCE
    Oxford Journals, Genome Biology and EvolutionBurial site and skeletal remains of the St. Helena marine forager, who was at least 50 years old when he died DNA from a 2,300-year-old skeleton suggests that the earliest known group of modern humans to branch off from the wider genetic population survived until astonishingly recently. The finding supports the case that southern, rather than eastern, Africa is humanity's ancestral home.Mitochondrial DNA, passed on only from the mother, demonstrates that all humanity is descended from a single ancestor around 200,000 years ago. Archaeological evidence points to the Omo Valley, where fossil evidence suggests that Homo sapiens roamed Africa 195,000...
  • DNA reveals details of the peopling of the Americas

    09/02/2013 8:46:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Science News ^ | August 12, 2013 | Tina Hesman Saey
    The scientists examined the DNA of mitochondria, tiny power plants within cells that get passed down from mother to child. Scientists use mitochondrial DNA from living populations to decipher ancient movements of their ancestors. Most studies have examined only a small part of the mitochondria's circular piece of DNA. But Antonio Torroni, a geneticist at the University of Pavia in Italy, and his coauthors compiled complete mitochondrial genomes from 41 native North Americans and combined that data with information from previous studies... supports the widely accepted notion of an initial coastal migration wave. A second wave of migration probably left...
  • The First Men And Women From The Canary Islands Were Berbers

    10/23/2009 8:30:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 942+ views
    Science News ^ | Wednesday, October 21, 2009 | Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology via Eurekalert
    A team of Spanish and Portuguese researchers has carried out molecular genetic analysis of the Y chromosome (transmitted only by males) of the aboriginal population of the Canary Islands to determine their origin and the extent to which they have survived in the current population. The results suggest a North African origin for these paternal lineages which, unlike maternal lineages, have declined to the point of being practically replaced today by European lineages... Although contribution is now mainly European, scientists state that North African and Sub-Saharan contribution was higher in the 17th and 18th centuries. The explanation as to why...
  • Unexpected origin of an early Eskimo

    05/31/2008 11:22:09 AM PDT · by BGHater · 14 replies · 803+ views
    Nature ^ | 29 May 2008 | Daniel Cressey
    But hair sample could have been from a wandering mercenary. An early wave of migration into the New World and the Arctic has been identified by sequencing a genome from a frozen hair excavated in Greenland. Archaeological evidence shows that there were two waves of migration to Greenland starting 4,500 years ago, first with the Saqqaq and then the Dorset groups, collectively known as the Paleo-Eskimos. Later, around 1,000 years ago, came the Thule culture which led to the current native population. The relationship between these three groups has been uncertain. Some theories hold that Paleo-Eskimos derived from the populations...
  • Genetic Study Uncovers New Path to Polynesia

    02/05/2011 4:22:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Thursday, February 3, 2011 | University of Leeds
    The islands of Polynesia were first inhabited around 3,000 years ago, but where these people came from has long been a hot topic of debate amongst scientists. The most commonly accepted view, based on archaeological and linguistic evidence as well as genetic studies, is that Pacific islanders were the latter part of a migration south and eastwards from Taiwan which began around 4,000 years ago. But the Leeds research -- published February 3 in The American Journal of Human Genetics -- has found that the link to Taiwan does not stand up to scrutiny. In fact, the DNA of current...
  • New research forces U-turn in population migration theory

    05/23/2008 10:49:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 21 replies · 142+ views
    University of Leeds ^ | May 23, 2008 | Unknown
    Research led by the University of Leeds has discovered genetic evidence that overturns existing theories about human migration into Island Southeast Asia (covering the Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysian Borneo) - taking the timeline back by nearly 10,000 years. Prevailing theory suggests that the present-day populations of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) originate largely from a Neolithic expansion from Taiwan driven by rice agriculture about 4,000 years ago - the so-called "Out of Taiwan" model. However an international research team, led by the UK’s first Professor of Archaeogenetics, Martin Richards, has shown that a substantial fraction of their mitochondrial DNA lineages (inherited...
  • No, Archaeologists Probably Did Not Find a New Piece of the Antikythera Mechanism

    11/23/2018 3:21:10 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | November 15, 2018 | Jason Daley
    This week, word began to spread around some corners of the web that a new piece of the legendary ancient Greek computer known as the Antikythera Mechanism may have been found. But the claims, which surfaced following a Haaretz feature on the ongoing archaeological work in the area where the device was first uncovered, are misleading at best... ...in 2017... marine archaeologists from the Greek Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and Lund University in Sweden uncovered more treasures including pieces of a bronze statue and an encrusted bronze disk with four tabs on it that appeared almost like a cog wheel....
  • Deep-sea mysteries (coral reefs found off Israeli coast)

    10/04/2010 7:35:26 AM PDT · by decimon · 3 replies
    University of Haifa ^ | October 3, 2010 | Editor
    The exploration vessel Nautilus, with a team of experts of the University of Haifa’s Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, headed by Prof. Zvi Ben Avraham, discovered for the first time an area of reefs with deep-sea corals in the Mediterranean, offshore of Israel. This area apparently stretches over a few kilometers, 700 meters under the surface and some 30-40 km off the coast of Tel Aviv. According to the researchers, this southeastern region of the Mediterranean has only sparse sea life and therefore the discovery is in fact parallel to discovering an oasis in the middle of an...
  • Major Quake Likely In Middle East, Survey Finds

    07/26/2007 1:42:31 PM PDT · by blam · 47 replies · 1,129+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 7-26-2007 | Kate Ravilious
    Major Quake Likely in Middle East, Survey Finds Kate Ravilious for National Geographic News July 26, 2007 In A.D. 551, a massive earthquake devastated the coast of Phoenicia, now Lebanon. The disaster is well-documented, but scientists had struggled over the years to locate the earthquake fault. Now a new underwater survey has uncovered the fault and shown that it moves approximately every 1,500 years—which means a disaster is due any day now. "It is just a matter of time before a destructive tsunami hits this region again," said Iain Stewart, an earthquake expert at the University of Plymouth in the...
  • Three New DNA Studies Are Shaking Up the History of Humans in the Americas

    11/08/2018 1:53:38 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    gizmodo ^ | George Dvorsky
    By sequencing and analyzing 15 ancient genomes found throughout the Americas—six of which were older than 10,000 years—these researchers determined that, around 8,000 years ago, the ancestors of Native Americans were still on the move, migrating away from Mesoamerica (what is today Mexico and Central America) toward both North and South America. These groups moved rapidly and unevenly, sometimes interbreeding with local populations, complicating the genetic—and historical—picture even further. The close genetic similarity observed between some of the groups studied suggests rapid migratory speed through North and South America. The Meltzer and Willerslev team, which included dozens of researchers from...