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Keyword: superconductivity

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  • Scientists use light to accelerate supercurrents, access forbidden light, quantum world

    05/19/2020 8:16:39 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    Phys.org ^ | https://phys.org/news/2020-05-scientists-supercurrents-access-forbidden-quantum.html | Iowa State University
    The scientists have seen unexpected things in supercurrents—electricity that moves through materials without resistance, usually at super cold temperatures—that break symmetry and are supposed to be forbidden by the conventional laws of physics, said Jigang Wang, a professor of physics and astronomy at Iowa State University, a senior scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and the leader of the project. "The forbidden light gives us access to an exotic class of quantum phenomena—that's the energy and particles at the small scale of atoms—called forbidden Anderson pseudo-spin precessions," Perakis said. ... Wang's recent studies have been made possible...
  • Scientists use pressure to make liquid magnetism breakthrough

    05/19/2020 12:19:19 AM PDT · by RomanSoldier19 · 21 replies
    https://phys.org/n ^ | MAY 19, 2020 | by Andre Salles, Argonne National Laboratory
    It sounds like a riddle: What do you get if you take two small diamonds, put a small magnetic crystal between them and squeeze them together very slowly? The answer is a magnetic liquid, which seems counterintuitive. Liquids become solids under pressure, but not generally the other way around. But this unusual pivotal discovery, unveiled by a team of researchers working at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, may provide scientists with new insight into high-temperature superconductivity and quantum computing. Though scientists and engineers have...
  • Superconductors with 'zeitgeist' – when materials differentiate between the past and the future

    05/18/2020 7:50:19 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 18, 2020 | Dresden University of Technology
    Physicists at TU Dresden have discovered spontaneous static magnetic fields with broken time-reversal symmetry in a class of iron-based superconductors. The past and the future of human life are not symmetric and therefore not reversible. In physics, this is different. The fundamental forces of nature in elementary particles, atoms and molecules are symmetric with respect to their development in time: Forwards or backwards makes no difference, scientists call this a time-reversal symmetry. However, for some years, physicists have been discovering new superconductors which brake time-reversal symmetry. To explain these observations, the basic mechanism of superconductivity, which has been known for...
  • Scientists find a rule to predict new superconducting metal hydrides

    04/16/2020 3:11:14 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 7 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 4/16/20 | Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology
    Credit: Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology The search for coveted high-temperature superconductors is going to get easier with a new 'law within a law' discovered by Skoltech and MIPT researchers and their colleagues, who figured out a link between an element's position in the Periodic Table and its potential to form a high-temperature superconducting hydride. The new paper is published in the journal Current Opinion in Solid State & Materials Science. The research was supported by the Russian Science Foundation. Superconducting materials, with zero resistance and thus no dissipation of energy to heat, would be extremely useful for...
  • 'Electron pairing' found well above superconductor's critical temperature

    08/21/2019 3:40:25 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    phys.org ^ | 08/21/2019 | Jade Boyd, Rice University
    Physicists have known since 1911 that electricity can flow without resistance in materials called superconductors. And in 1957, they figured out why: Under specific conditions, including typically very cold temperatures, electrons join together in pairs—something that's normally forbidden due to their mutual repulsion—and as pairs, they can flow freely. Electron pairs are named for Leon Cooper, the physicist who first described them. In addition to explaining classical superconductivity, physicists believe Cooper pairs bring about high-temperature superconductivity, an unconventional variant discovered in the 1980s. It was dubbed "high-temperature" because it occurs at temperatures that, although still very cold, are considerably higher...
  • Controllable fast, tiny magnetic bits

    01/04/2019 7:06:59 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    Phys.org ^ | January 4, 2019 by | Denis Paiste, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    [A] bit of heat production from resistance is a desirable characteristic in metallic thin films for spintronic applications such as solid-state computer memory. Similarly, while defects are often undesirable in materials science, they can be used to control creation of magnetic quasi-particles known as skyrmions. In separate papers published this month in the journals Nature Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, researchers in the group of MIT Professor Geoffrey S.D. Beach and colleagues in California, Germany, Switzerland, and Korea, showed that they can generate stable and fast moving skyrmions in specially formulated layered materials at room temperature, setting world records for size...
  • Extreme, Hydrogen-Crushing Physicists Are Pushing Us into a 'New Era of Superconductivity'

    03/30/2019 12:01:24 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    space.com ^ | 03/29/2019 | By Rafi Letzter
    For more than a century, physicists have hunted for superconductivity in warmer materials.... In 1986, researchers uncovered ceramics that were superconductive at temperatures as high as 30 degrees above absolute zero, or minus 406 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 243 degrees Celsius). Later, in the 1990s, researchers first looked in earnest at very high pressures, to see if they might reveal new kinds of superconductors. The next big breakthrough came in 2001, when researchers showed that magnesium diboride (MgB2) was superconductive at 39 degrees above absolute zero, or minus 389 F (minus 234 C). Since then, the hunt for warm superconductors has...
  • If These US Navy Patents are Made Then We Are in a Star Trek Technology World

    03/09/2019 6:04:55 AM PST · by vannrox · 90 replies
    Next BIG Future ^ | 22FB19 | Brian Wang
    February 22, 2019 |   Salvatore Cezar Pais is a US Navy researcher. Salvatore has three amazing patents that would be incredible breakthroughs in physics if they are true. The least extreme is a patent for Piezoelectricity-Induced Room Temperature Superconductor. The other two patents are gravity wave generator and inertial mass reduction.If these could be realized as technologies then we are talking Star Trek level spaceships. The gravitational wave generator could be used for propellentless propulsion to near the speed of light. Being able to reduce inertia would also mean capabilities which currently seem beyond known physics.The more likely situation...
  • Hemp waste fibers form basis of supercapacitor more conductive than graphene

    03/15/2016 7:38:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | March 11, 2016 | Rick Stella
    Comprised of a lone hexagonal honeycomb lattice layer of tightly packed carbon atoms, graphene is one of the strongest, lightest, and most conductive compounds ever discovered. Bottom line, it's an extraordinary composite. However, a scientist from New York's Clarkson University says he's found a way to manufacture hemp waste into a material "better than graphene." Moreover, the scientist -- known to his peers as Dr. David Mitlin -- says creating this graphene-like hemp material costs but a minuscule fraction of what it takes to produce graphene. Presented at an American Chemical Society Meeting in San Francisco, Dr. Mitlin described how...
  • New design could finally help to bring fusion power closer to reality

    08/10/2015 1:53:25 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    phys.org ^ | August 10, 2015 | by David L. Chandler & Provided by: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    A cutaway view of the proposed ARC reactor. Thanks to powerful new magnet technology, the much smaller, less-expensive ARC reactor would deliver the same power output as a much larger reactor. Credit: the MIT ARC team ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It's an old joke that many fusion scientists have grown tired of hearing: Practical nuclear fusion power plants are just 30 years away—and always will be. But now, finally, the joke may no longer be true: Advances in magnet technology have enabled researchers at MIT to propose a new design for a practical compact tokamak fusion reactor—and it's one that might be realized...
  • Scientists have discovered a new state of matter, called 'Jahn-Teller metals'

    07/25/2015 6:00:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 26 replies
    Science Alert ^ | May 12, 2015 | Bec Crew
    And it could be the key to understanding one of the biggest mysteries in physics today - high-temperature superconductors.An international team of scientists has announced the discovery of a new state of matter in a material that appears to be an insulator, superconductor, metal and magnet all rolled into one, saying that it could lead to the development of more effective high-temperature superconductors. Why is this so exciting? Well, if these properties are confirmed, this new state of matter will allow scientists to better understand why some materials have the potential to achieve superconductivity at a relativity high critical temperature...
  • High-temperature superconductor spills secret: A new phase of matter

    03/25/2011 3:27:53 PM PDT · by decimon · 23 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | March 24, 2011 | Unknown
    (PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California at Berkeley have joined with researchers at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to mount a three-pronged attack on one of the most obstinate puzzles in materials sciences: what is the pseudogap?A collaboration organized by Zhi-Xun Shen, a member of the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES) at SLAC and a professor of physics at Stanford University, used three complementary experimental approaches to investigate a single material, the high-temperature superconductor Pb-Bi2201 (lead bismuth strontium lanthanum copper-oxide)....
  • One-atom-thick materials promise a 'new industrial revolution'

    07/24/2005 10:53:00 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 20 replies · 1,584+ views
    Scientists at The University of Manchester have discovered a new class of materials which have previously only existed in science fiction films and books. A team of British and Russian scientists led by Professor Geim have discovered a whole family of previously unknown materials, which are one atom thick and exhibit properties which scientists had never thought possible. Not only are they ultra-thin, but depending on circumstances they can also be ultra-strong, highly-insulating or highly-conductive, offering a wide range of unique properties for space-age engineers and designers to choose from. Professor Andre Geim said: "This discovery opens up practically infinite...
  • Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current

    07/24/2015 10:52:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 24, 2015 | by Carla Reiter & Provided by: Argonne National Laboratory
    Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this...
  • New, expanding magnet turns around 175-year-old principle of magnetism

    05/28/2015 9:06:45 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The International Business Times UK ^ | May 23, 2015 | Jayalakshmi K
    A new class of magnets discovered that swell in volume and generate little heat when placed in a magnetic field could be used to harvest or convert energy efficiently. Applications range from sensors and actuators for automobiles to biomedical devices, besides defence applications. Discovered by scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD) and Temple University, the new magnets made from abundant metal alloys could replace the expensive, rare-earth magnets which exhibit poor mechanical properties. Maryland professor of materials science and engineering Manfred Wuttig, and Harsh Deep Chopra, professor and chair of mechanical engineering at Temple heated certain iron-based alloys (iron-gallium,...
  • Temple Physics Dept. chair accused of selling sensitive information to China

    05/22/2015 3:25:04 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 21 replies
    Philadelphia Inquirer ^ | 05/22/2015 | Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder,
    --SNIP-- The chairman of Temple University's physics department was charged Thursday in an alleged scheme to provide sensitive U.S. defense technology to entities in China, including its government. Federal prosecutors allege Xiaoxing Xi, a world-renowned expert in the field of superconductivity, sought prestigious appointments in China in exchange for sharing information on a device invented by a private company in the United States
  • Shedding new light on 175-year-old principle: New class of swelling magnets ... energize the world

    05/20/2015 11:06:44 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-20-2015 | Provided by Temple University
    A new class of magnets that expand their volume when placed in a magnetic field and generate negligible amounts of wasteful heat during energy harvesting, has been discovered by researchers at Temple University and the University of Maryland. The researchers, Harsh Deep Chopra, professor and chair of mechanical engineering at Temple, and Manfred Wuttig, professor of materials science and engineering at Maryland, published their findings, "Non-Joulian Magnetostriction," in the May 21st issue of the journal, Nature. This transformative breakthrough has the potential to not only displace existing technologies but create altogether new applications due to the unusual combination of magnetic...
  • This Strange Metal Might Be the Newest State of Matter

    05/14/2015 10:48:49 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 38 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 12 may 2015 | John Wenz
    Researchers at Japan's Tohoku University are making a bold claim: an entirely new state of matter. The team, led by Kosmas Prassides, says they've created what's called a Jahn-Teller metal by inserting rubidium, a strange alkali metal element, into buckyballs, a pure carbon structure which has a spherical shape from a series of interlocking polygons (think of the Epcot Center, but in microscopic size.) Advertisement - Continue Reading Below Buckyballs, which are somewhat related to other supermaterials like graphene and carbon nanotubes, are already known for their superconductive capabilities. Here, while combining buckyballs and rubidium, the researchers created a...
  • Ultrathin Copper-Oxide Layers Behave Like Quantum Spin Liquid

    06/10/2011 8:04:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 14 replies
    Brookhaven National Laboratory ^ | June 10, 2011 | Unknown
    Surprising discovery may offer clues to emergence of high-temperature superconductivityUPTON, NY — Magnetic studies of ultrathin slabs of copper-oxide materials reveal that at very low temperatures, the thinnest, isolated layers lose their long-range magnetic order and instead behave like a “quantum spin liquid” — a state of matter where the orientations of electron spins fluctuate wildly. This unexpected discovery by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland may offer support for the idea that this novel condensed state of matter is a precursor to the emergence of...
  • The 2011 Cold Fusion/Lattice-Assisted Nuclear Reactions Colloquium at MIT — Part 2

    09/27/2011 11:42:18 PM PDT · by Kevmo · 11 replies
    INFINITE ENERGY • ISSUE 99 • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011 ^ | ISSUE 99 • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011 | INFINITE ENERGY •/ Jet Energy Staff
    The 2011 Cold Fusion/Lattice-Assisted Nuclear Reactions Colloquium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — Part 2 (Report prepared by staff of JET Energy, Inc.) INFINITE ENERGY • ISSUE 99 • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011 The 2011 Lattice-Assisted Nuclear Reactions/Cold Fusion Colloquium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, Massachusetts) was held on Saturday, June 11 and Sunday, June 12, 2011. The meeting focused on the science and technology of cold fusion (CF) and lattice-assisted nuclear reactions (LANR). In 1989, the initial failures of cold fusion resulted from bad experiments, bad paradigm, materials issues, poor loadings and a poor appreciation of the...