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Marijuana Myths
TheCollegeConservative ^ | 02/03/2012 | Alan Groves

Posted on 02/03/2012 10:57:07 AM PST by gabriellah

In 2011, Gallup reported that 62% of 18-29 year olds and 50% of the general public supports the legalization of marijuana; 69% of liberals and even 34% of conservatives also support such measures. Obviously the pro-pot movement has taken root in the American populace and especially in the minds of Millennials (even managing to infiltrate the minds of the most conservative among us).

Myth #1: Legalization Would bring in Enormous Tax Revenues

The Heritage Foundation’s Charles Stimson published an extensive legal memorandum urging for the failure of the RCTC Act of 2010, which would have legalized pot in California. This memorandum debunks the myth that legalization would eliminate the black market for marijuana and would bring in enormous revenue, therefore stimulating the economy.

Dr. Rosalie Pacula, a drug policy expert at the RAND Corporation for over 15 years, testified that under the California law: “There would be tremendous profit motive for the existing black market providers to stay in the market. The only way California could effectively eliminate the black market for marijuana is to take away the substantial profits in the market and allow the price of marijuana to fall to an amount close to the cost of production. Doing so, however, will mean substantially smaller tax revenue”(Stimson 9).

In other words, simple economics expose the assumption that drug dealers would voluntarily enter the legal market, when the cost of production is virtually zero. In fact, it was calculated that “an individual will be able to produce 24,000 to 240,000 joints legally each year” (Stimson 9). This is more than any individual could possibly consume, and it is encouraging individuals to sell pot on the side, subverting taxation. Why would anyone buy marijuana legally when they would have to pay a higher price for it? It would be a much higher price considering California proposed a $50/ounce tax on top of the list price. Why would drug dealers leave the black market when they don’t have to?

Fiscal conservatives should not be lured into such intellectual inconsistency. We are not going to solve the budget crises and pay off our $15 trillion debt with whatever change is left from a feeble government attempt to tax the un-taxable.

Myth #2: Marijuana is a Victimless Drug

Marijuana has a history of being linked to crime in the United States and throughout the world. “60% of arrestees test positive for marijuana use in the United States, England, and Australia” (Stimson 6). And while many pro-legalization advocates argue that most of these marijuana users are people arrested for non-violent crimes, they fail to note that marijuana usage is strongly correlated with cocaine and other more serious drugs, as well as murder, assault, money laundering, and smuggling (Stimson 5-6). Surely, legalization advocates do not believe that all marijuana users are little angels?

In fact, in Amsterdam, one of Europe’s most violent cities, pot is legal and a prevalent aspect of society (Stimson 6). Heritage reports that “Officials are in the process of closing marijuana dispensaries, or ‘coffee shops,’ because of the crime associated with their operation” (Stimson 6).

California’s partial legalization via usage of “medical marijuana” is beginning to show the same effects. LAPD reports that areas surrounding cannabis clubs have seen a 200% increase in robberies and a 130.8% increase in aggravated assault (Stimson 6). A drug that increases crime doesn’t exactly qualify as “victimless.”

In addition to this, local communities where neighborhoods and residential housing are dominant will be adversely affected. Residents who live in areas with extensive marijuana usage have repeatedly complained about the incredible smell put off by the plants. Even worse than the smell though, is the growing crime rate in residential areas which is induced by theft of marijuana from yards where it is grown (Stimson 6).

It may be ideologically convenient for some to oversimplify the issue as a violation against individual liberty, but when all the facts are presented, it is obvious that the only liberty being violated is the blatant disregard for property rights, law, and order.

Myth #3: Marijuana = Alcohol

Legalization advocates link marijuana and alcohol as equally mild intoxicants, suggesting that they deserve equal treatment under the law. However, as the above research suggests, marijuana is more dangerous to the health and safety of society.

For better or for worse, alcohol as been part of human history for millennia. Typically, individuals responsibly self-monitor their consumption thereof. Alcohol has also been regulated by cultural norms rather than by government. Society, culture, and religion have proven to be the best regulators of alcoholic consumption. The same cannot be said of marijuana – as seen in the information presented earlier.

In addition to its lack of historical precedent in America’s historical experience, marijuana also has much more severe health effects than alcohol. 1) marijuana is far more likely than alcohol to be cause addiction, 2) it is usually consumed to the point of intoxication, 3) it has no known intrinsically healthful properties (it can only relieve pain –and artificially at that), 4) it has toxins that can result in birth defects, pain, respiratory damage, brain damage, and stroke, 5) it increases heart rate by 20% to 100% elevating the risk of heart attack (Stimson 4).

In relation to history, economics, and health, marijuana is nothing like alcohol.

Conclusion: Conservatives should not be afraid to combat the growing sentiment that supports the legalization of marijuana. Economics, historical precedent, and conservative principles are all on our side. It is up to unashamed, unapologetic young conservatives to articulate that message and continue to stand for ordered liberty.


TOPICS: Government; Health/Medicine; Politics
KEYWORDS: anslingersghost; drugs; drugwarnazis; jackbootedthugs; marijuana; reefermadness; wod; wodlist; wosd
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1 posted on 02/03/2012 10:57:08 AM PST by gabriellah
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To: gabriellah

Are they distinguishing “medical” usage from “recreational” usage? I would be for the former but not for the later.


2 posted on 02/03/2012 10:59:16 AM PST by sigzero
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To: gabriellah
I just had to laugh at this one... Marijuana has a history of being linked to crime in the United States and throughout the world..,p. And Alcohol isn't? Truth is that legalization would suck the wind right out of the sails of the narco-terrorists just as it did to the mop that controlled alcohol during prohibition.
3 posted on 02/03/2012 11:02:11 AM PST by rightwingextremist1776
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To: sigzero
You can't legalize drugs without putting a lot of cops and prison guards out of work.

Can't have that happen, can we?

4 posted on 02/03/2012 11:02:19 AM PST by starlifter (Pullum sapit)
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To: sigzero

The former would lead to the later. I’m not for either.


5 posted on 02/03/2012 11:02:19 AM PST by bgill (The Obama administration is staging a coup. Wake up, America, before it's too late.)
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To: gabriellah
For better or for worse, alcohol as been part of human history for millennia.

And so has cannabis.

6 posted on 02/03/2012 11:03:03 AM PST by svcw (For the new year: you better toughen up, if you are going to continue to be stupid.)
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To: sigzero
In empirical reality, the distinction is meaningless.

"Medical" users are recreational users with paperwork from prescription mills.

7 posted on 02/03/2012 11:03:08 AM PST by wideawake
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To: gabriellah
Of the many falsehoods in this article, the following may be the most glaring:

"marijuana is far more likely than alcohol to be cause addiction"

Exactly the opposite is true: according to research cited by the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine, of all those who ever used marijuana, 9% have at some point been addicted to it - whereas the corresponding figure for alcohol is 15%.

8 posted on 02/03/2012 11:06:42 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: rightwingextremist1776
Truth is that legalization would suck the wind right out of the sails of the narco-terrorists just as it did to the mop that controlled alcohol during prohibition.

If a person of reasonable intelligence thinks about the issue for more than five seconds, he will realize that legalization will have no meaningful impact on "the narco-terrorists" - just as the end of Prohibition had negligible impact on organized crime in America.

Unless you are prepared to argue that the mob ceased to exist on December 5, 1933.

9 posted on 02/03/2012 11:07:02 AM PST by wideawake
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To: gabriellah
An issue not usually addressed is that many occupations, such as oil and gas work, require by law, drug testing. And for good reasons. So assuming those safety requirements stay on they books, we have an another society polarizing effect. Those who are cool or at least cool to it and those that aren't, as the saying went. Can I enjoy a concert filled with pot smoke if I am subject to losing my job if I fail a wiz quiz? Considering the hate towards tobacco smoke these days, what's it going to be in public places against the smell of burning rope? Legalizing may still mean some boundaries exist but it is more likely that people who don't care for smoke will be affected if pot is more prevalent. Now if people would go to hookah houses or eat marijuana brownies that might work.
10 posted on 02/03/2012 11:08:11 AM PST by dblshot (Insanity: electing the same people over and over and expecting different results.)
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To: gabriellah

Drugs are a tax on your health.


11 posted on 02/03/2012 11:10:27 AM PST by Berlin_Freeper
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To: sigzero

There is much evidence that THC has medical benefits. (Kaiser did a ten year study, showing that people with medial of various sort, or are effective negatively from some treatments had relief). I can’t figure out why there aren’t pills or creams or whatever available for people who might be able to benefit.


12 posted on 02/03/2012 11:12:09 AM PST by svcw (For the new year: you better toughen up, if you are going to continue to be stupid.)
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To: wideawake
the end of Prohibition had negligible impact on organized crime in America.

Unless you are prepared to argue that the mob ceased to exist on December 5, 1933.

False dichotomy - there is a spectrum of outcomes between "negligible impact" and "ceased to exist."

That being so, the burden of proof falls on the one making the claim. Where is the evidence for your claim that "the end of Prohibition had negligible impact on organized crime in America"?

13 posted on 02/03/2012 11:12:25 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: gabriellah
That Heritage Foundation article is simply outstanding.
 
It's long. But read it. Read it now.
 
Legalizing Marijuana: Why Citizens Should Just Say No
 
 
It is beyond belief that there are so many liberals here at FR who want to legalize this.


14 posted on 02/03/2012 11:13:59 AM PST by Responsibility2nd (Newt or else. What part of "Join or Die" don't you understand?)
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To: dblshot
Can I enjoy a concert filled with pot smoke if I am subject to losing my job if I fail a wiz quiz?

Wow, I haven't been to a concert where anybody was allowed to smoke anything in years. Get smashed - You bet but smoke tobacco or cannibus or anything else? Not a chance. Where are you going?

15 posted on 02/03/2012 11:14:23 AM PST by rhombus
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To: gabriellah
In fact, in Amsterdam, one of Europe’s most violent cities, pot is legal and a prevalent aspect of society (Stimson 6). Heritage reports that “Officials are in the process of closing marijuana dispensaries, or ‘coffee shops,’ because of the crime associated with their operation” (Stimson 6).

Stupid

Amsterdam's crime is from Islamic immigrants who I doubt are big pot heads

In addition to its lack of historical precedent in America’s historical experience, marijuana also has much more severe health effects than alcohol. 1) marijuana is far more likely than alcohol to be cause addiction, 2) it is usually consumed to the point of intoxication, 3) it has no known intrinsically healthful properties (it can only relieve pain –and artificially at that), 4) it has toxins that can result in birth defects, pain, respiratory damage, brain damage, and stroke, 5) it increases heart rate by 20% to 100% elevating the risk of heart attack (Stimson 4).

Everything in the above is flat out lie

I haven't smoked pot in 10+ years and have no desire to do so again, but come on now, if you have to resort to half truths, distortions and flat out lies like those found in this article, then it's really time to reexamine your position.

Who ever wrote this tripe is an embarrassment to Conservatives, regardless of which position you take. Liberals use tactics and lies like this, not Conservatives

16 posted on 02/03/2012 11:14:35 AM PST by qam1 (There's been a huge party. All plates and the bottles are empty, all that's left is the bill to pay)
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To: gabriellah
This must have been published in The Onion. It's hysterical, the logic is flawed in all of the arguments, but "mythbuster" #3 is downright absurd.

Alcohol has destroyed more lives, destroyed more families, been responsible for more abused wives, abused children and general violent crime and killed more people--either directly or indirectly--than all the other drugs combined.

You can't successfully legislate behavior or morality and attempting to do so only increases criminality and scorn for the law.

Legalization is one of the areas where libertarians are right.
17 posted on 02/03/2012 11:14:52 AM PST by Sudetenland (Anybody but Obama!!!!)
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To: gabriellah

The conclusion is not supported by the “facts” ... In no place in the USA can someone grow their own supply free from threat of arrest ,, that keeps the bad elements involved and the price high (creating the crime in myth#2) ... Marijuana is not Alcohol (myth#3) , marijuana is far more benign... especially if the price were low enough where people could afford to use it in ways other than the most efficient (smoking) ... cooking or heated inhalation devices ...

The biggest fraud in this “study” is the arrest statistics ... sure a large percentage of people arrested test positive ... it is a fat soluable drug ... you could use crack or meth and test “clean” the next day where 6 months later you will test positive for THC.

P.S. before the “smart people” chime in ... I don’t use.


18 posted on 02/03/2012 11:16:17 AM PST by Neidermeyer
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To: Responsibility2nd
Now we know where the blogger got this lie: "marijuana is far more likely to cause addiction". See post#8 for the truth.
19 posted on 02/03/2012 11:17:35 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: gabriellah

Fact from direct sources in California prisons. The violent offenders LOVE their pot.


20 posted on 02/03/2012 11:19:00 AM PST by A CA Guy ( God Bless America, God bless and keep safe our fighting men and women.)
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To: gabriellah

Informative post, thank you.


21 posted on 02/03/2012 11:19:17 AM PST by Persevero (Homeschooling for Excellence since 1992)
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To: qam1
if you have to resort to half truths, distortions and flat out lies like those found in this article, then you must be a drug war supporter.
22 posted on 02/03/2012 11:19:46 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: svcw
They made a pill of THC called IIRC “Marinol” that was prescribed for nausea.

The problem being that the pill was often vomited up before it could be digested and bring relief.

Some joked that it was like prescribing a suppository to treat diarrhea.

23 posted on 02/03/2012 11:20:20 AM PST by allmendream (Tea Party did not send the GOP to D.C. to negotiate the terms of our surrender to socialism.)
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To: gabriellah
America's #1 Narco Terrorist. /s

WWWD?

Legalize herb. Outlaw the IRS. Yeah Willie is a threat to our nation.


24 posted on 02/03/2012 11:21:04 AM PST by rawcatslyentist (It is necessary that a person be born of a father who is a citizen; ~Vattel's Law of Nations)
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To: A CA Guy
More arrestees test positive for alcohol than for pot.
25 posted on 02/03/2012 11:21:42 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies

It’s not a lie. Marijuan is far more dangerous.

Did you read that Heritage Foundation report?

http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2010/09/legalizing-marijuana-why-citizens-should-just-say-no?query=Legalizing+Marijuana:+Why+Citizens+Should+Just+Say+No

Unsafe in Any Amount: How Marijuana Is Not Like Alcohol

Marijuana advocates have had some success peddling the notion that marijuana is a “soft” drug, similar to alcohol, and fundamentally different from “hard” drugs like cocaine or heroin. It is true that marijuana is not the most dangerous of the commonly abused drugs, but that is not to say that it is safe. Indeed, marijuana shares more in common with the “hard” drugs than it does with alcohol.

A common argument for legalization is that smoking marijuana is no more dangerous than drinking alcohol and that prohibiting the use of marijuana is therefore no more justified than the prohibition of alcohol. As Jacob Sullum, author of Saying Yes: In Defense of Drug Use, writes:

Americans understood the problems associated with alcohol abuse, but they also understood the problems associated with Prohibition, which included violence, organized crime, official corruption, the erosion of civil liberties, disrespect for the law, and injuries and deaths caused by tainted black-market booze. They decided that these unintended side effects far outweighed whatever harms Prohibition prevented by discouraging drinking. The same sort of analysis today would show that the harm caused by drug prohibition far outweighs the harm it prevents, even without taking into account the value to each individual of being sovereign over his own body and mind.[7]

At first blush, this argument is appealing, especially to those wary of over-regulation by government. But it overlooks the enormous difference between alcohol and marijuana.

Legalization advocates claim that marijuana and alcohol are mild intoxicants and so should be regulated similarly; but as the experience of nearly every culture, over the thousands of years of human history, demonstrates, alcohol is different. Nearly every culture has its own alcoholic preparations, and nearly all have successfully regulated alcohol consumption through cultural norms. The same cannot be said of marijuana. There are several possible explanations for alcohol’s unique status: For most people, it is not addictive; it is rarely consumed to the point of intoxication; low-level consumption is consistent with most manual and intellectual tasks; it has several positive health benefits; and it is formed by the fermentation of many common substances and easily metabolized by the body.

To be sure, there are costs associated with alcohol abuse, such as drunk driving and disease associated with excessive consumption. A few cultures—and this nation for a short while during Prohibition—have concluded that the benefits of alcohol consumption are not worth the costs. But they are the exception; most cultures have concluded that it is acceptable in moderation. No other intoxicant shares that status.

Alcohol differs from marijuana in several crucial respects. First, marijuana is far more likely to cause addiction. Second, it is usually consumed to the point of intoxication. Third, it has no known general healthful properties, though it may have some palliative effects. Fourth, it is toxic and deleterious to health. Thus, while it is true that both alcohol and marijuana are less intoxicating than other mood-altering drugs, that is not to say that marijuana is especially similar to alcohol or that its use is healthy or even safe.

In fact, compared to alcohol, marijuana is not safe. Long-term, moderate consumption of alcohol carries few health risks and even offers some significant benefits. For example, a glass of wine (or other alcoholic drink) with dinner actually improves health.[8] Dozens of peer-reviewed medical studies suggest that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol reduces the risk of heart disease, strokes, gallstones, diabetes, and death from a heart attack.[9] According to the Mayo Clinic, among many others, moderate use of alcohol (defined as two drinks a day) “seems to offer some health benefits, particularly for the heart.”[10] Countless articles in medical journals and other scientific literature confirm the positive health effects of moderate alcohol consumption.

The effects of regular marijuana consumption are quite different. For example, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (a division of the National Institutes of Health) has released studies showing that use of marijuana has wide-ranging negative health effects. Long-term marijuana consumption “impairs the ability of T-cells in the lungs’ immune system to fight off some infections.”[11] These studies have also found that marijuana consumption impairs short-term memory, making it difficult to learn and retain information or perform complex tasks; slows reaction time and impairs motor coordination; increases heart rate by 20 percent to 100 percent, thus elevating the risk of heart attack; and alters moods, resulting in artificial euphoria, calmness, or (in high doses) anxiety or paranoia.[12] And it gets worse: Marijuana has toxic properties that can result in birth defects, pain, respiratory system damage, brain damage, and stroke.[13]

Further, prolonged use of marijuana may cause cognitive degradation and is “associated with lower test scores and lower educational attainment because during periods of intoxication the drug affects the ability to learn and process information, thus influencing attention, concentration, and short-term memory.”[14] Unlike alcohol, marijuana has been shown to have a residual effect on cognitive ability that persists beyond the period of intoxication.[15] According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, whereas alcohol is broken down relatively quickly in the human body, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the main active chemical in marijuana) is stored in organs and fatty tissues, allowing it to remain in a user’s body for days or even weeks after consumption.[16] Research has shown that marijuana consumption may also cause “psychotic symptoms.”[17]

Marijuana’s effects on the body are profound. According to the British Lung Foundation, “smoking three or four marijuana joints is as bad for your lungs as smoking twenty tobacco cigarettes.”[18] Researchers in Canada found that marijuana smoke contains significantly higher levels of numerous toxic compounds, like ammonia and hydrogen cyanide, than regular tobacco smoke.[19] In fact, the study determined that ammonia was found in marijuana smoke at levels of up to 20 times the levels found in tobacco.[20] Similarly, hydrogen cyanide was found in marijuana smoke at concentrations three to five times greater than those found in tobacco smoke.[21]

Marijuana, like tobacco, is addictive. One study found that more than 30 percent of adults who used marijuana in the course of a year were dependent on the drug.[22] These individuals often show signs of withdrawal and compulsive behavior.[23] Marijuana dependence is also responsible for a large proportion of calls to drug abuse help lines and treatment centers.

To equate marijuana use with alcohol consumption is, at best, uninformed and, at worst, actively misleading. Only in the most superficial ways are the two substances alike, and they differ in every way that counts: addictiveness, toxicity, health effects, and risk of intoxication.

more. much more....


26 posted on 02/03/2012 11:22:10 AM PST by Responsibility2nd (Newt or else. What part of "Join or Die" don't you understand?)
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To: rhombus
I was making the point that if marijuana is legalized all the way, then we'd be back to concerts full of smoke. If you want to smoke pot at a concert now you have to go to Cynthia Mitchel Woods outdoor amphitheater or over to the Anahuac Mosquito Festival or such around Houston. Or drive up to Austin I reckon.
27 posted on 02/03/2012 11:22:26 AM PST by dblshot (Insanity: electing the same people over and over and expecting different results.)
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To: Persevero
Informative post

No, falsehood-filled post - read the replies.

28 posted on 02/03/2012 11:23:10 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: gabriellah
The only way California could effectively eliminate the black market for marijuana is to take away the substantial profits in the market and allow the price of marijuana to fall to an amount close to the cost of production. Doing so, however, will mean substantially smaller tax revenue.

You ususally put your strongest argument first - but this? What other crop can you grow in sandy soil with minimal care and sell 1 plant yielding 2-4 pounds retailing at $100 per gram (28 grams per ounce)? Well you shouldn't tax it because you might get bootleggers - and maybe a new sport like NASCAR.

29 posted on 02/03/2012 11:23:10 AM PST by frithguild (Withdraw from the 1967 Treaty on Outer Space. It bans private property and profits.)
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To: gabriellah
Myth #1: Legalization Would bring in Enormous Tax Revenues

It already is doing just that in many municipalities.

30 posted on 02/03/2012 11:23:46 AM PST by GSWarrior (I don't like half the folks I love.)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies
Exactly the opposite is true:...

The thing is that marijuana stays in your system for 30 days or so depending on how much fat a person has or how much they smoke/eat/vape. There is no sudden withdrawal when someone stops smoking. Alcohol, cocaine, nicotine (any "ine" really) is completely metabolized within 24 hrs. That's why there is withdrawal. With marijuana there is no physical addiction, but there can be a psychological one.

31 posted on 02/03/2012 11:24:08 AM PST by numberonepal (First they came for Sarah, then they came for Herman.....)
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To: gabriellah

To me it’s simple, GOVERNMENT SHOULD NOT SEEK TO OR PROFIT FROM THE VICES OF THE GOVERNED. TO DO SO INVITES TYRANNY OF THE WORST KIND.


32 posted on 02/03/2012 11:25:12 AM PST by vigilence
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To: gabriellah

To me it’s simple, GOVERNMENT SHOULD NOT SEEK TO OR PROFIT FROM THE VICES OF THE GOVERNED. TO DO SO INVITES TYRANNY OF THE WORST KIND.


33 posted on 02/03/2012 11:25:17 AM PST by vigilence
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To: Sudetenland
"Legalization is one of the areas where libertarians are right."

These guys agree with you.




34 posted on 02/03/2012 11:25:29 AM PST by Responsibility2nd (Newt or else. What part of "Join or Die" don't you understand?)
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To: gabriellah
It is up to unashamed, unapologetic young conservatives to articulate that message and continue to stand for ordered liberty.

Yes, because nothing says "conservative" and "small government" like telling other people what they can and cannot put in their own bodies.

35 posted on 02/03/2012 11:25:56 AM PST by gdani
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To: gabriellah
War on Drugs = Yet another way to addict people to federal tax dollars so they can get high on feeling good about themselves and protecting society at the same time.

War on Drugs = Ethanol = Cap & Trade Climate Fear = Federal Highway Funds = The Big Damn Dig

I live in NH. I don't give a ratz arse if people in CA smoke pot and I don't want my money going to make sure they don't. Cut the spending, remember?

36 posted on 02/03/2012 11:26:09 AM PST by rhombus
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To: allmendream

I did not know that. Thanks for the info.


37 posted on 02/03/2012 11:28:42 AM PST by svcw (For the new year: you better toughen up, if you are going to continue to be stupid.)
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To: dblshot

Since you can’t smoke tobacco in most concert venues anymore it’s unlikely that legalized pot would suddenly become OK in the venues. Heck they don’t even have to change the signs, “no smoking” doesn’t say anything about what’s being smoked.


38 posted on 02/03/2012 11:31:36 AM PST by discostu (How Will I Laugh Tomorrow When I Can't Even Smile Today)
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To: svcw
Marinol been around quite some time now........

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0000403/

Check out the "side effects"

39 posted on 02/03/2012 11:32:40 AM PST by Osage Orange (A clear conscience is the sign of a fuzzy memory.)
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To: rhombus

“I live in NH. I don’t give a ratz arse if people in CA smoke pot and I don’t want my money going to make sure they don’t. Cut the spending, remember?”

http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2010/09/legalizing-marijuana-why-citizens-should-just-say-no?query=Legalizing+Marijuana:+Why+Citizens+Should+Just+Say+No

In short, no state will likely be allowed to legalize marijuana on its own, with such serious, negative cross-state spillover effects. Yet even if California could act as if it were an island, the legalization route would still end very badly for the Golden State. There is strong evidence to suggest that legalizing marijuana would serve little purpose other than to worsen the state’s drug problems— addiction, violence, disorder, and death. While long on rhetoric, the legalization movement, by contrast, is short on facts.

More. Much more....


40 posted on 02/03/2012 11:33:08 AM PST by Responsibility2nd (Newt or else. What part of "Join or Die" don't you understand?)
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To: numberonepal
The thing is that marijuana stays in your system for 30 days or so depending on how much fat a person has or how much they smoke/eat/vape.

Inert metabolic byproducts are what stay in the system; if it was the active ingredient, users would stay high for 30 days.

41 posted on 02/03/2012 11:33:34 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: Osage Orange

Symptoms of overdose may include:

drowsiness

inappropriate happiness

sharper senses than usual

changed awareness of time

red eyes

fast heartbeat

memory problems

feeling that you are outside of your body

mood changes

difficulty urinating

constipation

decreased coordination

extreme tiredness

difficulty speaking clearly

dizziness or fainting when standing up too fast


42 posted on 02/03/2012 11:35:25 AM PST by allmendream (Tea Party did not send the GOP to D.C. to negotiate the terms of our surrender to socialism.)
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To: vigilence
To me it’s simple, GOVERNMENT SHOULD NOT SEEK TO OR PROFIT FROM THE VICES OF THE GOVERNED. TO DO SO INVITES TYRANNY OF THE WORST KIND.

So you support an end to alcohol taxes?

43 posted on 02/03/2012 11:35:55 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: frithguild
...retailing at $100 per gram...

Many of Oregon's legal growers have quit becuase pot became so cheap that they couldn't cover their electrical bills.

44 posted on 02/03/2012 11:36:37 AM PST by gundog (Help us, Nairobi-Wan Kenobi...you're our only hope.)
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To: Osage Orange

There are fewer side effects from this drug then there are on my thyroid meds.


45 posted on 02/03/2012 11:38:17 AM PST by svcw (For the new year: you better toughen up, if you are going to continue to be stupid.)
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To: Responsibility2nd

OK you be scared and pony up the funds. That kind of hand-wringing is way down on my list of priorities about what threatens the Republic.


46 posted on 02/03/2012 11:38:22 AM PST by rhombus
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To: Responsibility2nd
California has defacto legalized it. It is for sale in more shops than Starbucks around here. All you need is $30 and to tell a Dr. you think it helps with stress or whatnot, and then you can shop at the corner store for it.

Where is the corresponding increase in addiction, violence, disorder and death in California from the time it went widely available in legal shops?

Speaking of being short of facts.....

47 posted on 02/03/2012 11:39:01 AM PST by allmendream (Tea Party did not send the GOP to D.C. to negotiate the terms of our surrender to socialism.)
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To: gabriellah

I personally have never met a Pot Head who did not have a scrambled brain. They have the Medical shops all over in California, set outside one for awhile and observe the consumers. Very enlighting.


48 posted on 02/03/2012 11:39:06 AM PST by easternsky
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To: Responsibility2nd
"Legalize marijuana, and the demand for marijuana goes up substantially as the deterrence effect of law enforcement disappears. Yet not many suppliers will operate legally, refusing to subject themselves to the established state regulatory scheme— not to mention taxation—while still risking federal prosecution, conviction, and prison time."

Laughable BS. As a first-year econ student could have predicted, when the drug alcohol was legalized, legally-operating suppliers sprung up, and illegal supply was rapidly relegated to a footnote.

49 posted on 02/03/2012 11:39:29 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies (A free society's default policy: it's none of government's business.)
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To: rhombus
Had a friend awhile back go to a concert at a local Casino.

She lit up a cigarette..and got busted big time. All the while...people were burning weed at the same time. Ha!!

Maybe that was a one-time event. I dunno.

50 posted on 02/03/2012 11:39:37 AM PST by Osage Orange (A clear conscience is the sign of a fuzzy memory.)
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