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Weekly Cooking Thread ~ April 16, 2011
FreeRepublicCooks | April 16, 2011 | libertarian27

Posted on 04/16/2011 8:07:04 AM PDT by libertarian27

Welcome to the 19th installment of the FR Weekly Cooking Thread.

Looking for something new to make or made something new that came out great? Please share a 'tried-and-true' recipe or two - or all of them:)! for fellow FReepers to add to their 'go-to' recipe stack of Family favorites?

Here's the place to share and explore your next favorite recipe.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Food; Hobbies; Reference
KEYWORDS: cooking; food; recipes; weeklycookingthread
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You can say this for ready-mixes - the next generation isn't going to have any trouble making pies exactly like mother used to make. ~Earl Wilson~

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April 16 National Eggs Benedict Day * Day of the Mushroom

April 17 National Cheese Ball Day

April 18 National Animal Cracker Day

April 19 Garlic Day * Amaretto Day

April 20 Pineapples Upside Down Cake Day * Lima Bean Respect Day

April 21 Chocolate-Covered Cashew Truffle Day

April 22 Jelly Bean Day

1 posted on 04/16/2011 8:07:10 AM PDT by libertarian27
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To: libertarian27; FrdmLvr; TN4Liberty; Daisyjane69; HungarianGypsy; SouthDixie; illiac; EQAndyBuzz; ...

Weekly Cooking Thread Ping List

(to be added/deleted just request on the thread here/or PM)

Last week’s Recipe Recap:

Bread* 56 Dinner Rolls
Dessert* 45 Chocolate Peanut Butter No-Bakes
Drink* 12 LIME ICED TEA
Meal* 4 Roast Beef with Gravy
Meal* 5 Oatmeal Pancakes
Meal* 9 CORNED BEEF HASH IN BELL PEPPERS
Meal* 14 ham steak
Meal* 20 Asian Style Flank Steak
Meal* 27 Latin Style Flank Steak
Meal* 29 Smoked sausage
Meal* 32 The Very Best Rumaki
Meal* 34 Breakfast Cups
Meal* 37 Better than Olive Garden Alfredo Sauce
Meal* 38 Flank Steak Roulade
Meal* 64 CHICKEN TETRAZZINI
Side* 33 My carrots-Bizzy Bugz

Link to last week’s thread:
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2702197/posts?page=77#77


2 posted on 04/16/2011 8:10:36 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27

This is my grandmother’s King Ranch Casserole recipe. I have not made the following recipe (my husband is not big into casseroles), but have eaten it plenty of times and it is yummy.

Albia’s King Ranch Chicken

1 cup chicken broth
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 can cream of chicken soup
1 can mild rotel tomatoes
24 oz pkg. grated cheddar cheese
1 small diced onion
2 ½ lbs cooked & chopped chicken breast
8 – 10 corn tortillas

Mix chicken broth, cream of mushroom, cream of chicken and rotel tomatoes is sauce pan. Heat just to boil and remove from heat. In a large casserole pan that has been sprayed with Pam, place a layer of tortillas, chicken and cheese. Repeat, making 2 – 3 layers. Pour sauce mixture over contents of casserole and top with cheese. Bake at 350 for 25 – 30 minutes or until nice and bubbly.


3 posted on 04/16/2011 8:14:57 AM PDT by TheMom (I wish mosquitoes sucked fat instead of blood.)
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To: libertarian27

Method help/request

I’m making pork gravy for 70 people tonight for a pork loin meal- eek!

I’ve got a gallon of pork broth ready (made Pernil this week) and will most likely use the Argo cornstarch recipe. I’m looking for technique hints....should I make the whole thing in one shot or do them in batches. How do you think I should go about this? Beside buying bunches of gravy mixes- lol.


4 posted on 04/16/2011 8:18:43 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27

I would do it in batches, then mix them all together.


5 posted on 04/16/2011 8:25:26 AM PDT by TheMom (I wish mosquitoes sucked fat instead of blood.)
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To: TheMom

How about a delicious cookie for a diabetic?


6 posted on 04/16/2011 9:01:45 AM PDT by Melchior
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To: libertarian27

Depending on what and how much other food is being prepared you will need roughly 2-3 ounces of gravy per serving. You can count on some people wanting less and some more, but that number should work. 2 gallons is a safe bet.
Here is a recipe I would use
½ cup vegetable oil
3cups diced onion
2 cups diced green pepper
2 cups diced celery
2 cups diced carrots
6 cloves garlic chopped
1 bunch fresh Italian parsley chopped
1 gallon fresh made pork stock
1 1/2 gallons water
2 tablespoons gravy master or kitchen bouquet (caramel color)
1/3 cup Better Than Bouillon ham base (or 4 -5 bouillon cubes)
½ teaspoon thyme leaves
2 teaspoons cracked black pepper
Salt to taste

1 Place oil in a large pot and brown the onions, peppers, celery and carrots for 15-20 minutes on med-med-high until well browned and aromatic. (this will give your gravy that home-made flavor).
Add add remaining ingredients and simmer until liquid is reduced by 30% (leaving 2 gallons or so).
Pour gravy through a strainer mashing the vegetables while you do to get every last drop of flavor.
Place gravy back on the stove and bring to a boil. Thick with either flour and water or cornstarch and water method.
Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes to fully cook starch or flour.

You can do this in two pots if you don’t have a big one

Hope this helps.


7 posted on 04/16/2011 9:12:50 AM PDT by John 3_19-21 (Christianity = God's Son died for you - Islam = Your son dies for God.)
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To: John 3_19-21

Do I detect an experienced church supper meister? Second guess would be kids’ clubs organizer lol!


8 posted on 04/16/2011 9:22:59 AM PDT by Silentgypsy
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To: libertarian27

i always put the cornstarch in a blender with some of the stock before i add it to the rest of the ingredients to make sure it has no lumps...


9 posted on 04/16/2011 9:34:44 AM PDT by dunblak
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To: libertarian27

When I last made a large quantity of gravy using broth I made a roux by melting butter on very low heat and adding an equal amount of flour to it and cooking it out on the lowest heat possible for 1-2 minutes to get rid of the flour flavor. (I prefer to use spelt flour for my gravies since it gives the gravy a fuller flavor).

I then gradually add broth to the roux stirring pretty constantly and gradually bring the heat up and stir it until it thickens. I use two tablespoons of spelt flour for every cup of broth and an equal amount of butter).

I also like to add a little brewed coffee to my gravy to give the gravy a richer flavor. I usually wait until the very end and use it to thin the gravy just a little bit until it is the perfect consistency.

I have used this recipe to make half gallon batches of gravy numerous times and gallon batches of it every Thanksgiving for years and it comes out perfect for me every time.


10 posted on 04/16/2011 9:44:46 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: libertarian27
This is a recipe from a famous restaurant in Birmingham, AL.
Cobb's Corner Cupboard, owner Mrs Virginia Cobb
One of her signature dishes.
Roulage (cream filled chocolate roll)
6 ounces semi sweet chocolate
6 large eggs,separated, the whites at room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
2 cups well chilled heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
In small heavy saucepan melt the chocolate with 3 tablespoons water over low heat, stirring, and let the mixture cool. In a bowl with an electric mixer beat the egg whites for 30 seconds. Beat in 1 cup of the sugar, a little at a time and beat for 4 minutes or til thick and pale. Fold in the cooled chocolate carefully. In another bowl beat the egg whites til they hold soft peaks, stir 1/4 of them in the in chocolate mixture gently Then add the remaining whites gently.
Butter a jelly roll pan with butter. Line with wax paper and extend about 2 inches over the side. Butter the paper.
Turn batter into pan and bake in preheated oven for 25 minutes. Let cool in pan covered with a dampened dish towel for 30 minutes
Remove towel and lift paper just to loosened cake. Sift cocoa power over cake. Cover cake with buttered sheet of wax paper. buttered side down and a baking sheet. Invert unto baking sheet and peel off paper carefully.
Beat cream in chilled bowl til soft peaks, beat in remaining 1/2 cup sugar and vanilla. Beat til it holds stiff peaks and spread over cake.
Beginning with a long side roll up jelly roll fashion. Roll seam side down onto plate.
Cake keeps covered and chilled for up to 12 hours. Serves 10
Rather long but well worth the time.
11 posted on 04/16/2011 9:54:34 AM PDT by Bizzy Bugz
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To: libertarian27

This is a recipe from a famous restaurant in Birmingham, AL.
Cobb’s Corner Cupboard, owner Mrs Virginia Cobb
One of her signature dishes.
Roulage (cream filled chocolate roll)
6 ounces semi sweet chocolate
6 large eggs,separated, the whites at room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
2 cups well chilled heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
In small heavy saucepan melt the chocolate with 3 tablespoons water over low heat, stirring, and let the mixture cool. In a bowl with an electric mixer beat the egg whites for 30 seconds. Beat in 1 cup of the sugar, a little at a time and beat for 4 minutes or til thick and pale. Fold in the cooled chocolate carefully. In another bowl beat the egg whites til they hold soft peaks, stir 1/4 of them in the in chocolate mixture gently Then add the remaining whites gently.
Butter a jelly roll pan with butter. Line with wax paper and extend about 2 inches over the side. Butter the paper.
Turn batter into pan and bake in preheated oven for 25 minutes. Let cool in pan covered with a dampened dish towel for 30 minutes
Remove towel and lift paper just to loosened cake. Sift cocoa power over cake. Cover cake with buttered sheet of wax paper. buttered side down and a baking sheet. Invert unto baking sheet and peel off paper carefully.
Beat cream in chilled bowl til soft peaks, beat in remaining 1/2 cup sugar and vanilla. Beat til it holds stiff peaks and spread over cake.
Beginning with a long side roll up jelly roll fashion. Roll seam side down onto plate.
Cake keeps covered and chilled for up to 12 hours. Serves 10
Rather long but well worth the time.


12 posted on 04/16/2011 9:57:22 AM PDT by Bizzy Bugz
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To: libertarian27
Tuna Kimchi jjigae (Tuna Kimchi Stew)

Kimchi jjigae with 돼지고기 dwaegi gogi (pork), Spam processed ham or 두부 dubu (tofu), are common variations of the dish. Avoiding pork for religious reasons, I was pleased to find 참치김치찌개 chamchi kimchi jjigae, or kimchi stew with tuna, on the menu of a restaurant near Kangwon National University in Chuncheon, a lakeside city in the mountains northeast of Seoul. I first tasted that version in the mid-'90s and have been making it ever since.

This has been my go-to kimchi jjigage recipe for more than 10 years.

Tuna Kimchi Jjigae makes 1-2 servings

1 teaspoon grapeseed or other oil with a high-temperature smoke point
1 cup chopped kimchi
1 can white albacore tuna, packed in water
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 cups kimchi "juice" (top off with fish or chicken broth)
1 teaspoon Japanese dashi powder
1-2 teaspoons Korean gochujang or gochugaru (to your taste)
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Directions

1. Heat the pan, and add the oil. Saute the chopped kimchi and garlic until the kimchi barely becomes soft.
2. Add the water, dashi and gochujang/gochugaru and allow the mixture to boil for 10 to 15 minutes.
3. Add the tuna — it's already fully cooked — and continue to boil for about five more minutes.
4. Add the sesame oil immediately before serving so the flavor comes through.
5. Serve it with a grilled cheese sandwich — try my version with kimchi — for a Koreafornian spin on the classic tomato soup combo.

13 posted on 04/16/2011 9:58:13 AM PDT by Tamar1973 (Germans in 1932 thought they were voting for change too.)
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To: Bizzy Bugz

Sorry about the double post


14 posted on 04/16/2011 9:58:42 AM PDT by Bizzy Bugz
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To: libertarian27
If you want to add flavor without item in the finished sauce just add them to the boiling stock before you add the water cornstarch mixture. Then when the flavors meld just filter out the ingredients and then thicken the gravy with the cornstarch. The gravy will look cleaner. So many flavors go with that dish that it really depends on what part of the country you're from more than what is considered great.
15 posted on 04/16/2011 10:13:36 AM PDT by grapeape (Blitzshield.com - making football safer)
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To: John 3_19-21; TheMom; dunblak; Flamenco Lady

Thanks guys!

OK, I think I better make two gallons! And do it all in batches, just to make sure.

I wasn’t going to do any vegetable additions but I like that recipe and will incorporate.

I’ve got a lot of pork fat - and since ‘pork fat rules’ hopefully I’m half way there :>)

Thanks again.


16 posted on 04/16/2011 10:16:34 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: Melchior

Here is a good diabetic cookie my wife loves...

CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

1/4 c. margarine
1 tbsp. granulated fructose
1 egg
1 tsp. vanilla extract
3/4 c. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 c. mini semi-sweet chocolate chips

Cream together margarine and fructose, beat in egg, water and vanilla. Combine flour, baking soda and salt in sifter. Sift dry ingredients into creamed mixture, stirring to blend thoroughly. Stir in chocolate chips. Drop by teaspoonsful onto lightly greased cookie sheet about 2 inches apart. Bake at 375 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes. Makes 30 cookies.


17 posted on 04/16/2011 10:24:11 AM PDT by illiac (If we don't change directions soon, we'll get where we're going)
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To: libertarian27

Balsamic Caramelized Onions with Golden Raisins Sauce

[I adjusted this recipe I found on a chat site - It’s really good!]

1 Sweet Onion Sliced (all purpose onions don’t really cut it here)
4T Butter
2 T Brown Sugar (Original recipe called for 4T - too sweet for us - adjust as desired)
1/2 Cup Golden Raisins
4T Balsamic Vinegar
1/4 Cup Marsala Wine

In a saute pan cook the onions in the butter until golden, add the brown sugar, raisins and balsamic vinegar and cook to incorporate @5 minutes or so - finish off with Marsala wine - cooking for a few minutes (add additional butter at the end to finish if desired - I’ll hold back a Tablespoon at the beginning and throw it in at the end)

Great with pork tenderloin. Bake, grill or pan fry the pork, slice into medallions and add to sauce to coat and heat thoroughly.

(I’m going to make a bunch of this too for tonight’s dinner ... oops, I better get going - I’ve got sauce and gravy to make!)


18 posted on 04/16/2011 10:35:36 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27; Netizen; All

Last night I made the Three Grain Pilaf that Netizen posted on the March 26th thread (post 90) for my family. Since my husband will not eat anything with curry in it I substituted with 1 1/2 tsp. of our favorite Mrs. Dash seasoning instead of the curry powder in the recipe. I used a little more of the Mrs. Dash, since it is not as strong a seasoning as the curry would have been. My family absolutely loved this Pilaf. They ate every last grain of the pilaf.

We had roast chicken and my own cauliflower gratin recipe with it. I had not made the gratin for years since cauliflower is one of those vegetables my husband will not even touch. I only got away with cooking it last night because he had been with me when I saw cauliflower on sale at the grocery store and mentioned that I wished he liked it since I love it. He told me to go ahead and get some and just make it up for myself and who ever else wanted it, since most nights he prefers to skip vegetables altogether anyway. I bought the cauliflower!

Everyone except my husband tried the cauliflower right away and loved it and said it was especially good with the Three grain pilaf. They all started putting a little of each in every bite and said that it was the best combination they had ever eaten. My husband has never heard every family member rave about a vegetable like they did last night, so he actually decided to try the cauliflower and found he actually liked it. He even went on to say that he loved the combination of it with the pilaf and he would definitely eat it again. A victory!

If any of you have a family member who hates cauliflower, you might try this recipe and if you can get them to try it, you might just convince them to eating it every once in a while.

Cauliflower Gratin

1 head cauliflower cut into large florets
5 tablespoons butter, divided
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 cups milk
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1 c grated Swiss or other white cheese
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/2 of a small onion or 1/4 of a large onion, finely chopped
1/4 cup fresh bread crumbs

Blanch cauliflower florets in boiling salted water for about 2 minutes and then drain and set aside.

While the cauliflower is cooking melt three tablespoons of butter on low heat. Remove two tablespoons of the melted butter to reserve for your topping. Then stir in flour to the remaining butter in the pan and continue cooking on low heat for 1-2 minutes to get the flour taste out of the roux.

Add milk and gradually increase the heat stirring constantly and continue cooking until the white sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon.

Stir in pepper and nutmeg. (Do not add salt. There is enough salt in the Parmesan cheese for the entire recipe).

Remove from heat and slowly add about ¾ c of the Swiss cheese and about ¼ cup of the Parmesan cheese a little at a time making sure the cheese is all melted before going on to the next step.

Pour half of the white sauce into the bottom of either a 9X9 baking dish or a 8X13 depending on how many florets you have. Place the cauliflower florets on top of the sauce and sprinkle the onions on top. Pour the remaining half of the sauce on top of the cauliflower.

Top with the remaining Swiss cheese, the bread crumbs, and the remaining Parmesan cheese, in that order. Drizzle the top with the butter you had set aside.
Bake in a 375 degree oven for about 25 minutes or until the top is nicely browned.


19 posted on 04/16/2011 11:08:25 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: libertarian27

Hi, I am a classically trained chef.

If you already have a lot of pork stock on hand, you basically have the gravy done.

Just reduce the stock until it gets the flavor you want.

If the stock is weak, then you can fortify with the aromatics—celery, onion, and carrots, and bouquet garnie/sachet(thyme, pepper corn, bay leaf, parsley). Whatever you like, actually. You really don’t need any artificial flavor enhancers.

But my suggestion is reduce it, even if you add that stuff. The reduction is what fortifies the flavor.

And remember to strain it.

Then add roux to strained stock.

You can make roux of any fat and flour. Normally, the fat is butter.

You can even use rendered pork fat for the roux.

The proportion is one part flour, one part fat.

To make roux, melt butter/fat, add flour, mix, then when it starts to bubble and puff up a bit, take it off the heat to cool.

Note: Don’t overcook the roux and wait for it to cool before you add to hot liquid.

Also, don’t add salt to the gravy until the end. Believe it or not, salt is the most important ingredient, but in a reduced gravy, don’t salt until you are finished or the end product will be too salty.

You don’t need to make in batches. You can make everything in one big stock pot. And make the roux in a saute pan.

Last note: You should skin the gravy of oil, particles or white stuff that floats in the stock.


20 posted on 04/16/2011 11:13:22 AM PDT by radpolis (Liberals: You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy)
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To: Netizen; All

Don’t forget to make the Cauliflower Gratin with Netizen’s Three Grain Pilaf recipe as it is really a winning combination. You can cook them both in the same 375 degree oven.

I actually cooked my roasted chicken in the same oven as well, just giving the chicken a bit of a head start on the other two dishes, then adding the pilaf to the oven about 30 minutes in to the cooking time of the chicken and the gratin about 15 minutes later. I pulled the chicken first and let it rest covered in foil while the other two dishes finished cooking and then pulled them while my husband was carving the chicken.


21 posted on 04/16/2011 11:17:09 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: radpolis

Thanks, so your opinion is that a roux would be better than a cornstarch or flour slurry at the end?

I am a ‘roux’ gal at heart but was thinking the cornstarch would be lighter for the gravy.

(I got to get to chopping and simmering *yickes* - I’ll be back - out by 4pm)


22 posted on 04/16/2011 11:19:29 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27

The simple answer is it depends on how long you hold the gravy.

I would do a roux because it is such a large batch and the gravy will hold over time and stay good if you have leftovers.

The roux should only take a couple minutes.

Don’t dump the whole roux in at the same time. Just add until you get the thickness you want and it will not be heavy. I’d try two tablespoons per quart.

You can do a cornstarch slurry also.


23 posted on 04/16/2011 11:31:30 AM PDT by radpolis (Liberals: You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy)
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To: libertarian27

Pork gravy:

In a large pot saute’ onions, garlic, bell pepper and celery in bacon grease.
Add a three pound pork shoulder to pot and cover with water.
Cook for six hours.
Remove pork shoulder from pot and meat from bone.
Add meat back to pot and cook another thirty minutes.
Puree batches in a blender and return to pot.
Thicken or thin to desired texture.
Throw that away.
Buy large container of powdered pork gravy and follow instructions.

Enjoy!


24 posted on 04/16/2011 11:37:01 AM PDT by Mind-numbed Robot (I retain the right to be inconsistent, contradictory and even flat-out wrong!)
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To: Mind-numbed Robot
Throw that away.
Buy large container of powdered pork gravy and follow instructions.
Enjoy!

HA!

I do have a few packets of gravy kicking around if I need them - or the gravy comes out so fabulously everyone scarfs it and I run out - lol

(I tried some the other day to see how they taste - kind of yucky)
Back to my onions and raisins - thanks to all!

25 posted on 04/16/2011 12:14:22 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: radpolis

OK, you’ve talked me into a roux - for the holding power.

I want to pre-make this and bring to the function and keep hot. I got to get out of here at 4pm and the dinner is @6:30.

Do you think the roux will hold up better?
Would it be OK to ‘roux-it-up’ 2 hours before - then re-heat?
I figure I could add roux or loosen it up with stock right before it goes out - decent plan or no?

Thanks again, never thought I’d be making gravy for 70-lol


26 posted on 04/16/2011 12:20:08 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27

I reheat my gravy all the time, I just do it slowly on fairly low heat and stir it frequently until it is hot again. I always freeze any leftover gravy we aren’t going to finish up in a day or two in freezer containers, so if I want gravy for something mid week when I don’t want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen, I can just take it out of the freezer the night before or in the morning and then warm it up while our meat is cooking for dinner that night. It always tastes just as good to us the second time around.


27 posted on 04/16/2011 12:30:44 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: libertarian27

From the sound of things, I definitely think roux is the best way to go.

I’d roux it as soon as you get the flavor profile you want.

It should hold up.

If everything is done right, you’d only have to reheat it, but if it is too thick you can thin it out with stock.

You sound like you have a good plan and know what you are doing, so just trust your instincts and you’ll be good.


28 posted on 04/16/2011 12:35:25 PM PDT by radpolis (Liberals: You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy)
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To: libertarian27

Mulligatawney Soup

INGREDIENTS:
1 chicken
3 quarts water or chicken broth (no salt)
4 ribs diced celery
1 medium diced onion
3 diced carrots
3 diced tart apples
2 peeled and diced medium turnips
1 medium diced tomato
1 cup uncooked rice
1 tsp curry powder
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp black pepper
2 tsp salt
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp oregano

DIRECTIONS:

Combine all ingredients in a stock pot, and bring to a boil. Let slow boil for 45 minutes. Remove chicken and let chicken cool. Pick meat from chicken, discarding skin and bones. Return meat to pot. Cook until vegetables are tender. Taste and correct seasonings. Serve hot.


29 posted on 04/16/2011 12:38:26 PM PDT by dainbramaged (Courage is fear holding on a minute longer - George S. Patton)
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To: Flamenco Lady

Thanks for posting that recipe. It brought to mind one that I have, but is far simpler to make. I will try yours, it sounds great.


30 posted on 04/16/2011 1:26:50 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (1 Cor. 15: 1-4)
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To: dainbramaged

Is that the Soup Nazi’s secret recipe?

[If you never watched “Seinfeld”... never mind]


31 posted on 04/16/2011 2:39:20 PM PDT by hattend (How much do you have to invest in the future before you've spent it and no longer have one? - Steyn)
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To: rightly_dividing

Glad it sounded good to you. It is really an easy recipe to make and it went ever so well with the Three Grain Pilaf recipe that Netizen posted a couple of weeks ago. Please let me know how you like it.

My husband has always told me he doesn’t like brown rice or barley, as well as cauliflower but he certainly didn’t show it last night. Of course I didn’t tell him what was in the pilaf until after he said he loved it. I figured he would think it was all bulgur wheat pilaf (which he loves)and therefore not complain about the other grains in it. He actually went one better and asked me what I did to the pilaf this time because it tasted even better than usual. He ate two large helpings of the pilaf and one large helping of the cauliflower, so I actually had several victories last night over the pickiest eater in my family!

For someone who hates barley, brown rice, and cauliflower he sure ate a lot of it!


32 posted on 04/16/2011 2:55:14 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: libertarian27

BUMP & Bookmark. Thanks for all of your hard work! :)


33 posted on 04/16/2011 3:08:30 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'Hobbies.' I'm developing a robust post-Apocalyptic skill set...)
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To: Melchior
How about a delicious cookie for a diabetic?

All the recipes I have for cookies are full of sugar.

I think I have a diabetic cookbook upstairs somewhere, I'll take a look in a bit.

34 posted on 04/16/2011 3:34:54 PM PDT by TheMom (I wish mosquitoes sucked fat instead of blood.)
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To: hattend

No soup for you!!! :>)


35 posted on 04/16/2011 3:35:15 PM PDT by dainbramaged (Courage is fear holding on a minute longer - George S. Patton)
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To: Melchior

OK - The only diabetic book I have has five dessert recipes . . . Blueberry Bavarian; Chocolate Angel Food Cake; Italian Biscotti; Marble Cheesecake and Strawberry Frozen Yogurt.

Sorry, no cookie recipes. If one of the above floats you boat let me know.


36 posted on 04/16/2011 6:37:48 PM PDT by TheMom (I wish mosquitoes sucked fat instead of blood.)
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To: Flamenco Lady

I never met a cauliflower that I didn’t like! Sometimes I buy an extra one just to snack on raw.


37 posted on 04/16/2011 7:09:24 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (1 Cor. 15: 1-4)
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To: radpolis

Well, gravy came out decent, I used about 14 tablespoons of roux (had way too much stock) so I threw in 3 packs of (icky) pork gravy mix and some salt/seasonings (didn’t have any spare time to mess with it)- and it came out good - a thin sauce for the pork loin - had that sucker on the stove for 4 hours as everything else was getting done.

The caramelized onions and raisins was the hit of the dinner, excellent reviews. And nothing says banquet like those canned potatoes that we baked off and doctored with the pan drippings, butter and seasonings - another hit.

Pork loins came out of the oven at 140’ to rest - perfect.


38 posted on 04/16/2011 7:34:49 PM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: rightly_dividing

Oh I love it raw too!


39 posted on 04/16/2011 8:35:30 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

Glad you liked the Three Grain Pilaf. Its a good way to get a nice variety of nutrients and fiber. Its also a nice substitute for stuffing.

I bet you’ll come up with lots of seasoning variations. :)

I saved your Cauliflower Gratin recipe. It sounds really good.


40 posted on 04/16/2011 10:56:30 PM PDT by Netizen
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To: Netizen

I probably could come up with lots of different spice combinations, but I probably won’t on this recipe since all 5 people in my family loved it just the way I fixed it. Any time I try a recipe and they all agree they love it, I usually don’t make changes to it for my family cooking, since it is rare that all 5 family members like the same dish.

I think next time I will make two batches of the Pilaf, One with the curry and one using Mrs Dash seasoning. Then the two of us in the family that love curry can try it that way too. Now that I know everyone in the family loved the pilaf, I will probably be making it at least once a month and perhaps a couple of times in a month.

Come to think of it, I think I may make the cauliflower gratin once a month when I make the pilaf, since my family liked the combination so well. Any time I can get everyone in the family to all eat the same vegetable it is a real plus for me!


41 posted on 04/17/2011 8:48:25 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: All

We like to have breakfast for dinner about once a week. I made this family favorite last night as our main dish. I have used the basic recipe for years and have come up with lots of variations to serve for brunches and luncheons. I tried to include most of the variations as options when I typed up the recipe. I have yet to make a combination that I didn’t like using this recipe.

Breakfast Casserole

½ to ¾ lb. raw or cooked sausage, hamburger, sliced kielbasa, cubed ham, or even shredded chicken or turkey (great for using up leftovers)

½ cup chopped onions

½ cup chopped peppers, broccoli, spinach, or any other vegetable that would compliment your meat choice (optional)

8 oz. cream cheese, cut into small cubes (optional)

9 large eggs, beaten

½ cup milk or cream and ½ cup sour cream or ¾ cup milk or cream if you leave out the sour cream)

Salt and pepper

Other seasonings that would work well with your meat and vegetable choices (optional)

24 oz. of hash browns, O’Brien style potatoes, or other small diced potatoes or any combination of potatoes(I have even used up leftover augratin or scalloped potatoes here)

8 - 16 oz. of your favorite cheese or combination of cheeses, shredded

Bread Crumbs drizzeled with a little butter (optional)

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees

Break up your sausage or ground beef if you are using raw and sprinkle it on the bottom of a large casserole dish. (I use a large oval 2 ½ qt casserole dish). If you are using a meat that is already cooked, just spread it out in an even layer on the bottom of the dish.

Sprinkle the chopped onions on top of the meat, and then any vegetables you choose to add to the casserole.

If I am using the cream cheese option I sprinkle the cubes on top of the vegetable. If I am not using cream cheese, I sprinkle one layer of the shredded cheese here.

Mix the eggs and milk (and sour cream of you are using it) together with your spices and pour it over everything in the casserole dish.

Add the hash browns or other potatoes to the casserole and top with the remaining shredded cheese. If you decide to put breadcrumbs on top, then do so now.

Bake covered in a 350 degree oven for about 45 minutes. Remove the lid and cook for another 15 minutes or until the top is nicely browned.

Serves 6-10 people depending on the portion sizes.


42 posted on 04/17/2011 10:13:49 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

That recipe sounds delicious and, just yesterday, I was trying to think of something new to prepare for our church breakfast that will follow sunrise services Easter Sunday. Thanks for posting!


43 posted on 04/18/2011 9:30:07 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies. Plan it.)
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To: Flamenco Lady

I can understand that. I have a hard enough time finding something the three of us like. :)

Which of the Mrs. Dash seasoning do you like the best? I always double the batch of 3 grain. I was trying to think if I’ve ever tried it with beef broth instead of the chicken and I just can’t recall.


44 posted on 04/18/2011 9:52:07 AM PDT by Netizen
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Glad I posted it then. I actually first made this many years ago to take to our pot luck style family Easter Brunch and I have been making it ever since in some form or another.

It always goes over well at potluck style events. I sometimes make several different variations of it to a brunch for a large crowd by using different meats, vegetables, cheeses, and different kinds of potatoes, and even spices in them.


45 posted on 04/18/2011 9:52:47 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Netizen

I used the Original blend in your recipe for the Three Grain Pilaf for my family a few days ago.

I actually use several of the Mrs. Dash blends. My mother and mother in law were supposed to watch their salt intake, so I started making a lot more things using Mrs. Dash and reducing or eliminating the salt in the dish.

The two I use most often and always have in my spice cabinet are the Original flavor and the Spicy blend, but I also have used other Mrs. Dash blends. I haven’t found one yet that I didn’t like. I try to pick it up when it is on sale (which isn’t very often) and stock up a bit when it is on sale.

I also have mixed up my own spice blends similar to Mrs. Dash, so I could save a few pennies. When I find a spice blend I like I sometimes try to mimic it myself. It is sometimes a great way to use up spices that have been sitting in your cupboard a while that you want to use up more quickly.


46 posted on 04/18/2011 10:06:08 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Netizen

I believe it would be just as good made with the beef broth, but you might want to add a little more spice (but not the salt) to it since beef broth generally has a little stronger flavor. I frequently increase the spices just a little when I switch out beef broth for chicken broth.

For example if I would normally use a teaspoon of a spice blend, I would probably increase it by 1/4 teaspoon if I use beef broth, so the flavors of my spices aren’t overpowered by the stronger flavor of the beef broth.


47 posted on 04/18/2011 10:15:13 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

I have several of the Mrs Dash’s too and always have the Original and Spicy as well. Think I also have the Garlic and Herb and a Lemon one.

How much do you usually have to pay for it?

Good points on upping the seasoning when using beef broth.


48 posted on 04/18/2011 10:34:17 AM PDT by Netizen
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To: Flamenco Lady

I usually get my Original blend Mrs Dash at a restaurant supplier.

I just checked Amazon

http://www.amazon.com/Dash-Original-Blend-21-Ounce-Units/dp/B000YV7X1O/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1303148084&sr=8-2

I think the above is more than I pay from the restaurant supplier, but it may be cheaper than what you are paying.

I don’t know why, but when buying the larger container there seems to be a bit more black pepper taste so of a recipe calls for black pepper and I use the Mrs Dash, then sometimes I don’t add the additional black pepper.


49 posted on 04/18/2011 10:54:59 AM PDT by Netizen
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To: Netizen

I finished off a Lemon Pepper blend and the Herb and Garlic blend several months ago. I was going to buy more, but the best price I could find at the time was really expensive, but I don’t remember what it was at this point in time. I am sure it was at least over $3.00 for a small 2-3 oz. container of it and it could have been more.

I have just been using the other ones since or using a combination of some of the other dried herbs I have since and kind of experimenting.

Instead of Lemon pepper, I have been using grated lemon rind and/or lemon juice and lots of freshly ground black pepper. Instead of the Herb and garlic blend I have just been using garlic and herbs I thought would go well in the dish. So far the dishes I have cooked have turned out just as good.

I do buy a lot of spices at Asian, Indian, and other ethnic grocery stores or a store that sells spices and blends in bulk. I am fortunate that I have a Korean grocery store, an Indian grocery store, and several Mexican grocery stores all within a mile or two of where I live, so I sometimes stop in to brouse and see what they offer.

I find that Saffron is far cheaper at Indian grocery stores and I usually buy it in a 1 oz. box there (which is a huge amount of saffron. I would guess it was at least a cup of saffron threads.) I don’t remember what I paid for it the last time, but I do remember that I paid less for the 1 oz. box than a tiny vial of it was priced at my regular grocery store. They are also cheaper for curry powder, corriander seed, lemon grass, cumin seed, tumeric, and several other spices. Just about anything found in most curry powders is far cheaper at an Indian grocery store. They are sometimes cheaper on whole or crushed chili pepper, cinnamon sticks and whole cloves, but I try to check the dollar store or my grocery outlet stores too because sometimes those spices I can find cheaper there.

Asian Markets are cheaper for spices used in Asian cooking. I recently bought a 4 oz. package of Star Anise for $1.59 at an Asian grocery store that is close by where I live. They had larger packages that would bring the price per ounce down even more if you use a lot of it. I also buy a lot of Korean BBQ sauce there to use in my stir fry’s. The last time I bought it was in August of last year. I got a 32 oz. jar for $3.99, which is far cheaper than the price of a similar product in the regular grocery store and it makes wonderful stir frys. I doubt I could make from scratch for that price. They do make different ones for different types of meat and we have tried them all. We have decided we like the one for pork the best, but we use it on beef, pork, and chicken now.


50 posted on 04/18/2011 11:38:32 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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