Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

THE REGULARS ARE COMING OUT!
Boston 1775 ^ | 18 April, 1775 | God

Posted on 04/18/2012 5:42:57 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost

I, William Munroe, of Lexington, on oath do testify, that I acted as orderly sergeant in the company commanded by Capt. John Parker, on the 19th of April, 1775; that, early in the evening of the 18th of the same April, I was informed by Solomon Brown, who had just returned from Boston, that he had seen nine British officers on the road, travelling leisurely, sometimes before and sometimes behind him; that he had discovered, by the occasional blowing aside of their top coats, that they were armed.

On learning this, I supposed they had some design upon [John] Hancock and [Samuel] Adams, who were then at the house of the Rev. Mr. [Jonas] Clark, and immediately assembled a guard of eight men, with their arms, to guard the house.

About midnight, Col. Paul Revere rode up and requested admittance. I told him the family had just retired, and had requested, that they might not be disturbed by any noise about the house. “Noise!” said he, “you’ll have noise enough before long. The regulars are coming out.” We then permitted him to pass.

Soon after, Mr. Lincoln came. These gentlemen came different routes. Revere came over the ferry to Charlestown, and Lincoln over the neck through Roxbury; and both brought letters from Dr. [Joseph] Warren in Boston to Hancock and Adams, stating, that a large body of British troops had left Boston, and were on their march to Lexington. On this, it was thought advisable, that Hancock and Adams should withdraw to some distant part of the town.


TOPICS: History; Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS:
Never forget the brave deeds that happened 237 years ago, beginning in earnest on this date.

God save the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the United States of America.

1 posted on 04/18/2012 5:43:02 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost

Thanks for the post. I got a chill when I read it, for some reason.


2 posted on 04/18/2012 5:51:55 AM PDT by sneakers (Go Sheriff Joe!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
I do, too. I am a student of American history, and this is my absolute favorite moment in American history.

Check out what this guy did on April 19, 1775:

At Menotomy, the 2d inst. [i.e., this month] Capt. SAMUEL WHITTEMORE, Æt. 99. The manly and moral virtues, in all the various relations of brother, husband, father and friend, were invariably exhibited in this gentleman. He was not more remarkable for his longevity, and his numerous descendants, (his progeny being 185; one of which is the fifth generation) than for his patriotism.——

When the British troops marched to Lexington, he was 81 years of age, and one of the first on the parade [i.e., for militia duty]; he was armed with a gun and horse pistol; after an animated exhortation to the collected militia, to the exercise of bravery and courage, he exclaimed; “If I can only be the instrument of killing one of my country's foes, I shall die in peace,”

The prayer of this venerable old man was heard—for on the return of the troops, he lay behind a stone wall, and discharging his gun, a soldier immediately fell; he then discharged his pistol, and killed another—at which instant, a ball struck his face, and shot away part of his cheek-bone; on which a number of the soldiers ran up to the wall, and gorged their malice on his wounded head: they were heard to exclaim, “We have killed the old rebel.”

About four hours after, he was found in a mangled situation; his head was covered with blood, from the wounds of the bayonet, which were six or eight; but providentially none penetrated so far as to destroy him; his hat and cloaths were shot through in many places, yet he survived to see the complete overthrow of his enemies, and his country enjoy all the blessings of peace and independence.

3 posted on 04/18/2012 5:58:13 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
I thought Laz had a special announcement.
4 posted on 04/18/2012 5:59:17 AM PDT by bmwcyle (I am ready to serve Jesus on Earth because the GOP failed again)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
I work at Hanscom AFB, right on the route that the Regulars took both ways.

What has happened to the patriots who once inhabited this Commonwealth?

5 posted on 04/18/2012 6:00:11 AM PDT by Redleg Duke ("Madison, Wisconsin is 30 square miles surrounded by reality.", L. S. Dryfus)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Redleg Duke
What has happened to the patriots who once inhabited this Commonwealth?

We're still here. And sooner or later we're going to rise up again and rid the Commonwealth of socialists for good.

6 posted on 04/18/2012 6:03:50 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: bmwcyle

Nah. He ate a LOT of cheese yesterday.


7 posted on 04/18/2012 6:03:50 AM PDT by Safetgiver (The predator class is upset because they are being shot.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost

Thanks for posting.

What is interesting is that the first shots of the war were actually 5 months earlier in New Castle , NH where the colonials raided the British Fort William & Mary to steal the munitions. A British soldier was killed in the raid.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_William_and_Mary

The fort is now known as Fort Constitution.


8 posted on 04/18/2012 6:06:30 AM PDT by woodbutcher1963
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Safetgiver
Nah. He ate a LOT of cheese yesterday.

!!! The regular is staying IN.

9 posted on 04/18/2012 6:08:21 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost

10 posted on 04/18/2012 6:11:55 AM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Redleg Duke
What has happened to the patriots who once inhabited this Commonwealth?

We are here. We see what is happening and what road our nation is on. We prepare. We lie in wait. We will be heard. "You’ll have noise enough before long".

11 posted on 04/18/2012 6:14:08 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (I will not comply. I will NEVER submit.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost
If I can only be the instrument of killing one of my country's foes, I shall die in peace

Thank you, Mr. Whittemore . . your sentiment lives !

12 posted on 04/18/2012 6:17:57 AM PDT by tomkat (If I can only be the instrument of killing one of my country's foes, I shall die in peace)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: woodbutcher1963
Yep.

Things were getting pretty belligerent before the 19th of April.

You had the Powderhouse Alarm in Somerville. You had the Salem Alarm in, well, Salem (or was it near Danvers?). You had the Gaspee Affair. You had the Fort William and Mary Alarm (as you mentioned).

To say nothing of the Boston Massacre and the Tea Party.

Lots of animosity building up to this fateful day in 1775.

13 posted on 04/18/2012 6:24:18 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost
I am not worthy to hold the powder horns of my sainted ancestors who participated in the War to free America from British tyranny.

But I expect to participate nonetheless in the war to liberate her from domestic tyranny. I can hold a rifle and shoot straight. That is enough.

14 posted on 04/18/2012 6:33:00 AM PDT by backwoods-engineer (I will vote against ANY presidential candidate who had non-citizen parents.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Bloody Sam Roberts
We prepare. We lie in wait. We will be heard. "You’ll have noise enough before long"

There's a line in Hiller Zobel's "The Boston Massacre," I believe, that has always given me the chills. He talks of an alarm system in Boston consisting of a barrel of turpentine, or other like flammable liquid, atop the tallest hill in Boston proper (maybe Beacon Hill?). In any event, upon lighting that barrel of turpentine and sounding the alarm, the radicals could count on "30,000 men from the countryside" to come to their aid.

I feel the same way about the suburbs today. There's an anti-socialist stirring among the middle class, and it's growing stronger.

15 posted on 04/18/2012 6:33:29 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Redleg Duke; Hemingway's Ghost; Bloody Sam Roberts

We are here, and we are all doing our part, in some small way. I may be an aging woman, but I raised a patriot and I am married to a patriot. Future daughter-in-law is a patriot now that she knows what a gift we have in this country (son is teaching her well). I am also a student of history, and I won’t let that history die.


16 posted on 04/18/2012 6:37:59 AM PDT by sneakers (Go Sheriff Joe!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: backwoods-engineer
But I expect to participate nonetheless in the war to liberate her from domestic tyranny. I can hold a rifle and shoot straight. That is enough.

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

We're long overdue.

17 posted on 04/18/2012 6:38:54 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Joe 6-pack

18 posted on 04/18/2012 6:45:47 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost
According to David Hackett Fischer there are many Whittemores in Middlesex County today.

'Paul Revere's Ride' is among my favorite books.

19 posted on 04/18/2012 6:48:19 AM PDT by skeeter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: skeeter

One of mine as well. Fischer is a treasure. I wish I had gone to Brandeis, majored in history, and had a chance to take a few classes with him.


20 posted on 04/18/2012 6:50:45 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost

The Redcoats were marching to seize arms and gunpowder stored in the powder house in Concord. They had already seized the Powder House in Charlestown. To be precisely clear, this was the government attempting to seize private arms. If anyone doubts the Founders’ ideas about the right to keep and bear arms they need to explain what the shooting was about at Concord and Lexington.

btw, check my profile for a pic of Capt. Parker at Lexington.


21 posted on 04/18/2012 6:58:11 AM PDT by Paine in the Neck (Romney's judicial appointments were more radical than Obama's)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost

I want to thank you for the post because it revealed to me another great website for American History—the Boston 1775 blogspot which seems to have a whole lot of articles I want to take the time to read.

So much history, so little time. [sigh]


22 posted on 04/18/2012 7:05:50 AM PDT by wildbill (You're just jealous because the Voices talk only to me.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost

Years ago I wrote a letter-to-the-editor about how the newspaper failed to note what day it was.


23 posted on 04/18/2012 7:06:24 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost

***At Menotomy, the 2d inst. [i.e., this month] Capt. SAMUEL WHITTEMORE, Æt. 99.***

When I read the title to this thread I thought of this old man. rejected by the militia as too old, he went on a one man attack on the British.

Discharged his weapons, himself shot and bayoneted, left for dead he survived and NEVER regretted his actions that day.

Damned vigilante! Wonder if the Brits had skittles. sarc/off


24 posted on 04/18/2012 7:10:57 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
I raised a patriot and I am married to a patriot. Future daughter-in-law is a patriot now that she knows what a gift we have in this country (son is teaching her well). I am also a student of history, and I won’t let that history die.

Good to hear. Our families are much the same. I couldn't be prouder of my two college age kids.

They will be leaders among their addle-minded, mush-brained peers. I prepare and stand stalwart for them. We have given them the tools and the education on what this nation is built on. I pray for them daily. I weep for the country they may inherit. To my last breath I will fight to keep that from happening.

25 posted on 04/18/2012 7:16:46 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (I will not comply. I will NEVER submit.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Paine in the Neck
To be precisely clear, this was the government attempting to seize private arms.

No doubt that was one of the dual goals of the lobsterback's journey out into the countryside. Thankfully the arms in Concord were well-hidden, nor were they able to find Hancock or Adams (S) in Lexington.

Were it not for Percy's relief, and Pickering's inexplicable delay in arriving on-scene, where he could have cut the British off on their retreat, the day would have been a complete rout for the British.

26 posted on 04/18/2012 7:18:02 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Ruy Dias de Bivar
Discharged his weapons, himself shot and bayoneted, left for dead he survived and NEVER regretted his actions that day.

A Dr. Tufts, I believe (seems like the Tufts family had a ton of physicians), had him brought into a tavern or a private home on a makeshift stretcher---a door---and considered his wounds so grave he didn't bother to do too much for him. But the old bastard survived to see the US Constitution go into effect and more. In Whittemore you have a fascinating character; a man who fought bravely for the English in King George's War, then the French and Indian War (probably where he got the antique weapons he used that day), and then ended up fighting against the English on April 19th.

27 posted on 04/18/2012 7:25:32 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost
You and I both. When my kids were younger I took them to Lexington MA, sat on the green and read them Fischer's account.

Reading Washington's Crossing now.

28 posted on 04/18/2012 7:51:23 AM PDT by skeeter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Paine in the Neck
To be precisely clear, this was the government attempting to seize private arms. If anyone doubts the Founders’ ideas about the right to keep and bear arms they need to explain what the shooting was about at Concord and Lexington.

A fact that is emphasized at every Appleseed shooting event put on by the Revolutionary War Veterans Association.

We must not lose sight of this. Our own governments continue to do that which our Founders fought a war over.

29 posted on 04/18/2012 7:56:17 AM PDT by backwoods-engineer (I will vote against ANY presidential candidate who had non-citizen parents.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: backwoods-engineer
Our own governments continue to do that which our Founders fought a war over.

Well, to be completely fair, and as unbiased as possible, I'd put forward the following argument:

It wasn't an issue so much of the notion of private citizens owning guns and other forms of weaponry, military or otherwise. I don't think the British were making the claim that private citizens could not legally possess guns. Rather, the issue was more about who owned the guns/weaponry: the Crown or the people of Massachusetts by way of their provincial government. The Crown would argue that the weaponry to be confiscated---cannon and powder---were the property of the "legitimate" General Court, which was nominally British and loyal to the King. The radicals would argue that the old rules no longer applied: the MA government was no longer represented by the old guard but by the provincial government, and therefore, they owned the munitions.

All of this, of course, doesn't really matter, because possession is nine tenths of the law.

So while yeah, Lexington and Concord was a gun grab, it wasn't a "gun grab" in the way we use the concept today.

30 posted on 04/18/2012 8:42:22 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost
The Crown would argue that the weaponry to be confiscated---cannon and powder---were the property of the "legitimate" General Court, which was nominally British and loyal to the King.

I would expect to hear that argument but I don't believe it is correct. I can't lay my hands on the references now (my books are all boxed up) but I believe the cannon were privately owned. The powder was probably a mix of private and gov't. The powderhouses worked a bit like a bank. You could store your powder there retaining a chit to retrieve it as desired. It was safer that way as the old black powder was a bit unstable.

You can bet there was a surge in private stockpiling of ammo then just as there is now.

31 posted on 04/18/2012 8:59:40 AM PDT by Paine in the Neck (Romney's judicial appointments were more radical than Obama's)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost
In all due reverence...

God knows I love my country...
... and I am deeply saddened to see her in such a sad state of affairs...

Like Daniel... and Nehemiah.... I find myself praying often...
Sovereign Lord, this mess we are in...
...it's my fault!....
...for myself and my country I confess...
...we have not been faithful to you....
... nor held fast to your Word...
Please forgive us-- our great and grievous sins...
Deliver us-- only by your great love... deliver us, Oh God!

I feel like I, myself...despite teaching my kids, and proudly serving her in uniform...
...and my "baby-boom" generation likewise..
...have mostly failed to impart to the incoming generations the correct history... the principles and precepts that made her great...
And the accounting of true courage--married to genuine and personal faith in One True God-- that purchased her Freedoms... and until very recently-- vigorously defended our liberty unto the present day...

Family, Loved Ones, fellow Patriots....

It is time for another "ride"...
...to awaken every patriotic heart in the land....
... to call them to arise and exercise the franchise of our liberties at the ballot...
...as well as speaking fearlessly in her defense---and "loud enough" -- on the town square and every appropriate public forum.

Now-- like then....
Our [ideological] adversaries are "quartered among us"...
-- and remain fully intent on taking our liberties and confiscating the fruit of our labors for their own gain and control.

May God forgive us...
...strengthen our resolve....
...and help us do what He as called us to do...

"... TO SECURE THE BLESSINGS OF LIBERTY TO OURSELVES AND OUR POSTERITY..."

In Your Great Mercies, Lord... Hear our prayer!
Even though we don't deserve it....
Lord, with a genuine revival of our Christian faith heritage....
...and renewal of our national values and purpose...
...God bless the USA.

Everyone have a good day.

32 posted on 04/18/2012 9:07:22 AM PDT by Wings-n-Wind (The main things are the plain things!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Paine in the Neck
I would expect to hear that argument but I don't believe it is correct. I can't lay my hands on the references now (my books are all boxed up) but I believe the cannon were privately owned. The powder was probably a mix of private and gov't. The powderhouses worked a bit like a bank. You could store your powder there retaining a chit to retrieve it as desired. It was safer that way as the old black powder was a bit unstable.

Agreed, and I think those actually were the arguments the radicals put forward. Don't get me wrong; I wasn't trying to argue the British case for the win, but merely trying to present it as it was.

And to agree that while it was, technically, a gun grab, it wasn't a gun grab in the sense we use the phrase today. It was nothing short of a strategic military move that backfired terribly.

33 posted on 04/18/2012 9:32:36 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost

You’re right, the crown wasn’t concerned with the ownership of guns per se, they acted because the townships in the colonies, especially those in new england, had begun forming and drilling militias for the first time since the French Indians wars. With the rising tensions between them and the mother country it wasn’t hard to figure out why.


34 posted on 04/18/2012 10:38:32 AM PDT by skeeter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: skeeter

Exactly correct. Before 1765 or so, Training Days were town festival days where everyone gathered to socialize and watch the men play at soldering for awhile before they went to drink in the taverns. Around 1770, they probably got a bit more serious about it, and by 1773-4, we’re talking Minute Man time.


35 posted on 04/18/2012 10:47:31 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Paine in the Neck
Paine in the Neck said: "...this was the government attempting to seize private arms. "

For even more clarity I would have worded this: "... this was THEIR OWN government attempting to seize THEIR private arms."

The call to arms was not, "The British are coming", but "the Regulars are coming", meaning the regular army troops occupying Boston. It was their own army coming to disarm them.

36 posted on 04/18/2012 11:23:55 AM PDT by William Tell
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: William Tell
For even more clarity I would have worded this: "... this was THEIR OWN government attempting to seize THEIR private arms."

The call to arms was not, "The British are coming", but "the Regulars are coming", meaning the regular army troops occupying Boston. It was their own army coming to disarm them.

Quite so.

37 posted on 04/18/2012 12:26:02 PM PDT by Paine in the Neck (Romney's judicial appointments were more radical than Obama's)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson